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Science Is Giving the Pro
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The first time Ashley McGuire had a baby, she and her husband had to wait 20 weeks to learn its sex. By her third, they found out at 10 weeks with a blood test. Technology has defined her pregnancies, she told me, from the apps that track weekly development to the ultrasounds that show the growing child. “My generation has grown up under an entirely different world of science and technology than the Roe generation,” she said. “We’re in a culture that is science-obsessed.”
SpaceX and NASA Probed on Zuma Spy Satellite Failure That May Cost Taxpayers Billions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Wednesday, House lawmakers probed SpaceX and NASA on the possible loss of the Zuma secret spy satellite. The potential failure of this mission raised questions in the House on the ability of SpaceX and other commercial providers to take astronauts into space safely as part of a planned commercial crew program. The financial responsibility for Zuma, Bloomberg reported, may land on the U.S. taxpayer.
World's largest underwater cave discovered in depths of Mexico
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After 10 months of exploring the watery, underwater passageways of the Great Maya Aquifer, a team of divers achieved a major breakthrough this month when they found an open tunnel linking two of the world's largest flooded cave systems. According to the rules of caving, when two cave systems are connected, the largest cave absorbs the smallest.
The Internet Is Up in Arms About This Sandwich Not Being Perfectly Cut in Half
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The ratio was off by a half centimeter
This Flu Map Shows How the Biggest Influenza Outbreak in Years Spread Across the U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This season's deadly flu is all over the continental U.S.
The Surprisingly Complicated Meaning of Chicago West's Name
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some people think the city's name means "bad smell"
How we uncovered the feeding habits of sharks, thanks to plankton 'post codes'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Plankton has a chemical fingerprint that reveals where it came from. Scientists have now used this to track sharks at the opposite end of the food web.
Investigators Still Don't Know Why the Las Vegas Shooter Killed 58 People
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
His motive remains a mystery months after the slaughter
Trump Has Divided the Country. Some Americans Are Trying to Bring Us Back Together
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Partisan hatred is not the only story of the President's first year
What to Know About David and Louise Turpin, the Parents Accused of Torturing 12 Siblings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They are each being held on $12 million bail
Brexit costs Britain data center for Europe's satnav system
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Officials have decided to move a data center for the European Union's new satellite navigation system out of Britain because of Brexit. The European Commission says diplomats voted Thursday to relocate ...
Baby Reportedly Killed, 15 Injured After Car Crashes into Crowd at Rio de Janeiro's Copacabana Beach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A car crashed into a crowd on Rio de Janeiro's famous Copacabana beach in Brazil Thursday night.
'Depraved Conduct.' The Parents of 13 Malnourished Children Found in Captivity Could Face Life in Prison
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
David and Louise Turpin were charged with committing years of torture and abuse
The Trump Organization May Have Engaged in Money Laundering with Russian Nationals, Researcher Alleges
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trump Organization has dismissed the allegations as unsubstantiated
How to Find the Michigan Meteor: Top Tips to Hunt Down a Fragment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Updated | A blazing meteor on Tuesday night rocked Michigan. An intense flash of light stunned residents, and a loud boom shook local buildings. A meteor had ripped through the skies above the state, with more than 355 sightings reported across six more—plus Ontario—according to the American Meteor Society (AMS).
13 siblings allegedly held captive at home by parents: Part 1
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
David and Louise Turpin pleaded not guilty to a combined 75 total counts, including charges of torture, child abuse and false imprisonment.
