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Friday, July 21, 2017

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Presidential persuasion: So far, the art eludes Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Until this week Mr. Trump has been largely uninvolved in twisting arms and bending ears in an effort to win passage of the bill. In recent days Trump has thrown himself into lobbying for a health-care “win,” but his message has at times contradicted itself, while the bill teeters on the edge of extinction. The irony is that the image Trump has long sold – the dealmaker, the negotiator, and the guy who gets everybody in the room to “yes” – might be somebody America could really use at the moment.
She arrived in Senegal 43 years ago – and is still there working on social issues
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Two dozen men and women sit in a circle at a training center an hour’s drive from Dakar, the capital of Senegal. Molly Melching, a warm American in her 60s who is Tostan’s founder and chief executive officer, listens attentively as participants share what they’ve learned. With support from the Atlanta-based Carter Center, these individuals are learning about human rights at Tostan.
Curiosity as an answer for income inequality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The closer that economists look at the rise in income inequality, the more they find one cause may be the rise of another inequality: The least productive firms are falling further behind the most productive firms. This point was made in a recent study spanning 16 countries by the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. It found the “productivity gap” between firms in the top 10 percent by productivity and those in the bottom 10 percent rose by about 14 percent from 2001 to 2012.
How Western spyware is being used to shut down Arab rights activists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For veteran observers in the Middle East, the revelation that the UAE may have hacked Qatar’s news agency, precipitating a diplomatic crisis, reads like the rejected plot for a spy novel. Since the so-called Arab Spring erupted seven years ago, Arab governments and intelligence agencies have spent millions on spyware, malware, and hacking services, experts and analysts say, waging a digital battle against their own citizens.
How cities are helping former felons get stable housing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Six months after Ronald Doyle’s wife died, he got a call from a public housing officer. When Doyle got out of jail in 1991 after serving eight years, he had nowhere to go. Public housing wasn’t an option for a felon like Doyle, so he drifted between addresses.
Why the ground shifts under Venezuela's regime
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A defining moment in a democratic revolution often comes when a nation’s poor, who mostly focus on daily material needs, join others in demanding basic rights and uncorrupted governance. The Trump administration, for example, promises stiff sanctions if President Nicolás Maduro goes ahead with a pre-rigged vote on July 30 to rewrite the Constitution and move Venezuela closer toward Cuba-style authoritarian rule. The United States, says President Trump, “will not stand by as Venezuela crumbles.” The Obama administration first imposed sanctions in 2015.
GOP challenge: Reforming widely accepted 'safety net' programs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The failure of Senate Republicans to close ranks on health-care reform this week put on display an old* challenge: How conservatives can reform social safety-net programs when there’s a growing acceptance of them – even among Republican voters. Chastened, some GOP lawmakers are talking about trying to pivot toward other issues, notably tax reform, after failing to fulfill their pledge to “repeal and replace” Obamacare. If anything, the health-care debate is a reminder of its staying power, and of how the politics of social welfare have been shifting within the Republican Party.
Europe's female imams challenge Muslim patriarchy – and fight Islamophobia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Sherin Khankan flits about the window sills, lighting wicks and placing bouquets of roses in just the right places as she prepares for Friday prayers. “We being women, there is always a lot of candles and flowers,” explains Denmark’s first female imam, placing a single, deep pink rose in a potted plant. A second-floor walk-up off an upscale street in Copenhagen, the Mariam mosque indeed feels as snug as it does spiritual, and is intended foremost as a faith community for Danish Muslims who’ve failed to find one at more traditional mosques.
Health care: The promise, and the perils, of bipartisanship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Last week, when Republican senators unveiled their revised health-care plan, reporters swamped Sen. Susan Collins (R) of Maine, a crucial swing vote, pinning her against a wall just steps from the Capitol’s magnificent rotunda. Inching her way forward, reporters flowing along like flotsam and jetsam, she urged starting anew with a bipartisan, open approach – the way significant bills of the past were forged in Congress. Indeed, on Tuesday morning, the Senate Democratic leader, Charles Schumer of New York, took to the Senate floor to say that “the door is open right now, Republican leadership only needs to walk through it.” This, after Republican support for the GOP health-care plan collapsed on Monday evening, prompting majority leader Mitch McConnell (R) of Kentucky to announce a last-ditch effort at delayed repeal – an idea that also looked to be going nowhere.
