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Pogue's Basics: How to create a search
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Among its thousands of features, macros are power-user tools that could benefit a lot of people. You hit Record Macro, you do something — a search and replace, let’s say — and then you can play back that macro later. Actually, search and replace is a bad example — Microsoft Word cannot, in fact, record and play back a search/replace.
Google Earth’s new update will take you anywhere in the world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Google Earth’s new update will take you anywhere in the world
Build your own DIY video game console
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Have you ever wanted to build your own retro gaming device from scratch?
The first flying car is available for pre
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The company unveiled their flying car in 2014 but it was not commercially available. Now it’s ready and being presented at the Top Marques car show in Monaco. The vehicle is fully functional as both a car and an aircraft, and its hybrid engine makes it environmentally friendly.
Inside the World's Greatest Scavenger Hunt, Part 1
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Yahoo Finance's David Pogue spoke to Misha Collins, star of the CW series "Super Natural," and creator of the Greatest International Scavenger Hunt the World Has Ever Seen.
Jeff Bezos describes one change some Amazon employees hated
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Amazon is one of the world's most powerful companies, and to keep it that way CEO Jeff Bezos ensures employees make important decisions as fast as possible.
This gadget can turn an ordinary surface into a smart controller
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
You can now turn on your smart appliances with a touch of any ordinary surface.
Jeff Bezos: Nobody asked for one of our most popular services
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
In his recent letter to shareholders, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos wrote that the company has become skilled at predicting customers' desires. "No customer ever asked Amazon to create the Prime membership program," he wrote.
Pogue's Basics: How to forward a text message
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
In a previous “Pogue’s Basics” tip, I let you know that you could report cellphone text-message spam by forwarding it to 7726.
The 20 highest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
A new Glassdoor report called the “25 Highest Paying Companies in America for 2017” features 20 tech-related companies.
The best ways to stream live TV without cable
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Google’s YouTube TV is a solid streaming cable option, but is it the best? Google, though, is entering an increasingly crowded market with a wide variety of different channel offerings that can be difficult to parse when all you want to do is watch “The Bachelor” and eat your KFC $20 Fill-Up in your comfy chair. YouTube TV is missing Turner and Viacom properties.
Fitbit’s new smartwatch has been plagued by production mishaps
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Fitbit’s first “proper” smartwatch and first-ever pair of bluetooth headphones are due out this fall after a series of production mishaps delayed the project.
The government might stop searching your phone at the border, but things could still get worse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The Department of Homeland Security can currently search your smartphone when you come into the country whether you're a citizen or not. But a new bill could prevent those searches.
Why Silicon Beach will still lure tech talent despite skyrocketing prices
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Over the last two years, Venice has become one of the priciest neighborhoods in all of Los Angeles, thanks in part to the success of companies headquartered there like Snap. But the area, dubbed "Silicon Beach," is likely going to continue drawing tech talent.
I drove the electric Chevy Bolt all weekend and only freaked out once
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The Chevy Bolt is the first major mass market electric car for the mainstream consumer market. So what's it like to drive an all-electric vehicle versus a regular gas-powered car? I hopped in the Bolt to find out.
Ford brings baby’s car
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Say goodbye to those late-night drives to get your baby to sleep.
Don’t throw these sneakers out — you can compost them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Reebok has just announced its Cotton + Corn initiative, which aims to produce shoes made using sustainable materials.
Pogue’s Basics: How to speed up YouTube playback with a keystroke
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
If you’re a longtime Pogue’s Basics fan, then you already know that you can jump 10 seconds ahead in playback of a YouTube video by pressing the L key. And jump 10 seconds back with the H key. And pause or unpause the video with the letter K.
How Apple's secrecy can hurt consumers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Apple's secrecy when it comes to its products might build hype with investors, but it can hurt consumers.
Pogue's Basics: How to speed up YouTube playback with a keystroke
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
If you’re a longtime “Pogue’s Basics” fan, then you already know that you can jump 10 seconds ahead in playback of a YouTube video by pressing the L key. Or jump 10 seconds back with the H key. Or pause/unpause the video with the letter K.
Robot arms are now teaching each other how to work
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
In “robots are taking over the world” news… This robot arm made by RightHand Robotics is teaching other robot arms how to pick up objects. The multifingered gripper was built with an extending suction tool in the middle and a camera that’s able to analyze objects to help determine the best way to pick them up and hold them. Images are processed by an algorithm that will then help other robot arms learn what to do. This new skill will help factories and fulfillment centers like Amazon’s to fill orders more efficiently. ...
