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John McCain Says His Health Care Vote Wasn’t Personal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I was raised in the concept and belief that duty, honor, country is the lodestar for the behavior that we have to exhibit every single day," McCain said.
Palestinian Kills Three Israelis in a Settlement Near Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was one of the deadliest attacks in a two-year spate of violence
Pat Tillman's Widow Says Her Husband's Service 'Should Never be Politicized'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tillman walked away from the NFL to join the Army after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. He was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan in 2004
Protesters Got Dragged Out of a Hearing on the Republican Health Care Repeal Bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Senate is headed toward a last-ditch repeal vote this week
Microsoft Billionaire Bill Gates Doesn't Understand Quantum Computing, Either
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Quantum computing is like 'hieroglyphics' for Bill Gates. Current Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has trouble perfectly explaining the concept, too, Gates said.
Evacuations from Bali volcano swell to more than 57,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BALI, Indonesia (AP) — More than 57,000 people have fled the surrounds of Mount Agung volcano on the Indonesian tourist island of Bali, fearing an imminent eruption, officials said Tuesday.
Obamacare Repeal Is on Life Support. These 5 Senators Could Decide Its Fate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Congress is facing a looming vote on repealing Obamacare that will be decided by a handful of key Republicans. Here are 5 senators to watch.
Need To Adapt May Not Have Caused Brain Evolution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A popular theory, called the cognitive buffer hypothesis, says large brains were a result of the need to quickly cope with frequent or unexpected changes to the environment.
What a Roy Moore Win Could Mean for Washington
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Tuesday, Alabamians will cast ballots in a highly anticipated primary election
Lone Steelers Player Who Stood During the National Anthem: 'I Feel Embarrassed'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I threw my teammates under the bus, unintentionally"
President Trump and Republicans Are Planning Big Tax Cuts for the Rich and Corporations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It would be the first major tax overhaul in three decades
Can This Tesla Alum Build the World’s Greenest Battery?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A planned electric vehicle battery factory in Sweden wants to incorporate green energy and mineral sourcing practices to make a super-green car.
Archaeologists Solve Mystery Of How Easter Island's Tiny Population Built Hundreds Of Statues
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“It appears the island could have supported 17,500 people at its peak, which represents the upper end of the range of previous estimates,” said Cedric Puleston, lead author of the study, based at the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, in a statement. “Despite its almost complete isolation, the inhabitants of Easter Island created a complicated social structure and these amazing works of art before a dramatic change occurred,” Puleston added. “We examined detailed maps, took soil samples around the Island, placed weather stations, used population models and estimated sweet potato production.
President Trump Says Hurricane
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Millions could be without power for months
Pioneering nerve treatment gives man in vegetative state signs of consciousness for first time in 15 years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A 35-year-old man who had been in a vegetative state for 15 years is showing signs of consciousness after receiving a pioneering treatment based on nerve stimulation. In the month since a vagus nerve stimulator was put into his chest, the man, who was injured in a car accident, has begun responding to simple orders that had been impossible before. The findings reported in Current Biology may help to show that by stimulating the vagus nerve "it is possible to improve a patient's presence in the world", according to lead researcher Angela Sirigu of Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod in Lyon, France. The researchers say it may challenge the view that a vegetative state which lasts for more than 12 months is irreversible. "Other scientists have hailed it as "a potentially very exciting finding" but have also urged caution. Images show how brain stimulation in the patient changed Credit:  Corazzol et al/PA After treatment, it was reported the patient could follow an object with his eyes, turn his head on request and his mother said there was an improved ability to stay awake when listening to his therapist reading a book. The vagus nerve connects the brain to many other parts of the body, including the gut. It is known to be important in waking, alertness, and many other essential functions. The patient, who was picked because he had been lying in a vegetative state for more than a decade with no sign of improvement, also appeared to react to a "threat". Researchers spotted that he reacted with surprise by opening his eyes wide when the examiner's head suddenly approached his face. Changes in brain activity may show that he had shifted from being in a vegetative state to being a state of minimal consciousness. An important signal in distinguishing between these conditions increased significantly in areas of the brain involved in movement, sensation, and awareness, according to the scientists. Gains were also spotted in the brain's functional connectivity, metabolic activity in both cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. The researchers are now planning a large collaborative study. Dr Tom Manly of Cambridge University's MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, described it as a "potentially very exciting finding". He added: "It is very important to take into account that the patient moved from a vegetative to a minimally conscious state. That is, consciousness remains severely altered but, in contrast to the vegetative state, there is minimal but definite behavioural evidence of self or environmental awareness. "The finding is therefore in my view an exciting preliminary indication that prolonged intervention could produce benefits that further work will no doubt address. "In my view it would be fair to say that this treatment could potentially restore consciousness in some patients in a vegetative state, rather than that it can." Roland Jones, professor in neuropharmacology at the University of Bath, said: "These results need to be repeated in other patients with long-term vegetative conditions to confirm the findings. "If they can be, this treatment could complement a growing range of pharmacological approaches (eg: low doses of the anti-anxiety drug, zolpidem) that have been shown to partially reverse vegetative states and restore both motor and cognitive function in some cases."