Shawarma – São Paulo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On a Thursday morning in São Paulo, Ghazal Baranbo prepares for the lunch rush at her family’s restaurant. It looks like a well-choreographed dance, but four years ago Ms. Baranbo and Mr. Altinawi, refugees from Syria, could have never imagined they would own a successful Syrian restaurant in São Paulo, South America’s largest city. Recommended: How well do you know Brazil?
A toehold for peace in Syria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
After six years of war, nearly 100,000 civilian casualties, and rising foreign intervention, Syria has a toehold on peace. A truce in southwest Syria, brokered on July 7 by Russia and the United States, has so far held up. While the silencing of guns may fail, it at least shows growing war fatigue and provides some hope for a reshaping of Syria by peaceful means.
What is stirring Russia's youth to rally around Alexei Navalny?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Mikhail Aralov is part of the biggest political surprise of the year in Russia. The 22-year-old student chef has been arrested twice in the past few months for taking part in unsanctioned protest rallies called by Russian opposition leader and aspiring presidential contender Alexei Navalny. Not only is Mr. Aralov unrepentant, he says he's ready to hit the streets again and again, until the Kremlin agrees to let Mr. Navalny run against Vladimir Putin in elections that are less than a year away.
South Carolina debuts a new model for bridging racial divides
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In this rural outpost, a pair of statues collectively called “Reconciliation” celebrate two natives and their heritage, Jewish financier and presidential adviser Bernard Baruch and African-American baseball legend Larry Doby. The South’s stubborn, persistent history of racial prejudice is usually not so brazenly on display. In the wake of the mass shooting, he helped set up the South Carolina Collaborative for Race and Reconciliation at the University of South Carolina (USC), an initiative designed to encourage communities to address racism by building stronger alliances and friendships across racial lines.
Will Trump restrain steel imports? Why many in GOP wouldn’t mind if he did
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The US and China have just wrapped up 100 days of trade talks, heading into a bilateral economic summit this week in Washington. A month later, the administration will begin renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with partners Canada and Mexico. The administration has rattled its sword repeatedly since taking office.
Meet a new breed of prosecutor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The new district attorney of Nueces County here in southern Texas strolls around the local courthouse in cowboy boots and a crisp brown suit with a colorful tie and matching pocket square, flashing a smile as wide as the grille of the Ford F-350 pickup he drives. On the surface, at least, he seems like your stereotypical Texas lawman – the one you see in movies wearing a Stetson and spurs, delivering justice and colloquial quips through a lip filled with chewing tobacco. Eventually, he may talk about the raft of progressive changes that he’s beginning to implement in Nueces County, such as helping young offenders go to trade school instead of to prison.
Why 'son et lumiere' shows light up French summer nights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Forget fireworks, we had son et lumiere. While the French are old hands at the artform, I had the feeling we were experiencing the show “Chroma” the way spectators did in 1952, when Paul Robert-Houdin officially introduced them to a brand new genre. The architect and curator, fittingly also the grandson of a famous French magician, projected special lights, set to accompanied sound, onto the facade of the Chateau de Chambord, a Renaissance castle in the Loire Valley, playing with spectators’ sense of place and emotion.
Creating a virtuous circle with North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With tensions rising over North Korea’s nuclear and missile capabilities, the new president of South Korea, Moon Jae-in, has decided to break what he calls “the vicious circle of military escalation.” On July 17, his government offered to hold talks with North Korea. The two sides have not held talks since 2015, or just before North Korea began rapid advances in the firing range of its missiles. Any gradual engagement with North Korea now, Mr. Moon hopes, might lead to a virtuous circle of trust and goodwill that allows the two Korean nations to negotiate the difficult issues of nuclear disarmament and mutual recognition.
Year after coup, Turkey's opposition on the march. But to where?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The crowd stretched for as far as the eye could see: the biggest flag-waving Turkish opposition rally in many years. Recommended: Think you know Turkey? This weekend marks the anniversary of last summer’s failed coup, which Erdoğan’s critics say he has exploited to fortify his own power and crack down on a range of political opponents.
