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Zimbabwe's new liberation struggle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In Africa, a popular Twitter hashtag in recent days has been #Zimbabwe. It is rare for Africans to witness a dictator like Robert Mugabe being sidelined so easily by close associates, especially after 37 years in power. Just as compelling for Africans is the sudden lifting of mental chains among millions of Zimbabweans.
Wounded vets force disability rethink in Ukraine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As he approaches the finish line of the Marine Corps 10K race, Vadym Svyrydenko breaks into a broad smile: He has picked out the blue and yellow of his country’s national flag amongst the red, white, and blue. Back home he is spearheading a campaign to bring people with disabilities out of the shadows where they have long been hidden, and to help them carve out new lives. “We are getting more boys who were severely wounded and are showing them that rehabilitation through sport is effective,” the 44-year-old former soldier says as he recovers from his race.
Congress has an 'et tu?' moment as it grapples with sexual harrassment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Now, it’s the US Capitol – where a wave of complaints about sexual abuse and harassment have flooded the stately halls and engulfed a sitting senator, Democrat Al Franken of Minnesota. Women lawmakers and aides say inappropriate sexual behavior has long been “pervasive” on the Hill, largely kept in the shadows amid an insular, old-boys-club culture that persists to this day. “I was of a generation of survivors that never said a word,” Rep. Ann McLane Kuster (D) of New Hampshire told reporters after she and a bipartisan group of lawmakers on Thursday introduced legislation to make it easier to file sexual harassment complaints in Congress.
In Latin America, no more women presidents – for now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In a part of the world known for its rampant machismo, the recent Presidenta period marked a hopeful turning point for Latin America. There have been signs of progress in gender equality in many nations, but some women are disappointed that Bachelet and her fellow women leaders did not do more. “At one point Latin America had four women presidents at the same time,” in Argentina, Chile, Brazil, and Costa Rica, says Farida Jalalzai, who teaches politics at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater.
US needs corporate tax reform. Does the GOP deliver it?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Ask Americans what bothers them the most about taxes, and they typically don’t talk about their own tax bill. Polls this year suggest that roughly two-thirds of Americans believe corporate taxes should go up. As the Senate Finance Committee voted Thursday to move its tax bill to the floor, the measure was stirring controversy on several fronts – not least because it makes its tax cuts for average Americans temporary, and it uses that phaseout to help finance a permanent tax cut for corporations.
Mumbai museum challenges Indians' self image
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Such intriguing juxtapositions, unexpected stories, and global connections form the essence of an ambitious new exhibition that recounts India’s history and its engagement with the world through 200 objects. Recommended: How well do you know India?
Protecting the innocent from cyber warriors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In new warnings about cyberattacks by foreign entities, Britain and the United States have lately left the impression that innocent civilians, and not just governments, might become victims on a digital battlefield. On Nov. 15, for example, the US said North Korea is targeting banks, airlines, and telecom firms. The warnings are credible given evidence of Russian meddling in the 2016 US elections and North Korea’s 2014 hacking of Sony Pictures.
New refrain in Washington: Is this the Saudi Arabia we wanted?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
From the outset of his presidency, Donald Trump has signaled his intention to refashion Middle East policy in a big way – and to return Saudi Arabia, sidelined in President Obama’s regional vision, to a preeminent spot in US policy. Mr. Trump broke decades of presidential precedent by making Saudi Arabia the first foreign destination of his presidency.
Why Jordanian mothers still can't give citizenship to their children
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Ahmed Zubeidi is a living ghost.
'Thoughts and prayers': For devout, what does it mean to pray after tragedy?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It’s a familiar performance in a long-running drama: Following a mass shooting, proponents and opponents of gun control take to the national stage, find their blocking on the scene, and recite the same impassioned lines of dialogue. When politicians doled out their automatic condolences of “thoughts and prayers,” gun control advocates responded with rhetorical jiu-jitsu. If prayers did anything, they’d still be alive,” tweeted “Star Trek” actor Wil Wheaton, one of a number of Twittizens who used the cruel irony to mock Republican politicians.
In 2017, transgender community sees record political gains – and violent hostility
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Lisa Middleton ran for city council in Palm Springs, Calif., this year, she says, because she felt the time was right for her as a civil servant. Recommended: How much do you know about gay rights in America? “I didn’t get into this to make a symbolic statement about being a transgender candidate that got close,” says Ms. Middleton, who was among eight openly trans candidates who won state and local elections across the country on Nov. 7.
Amid apparent coup, Zimbabwe ponders a future without Mugabe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When troops placed Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe under house arrest Wednesday in what appeared to be a military coup, it wasn’t just the possible unseating of the country’s long-time president. It was the political unraveling of a man who had, in many ways, often seemed to be Zimbabwe personified – in both its brightest days and its most troubled. By the time tanks rolled into Harare the day before, Mr. Mugabe had presided over nearly four tumultuous decades of Zimbabwean history.