Has This Happened Before? 6 Things to Know About the History Behind NFL Protests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Why is 'The Star-Spangled Banner' part of sporting events?" and 5 other questions
Extinct Big
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Initially, the scientists calculated the bite force in small "Pac-Man" frogs, also known as South American horned frogs. Then, the researchers scaled up their findings to determine bite force in an extinct relative, a giant, armored amphibian known as Beelzebufo ampinga, or "devil frog," that lived about 65 million to 70 million years ago. The scientists' findings showed that the extinct devil frog would have had a vise-like mouth grip even more powerful than that found in living horned frogs.
Nobel Foundation increases cash award for prizes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One week before the announcement of the 2017 Nobel prizes begins, the Nobel Foundation said Monday that this year's winners will receive a larger monetary award worth over a million dollars. "The Board of Directors of the Nobel Foundation decided at its meeting on September 14 that the 2017 Nobel Prize will amount to SEK 9 million ($1.1 million, 944.000 euros) per prize category," the private institution based in Stockholm said in a statement. In 2012, the cash award was reduced by 20 percent to 8 million krona from the 10 million krona which had been awarded since 2001 in order not to put the foundation's capital at risk long term, it said at the time.
Australian space agency plans are about to lift off
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Unlike most other developed nations, Australia doesn’t have one.
One week on, jittery Mexico far from coming to grips with quake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn Tuesday between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. Improbably, it hit just two hours after an annual earthquake drill, turning Mexico City's most seismically unstable neighborhoods into something out of a post-apocalyptic movie. Scores more were killed in the states of Morelos, Puebla, Mexico, Guerrero and Oaxaca.
People Were Convinced Justin Trudeau's Photographer Was Actually Prince Harry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The video is pretty hilarious
14 Things Flight Attendants Know About Flying — and You Probably Don't
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You really should avoid the water
In a Landmark First, the U.S. Marines Now Has a Female Infantry Officer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The lieutenant is the first woman to completed the grueling 13-week course
Satellite photos show Puerto Rico went dark after Hurricane Maria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When Hurricane Maria's Category 4 winds roared across Puerto Rico last week, it left the U.S. territory and its 3.4 million residents nearly entirely without power.  It's possible that parts of Puerto Rico could be without electricity for months, due in part to the hurricane's diagonal track across the entire island. The darkness that has fallen on the island is so prevalent that it's even visible in photos of the territory taken from space.  SEE ALSO: Photos from Puerto Rico reveal the devastating power of Hurricane Maria A nighttime photo taken of Puerto Rico from space on September 25 shows most of the island has gone completely dark. This is particularly apparent when this picture is compared to images taken prior to the storm, which show the bright lights of cities around the island. Image: noaa Image: noaa The power failure isn't the only problem facing Puerto Rico. Communications are also hobbled. According to reporting from the Associated Press, 1,360 of Puerto Rico's 1,600 cell phone towers are no longer in service.  While the power outages across the island are devastating, they aren't a surprise.  The Suomi NPP satellite generated this "before/after" image of visible lights in #PuertoRico early this morning (9/25/17) vs. (7/24/17) pic.twitter.com/V7vjMNDgOV — NOAA Satellites PA (@NOAASatellitePA) September 25, 2017 Governor Ricardo Rossello reportedly predicted that 100 percent of the island would be without power after Maria. The territory's aging infrastructure is in part to blame for the widespread outages. The storm is the worst to hit the island in modern memory, and now, the territory is facing months or even years of rebuilding.  WATCH: This is how hurricanes are named
Botanical gardens a lifeboat for threatened plants
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Botanical gardens are a Noah's Ark for endangered plants, collectively safeguarding four out of 10 species known to face extinction, researchers said Monday. Species diversity is far richer in the tropics, but more than 90 percent of vegetal safe havens are in the northern hemisphere. "The global network of botanical gardens is our best hope for saving some of the world's most endangered plants," said senior author Samuel Brockington, a researcher at the University of Cambridge in England.