Best lesson yet in Brazil's anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Barack Obama once called him “the most popular politician on earth.” But on July 12, former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva was sentenced to almost a decade in prison for corruption and money laundering. Known widely as Lula, he is the biggest fish caught so far in a graft probe that has spread across dozens of countries and snared dozens of politicians. The current Brazilian president, Michel Temer, also faces corruption allegations while his predecessor, Dilma Rousseff, was impeached last year under a cloud of suspicion over a massive kickback scheme involving the state-owned oil company Petrobras.
For foreign reporters, hints of 'House of Cards' in 'Trump Show'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Sean Spicer, Steve Bannon, Stephen Miller – all are players in the palace intrigue known as the Trump White House. Chinese TV viewers can’t get enough of the “Trump Show,” and coverage of America in general, says Ching-Yi Chang, White House correspondent for Shanghai Media Group.
Why GOP Senate bill is ‘a long way’ from repealing Obamacare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For more than seven years, Republicans have been promising voters they would repeal the Affordable Care Act. The bill that GOP senators unveiled on Thursday is very far from that promise. Yes, some Obamacare measures are out, like the individual and employer mandates.
Trump is back in Europe: Why the continent suddenly appeals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Who would have imagined that Donald Trump would take such a liking to Europe – and especially to France – so quickly in his presidency? Recommended: More than Bastille, Bonaparte, and brie: Test your knowledge of France with our quiz! Ostensibly, Mr. Trump and first lady Melania Trump are on a quick, barely 48-hour jaunt to the City of Lights because France’s new president, Emmanuel Macron, invited them to take part in the July 14 Bastille Day festivities – the pièce de résistance of which is a grand military parade down the Champs-Élysées.
Do the US and Russia need clearer rules of engagement?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Barely a week after Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin sat down in a bid to iron out their differences, the effort appears to be in tatters. The scandal engulfing Mr. Trump's administration, over its alleged election collusion with Russia, has grown so intense that leading Russian foreign-policy specialists say they fear the very principle of US-Russia rapprochement is in danger of being thrown out with the Trump bathwater. Three key deals that seemed to be struck at the meeting – to work out joint rules for security in cyberspace, a ceasefire in southern Syria, and a new US push to support the Minsk accords in Ukraine – are already floundering.
Using a taro patch in Hawaii, this couple teaches the islands’ values to youths
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Dean and Michele Wilhelm dreamed of creating a space that was restorative and healing for others, perhaps a relaxing retreat for couples or families. At the same time, the family began cultivating community through gatherings around traditional Hawaiian food. It became clear that taro farming was just the way for the couple to realize their dream.
Amid the rubble of Mosul, Iraqi reconciliation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When the Islamic State (ISIS) took over Iraq’s second-largest city in 2014, one of its first acts was to kill any Mosul resident who merely thought differently. Now compare that murder spree on individual conscience to what has happened since Iraqi forces recaptured the city on July 9. Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi promises to create stability for Mosul and extend the political unity among Iraqi leaders in fighting ISIS.
To handle Trump's isolationism, France takes lessons from World War I
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When President Trump takes his place as guest of honor on the Champs-Élysées on Friday to watch US soldiers march with French troops in France’s annual Bastille Day parade, he will be commemorating the 100th anniversary of the US entering World War I. As war was raging in Europe, American President Woodrow Wilson was campaigning for reelection with the slogan, “He Kept us out of War/ America First.” Some of the bloodiest battles of the war – in fact, of history itself – were playing out.
Among Trump voters, is there a tipping point?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With his rainbow-tinted aviator glasses, Vietnam-era jungle hat, and American flag sleeveless shirt, Tony Carraway comes across as a patriot the way Hunter S. Thompson did: on his own terms, without apology. A reservist pilot in Conyers, Ga., who flies twin-props in support of domestic Army maneuvers, he turned to President Trump after watching what he saw as years of Democrats starving the military of funding. Recommended: How much do you know about Texas?
Trump’s challenges escalate, with son’s email of ‘love’ for Russia help
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With those three words, Donald Trump Jr. has brought the Justice Department’s investigation of Russian meddling into the 2016 election deep into the immediate Trump family, setting up a possible confrontation with the FBI and perhaps altering the future course of President Trump’s administration. Mr. Trump Jr. wrote this in June 2016, in response to the prospect of receiving Russian-government produced derogatory information on then-presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. It was part of the Russian government’s support for presidential candidate Donald Trump, according to the friend.
