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Readers write: Enriching poetry, insight into interpreters, following Mars news, straws and sea life, local impact of controversy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Danny Heitman’s review in the July 9 & 16 issue of Ted Kooser’s new book of poetry, “Kindest Regards,” was uplifting to read. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? How about a piece on the two interpreters who were in the room with President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un when they met in June?
Can surfing lift all boats in one impoverished Salvadoran community?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Marcelo Castellanos was 15 years old when he first came up with an idea about how to help the impoverished communities on El Salvador’s Pacific coast, where he was spending all his free time surfing. El Salvador was already recognized for having some of the best “point breaks” in the world, to use a surfing term. The young Mr. Castellanos emailed an international surfing organization and asked if he could start a local chapter.
As Imran Khan takes office, military looms over plan for 'New Pakistan'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Pakistan installs Imran Khan as its new prime minister Saturday, the cricket star-turned-populist politician will be wearing an old sherwani, or traditional coat-length garment. As part of his bid to demonstrate frugality and a new path for Pakistan’s leadership, Mr. Khan plans to forego the crisp new sherwani traditionally crafted for the ceremonial swearing-in by one of Islamabad’s go-to tailors to the political elite. The gesture seems to fit a politician who ran on a slogan of “New Pakistan,” and attracted the support of down-on-politics millennials and a besieged middle class by promising an end to the country’s rife corruption, nepotism, and political-party patronage.
Amid 'summer of the gun,' Canada sees US firearms debate creeping north
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
This might sound like a familiar storyline in the United States. While streets in Canada are much less violent and its debate about guns much less virulent than in the US, many see an American “creep,” both in the prevalence of guns and the polarization around them. As the government weighs tighter restrictions, some are calling into question the comfort Canada has long taken in its relative peace compared with the US.
Russia takes a new look at an old enemy: Genghis Khan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In the south of Buryatia, near the present-day border with Mongolia, there is a mountain-sized rock outcropping known locally as the Merkit Fortress, which looks out over the arid, rolling steppe that gradually fades into the Gobi Desert a few hundred miles away. Taking the name Genghis Khan, which means “universal ruler,” he flung his vast army of highly disciplined, horse-mounted shock troops to the south and west, conquering China, most of Central Asia and the Middle East, present-day Russia, and parts of Eastern Europe. At its peak the Mongol Empire was the largest contiguous land empire in history, and it left its imprint everywhere.
The nature of talking in Turkey
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When financial markets were put on edge this past week by Turkey’s shaky economy, German Chancellor Angela Merkel decided to offer some advice. Turkey, after all, is the largest economy between Italy and India, a pivotal state between East and West. “Nobody has an interest in economic destabilization in Turkey,” she said.
Can tourist meccas beat the heat?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For Christopher Warren, global warming has gotten uncomfortably up close and personal. Dr. Warren and his wife run Crystal Creek Meadows, a rural get-away tourist resort a couple of hours outside Sydney, Australia. Weird weather in Europe this summer – temperatures topped 114 in Portugal and British beaches rivaled the Mediterranean Riviera – has made theoretical climate-change models a stifling reality for tourists from around the world.
What's behind Saudi Arabia's summer of discontent?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For Saudi watchers, the headlines out of the kingdom this summer – women’s activists jailed, clerics silenced, a diplomatic row with Canada – have been perplexing, even jarring. After all, despite Saudi Arabia’s failing war in Yemen, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has an iron grip on power in the oil-rich kingdom and no serious internal rivals and remains in control over one of the wealthiest economies in the world. Within the Saudi government, the crown prince controls the economy, defense, military, and foreign policy portfolios.
Stark revelations: For Catholics, an excruciating new test of faith
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It was an extraordinary opening for a grand jury report. The investigative commission in Pennsylvania, setting aside in many ways the sober-minded law enforcement tone of “just-the-facts,” could only express its own horror and sense of urgency at the catalog of abuses they presented, and the relentless and widespread culture of casual cover-ups within one of the globe’s most powerful religions. “There have been other reports about child sex abuse within the Catholic Church.