A tax cut, but for whom? Republican plans favor business
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The latest plot twist in Republican efforts to overhaul the US tax code amplifies what may be the most fundamental debate surrounding the legislation: Who is this really for?
Behind religious defense of Roy Moore, an aggressive view of masculinity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When some of Roy Moore’s defenders seemed to justify the idea of older Christian men dating teenage girls, a number of conservative Evangelical Christians, like a number of Americans, were both outraged and appalled. One of Mr. Moore's defenders compared a grown man dating a teen as akin to the biblical Mary and Joseph. While their ages are not given in the Bible, in some evangelical circles they are believed to be an adult male carpenter and young teenage girl.
What really fell in Zimbabwe’s coup
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When he was elected the first leader of a newly democratic Zimbabwe in 1980, Robert Mugabe sought reconciliation with the country’s former rulers, the white minority. It was a recognition of the need for rule by equality and merit over rule by race and heritage. After 37 years in power, however, Mr. Mugabe forgot that guiding principle of modern governance.
Pet grooming: how one woman thinks it can help people exit the poverty cycle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The Grooming Project is the principal initiative of Empowering the Parent to Empower the Child – a nonprofit in Kansas City, Mo., that’s dedicated to helping families exit the poverty cycle and become self-reliant. Behind it all is Natasha Kirsch, EPEC’s founder and executive director. Given the many issues facing such individuals, Ms. Kirsch emphasizes much more than just grooming in The Grooming Project.
As ban on 'Il Duce' trinkets looms, Mussolini's hometown eyes educational future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Mussolini busts, Mussolini keyrings, statues of “Il Duce” on a rearing stallion, and Mussolini propaganda posters. The bizarre objects are crammed into a shop on the main street of Predappio, a town in northern Italy where Benito Mussolini was born in 1883. In the past few decades it has become a place of pilgrimage for Italy’s unrepentant neo-Fascists: unabashed admirers of a man who led Italy into disastrous colonial adventures and an alliance with Adolf Hitler which brought Italy to its knees.
Why Shiite pilgrimage to Karbala had special meaning this year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For Iraq, guaranteeing the safety of millions of Shiite faithful on their annual ​pilgrimage to the shrine of a revered saint in Karbala has always been a monumental challenge. The march, the largest annual religious pilgrimage on earth, ​is in defiance of Iraq’s chronic insecurity and the frequent attempts by Sunni militants – including, recently, Islamic State (ISIS) fighters – to derail this event with violence. ​This year, the pilgrimage ​to the shrine of Imam Hussein ​held special resonance, as ISIS in Iraq has been all but defeated in recent months by Iraqi security forces – supported by Iran-backed Shiite militias and a US-led bombing campaign.
A petrostate’s path back from the debt brink
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The country with the world’s largest proven oil reserves was declared to be in a debt default by Standard & Poor’s this week. Like many petrostates, once-rich Venezuela has squandered its natural wealth, mainly by a poverty of democracy. To fix the debt crisis will now require that its socialist dictator, President Nicolás Maduro, return the country to democratic ideals, starting with a presidential election slated for next year.
The deeper meaning of the Roy Moore saga
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Few stories illustrate the zeitgeist of American politics and culture more clearly right now than that of the Republican Senate candidate in Alabama, Roy Moore, who is battling accusations of sexual misconduct with teenage girls. “I don't see how this ends well for Mr. Moore,” says Sen. Lindsey Graham (R) of South Carolina, who is one of a growing chorus of senators calling on Moore to drop out of the Dec. 12 special election. What should be a safe seat for Republicans is clearly in jeopardy, with the latest state polling showing Moore now slightly behind Democrat Doug Jones, although within the margin of error.
Paid leave to care for pets? For more Italians, the answer is 'sì!'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In a rundown park in the shadow of Rome’s Colosseum, Eleonora Venturelli takes her dog Maya for a walk after finishing a day at nursing school. Recommended: How well do you know your dog breeds? The place of pets in the family hierarchy is on Italian minds – after a university employee was granted a paid sick day by her employer to care for her English Setter earlier this fall.
What’s the real story behind Hillary Clinton, Russia, and uranium?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump calls it the “real Russia story”: allegations that as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton approved the sale of 20 percent of US uranium supplies to Rosatom, the Russian state nuclear company. The sale was greased by $145 million in contributions to the Clinton Foundation from Canadian executives who benefited from the sale, according to these allegations. Prosecutors at the Justice Department are now reportedly considering the appointment of a special prosecutor to look into the transaction.