For conservatives, health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In the crucible that Republicans hope will produce a health-care bill acceptable to at least 50 GOP senators, key conservative values – such as more choice in health plans – are taking precedence over another important one: attitudes about government spending. Or at least that’s the case with a much-talked-about change to the bill offered by conservative Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Sen. Mike Lee of Utah. The title of their amendment says it all: The Consumer Freedom amendment. It favors the ability to choose no-frills insurance plans instead of being forced to pay a fine or buy a plan with guaranteed benefits that people may not want, as mandated under the Affordable Care Act.
Black gun owners ask: Does the Second Amendment apply to us?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Like many African-Americans of his generation, Phillip Smith, a Californian in his 50s, grew up without a gun in the house. To his parents, gun ownership was not just politically unacceptable, but morally wrong – a fount, if anything, of trouble and tragedy. Mr. Smith was intrigued.
How Germany forced a rethink of Africa
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Just this year alone, an estimated 400,000 African migrants will flee to Germany, escaping either war or poverty, or both. Among the 400,000 companies in Germany, fewer than 1,000 invest in Africa, officials found. “That has to change!” declared Gerd Müller, Germany’s development minister, in February.
Economy races ahead, but land
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Some have left behind drought-affected farmland in the country’s south. The 4.5-mile irrigation dyke, constructed with forced labor when the Khmer Rouge regime controlled Cambodia between 1975 and 1979, offered a small piece of free land on which to attempt to rebuild their lives. Just 45 minutes north by car lies the booming capital, Phnom Penh, where skyscrapers and malls illustrate Cambodia’s ongoing economic transformation: today, the country enjoys about 7 percent annual economic growth, and the number of Cambodians living under the poverty line is steadily dropping.
Mary Matsuda Gruenewald graduates from her high school – 74 years later
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For 17-year-old Mary Matsuda, a not-so-funny thing happened on the way to her high-school graduation: Soldiers armed with rifles and bayonets forced Mary to abandon her family’s strawberry farm here, weeks before the end of her junior year at Vashon High. It was May 16, 1942, and Mary, along with 110 others of Japanese-American ancestry, were “evacuated” from this bucolic agricultural island in the Puget Sound and sent to the first of four federal internment camps Mary would inhabit during World War II. “My friends accompanied me to the ferry,” Mary, now 92, recalls.
In G20 protests, a different view of extremism
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recent years have seen rallies by Pegida, an anti-Islamic group, gain momentum, as well as those by the far-right Alternative for Germany party. Germany, it seemed, was in the midst of its own turn to the populist right.
Sanction China over North Korea? The cases for and against
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Nikki Haley, President Trump’s ambassador to the United Nations, says the United States has “multiple forms” of “ammunition” yet to use to stop North Korea’s growing nuclear and ballistic missile threats. If Beijing fails to do more – or undermines international efforts to do more – to pressure Pyongyang over its advancing nuclear and intercontinental ballistic missile programs, the US will slap the Chinese with punitive economic measures to encourage them to reconsider. Recommended: Kim 101: How well do you know North Korea's leaders?
One test case for voter fraud vs. suppression: Sparta, Ga
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In 2014, the rodent chewed some wires at the historic Hancock County, Ga., courthouse in downtown Sparta, Ga., about 100 miles from Atlanta. Marion Warren, a city election official, happened to be present. Once it’s signed off on, it will make Hancock County the first jurisdiction to earn federal election oversight since the United States Supreme Court invalidated part of the Voting Rights Act in 2013.
How Cleveland has become a leader in trying to eradicate human trafficking
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On a recent Friday night, when many women are spending time with their families or going to see a rom-com movie with friends, Renee Jones is doing something unconventional. It is to connect with them in hopes of preventing the women from falling prey to one of the country’s most overlooked but vexing social problems: sex trafficking.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Readers write: Breakfasts with Dad, Muslim coverage, ‘suburbia’s new face’ cover story, thoughtful investigation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Regarding the June 12 Home Forum essay, “Breakfasts that nourished my dreams”: This was an appropriate story for Father’s Day weekend. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? There’s an app for that”: I so appreciate the way the Monitor covers stories about the Muslim community, their culture, and beliefs.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?