The election’s ‘pink wave’ that is driving equality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
While political pundits debate the possibility of a “blue wave” – a Democratic Party landslide – in November’s elections, less has been said about a possible “pink wave” – the election of an unprecedented number of women to public office. In addition, a record 19 women have won major-party nominations for the US Senate while 11 women have been nominated for gubernatorial races and at least 185 women have won nominations in House races, according to the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. Twenty-something Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez gained attention when she upset a veteran incumbent congressman in a New York Democratic Party primary race.
Teaching police to holster their emotions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At that point, a police instructor halted the training exercise, praising Kelly and his partner for their calm approach to the mock emergency. The scene unfolded not inside a home but in a cinderblock room on the campus of the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission in this Seattle suburb. The training, held last month at the state’s police academy, mirrors programs spreading nationwide amid intensified scrutiny of fatal shootings by police of people with mental illness.
Meanwhile in ... Victoria, Seychelles, stray dogs are being paired with prison inmates
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Mexico City, traffic is notoriously frustrating. With a series of choreographed dances (to music ranging from “Swan Lake” to Michael Jackson’s “Rock With Me”), performers leap into the street as the streetlight changes and dance for exactly 58 seconds (the duration of the red light). “We never thought this was going to have this kind of impact,” one of the dancers, Manuela Ospina Castro, told The Associated Press.
In Brazil's poorest state, flood of Venezuelans tests limits of compassion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It’s an increasingly common sight in Roraima, Brazil’s poorest and smallest state, which is situated in the Amazon and shares a border with Venezuela. As humanitarian, economic, and political crises have intensified across their country, tens of thousands of Venezuelans have crossed into Brazil seeking medical attention, food, and opportunity. “Things in Venezuela have changed,” says Jesús Quispe, a former member of Venezuela’s armed forces, as he lines up for the bare-bones breakfast.
What price loyalty? How cast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
What's the difference between Omarosa Manigault Newman and Corey Lewandowski? Loyalty to the boss – Donald Trump – who hired and fired you.
One city’s crime fighting quandary: where exactly to invest?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Lonnie McClain was playing video games inside his house on Chicago’s West Side one afternoon this May, when two white police officers came up on his porch. Chicago has been in the national spotlight in recent years for its high-profile police shootings of black residents, including Laquan, as well as its struggles with gun violence.
Monitor grapples with gender balance in sourcing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Journalism is built on sources. Reporters count on experts and ordinary citizens to bring nuance and humanity to news events. The sources that reporters select shape the tone and direction of a story.
A cold
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In quiet ceremonies next week, the people in the Czech capital of Prague will commemorate the 50th anniversary of an event that still reverberates across much of Europe. On the night of Aug. 20, 1968, the tanks and troops of the Soviet empire rolled into the city to end what was called the Prague Spring. In the months before the Moscow-led invasion, the head of then-Czechoslovakia, Alexander Dubček, had reversed some basic elements of Soviet ideology by reducing state control of industry and embracing the dignity of individuals in choosing their own form of government.
How to be a philanthropist while you’re on the job
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
This column is part of an occasional series about how you, too, can make a difference. It is written by the head of our partner organization UniversalGiving, which helps people give and volunteer in more than 100 countries.
Desperate for officers, a Georgia police chief hits the road
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recently, a 911 call from the other side of the spectrum reached Chief Wallace’s dispatcher: a mom requesting an officer to talk to her 7-year-old, who refused to go to school. Decent pay, sometimes quirky but always critical work, and keys to a take-home cruiser are among the perks to being a Floyd County Police Department officer – 53 deputized men and women patrolling 500 square miles of Appalachian highlands. Like thousands of small-town and big-city police chiefs across the US, Wallace says his biggest challenge isn’t busting counterfeiters or conducting manhunts – at least not of the traditional sort.
An alignment for peace in Afghanistan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Over the past year, the long war in Afghanistan has seen no strategic breakthroughs. This includes strengthening the Afghan government and its security forces while eliminating any terrorism threat, especially from the Afghan branch of Islamic State (ISIS). It is working closely with President Ashraf Ghani, who has made courageous gestures toward the Taliban and a peace process.
