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Startup plans to launch small satellites from Virginia coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — A California-based startup has announced big plans to go small as it reaches into space, rocketing satellites the size of loaves of bread into orbit from Virginia.
China Wants Its Own X
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But spaceplanes come with certain liabilities.
The Making a Murderer Filmmakers on How Steven Avery's New Lawyer Changes Everything
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Filmmakers Moira Demos and Laura Ricciardi on how they used season 2 to responded to criticisms of Marking a Murderer's first season.
NASA puts out the call for science and technology payloads made for the moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA is following up on its plan to purchase rides on commercial lunar landers by soliciting ideas for the scientific and technological payloads to put on them. Those payloads could be flying to the moon as early as next year, NASA said today in its announcement of a program known as Lunar Surface Instrument and Technology Payloads. Somewhere between $24 million and $36 million would be available for the first round of payloads, with eight to 12 payloads expected to be selected. “We are looking for ways to not only conduct lunar science but to also use the moon as… Read More
'My Kind of Guy.' President Trump Praises Montana Congressman Who Assaulted a Reporter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Any guy that can do a body slam — he's my kind of guy," the President said at a rally
New moon: China to launch lunar lighting in outer space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China is planning to launch its own 'artificial moon' by 2020 to replace streetlamps and lower electricity costs in urban areas, state media reported Friday. Chengdu, a city in southwestern Sichuan province, is developing "illumination satellites" which will shine in tandem with the real moon, but are eight times brighter, according to China Daily. The first man-made moon will launch from Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan, with three more to follow in 2022 if the first test goes well, said Wu Chunfeng, head of Tian Fu New Area Science Society, the organization responsible for the project.
MBS Says the Saudi Consulate in Turkey Is 'Sovereign Territory.' He's Wrong.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mohammed bin Salman said the Istanbul consulate in the case of Jamal Khashoggi was "sovereign territory." Here's why he was wrong.
My Kind of Guy.' President Trump Praises Montana Congressman Who Assaulted a Reporter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump defended Republican Greg Gianforte at a rally in Montana on Thursday, after the congressman pleaded guilty to assaulting a reporter last year.
Europe's set to blast off to Mercury – here's the rocket science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It will take more energy to get the BebiColombo spacecraft inro a stable orbit around Mercury than it would to send it all the way to Pluto.
California Principal Apologizes for Sending Email Warning About a Black Man at Starbucks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A San Diego school principal apologized this week for sending an email to parents about a black man that perpetuated racist stereotypes.
European Council President Says There Is Not Enough Progress On Brexit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
European Council President Says There Is Not Enough Progress On Brexit
Europe, Japan ready spacecraft for 7
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BERLIN (AP) — Final preparations were underway Friday for the launch of a joint mission by European and Japanese space agencies to send twin probes to Mercury, the closest planet to the sun.
Driver Fatally Shoots North Carolina State Trooper During a Traffic Stop
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A North Carolina state trooper was shot and killed after pulling over a pickup truck on suspicion of speeding.
The T Rex’s tiny baby arms might have been way more useful than they seem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Running into a Tyrannosaurus rex in the wild would have been a truly frightening thing for just about any animal that roamed the earth between 65 million and 80 million years ago, and for an obvious reason. The mighty meat-eater was huge in size and had a mouth built to turn bones into powder. If it snagged you with its jaws you were probably going to have a bad time, but nobody was afraid of its puny little arms... or were they? As Live Science reports, a new study presented at a recent meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology took a close look at how T. rex's arms would have functioned, and it makes some bold predictions. Just how T. rex used its arms and for what purpose has been hotly debated for years and years. Some believe the arms didn't do much of anything, while others have suggested that the tiny limbs flailed wildly with sharp claws that could have seriously injured prey or foes. This latest round of research approaches things from a different angle, seeking to determine the range of movement of the arms as a clue to their usefulness. The researchers studied the limbs of two distant modern relatives, the alligator and turkey, for hints. What the team concluded is that the T. rex could likely have turned its hands inward if it wanted to, and it may have used its arms to hold prey in place or pull it closer. The idea here is that the T. rex knew its jaws were its most potent weapon and so it used its arms to keep prey at the perfect biting distance. We'll of course never know for sure unless we could somehow watch a T. rex or similar upright carnivore find a meal, but the researchers are confident in what the fossils and modern animals tell them about how the dinosaur could move its limbs.