'Those Kids Have Every Right to Protest.' 97
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I'm trying to say that you have to love everybody"
Anthony Weiner Is Going to Prison for Sexting Scandal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He broke down in tears when the sentence was announced
How Russian Voters Fueled the Rise of Germany's Far
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russian emigrees and Kremlin influence helped steer the anti-migrant Alternative for Deutschland party into the Bundestag
Republicans Throw Money at Reluctant Senators Amid Last
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Yet it could still prove impossible to change the Affordable Care Act
UW center targets moonshots in materials science with $15.6 million federal grant
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The University of Washington has received a $15.6 million, six-year grant from the National Science Foundation to fund its Molecular Engineering Materials Center and take on “moonshots” that could lead to cleaner energy, advanced light-based electronics and quantum computing. The grant was awarded as part of the NSF’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center program, or MRSEC. Funding was provided to continue work at six MRSEC centers and start up three more centers, including UW’s. UW’s center brings together an initial team of 15 faculty members, including researchers who work at the university’s Clean Energy Institute and Molecular Engineering and… Read More
North Korea Says Trump's Latest Threat Is a 'Declaration of War'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It also said it has the right to shoot down U.S. bombers
This Photo of MLK Kneeling Has New Power Amid the NFL Protests. Here’s the Story Behind It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He was leading a group of protesters in prayer
These are the horrifying things a nuclear war would do to the planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The bomb blasts themselves would be devastating, but firestorms and radioactivity would do even more damage, says Jurica Dujmovic.
Pro Racer Dale Earnhardt Jr. Sides With NFL Players Protesting Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After NASCAR owners threaten to fire protesting drivers
Ford Turns to Students for the Future of Truck Design
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The company wants to challenge existing notions of what makes a good pickup.
Plastic waste now polluting Arctic Ocean, scientists find 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Plastic waste in the ocean is now so widespread it is polluting remote ice floes in the Arctic, scientists have discovered. A team from Exeter University discovered blocks of polystyrene in areas hundreds of miles from land which until recently were covered by ice all year round. Large plastic pieces break down into ‘microplastics’ which are consumed by wildlife and are then passed up the food chain. The expedition was able to go further into the Central Arctic Ocean than any other yacht in history, because of recent reductions in summer ice cover in the Arctic, which is thought to be the result of climate change. Scientists fear the blocks are breaking up into microplastics  Credit: CONOR MCDONNELL @CONORMCDPHOTO Marine biologist Tim Gordon of Exeter University said: “Finding pieces of rubbish like this is a worrying sign that melting ice may be allowing high levels of pollution to drift into these areas. “This is potentially very dangerous for the Arctic’s wildlife. “The Arctic Ocean’s wildlife used to be protected by a layer of sea ice all year round. Now that is melting away, this environment will be exposed to commercial fishing, shipping and industry for the first time in history. “We need to seriously consider how best to protect the Arctic’s animals from these new threats. By doing so, we will give them a fighting chance of adapting and responding to their rapidly-changing habitat.” The Arctic Mission team also used nets with holes smaller than a millimetre to sieve for microplastics in the water. They will now analyse the samples in the laboratory to evaluate current levels of pollution in the Arctic and its likely impacts on wildlife. Estimates suggest there are over 5 trillion pieces of plastic floating in the world’s oceans, and there are estimates it will soon outweigh fish. Scientists are now checking the area of microplastics Scientists fear there is now enough plastic to form a permanent layer in the fossil record. Dr Ceri Lewis, scientific adviser to the expedition based at the University of Exeter, said: “Many rivers lead into the Arctic Ocean that are often a source of plastic pollution, but plastic pollution has been literally trapped into the ice. “Now the ice is melting we believe microplastics are being released into the Arctic.  