A government shutdown probably won't have a big effect on internet security
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The U.S. government may shutdown at midnight on Friday, but this will likely have little to no effect on the nation's all-important cybersecurity activities. In fact, if the Congress fails to fund the government and it shuts down — which it has done 12 times since 1981 — most federal employees are still required to come to work because they are responsible for "essential" tasks. These employees include air traffic controllers for the FAA, TSA officials scanning bags at airports for weapons, and Army intelligence personnel tracking potential cyberattack attempts. SEE ALSO: Apple's 'I'm sorry' for throttling old iPhones isn't good enough for Congress The agencies hardest hit by a potential shutdown have nothing to do with the nation's web oversight. A 2018 shutdown will likely mirror the last federal shutdown, which occurred in 2013. Then, over 60 percent of federal employees continued to work.  Most of the furloughed employees, according to Office of Management and Budget data gathered by The New York Times, worked for NASA, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Departments of Labor, Commerce, and Interior.  The National Parks, which fall under the Department of the Interior, often serve as a symbol of the government's closure, as "Park Closed" signs are placed at entrances and gates are locked shut. National parks shut down during the last federal government shutdown in October 2013.Image: Getty ImagesMashable contacted the relevant government departments and agencies — such as the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Federal Communications Commission (FCC), and the National Security Administration (NSA) — to ask how a shutdown might affect cybersecurity and internet oversight.  None answered the question directly, but gave no hint that web-related operations would be impacted by absent employees: A DHS official told Mashable that "Nearly ninety percent of all DHS personnel are considered essential staff and will continue to perform their duties in the event of a government shutdown." In a statement provided to Mashable, the FCC said that even in the event of a shutdown the agency would be able to stay open through the close of business on Friday, January 26. The NSA wouldn't specify how a shutdown might affect its cybersecurity operations, but said that its work would continue. "While NSA is not exempt from the legal requirement to carry out an orderly shutdown of government activities, our core functions will continue," the agency said in a statement. "We are still charged with carrying out our critical mission of protecting America and our allies, and we will continue to do so." The Department of Defense, too, would not answer specific questions about how intelligence or cybersecurity personnel would be affected by this shutdown, but referred Mashable to its January 18, 2018, contingency plans, which noted that military personnel would not be affected by a shutdown.  Although it's unlikely the nation's internet will be disrupted during a potential shutdown, many government functions will surely be affected. The Labor Department, for instance, may be late in producing its monthly employment reports. Work at the IRS may be slowed. And there will be fewer park rangers monitoring national resources or vulnerable species.  WATCH: 4 hacks that totally embarrassed the US government
The Flu May Be Spread Just By Breathing, Study Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
No coughing or sneezing required
How NASA Might Sustain Life on Mars and the Moon Using Mini Nuclear Reactors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Getting to space is just part of the challenge.
The U.S. Is Holding Back a Further $45 Million in Aid for Palestine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The announcement comes after Washington cancelled a separate $65 million in funding for Palestinian refugee programs
Here Are the Promises President Trump Kept and Broke in His First Year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here's a look back at Donald Trump's first-year promises, plus which ones he kept and which he broke
Pope Francis Has Defended a Chilean Bishop Accused of Covering Up Sex Crimes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
His remarks drew shock from Chileans and immediate rebuke from victims and their advocates
The Great Crack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A polar flyover reveals the ravages of climate change
Buckingham Palace, the Empire State Building and the Pentagon Are All Full of Tiny Fossils From the Jurassic Period
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Buckingham Palace is made from stone containing microscopic ancient fossils from the time when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. Along with a number of other historic London buildings, the palace is constructed from oolitic limestone, a material that contains microbes dating to the Jurassic period, around 200 million years ago, according to an Australian National University press release.
Enormous Metalworking System, Including Bronze Age Weapons, Discovered Underneath Pyramid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A pyramid-shaped hill on the Greek island of Keros has revealed a complex system of drainage tunnels and metalworking from the 3rd millennium B.C. that was ahead of its time. Researchers from the University of Cambridge worked with members of the Ephorate of the Cyclades and the Cyprus Institute on an Early Bronze Age site called Dhaskalio, according to a new University of Cambridge press release. Rising sea levels have turned Dhaskalio into an island, but a thin land bridge (now underwater) still connects it to Keros, a "not so popular" island, according to the Greek community newspaper, Neos Kosmos.
Christa McAuliffe's lost lessons finally taught in space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Christa McAuliffe's lost lessons are finally getting taught in space
Arkansas restricts controversial Monsanto, BASF farm chemical
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Tom Polansek CHICAGO (Reuters) - In a blow to manufacturers Monsanto Co and BASF SE, Arkansas state lawmakers voted on Friday to bar sprayings of a controversial weed killer after mid-April to protect farmers from potential crop damage. Arkansas will prohibit the use of herbicides based on a chemical known as dicamba from April 16 to Oct. 31, the strictest state limits imposed on the product after it was linked to millions of acres of U.S. crop damage last year.
Delta's Cracking Down on 'Emotional Support Animals' On Board Flights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
People have tried to fly with turkeys, sugar gliders, snakes and more
Prosecutors Lay Out Horrifying Details in 'Severe, Pervasive, Prolonged' Torture of 12 Siblings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An act of courage and desperation freed 12 siblings from a house of horrors that shocked police
Birth Control Pills May Help Prevent Some Cancers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study looks at how oral contraceptives affect cancer risk
This Neutron Star Merger is Glowing in a Seriously Weird Way
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Truly a cosmic mystery.
New Trump Office Will Protect 'Conscience and Religious Freedom' Rights of Doctors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Leading Democrats and LGBT groups immediately denounced the move
Last three years hottest on record: UN
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The last three years were the hottest on record, the United Nations weather agency said Thursday, citing fresh global data underscoring the dramatic warming of the planet. Consolidated data from five leading international weather agencies shows that "2015, 2016 and 2017 have been confirmed as the three warmest years on record", the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said. It added that 2016 remains the hottest year ever measured, due to the warming effect of El Nino, while 2017 was the warmest non-El Nino year beating out 2015 by less than one hundredth of a degree.