Google's new YouTube TV lets you watch cable for $35 a month
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Google's YouTube TV is officially here. The streaming TV service will get you 40 channels for $35 per month with more coming in the future.
The disruption of workers by robots is about to take a giant leap forward
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
One thing is clear: Robots are definitely going to take over millions of our jobs. However, experts don't agree on what all of this disruption means.
Artificial intelligence is now trying to make sense out of the mess that is Congress
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Governing is hard. Predicting what the, ahem, disjointed members of Congress are going to do on any given day is even harder.  So why not give your noggin a little rest and let artificial intelligence do it for you? SEE ALSO: Microsoft CEO says artificial intelligence is the 'ultimate breakthrough' Enter PredictGov, a website that uses machine learning to try and determine the future of congressional bills. Will they pass? Won't they? Now you can spend your time only freaking out about, say, the erosion of your privacy thanks to Congress, instead of all the additional garbage that may or may not get signed into law.  Pretty neat, huh? (As an added bonus, all that extra cognitive space will come in handy as you prep for the inevitable eco-apocalypse).  The brainchild of Vanderbilt University law Professor J.B. Ruhl and computer scientist and doctoral candidate John Nay, PredictGov is more than just some rando-pundit dude's attempt to sound smart on cable TV.  There's data in them thar hills.  "It pulls from decades of congressional data plus hundreds of variables, including the bill’s sponsor, amendments, economic trends and political shifts," reads a press release. "Each bill’s score updates every 24 hours, accounting for amendments that jump on or off." But what, other than the aforementioned aid in disaster prep, is this service good for? Well, potentially a lot.  "Based on our deep learning A.I. system, we provide updated predictions for the bills currently under consideration, assigning each a chance of being enacted," the website explains. "This freely available resource allows you to focus on legislation that is likely to matter and offers a glimpse into the power of our more advanced subscription-based tools." In other words, it could save you from lobbying against the latest congressional monstrosity that has little-to-no chance of passing and allow you to focus on one that does.  As to the accuracy of PredictGov's predictions? It may be too early to say for sure, but either way it lets you outsource one more cognitive task. And that, in these confounding times, is a big ole plus.  WATCH: This inventor built a real-life 'Iron Man' suit and it's awesome
Obsess over your dog even more with this smart pet door
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
People who want to know everything about their pets have a powerful new tool.  SureFlap, based in the UK, already makes a line of products connected to pets' implanted microchips. Now it's putting out an app-enabled pet door for cats and small dogs.  SEE ALSO: Finally, you can vacuum clean your dog It should be pretty straightforward to start tracking your pet with the ultimate pet surveillance set-up, called the Microchip Pet Door Connect. You install the pet door just like any cat or small doggie door. You plug in the "hub" which connects the door to the internet. Then your cat comes slinking in from the garden and you get a notification on your smartphone.  Beyond letting you know when your pet comes and goes, the flap is smart enough to be set to lock or unlock, which you can control from the app. As the site a bit creepily suggests, "create a curfew" for your dog. Or "protect your home," since you can now block out neighborhood cats and strays from coming in. So much power. Like company's already-available cat flap and pet feeder, this new product uses pets' microchips. But if they don't have one implanted, RFID collar tags work, too, and are conveniently sold by the British pet tech company. It's coming out this summer for about $200, per the Verge, just in time for tracking Fido's every single move.  WATCH: Finally, you can vacuum clean your dog
‘Thursday Night Football’ is coming to Amazon Prime next season
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Amazon has outbid Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube to secure streaming rights for 10 Thursday Night Football games for the upcoming season. The company reportedly paid $50 million -- far more than what Twitter paid last season.
Gay tech workers earn less than their straight counterparts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
According to a study out this week from the San Francisco-based tech recruiting firm Hired, heterosexual men outearn all others, followed by LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer) men, non- LGBTQ women, and finally, LGBTQ women, respectively.
The McAfee brand is back again after Intel finalizes spin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
After existing as a sub-brand of Intel (INTC) for the past seven years and being rebranded as Intel Security, the company best know for that little shield logo in your computer’s toolbar has finalized its split from the chipmaker and will now be run as an independent organization. Intel purchased the antivirus organization for $7.68 billion in 2010. At the time, the chipmaker hoped to fold McAfee’s security capabilities into Intel’s chips to better protect consumers’ devices.