Turkish Official Says Jamal Khashoggi's Remains May Have Been Taken Outside Istanbul
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Investigators are looking into the possibility that missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi's remains may have been taken out of Istanbul
Dr. Leana Wen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fighting the Politics of Medicine
Water woes as drought leaves Germany's Rhine shallow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Months of drought have left water levels on Germany's Rhine river at a record low, exposing a World War II bomb and forcing ship operators to halt services to prevent vessels from running aground. The water level on the Rhine on Friday reached just 77 centimetres (30 inches), 4 cm below a previous record low of 81 cm recorded in 2003, Cologne's waterworks authorities said. Although rainfall is expected next week, forecasters said it would not suffice to bring up water levels in Germany's most important waterway and a key shipping route for the Netherlands and France.
Carrots could be key to making greener buildings, say researchers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A group of researchers at Britain's Lancaster University has been using a household food blender to mix particles from the root vegetable with concrete to see if they can produce a stronger and more environmentally sound product.     "We found out you could increase the strength of concrete by 80 percent by using a small amount of this new material," lead researcher Mohamed Saafi told Reuters. The addition of carrots prevent any cracks in the concrete, the team said. It also means less cement is required, therefore lowering the global carbon dioxide (CO2) output.
Former U.K. Prime Minister Says Electing Women Could Help Combat Wave of Populism
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Women are the answer to rising populism and extremism in the U.K., according to the country's former Prime Minster John Major.
The Bracing Honesty of Kiese Laymon’s Memoir Heavy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kiese Laymon's memoir 'Heavy' explores his relationship with his mother while growing up as a black man in Mississippi.
Scientists in Chile unveil 'A Cosmic Titan' cluster of galaxies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hyperion has a mass 1 million billion times greater than the sun and is so distant that it is viewed from earth as it looked billions of years ago. "Hyperion is like 5,000 galaxies of the Milky Way", astronomer Steffen Miefke, the chief of operations for the European Southern Observatory, told Reuters. The ESO operates the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, which detected Hyperion.
President Trump Threatens Mexico If Caravan of 4,000 Honduran Migrants Reaches U.S. Border
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As about 4,000 Hondurans made their way through Guatemala, attention — and pressure — turned to Mexico Thursday, after U.S.
93 More Women Accuse Former USC Gynecologist George Tyndall of Sexual Misconduct
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ninety-three more women have accused former University of Southern California gynecologist George Tyndall of sexual misconduct in two new lawsuits filed against the doctor and the school, according to their lawyer.
An Australian Woman Has Been Charged After Faking Cancer to Raise Money
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She allegedly raised tens of thousands of dollars for a fraudulent GoFundMe page
Joe Biden, 75, Says His Age Would Be a 'Legitimate Issue' If He Runs for President
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"They're gonna judge me on my vitality"
WHO says Zika risk low in Pacific ahead of Meghan visit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As Prince Harry and his expectant wife Meghan prepare to tour Fiji and Tonga next week, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has declared the risk of contracting Zika virus in the Pacific nations is low. The British royals, currently in Australia, arranged their trip before Meghan's pregnancy was known, sparking fears she and her unborn baby could be vulnerable in the island nations, where Zika is officially listed as a risk.
The world’s biggest organism is facing its end
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At first glance, Pando is unimpressive. If you aren’t looking for it, you could easily drive past the homogenous forest of stems ranging from a few inches to some 100 feet (about 30 meters) tall—the biggest they appear more like trunks—all with matching leaves, on one of the few roads leading to Fish Lake in…
No, Elizabeth Warren: DNA Testing Can’t Tell You Who You Are, and Here’s Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Over-generalization can be dangerous. Read More...
