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A Breathtaking New GIF Shows CRISPR Chewing Up DNA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CRISPR is the set of molecular scissors that's changing the world. It's an enzyme that cuts DNA, and scientists figured out in 2012 that they could deploy it for cheap, effective gene editing: Just tag the CRISPR molecule with a bit of RNA (a slim sliver of genetic material that sticks to DNA) to guide it, and it can cut out and "rewrite" any snippet of DNA its wielders would like to target. Researchers have been playing with CRISPR for years, tackling HIV, deleting genetic diseases from the cells of experimental human embryos and raising the possibility of cross-species organ transplants.
UN climate envoys agree on way forward, despite Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Negotiations to bolster the climate-saving Paris Agreement, crafted over two decades, closed in Bonn Saturday, deflated but not derailed by Donald Trump's rejection of the treaty and defence of fossil fuels. The US President's decision to yank the United States from the hard-fought global pact cast a long shadow over the talks, which ran deep into overtime. Negotiations were marked by revived divisions between developing countries and rich ones.
Senate Judiciary: Jared Kushner Withheld Emails on WikiLeaks and 'Russian Backdoor Overture'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The panel asked him to provide emails sent to him involving WikiLeaks and a "Russian backdoor overture and dinner invite"
Religion That Worships Artificial Intelligence Wants Machines To Be In Charge Of The Planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A newly established religion called Way of the Future will worship artificial intelligence, focusing on “the realization, acceptance, and worship of a Godhead based on Artificial Intelligence” that followers believe will eventually surpass human control over Earth. The first AI-based church was founded by Anthony Levandowski, the Silicon Valley multimillionaire who championed the robotics team for Uber’s self-driving program and Waymo, the self-driving car company owned by Google.
Sicilian Mob Boss Salvatore 'Toto' Riina Has Died While Serving 26 Life Sentences
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Sicilian mobster was serving 26 life sentences for murder convictions
Obama climate envoy slams Trump's rejection of Paris Agreement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Obama-era official who helped deliver the 2015 Paris Agreement, lashed out Thursday at the Donald Trump administration's "wrongheaded" decision to abandon the first-ever pact committing all countries to limiting climate change. Todd Stern, who was Barack Obama's special envoy for climate change, said he was "annoyed, frustrated" by the new president's rejection of a deal that took the world's nations more than two decades to negotiate. "It's completely wrongheaded thing to do," Stern, who left the state department in 2016, told AFP on the sidelines of a UN climate conference in Bonn which he attended as an observer.
Roy Moore's Wife: He Will Not Step Down From Senate Race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She has repeatedly defended him
Stromatolites: Earth's Most Ancient Life Forms Have Just Been Discovered Alive in Tasmania
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stromatolites were likely the first living organisms on Earth, with fossil records dating these strange creatures back 3.7 billion years. Today, stromatolites are rare, mostly existing in fossil form, but scientists were shocked to find living ones hidden away in a untouched swamp in Tasmania, where they likely have thrived for the past few million years. Stromatolites aren't what comes to mind when you think of life.
Killings of Transgender People Hit a Record High in 2017, Advocacy Groups Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"A legacy of intolerance, hate and discrimination"
People on Twitter Are Upset That President Trump Lifted an Elephant Trophy Ban
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump lifted a ban on elephant trophies and the internet is spreading photos of Donald Trump Jr.'s post-elephant kill pose.
NASA Wants to Put More People in Space for a Year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scott Kelly's year in space was only the beginning.
Scientists Can Now Tell How Much Glaciers Melting Will Affect Specific Cities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New York will be most affected by the northeastern part of the Greenland ice sheet
UN climate talks enter extra time, unnerved by pro
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
UN negotiations to bolster the Paris Agreement, crafted over more than two decades to avert climate catastrophe, dragged into extra time Friday, unnerved by Washington's rejection of the process and defence of fossil fuels. Delegates said the talks were stalled mainly on finance, reviving a divide between rich and developing nations at the talks. The world's poorer nations, often at the forefront of the effects of climate change, need money to make the costly shift away from atmosphere-fouling coal, and to shore up their defences against weather extremes.