The Arctic is thought to be a hot spot of microplastics accumulation due to the number of rivers that empty into the Arctic basin, yet we have very little data to support this idea in the more northerly parts of the Arctic Ocean. “This is really important data to collect as the Arctic supports many key fisheries which might be impacted but the presence of microplastics.” The team are is investigating the impact of man-made noise pollution on Arctic marine life and mammals, which can be particularly sensitive to sound. The Arctic Mission team used underwater loudspeakers and microphones to understand how sound travels through the polar seas, and how this might be impacted by ice loss. Professor Steve Simpson, an expert in bioacoustics and noise pollution at Exeter said: "It is critical that we establish baseline natural recordings in this newly exposed oceanic environment. “These recordings will allow us to understand how human activities are changing the soundscape of the summer Arctic, and assess the success of future noise management in this unique acoustic world.”
Treatment restores signs of awareness in brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — French researchers say they restored some signs of consciousness in a brain-injured man who hadn't shown any awareness in 15 years.
Physics Explains How Maryland Fan Epically Crushed a Beer on Her Head
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She puts shotgun champions to shame.
Living On The Moon May Happen By 2030, Scientists Claim
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By 2040, the population may reach 100.
'They Tell Me a Demon Lives Inside Me'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A young man tormented in Chechnya for being gay discovered Europe offers no safe haven.
How Deaths from Opioids Have Impacted US Life Expectancy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Life expectancy in the United States ticked upward between 2000 and 2015, but that rise was blunted by increasing rates of opioid-related deaths, a new report finds. Overall, life expectancy at birth increased by 2 years between 2000 and 2015, the report found. The life expectancy for a person born in the U.S. in 2000 is 76.8 years, compared with 78.8 years for a person born in the U.S. in 2015.
Blame starts to fly over Mexico quake collapses
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Allegations of negligent construction and oversight began to fly Monday after deadly building collapses during Mexico's earthquake, as hope faded of finding more survivors of a disaster that killed more than 300 people. Mexico City's mayor, the education minister, and the top official for the district all traded blame after reports that the Enrique Rebsamen primary school operated using false documents. "If confirmed, it would be very serious," Education Minister Aurelio Nuno told TV network Televisa, saying he had ordered an investigation.
Intel’s New Chip Design Takes Pointers From Your Brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Silicon neurons might make cars and robots smarter and more independent.
‘Fire or Suspend!’ President Trump Encourages NFL Fans to Boycott Games
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He also criticized the NFL's ratings
50 Years Ago This Week: 'Individuals Marry, Not Races'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Also in this issue: Hurricanes and hunting
We're building a 1,300km
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) could help unravel the mysteries of antimatter and complete scientists' next model of the universe.
Nearly 50,000 Evacuated as Fears of Volcanic Eruption Grow in Bali
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mount Agung volcano's alert status was raised to the highest level on Friday
See How Human Activity Is Changing Animal Migration Patterns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new book maps how animals navigate a world heavily altered by urban development and climate change.
Mass Graves Containing Bodies of 28 Hindu Women and Boys Found in Myanmar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Myanmar's army blames the deaths on Rohingya insurgents
RXi Pharmaceuticals’ sd
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASDAQ:RXII RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (NASDAQ:RXII) is a unique player in the RNAi space due to the inherent self-delivery mechanism that efficiently distributes its interference RNA to the cell. ...