Eating Fish May Help Keep You Healthy Into Old Age, Study Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thanks to omega-3 fatty acids
Breaching dams to save Northwest orcas is contentious issue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention.
President Donald Trump Wants to Stop the Caravan. Here's What Experts Think Would Help
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For the second year in a row, President Donald Trump is upset about a caravan of Central American migrants headed to the United States.
Justice Department Opens Investigation of Catholic Church Sex Abuse in Pennsylvania
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Confidential files and testimony from church leaders have been subpoenaed
Saudi Lobbying in the U.S. Has Tripled Since Trump Took Office
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lobbying from Saudi Arabia has tripled since President Trump took office
How life changes when you're 11 years old and arrested for murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jordan Brown, now 21, shares the conditions he faced after his arrest at age 11 for murder and his life today after his conviction was overturned.
Donald Trump Didn't Really Win 52% of White Women in 2016
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The idea that a majority of white women voted for the President has shaped national narratives. The only problem? It's probably wrong.
Melania Trump Visits Newborn Victims of Opioid Crisis Following Plane Malfunction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
First lady Melania Trump is touring an intensive care unit at a Philadelphia hospital to learn about the care being given to newborns suffering from opiate withdrawal.
How the Murder of Jamal Khashoggi Could Upend the Middle East
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The vanishing of Jamal Khashoggi threatens to make a global pariah out of Saudi Arabia's once feted crown prince
Oops: Researchers say 3.7 billion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hunting for fossils is a difficult business in the first place, but the challenge is multiplied the farther back in time you're searching. Finding bones from a dinosaur that lived 50 million years ago is a cake walk compared to hunting for evidence of life from billions of years back. A new analysis of supposed 3.7 billion-year-old fossils in Greenland reveals that the researchers who first announced the discovery may have gotten it all wrong. In truth, it seems the strange deposits found in ancient ground may have just been rock all along. The features, which were touted as potentially being the oldest evidence of life on Earth, look a lot like the pyramid-shaped remains that hinted at the presence of microbial life in other rock samples. In a new letter published in Nature, it seems there are also some very important differences that throw the conclusions of prior research into question. The strange shapes certainly look like they may have been created by life, but as NPR reports, this new round of research points to the alleged cone-shaped features in the rock being elongated and stretched. Three-dimensional examination of the shapes hints at the features having been created by intense pressure between rocks, squeezing and twisting stone into bizarre forms. "They're stretched-out ridges that extend deeply into the rock," Joel Hurowitz, co-author of the work, told NPR. "That shape is hard to explain as a biological structure, and much easier to explain as something that resulted from rocks being squeezed and deformed under tectonic pressures." As for the researchers involved in the original study that claimed evidence of ancient microbial life, they are sticking with their findings. Those scientists have weighed in by saying that this new research is "disappointing" and that their original work holds up despite being challenged.
Indian Government Minister Resigns Amid Allegations of Sexual Misconduct
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
M.J. Akbar, India's junior external affairs minister, resigned Wednesday amid accusations by 20 women of sexual harassment
What's next for Paul Allen's big investments? It's not clear
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Prior to his death on Monday, billionaire Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen invested large sums in technology ventures, research projects and philanthropy, some of it eclectic and highly speculative. Outside of bland assurances from his investment company, no one seems quite sure. Allen died in Seattle from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, according to his company Vulcan Inc. He was 65.
What Makes the U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 75-year alliance between the two nations has been built on American demand for Saudi oil and Saudi demand for American firepower.
How can genetic data be better encrypted? Researchers find a way
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Using nothing more than a simple vial of saliva, millions of people have created DNA profiles on genealogy websites. This problem of access is one that Bonnie Berger, a professor of mathematics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and her colleagues think they can solve, with a new cryptographic system to protect the information. "We're currently at a stalemate in sharing all this genomic data," Berger told AFP.