How BlackBerry stays relevant in the age of the iPhone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
A reporter uses a Blackberry device to photograph Blackberry CEO John Chen as he speaks to reporters following their annual general meeting for shareholders in Waterloo, Canada in this June 23, 2015. BlackBerry (BBRY) may not be the hip smartphone giant it once was, but the Canadian business is still alive and kicking based on its new fourth-quarter earnings report. BlackBerry announced better-than-expected earnings for the sixth straight quarter Friday, with revenues of $297 million, beating analysts’ estimate of $289 million.
Pogue's Basics: The secret keystroke that shows the Mac's invisible files
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
On the Mac, it’s sometimes helpful to be able to see all the invisible files that teem on your drive, especially if you’re a pretty competent techie. But how can you make them appear? If you’ve ever heard someone tell you, the procedure probably involved typing some arcane Terminal command, or downloading a shareware program.
Trump is going after the open internet next
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The Trump administration is eyeing big changes to net neutrality rules. The Trump’s administration’s campaign to reverse President Obama’s tech-policy moves won’t stop with this week’s vote by the House to shut down internet-privacy regulations. On Thursday, President Trump’s press secretary Sean Spicer made it clear that the legal foundation of net neutrality, which prevents broadband providers from limiting access speeds to certain sides, is also on Trump’s hit list.
Major ISPs now say they won't sell your browsing history. Yeah. Right.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Internet service providers are in an awkward spot. After getting all dressed up for the sell-your-data dance, it turns out they'll be staying home.  Or so they claim. Reuters reports that representatives from Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T all came out today to assure worried consumers that the companies will not in fact sell customers' browsing histories to the highest bidder.  "We do not sell our broadband customers’ individual web browsing history," writes Comcast Chief Privacy Officer Gerard Lewis on the company's blog . "We did not do it before the FCC’s rules were adopted, and we have no plans to do so."   But should we trust Lewis and his counterparts at AT&T and Verizon? SEE ALSO: The software that could prevent ISPs from selling your browsing history could also just make things worse The denials were issued after the House and Senate voted to repeal landmark consumer privacy rules passed in 2016 that would have blocked internet service providers from selling the browsing history of their customers.  The public backlash has been strong — people are even donating to GoFundMes seeking to buy the browsing histories of members of Congress (although the success of those efforts is very much in doubt as no one is currently selling a "Congress's Browsing History" package deal) — and major ISPs are rushing to tell everyone that hey hey hey, we're the good guys here. And yet.  The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Kate Tummarello points out the obvious incongruity of ISPs denying that they plan to take advantage of the new privacy landscape when those same companies lobbied so hard to bring it about.  "Those rules were a huge victory for consumers," Tummarello wrote on the EFF blog of the to-be-repealed rules. "Of course, the ISPs that stand to make money off of violating your privacy have been lobbying Congress to repeal those rules. Unfortunately, their anti-consumer push has been working." What's more, it's not like internet service providers haven't creeped hard on customers before. They most certainly have.  "Consumers have every reason to be skeptical about what the ISPs say," the EFF's Karen Gullo wrote to Mashable, "because, as we have pointed out, they have already tried many of the practices — including hijacking your searches — that they are now allowed to do thanks to the party-line vote in Congress." Spokespersons for Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T can proclaim their devotion to your privacy all they want, but if the past is any indication you'd be right to remain skeptical. WATCH: Terrifying face gadget promises to keep your conversations private in public places
Some Facebook users are seeing a rocket icon in their app. Here's what it does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
In recent weeks, some users have started noticing a rocket-shaped icon in their Facebook mobile app.  The icon, positioned right next to the main news feed icon, gives you a different type of news feed, one which displays popular posts from people and pages that you haven't befriended or liked.  SEE ALSO: Facebook's new emoji are finally available to everyone I've had the new feature on my Android phone for at least three weeks now, though it tends to disappear and reappear every now and then. (I’m based in Croatia, but there are also reports of users seeing the new icon in the UK.) The rocket feed offers a great deal of local content, so it's possible that it's showing posts that are popular near my geographical location. However, I'm also seeing some posts that are relevant to my interests, so it might not be completely disassociated from my likes/friends.  Most of the posts I'm seeing in the new feed are from pages (some of which I've liked), and some are from users that aren't my friends. Image: Stan Schroeder/Mashable The new feed seems to be remarkably similar to Instagram's Explore tab, which shows you posts that the company's algorithms have determined to be relevant to your interests.  UPDATE: April 3, 2017, 2 p.m. CEST A reader (thanks, Petar) sent us a few screenshots of the new feature as seen on the iPhone, where it is slightly different. Here, the new feed (labeled "Explore") has more of a magazine vibe to it, with two news items laid out side by side.  The new Explore feed looks a little different on the iPhone. Image: Petar Zivkovic This isn't the first time Facebook is testing a different type of news feed on a (typically small) subset of its users. For example, in April 2016 we've seen a new style of news feed which shows stories clustered around certain topics.  Mashable has contacted Facebook for more details on this new feature and will update the post when we hear back from them.  WATCH: Check out WhatsApp's new Statuses
The cheapest way to watch baseball online
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
St. Louis Cardinals’ Dexter Fowler, left, scores past Chicago Cubs catcher Willson Contreras during the third inning of a baseball game Sunday, April 2, 2017, in St. Louis. The 2017 Major League Baseball season will feature something that once seemed utterly implausible — no, not just the Chicago Cubs raising a new World Series championship flag at Wrigley Field. This year, baseball fans who don’t subscribe to cable or satellite TV services will finally be able to stream their teams’ games through one of the cheapest video services around, Sling TV, without having to resort to illegal workarounds.