2017 Was One of the Hottest Years Ever
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Near-record heat despite the absence of an El Nino is evidence of climate change
‘It’s Dangerous to Write the Truth.’ Journalists Fear the End of Press Freedom in Myanmar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Aung San Suu Kyi’s civilian government has proven itself firmly in alignment with the country's powerful military to repress critical coverage
President Trump's New Defense Strategy Is a Return to the Cold War
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump is bracing the Pentagon for a long-term, strategic competition with with Russia and China for the foreseeable future.
SpaceX test fire of Falcon Heavy rocket will finally happen on Friday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry, as has been the case for SpaceX virtually any time the private aerospace manufacturer and transport service company attempts to launch a rocket. First set for last Thursday at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the test fire of the Falcon Heavy rocket was delayed to this Monday, then Tuesday, and has now been rescheduled for Friday afternoon (though that date is also subject to change). The Falcon Heavy is not only the most powerful rocket in the SpaceX arsenal -- it has been called "the most powerful rocket this generation has ever seen." Designed to one day bring humans to the Moon or Mars, the rocket can carry double the cargo of the next closest rocket, and is comprised of three Falcon 9 nine-engine cores. Elon Musk and the SpaceX team want to launch the Falcon Heavy before the end of the month if possible, but that won't be possible until the test fire takes place. Emri Kelly said in a report for Florida Today yesterday that "SpaceX is targeting no earlier than 3:30 p.m. Eastern time Friday for a test fire of its Falcon Heavy rocket at Kennedy Space Center. Teams have six hours, or until 9:30 p.m., to briefly fire the 27 Merlin engines." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ca6x4QbpoM You can learn more about why the test fire was delayed on Teslarati, but providing everything goes according to plan on Friday, SpaceX will then gear up for the Falcon Heavy's inaugural flight in the coming days. The only way to watch the static test will be through Spaceflight Now's subscription service, but the Kennedy Space Center will offer viewing of the actual launch, pending the scheduled launch time and NASA approval.
The 8 Top Beauty Trends Of 2018 Are Surprisingly Easy To Pull Off
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Prepare your beauty bag, because 2018 is bringing with it some surprisingly easy looks you’ll want to try.
NASA bumps astronaut off space station flight in rare move
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA has bumped an astronaut off an upcoming spaceflight, a rare move for the space agency
How to secure your privacy in the new age of technology
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kurt 'The Cyber Guy' Knutsson offers tips on how to manage your settings on your Amazon home devices.
Michigan Meteor: Why Did it Explode, and How Likely Is It to Happen Again?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Residents of southeast Michigan got either a thrill or a scare Tuesday when a rare meteor appeared to explode in the night sky. “I went to turn and I noticed a ball of flame coming at an angle,” a local man told The Detroit News. Events like these occur dozens of times each year, including a handful over Michigan within the last decade or so, according to Michigan Live.
Congress Likely Racing Toward a Government Shutdown
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The measure faces iffy prospects in the Senate
Allowed 1 Shower a Year and Fed Just Once a Day: New Allegations of Abuse in House of Horrors Case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The couple faces more than three dozen charges
Need a Job? Why Artificial Intelligence Will Help Human Workers, Not Hurt Them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In 2013, James “Jimi” Crawford founded a company called Orbital Insight, barely noticed at the time amid the Silicon Valley froth. Crawford had worked at NASA for 15 years and wrote software for Mars rovers. Crawford saw an opportunity to collect and analyze what he anticipated would be a deluge of images from a surfeit of new satellites that would circle the Earth, taking readings and pictures.
The 20 Funniest Tweets From Women This Week
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The ladies of Twitter never fail to brighten our days with their brilliant ― but succinct ― wisdom.
U.S. tests nuclear power system to sustain astronauts on Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Initial tests in Nevada on a compact nuclear power system designed to sustain a long-duration NASA human mission on the inhospitable surface of Mars have been successful and a full-power run is scheduled for March, officials said on Thursday. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and U.S. Department of Energy officials, at a Las Vegas news conference, detailed the development of the nuclear fission system under NASA's Kilopower project. Months-long testing began in November at the energy department's Nevada National Security Site, with an eye toward providing energy for future astronaut and robotic missions in space and on the surface of Mars, the moon or other solar system destinations.
What Donald Trump's Mental Health Exam Doesn't Tell Us
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He bragged that he "scored the highest"
Supreme Court Delays Order for North Carolina to Redraw Map in Gerrymander Case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A lower court had said Republicans would need to redraw the state's Congressional districts by next week
A Norwegian Airline Claims to Have Set a New Record for New York to London Flights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Norwegian Airlines flight DY7014 beat the previous subsonic record by three minutes
Even Chris Hemsworth Can’t Give 12 Strong the Momentum It Needs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"12 Strong," based on Doug Stanton’s 2009 book "Horse Soldiers," never pulls off the momentum it needs to be a rousing film.