China wants to put a big fake moon in orbit to reflect sunlight back down at night
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Moon is great, but apparently it's just not enough for the city of Chengdu in China. Not satisfied with the meager light the Moon reflects back down to Earth at night, scientists in the region plan to launch a satellite that will actually reflect sunlight back down to Earth and turn night into day... sort of. The satellite is effectively a giant mirror that will redirect sunlight back down on Chengdu even after the Sun sets. The spacecraft will be roughly eight times brighter than the Moon, according to the Chengdu Aerospace Science and  Technology Microelectronics System Research Institute, and should provide enough light that it will actually make street lights totally irrelevant for at least part of the city. If this all sounds kind of bizarre that's because it is. It really, really is. The group planning the satellite says the mirror will produce light over an area of between 5 and 50 miles. That's, well, not a very specific, and it's unclear from current reports just how long the satellite will last. There's also been some very real concern that the mirror's never-ending glow could seriously impact natural cycles of animals. Scientists have long been critical of human light pollution and its ability to potentially throw off the day/night rhythm of animals, and the same could be true of this fake moon plan. Some experts who support the plan suggest that it'll produce little more than a "twilight glow" that shouldn't change how animals behave, but nobody will know for certain until the satellite is up and running. The institute working on the satellite plans to have the fake moon deployed by 2020. There seems to be some conflicting information over just how bright the light will be — something bright enough to make street lights obsolete sure sounds like it's brighter than a "glow" — so it'll be interesting to see just how well the mirror works... or doesn't.
De Beers eyes tech markets for synthetic diamonds future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TORONTO/LONDON (Reuters) - Anglo American unit De Beers is going after lucrative, but elusive high-tech markets in quantum computing, as it aims to expand its lab-grown diamond business beyond drilling and cutting. Element Six, De Beers' synthetic diamond arm, is building a $94 million factory in Portland, Oregon, an expansion that comes as scientists from Moscow to London push to develop diamonds for futuristic applications. Now coming of age after decades of experiments, technology called chemical vapor deposition, or CVD, offers a path to higher-quality, lower-cost production of synthetic diamonds and that opens the door to potential new computing markets.
Provocateur Stormy Daniels Takes an Unexpected Turn in the National Spotlight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Porn star Stormy Daniels remains in the spotlight as her alleged affair with President Donald Trump continues to make waves.
You Are Not Your DNA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just days before Warren announced her DNA ancestry results, headlines were warning of a new threat to the genetic privacy of us all. The privacy warnings came from a paper in Science, which proclaimed that detectives, or hackers for that matter, could find the identity of “almost anyone” from a sample of DNA. Of course, if you committed rape or murder and left your DNA at the scene, this DNA matching capability could reveal that you are the perpetrator.
In toothy prequel, piranha
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists said on Thursday they have unearthed in southern Germany the fossil of a fish that, with its mouth full of razor-sharp teeth, strongly resembled today's piranhas, the stars of more than their fair share of Hollywood horror films. Named Piranhamesodon pinnatomus, it is the earliest known example of a bony fish - as opposed to cartilaginous fish like sharks - able to slice flesh rather than simply swallowing prey, enabling it to attack victims larger than itself as piranhas can. Piranhas are freshwater fish that inhabit rivers and lakes in South America.
Wounded to Be Airlifted to Russia After Deadly Crimea School Attack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At least 10 of the wounded in a school shooting and bomb attack carried out by a student at a vocational school in Crimea will be airlifted to hospitals in Russia, the health minister said Thursday.
Women Achieved Enormous Power in Ancient Egypt. What They Did With It Is a Warning for Today
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Ancient Egypt allowed more females into power in the ancient world than any other place on earth. Was that society somehow more progressive than we might expect? The answer is a quick and deflating no."
Workers would pay to have a boss with these 10 traits, new research finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New research from New York University finds that both men and women see stereotypically male traits such as assertiveness and competitiveness as 'must-haves' for successful leaders. Researchers argue that preference for these certain types of leadership traits could explain why there are fewer women in positions of power. In the findings, published in the journal "Frontiers in Psychology," researchers ran two studies to understand how men and women perceive what makes a great leader by focusing on attributes often associated with certain genders.