Trump's approach to human rights? It's personal, critics say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When President Trump spoke to South Korea’s National Assembly last week, his emphasis on the systematic abuses and absence of basic freedoms in the authoritarian state to the north made him sound like a fervent champion of universal human rights. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says human rights “briefly came up” in Trump’s meeting with President Duterte Monday, which she said instead focused on ISIS, illegal drugs, and regional security. Recommended: What do you know about Donald Trump?
Russia investigation: What we know and where it may head next
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Early last month, as part of its effort to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election, the FBI filed an affidavit in federal court explaining why the bureau wanted to keep secret a plea deal it had struck with a low-level former Trump campaign adviser named George Papadopoulos. Mr. Papadopoulos was a bit player in the Trump 2016 effort, a young, unpaid foreign policy adviser who attended meetings but seemed to do little else. Why cloak the fact that Papadopoulos had lied to agents and then deleted social media accounts in a hapless attempt to conceal his actions?
In Israel's north, seeking a measure of calm as Mideast tensions spike
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At first glimpse, the sweeping view north into Lebanon from this ridge-top border kibbutz appears so tranquil – dense forest hillsides of oak and pine cutting a swath of deep green under an open sky, a white-washed house with a red tile roof in the distance. Nearby are a pair of radar towers, a small Israeli army outpost with a watch tower, and across the border fence a Lebanese Army lookout staring right back. “They say it’s the Lebanese Army tower, but it’s Hezbollah.
Measuring the kindness of strangers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
How many people honored this year’s World Kindness Day on Nov. 13, preferably with a random act of kindness? Public indifference toward World Kindness Day may be excused by the fact that the annual celebration has only been around fewer than 20 years. Earlier this year, Microsoft released a survey of 14 countries tracking the level of empathy, respect, and dignity used in digital platforms, such as social media and online forums.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Liberia bet big on charter schools. One year in, what's it learning?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At first glance, Cecilia Dunbar Elementary School hardly looks like the site of a radical educational experiment. Set in a cacophonously green village surrounded by lanky rubber trees about an hour from Liberia’s capital, its low-slung classrooms are unlit and streaked with dirt. On a recent morning in the 4th grade classroom, two students – one who looked about 9, the other perhaps 15 – share a bench with no legs, propped up by large rocks, with tattered workbooks balanced carefully on their knees.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
The man and fellow retirees behind a science lab for students in rural India
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The 10th-grade girls are acing it when it comes to verifying Ohm’s law in this remote village school. Ohm’s law, a fundamental part of physics, states that voltage and current are proportional. The students are trying to verify the law by conducting experiments on a resistance board.
Meet Mr. Bicycle, who’s helped fix thousands of bikes in Pennsylvania
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Some 15 years ago, Ross Willard was volunteering with a food program in Harrisburg, Pa., when he started to notice children riding bicycles with brakes that didn’t work. “It became a little toolbox, a bigger toolbox, [then] the van, the trailer, and the warehouse,” says Mr. Willard, founder and chief mechanical officer of Recycle Bicycle Harrisburg, which opened its first shop in 2007. Today, Willard operates a bicycle collection point, repair facility, and teaching center for bicycle safety and maintenance, geared toward anyone who is interested.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Readers write: Rewilding of Europe, guide to Puerto Rico’s challenges, encouragement for students, hope for the future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? Regarding the Oct. 9 OneWeek article “Puerto Rico: Out of the shadows?”: Having previously lived in Puerto Rico for more than 12 years, I thought this was an excellent article that would give someone with little knowledge of Puerto Rico a very balanced perspective of what challenges people are facing there.
Not the time to apologize for the Balfour blunder, Burundi’s departure from the ICC might have a ripple effect, It is time to cut off aid to Burundi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[The] Balfour Declaration ... reached its first centennial anniversary this week,” writes Hasan Abu Nimah. “The Israelis, along with many of their Western supporters, are celebrating the British foreign minister’s ‘promise’ of a Jewish national home in Palestine as a document that amounts to the birth certificate of the state of Israel.... The Palestinians remember it as an illegal ominous ‘promise’ by a colonial power to the Jewish people to establish for themselves a national home in a land that belonged neither to them nor to those who offered them the land.... There are voices calling for a British apology. “Burundi’s decision to quit the International Criminal Court is likely to resonate in other African states whose leaders have long complained that they are targeted for investigation by the UN institution...,” states an editorial.
Thanksgiving’s ties to safety and comfort
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation that set the last Thursday in November as a national “day of Thanksgiving,” he did so at the height of the Civil War. He asked Americans to entrust to God’s “tender care” all those who had suffered from the war’s violence. In the decades since, that spirit of care and giving has endured in the holiday season. Witness the many who will volunteer in soup kitchens this Nov. 23.