Venezuela's Ousted Chief Prosecutor Says President Nicolas Maduro Is Responsible for 8,000 Murders
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Luisa Ortega leads a campaign from exile to discredit Maduro's government for human rights abuses
See How the Earth Has Changed Over the Past 20 Years in This NASA Timelapse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new 20-year NASA timelapse taken from space shows in just a few minutes how life on Earth shapes the planet year by year.
The Investigation Into Chemical Attacks in Syria Is Fizzling Out After a Security Council Showdown
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russia vetoed a resolution to extend the mandate of investigators
'Let the Battle Begin.' Roy Moore's Campaign Lashes Out at His Accusers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Alabama candidate will "fight to the death," his chief strategist said
Cremated Remains of the 'Buddha' Discovered in Chinese Village
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The cremated remains of what an inscription says is the Buddha, also called Siddhārtha Gautama, have been discovered in a box in Jingchuan County, China, along with more than 260 Buddhist statues. The translated inscription on the box reads: "The monks Yunjiang and Zhiming of the Lotus School, who belonged to the Mañjuśrī Temple of the Longxing Monastery in Jingzhou Prefecture, gathered more than 2,000 pieces of śarīra [cremated remains of the Buddha], as well as the Buddha's teeth and bones, and buried them in the Mañjuśrī Hall of this temple," on June 22, 1013. At the site where the statues and Buddha remains were buried, archaeologists also found the remains of a structure that could be from the Mañjuśrī Hall.
Whether by Coup or by 'Correction,' Mugabe's 37
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The president and first lady are under house arrest
Toxic algae: Once a nuisance, now a severe nationwide threat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Competing in a bass fishing tournament two years ago, Todd Steele cast his rod from his 21-foot motorboat — unaware that he was being poisoned. A thick, green scum coated western Lake Erie. And Steele, ...
When Will We Find Aliens? NASA Is Studying Earth to Find Signs of E.T. On Distant Planets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The Earth will always be our best studied case of a habitable exoplanet," Stephen Kane, a planetary scientist at the University of California, Riverside, wrote during a Reddit AMA. Right now, the easiest characteristic for astronomers to spot about an alien planet is whether it falls in what's nicknamed the habitable zone, the distance from a star where a planet is the right temperature to hold liquid water on its surface. We can take amazing photographs of Earth—and then we can study them as if they were terrible photographs of exoplanets.
U.S. soybeans escape yield losses after signs of chemical damage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A weed killer blamed for damaging millions of acres of U.S. crops this summer did not reduce yields for most of the soybeans checked by BASF SE , which makes a version of the herbicide, the company said on Friday. BASF, the world's third-largest maker of crop chemicals, investigated 787 complaints involving soybeans that showed signs of damage linked to sprayings of the herbicide that contains a chemical known as dicamba, according to the company.
Bill Clinton Should Have Resigned After Monica Lewinsky Affair, Democratic Senator Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“I think that is the appropriate response," Gillibrand told the New York Times.
Rare pic of Billy the Kid and Pat Garrett surfaces
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A grainy 19-century photo of Billy the Kid and his killer Pat Garrett, bought at a flea market for $10, could potentially be worth millions of dollars.
Oklahoma Science Teacher, 22, Charged with Rape of Teenage Student After Police Barge In
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sheriff's deputies barged in on a tryst she had allegedly set up with the teenage student
Rose McGowan Arraigned on Felony Cocaine Charges
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She claimed drugs were planted to discredit her
Repealing the Obamacare Individual Mandate Could Complicate Tax Reform. Here's How
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some Republicans don't like tying tax reform and health care together
Rural Americans say everyday life hurt by slow internet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
State officials are looking for a solution after Verizon declined $140 million in federal help.
Time travel is possible, says astrophysicist (but there’s a catch)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's a bit more complicated than using a flux capacitor, mind
Huge Underwater Castle With Ancient ‘Fairy Chimneys’ Discovered at the Bottom of Turkey’s Lake Van
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers studying a vast lake in Eastern Turkey have unearthed the remains of a 3,000-year-old castle buried beneath its waters. Tahsin Ceylan, an underwater photographer and videographer, Mustafa Akkuş, an academic from Van Yüzüncü Yıl University’s fishery faculty, Murat Kulakaç, a diving instructor and Cumali Birol, a diver, plunged into Lake Van, Turkey's largest lake, to discover its secrets, Hurriyet Daily News reported.