Now I Get It: Bitcoin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Man, if anything needs the “now I get it” treatment, it’s Bitcoin. You hear about it all the time in financial and technical circles—but most people really don’t grasp it.
Google Maps turns into Ms. Pac
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
No your eyes are not playing tricks on you – your mobile Google Maps app did just turn into a Ms. Pac-Man game. Google’s gag is just in time for April Fools’ Day. The game plays on real-life streets from wherever you are. You get the full Pac-Man experience, including the infamous sound effects. Just open up your app and you can start playing. Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/play-ms-pac-man-google-maps-april-fools-day-trick-2017-3 More:
Virtual reality pioneer Palmer Luckey departs Facebook in wake of controversies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Palmer Luckey, the mind behind the Oculus Rift, will leave Facebook at the end of the week. It's unclear if he resigned on his own terms, but his departure comes two months after the high-profile Zenimax lawsuit.
Lyft made these goofy wearables as a prank but they're actually kind of cool
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Would you believe it if Lyft rolled out an actual, physical product to hail a ride? A one-use wearable, giving you streamlined access to all the service's cars at the lyft (lolz) of your thumb? You shouldn't believe it — well, not completely. The ride-hailing app is currently shilling Mono, a wearable with some legitimately cool specs: it has BLE tech to pair with your phone, a micro-controller synched with the Lyft API that reads gyroscope and accelerometer data to request rides, and motion-triggered LED confirmation indicators to let you know your trip status without having to check your phone.   Just stick your thumb in the air wearing the Mono, Lyft claims, and you'll soon be ferried on your way.  SEE ALSO: Lyft just came out with its biggest innovation yet: buses But you'll (probably) never see someone rocking a Mono to get a ride home after a night out on the town — it's April Fools' Day season again, and the wearable is Lyft's idea of a viral prank, designed to confound the internet and get us all buzzing. The only problem is, Lyft didn't just make a joke prototype for a one-off photoshoot — the company went all the way in, creating actual working Mono devices.  Sure, we have all the hallmarks of a viral prank campaign — a slightly ridiculous concept that's just believable enough, especially with the hyped-up videos and web presence to back it up. But bringing Mono to life makes it less a prank and more a one-off promotion, like Pizza Hut's pie-ordering sneakers for March Madness.  We're giving away 5 Monos! Post a photo of the Mono on Twitter/Instagram tagging @lyft, #GetMono, and #Sweepstakes. https://t.co/O58NUdhPSh pic.twitter.com/jb4ZjqYaIY — Lyft (@lyft) March 30, 2017 It's almost like Snapchat Spectacles on a small scale: a wearable created to give users a physical extension of an experience typically tethered to smartphones. Mono's little more than a novelty item — obviously, no one's really gonna walk around with their thumb in the air more than once or twice for kicks — but it is kinda cool looking and, dare I say it, fun.  That's what April Fool's is all about, right? We'll cut Lyft some slack here for the full-out effort even with the botched delivery — just as long as they don't immediately start bragging about how #woke hailing a car with your thumb can be.  WATCH: I tried a self-driving car in London and lived to tell the tale
Elon Musk heralds ‘huge revolution in space travel’ after historic SpaceX mission
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
SpaceX has successfully completed the first reflight — and landing — of an orbital class rocket. The Falcon 9 launched from the Kennedy Space Center on Thursday evening, returning to an ocean-based barge a short while later.