What sanctions on Turkey say about Trump's brand of diplomacy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump has proven to be a fan of economic sanctions and penalties. Recommended: Did Turkey end its state of emergency or make it permanent? Such use of economic punishment to try to influence the actions of a friend and ally is at least unusual, experts in international sanctions say, if not unprecedented.
In a rough part of the US capital, an endeavor to unlock children’s potential
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
After earning her master’s degree, Robin Berkley spent more than a decade working on education policy and programming. Once a week after hours, she’d walk from her office across the National Mall to tutor Devin. “I just got really moved by working with children and getting to go from the 50,000-foot ether, where you’re basically trying to support, inform, and influence people at the state level, to seeing the end result,” Ms. Berkley says.
Got a story to tell (or sell)? Better back it up with a tape
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Some years ago, I accidentally carried a tape recorder into an interview with a senior national-security official in a secure US government building. US presidents, of course, have been responsible for the most – and probably most consequential – secret recordings of unguarded political conversations.
The qualities of mediating a US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Since May, the United States and Iran have appeared on course for confrontation. President Trump pulled the US out of the 2015 nuclear deal with Tehran. Iran’s forces in Syria began to threaten Israel. In August, Mr. Trump imposed new sanctions on Iran and sought to reduce Iranian oil exports to zero. Iran then warned of a regional war if the US pushed too hard.
Can fighting corruption help Arab states sell painful economic reforms?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Across the Arab world, cash-strapped governments are flying the anti-corruption flag. Tunisia, in the midst of year-long anti-corruption campaign, passed a law in July requiring officials and members of Parliament to declare their assets.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
France fights flight to big cities with funds for smaller towns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
After François Goblé retired this March, the town and surrounding area of 5,000 inhabitants were left with one primary care physician. Cherrueix is just one example of a “medical desert” – where the number of doctors is 30 percent lower than the national average in France. This is especially a concern for elderly patients or those with reduced mobility. It’s also a symptom of a larger problem in France and across the globe: An increasing number of small towns are struggling economically and demographically to remain competitive in the face of urbanization.
A nearly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Just go to Zimbabwe instead. Here, grocery store cash registers still yawn open when a payment is processed, as if by instinct, but where cash should be there are only empty plastic slots. Signs at gas stations, maternity hospitals, and even informal backyard bars implore customers to pay by EcoCash, a form of digital currency.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Readers write: History of China, Middle East players, feminizing of words, small feature, big impact
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Regarding the May 17 Books review “ ‘Our Story’ offers a graphic glimpse of a China that no longer exists” (CSMonitor.com): Thank you for this article. Recommended: Think you know Latin America? Take our geography quiz.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
How one man left hate behind – and helped others do the same
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Christian Picciolini was recruited into America’s first skinhead group, Chicago Area Skinhead, when he was a young teenager. Picciolini is the host and narrator of a new documentary produced by Part2Pictures, “Breaking Hate,” which traces the story of how he helped a Charlottesville protester walk away from the neo-Nazi views he espoused – with the help of Susan Bro, whose daughter was killed in the protests. Q: What originally attracted you to white supremacy?
In Canada's spat with Saudi Arabia, signs of a trickier road for democracies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The furious reaction by Saudi Arabia to what was a rather stock Canadian statement calling for the release of imprisoned human rights activists has little to do with Canada – and everything to do with the ruling agenda of Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman. In doing so, it has raised questions about the price Canada must pay to stand up for its principles on the global stage, which has become a lonelier place as of late.
Paving Mexico’s road to reconciliation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Elected as Mexico’s next president by a wide margin on July 1, Andrés Manuel López Obrador does not take office until Dec. 1. It’s part of a broad effort to reform institutions and create new options for youth, including those already seduced by crime. AMLO stresses the need for citizens – of every country – to help create the conditions for peace and ensure that the tragedies of recent years are ended and not repeated.