UN climate talks wind down, deflated but not derailed by Washington
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
UN negotiations to activate the Paris Agreement, designed to avert a climate catastrophe, were wrapping up Friday deflated, but not derailed, by Washington's rejection of the process and its defence of fossil fuels. President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the hard-fought global pact cast a long shadow over the talks, marked by revived divisions between developing countries and rich ones. With a wary eye on America, which still has negotiators at the forum it has spurned, envoys from nearly 200 countries got on with the business of designing a "rule book" for enacting key provisions in the agreement which enters into force in just three years' time.
World's first human head transplant has been 'successfully carried out'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A controversial surgeon has successfully carried out the operation on a corpse
'He Didn't Pinch It, He Grabbed It.' Another Woman Has Accused Roy Moore of Groping Her
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Six women have now accused him of sexual misconduct
Treacher Collins syndrome: What you need to know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Answers to some of the more common questions about the disorder.
Interstellar visitor shaped like giant fire extinguisher
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A newly discovered object from another star system that's passing through ours is shaped like a giant pink fire extinguisher.
Unsettled by pro
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
UN negotiations on how to implement the climate-rescue Paris Agreement wrap up in Bonn Friday, after two weeks of talks unnerved by an American defence of fossil fuels. President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the hard-fought global pact cast a long shadow over talks marked by revived divisions between rich and developing countries. Key disagreements revolve around how to share out responsibilities for drawing down greenhouse gas emissions, and the money required to do so.
Raqqa Needs Rebuilding. Who Will Foot the Bill?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Authorities in the Syrian city face a staggering task as it tries to restore life to a ruined city
Scientists trace origin of misbehaving electrons to creepy whistles in space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Space is weird. It's full of weird rocks, weird balls of gas, weird stars, and weird things that we can't even properly categorize. It's also full of weird sounds, and if you spent a moment to sample NASA's Halloween playlist of spooky space noises you know exactly what I'm talking about. Some of the noise we hear in space has simple explanations, while others are a lot more mysterious, and NASA thinks it's finally figured out where one of the most mysterious "whistles" is coming from. NASA calls them the "whistler mode chorus," and they sound like something straight out of a 1980s arcade game. They're definitely odd, and while they're pretty fun to listen to, researchers using NASA data now know what role they play in a particularly strange phenomenon taking place in Earth's atmosphere. The new study, which was published in Geophysical Review Letters, was conducted by scientists at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. It focuses on the behavior of high-energy electrons which have a habit of being launched into the Earth's upper atmosphere. Researchers have known about this behavior for some time, but were puzzled by the cause. The strange, bird-like chirps, as it turns out, are responsible. https://soundcloud.com/nasa/whistler-waves2 Thanks to a bit of luck with the position of two NASA satellites, the scientists were able to determine that the electrons were escaping into the atmosphere thanks to a plasma wave. The waves are the result of the mishmash of electric and magnetic fields twisting around the Earth, and they happen to be very good at making electrons fly. What you hear in the high-pitched whistles is the waves themselves, and when a wave manages to accelerate many electrons at once it fires them off into the atmosphere in what scientists call a "microburst." Using one satellite to observe the waves swooping in and another to spot the high-energy particles taking flight, the researchers were able to show that they were indeed linked.
Roy Moore's Democratic Challenger Surges Ahead in New Poll — Thanks to Women
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Doug Jones leads Moore by 8 points
'We Would Have Had a Horrific Bloodbath.' How Quick
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The shooter repeatedly tried to break into the Rancho Tehama Elementary School
Here's How To Get Free 2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Wondering where else you can snag good deals and free two-day shipping on Black Friday other than Amazon?
Tesla Unveils World's Fastest Production Car In Surprise Announcement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tesla on Thursday night unveiled its electric semi truck, but the massive new vehicle was overshadowed by what it was hauling inside.