This AI device will be your personal assistant for the car 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Meet Chris. The first AI device to keep your digital life connected while you’re behind the wheel. The no-touch gadget is designed for drivers so they can keep their eyes on the road. Chris listens and talks to you using artificial intelligence and understands speech recognition and gesture control. Now when you get a call, voicemail, Facebook, What’s App, or email message, you can safely answer without taking your eyes off the road. The company that makes it, German Autolabs, says you can also control music and navigation. ...
The Fitbit Alta HR band is the least dorky fitness band you can buy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Yes, we know we should move more, sleep better, eat right. This amazingly thin, stylish band smoothly and reliably tracks your steps, calories, and sleep. Above all, the Alta HR is the slimmest tracker ever made with continuous heart-rate tracking.
Windows 10 Creators Update: Microsoft's best just got better
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
One of the key reasons Apple’s (AAPL) Mac became so popular was that, in addition to its good looks and powerful performance, it catered to creative types. Available April 11, the Creators Update is designed to serve as the backbone of Microsoft’s Windows Mixed Reality capabilities. Originally called Windows Holographic, Windows Mixed Reality will allow developers to create mixed reality devices like Microsoft’s Hololens for the consumer market.
Samsung Galaxy S8
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Samsung had a rough 2016. Now that its Note7 has literally gone up in flames, the company needs a hit to revitalize its image. Which is where the Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus come in.
Samsung Galaxy S8 price
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Samsung’s Galaxy S8 looks like the phone of the year, but it’ll cost a bit more than the iPhone. Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus are finally here, and they’re just what the company needs after last year’s Note7 fiasco. The Verizon version of the Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus will retail for $720 and $840, respectively.
Survey: Millennial Uber users don't care about the scandals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
A new survey out this week from LendEDU, an online financial services marketplace, found 93% of millennials who have Uber will continue to use the ride-hailing app despite recent scandals.
Samsung's new Galaxy S8 is more expensive than Apple's iPhone 7
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus are finally here, and they’re just what the company needs after last year’s Note7 fiasco. And while the phones push the boundaries of smartphone design, they’re also surprisingly expensive — especially when compared to Apple’s iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.
Pick up your AmazonFresh order without leaving your car
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
AmazonFresh is testing out a new delivery service in Seattle called AmazonFresh Pickup. Shoppers will be able to order their items online, drive to a grocery pickup location and have them delivered to their car in 15 minutes. You don’t even have to get out of your car. The service will be free to Amazon Prime members, with no minimum order – in the hope of increasing Amazon’s physical retail presence. If Pickup takes off, it could change the game for all “click and collect” grocery retailers in the future. Source: https://www.cnet.com/news/amazon-fresh-pickup-prime-revealed-seattle/
Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus: Giant screens, new voice controls and no fires
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Samsung had a rough 2016. Now that its Note7 has literally gone up in flames, the company needs a hit to revitalize its image. Which is where the Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus come in.
This tiny iOS change will make your iPhone even zippier
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Apple rolled out the new iOS 10.3 update Monday — and if you took the plunge and upgraded to the new OS, you might have noticed your iPhone is running a bit more quickly and smoothly than it did before.   That alone shouldn't be a big surprise. New software should make your phone hum, and this update in particular includes a fancy new modern file system that has played a part in freeing up more storage space on devices than the previous OS.  SEE ALSO: Definitely don't follow these DIY steps to give your red iPhone 7 a black front But that's not the only reason your iPhone now has some extra pep, according to Apple engineer Renaud Lienhart. He took to Twitter to reveal one of the undocumented tweaks to the OS.    iOS 10.3 feels “snappier” because many animations were slightly tweaked & shortened, for the better. — Renaud Lienhart (@NotoriousBUGS) March 28, 2017 The animations he's talking about come when you open, close or switch between apps, as BGR notes. This doesn't mean the apps will be running faster when you use them — it has to do more with improved responsiveness, which I noticed right away while switching between open apps on the new OS. It's a small change, but it makes multitasking on the iPhone even more seamless than before. You should update your device to iOS 10.3 for more than just the speed boost, too. It's always a good call to keep your phone's OS current, since updates usually fix issues and bugs, like the Safari ransom bug that 10.3 knocked out. That, and you'll finally be able to track down pesky AirPods when they get lost and avoid dropping a $69 fee (not nice) for a replacement.  WATCH: A new way to take selfies — and six other features the iPhone 8 might have
Bungie confirms 'Destiny 2' is to be the Destiny sequel's official name
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Destiny 2 is the official name for the sequel to hit sci-fi shooter Destiny. Confirmed by Bungie itself following the leaked image of a poster with the same name, we also get a glimpse of a smoking cityscape in the name reveal.