Sea creatures in Mariana Trench (the deepest place on Earth) have plastic in their stomachs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sea creatures living in the deepest part of the ocean have been found with man-made fibres in their stomachs for the first time, showing that no part of the world’s seas are now untouched by human rubbish. Scientists from Newcastle University discovered that every single crustacean surveyed at the bottom of the Mariana Trench, a six mile deep schism in the Pacific Ocean, had debris in its body. The team used the same deep-diving technology which was recently used to film the remarkable footage of the trench for the BBC’s new natural history series Blue Planet II. Fragments found in the stomachs and muscles of sea creatures included synthetic fibres including Rayon, Lyocell and Ramie as well as textiles such as Nylon, polyethylene and polyvinyl. The same lander which sampled the crustaceans were used to film remarkable footage for Blue Planet II Credit: BBC Dr Alan Jamieson, who led the research, said: “The results were both immediate and startling. “This study has shown that manmade microfibres are culminating and accumulating in an ecosystem inhabited by species we poorly understand, cannot observe experimentally and have failed to obtain baseline data for prior to contamination. “There were instances where the fibres could actually be seen in the stomach contents as they were being removed. “It is highly likely there are no marine ecosystems left that are not impacted by anthropogenic debris.” Mariana trench - locator map The team tested crustaceans found in the ultra-deep trenches that span the entire Pacific Ocean - the Mariana, Japan, Izu-Bonin, Peru-Chile, New Hebrides and Kermadec trenches. The sampled depths range from four to more than six miles including the deepest point, Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench, at 6.7 miles (10,890m) using free-falling deep-sea landers. After examining 90 individual they and found ingestion of plastic and fibres ranged from 50 per cent in the New Hebrides Trench to 100 per cent at the bottom of the Mariana Trench. A man-made fibre which was found in the stomach of an amphipod in the Mariana Trench Credit: BBC Deep-sea organisms are dependent on food raining down from the surface and because food is scarce they are not picky about what they eat. And once the plastics are on the sea-bed there is nowhere for them to go, so they continue to accumulate. Sir David Attenborough, who narrates BBC Blue Planet II, said plastic in the ocean was now a major threat to the world’s oceans. “Everybody should be concerned about it,” he told The Telegraph. “It’s a terrible paradox that when it was invented in the 1920s or earlier scientists went to huge trouble to make sure it was indestructible. And now we are dumping hundreds of tons into the oceans every day. “It doesn’t mean it doesn’t fragment and that is one of the problems, it fragments into tiny little sphere which absorb poisons selectively, so these highly poisonous globules are then eaten by fish.” Mariana trench - depth An estimated 300 million tonnes of plastic now litters the oceans, with more than 5 trillion plastic pieces weighing over 250,000 tons currently floating on the surface. Although the majority of marine litter can be observed floating on the surface, the degradation and fragmentation of plastics will ultimately result in sinking to the underlying deep-sea habitats, where opportunities for dispersal become ever more limited. It is estimated that without a major intervention the weight of plastic in the ocean will be greater than the weight of fish by 2050. Amphipods taken from Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench Credit: Newcastle University  Craig Bennett Friends of the Earth chief executive officer said: “This is further shocking evidence that toxic plastic is accumulating in even our most precious and remote environments. “Urgent measures are needed to defuse this plastic pollution time bomb. “Government’s around the world must come up with a plan to rapidly phase-out fossil fuel-based plastics for good. “There should be no place for plastics that aren’t biodegradable and made from natural materials.”
15 Black Men Arrested By a Corrupt Cop Are Cleared of All Convictions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The police officer tried to extort each of the men for money
Eating Organic Is Not As Good for the Environment As You Think
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Organic food is trendy and expensive, but would a complete switch to organic food offer a magic solution to sustainable food production?
Roy Moore: Mitch McConnell Should Step Down, Not Me
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Moore refuses to quite despite calls from GOP leaders
The FCC Just Made It Easier for One Company to Own Multiple TV Stations Where You Live
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It weakens rules meant to support independent local media