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These 77,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Precisely honed lethal stone tools have been discovered in the Sibudu Cave in South Africa dating back to the Middle Stone Age in the region. Sophisticated methods to hone sharper and more deadly stone weapons is thought to have come much later. The previous earliest stone tools of this kind at the site were 65,000 years old.
Trump moves to review status of America's nature preserves
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After moving to unstitch climate change rules, US President Donald Trump Wednesday opened the door to undoing the federally protected status of some of America's vast nature preserves. "Today I'm signing a new executive order to end another egregious abuse of federal power and to give that power back to the states and to the people where it belongs," Trump said at the signing ceremony.
Strange Recall: How Do Golf Balls Get into Hash Browns?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bizarre and unwanted ingredient is prompting a recall of several frozen hash-brown products: The hash browns may contain pieces of golf balls. On Friday, frozen-food maker McCain Foods USA issued a voluntary recall of two hash-brown products because they may be contaminated with "extraneous golf ball materials," the company said in a statement. The golf ball pieces in these products could pose a choking hazard or cause injuries to the mouth if consumed, the company warned.
A “Hunger Games”
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What qualities make a good astronaut? The Canadian Space Agency has offered the public some answers in an unusual semi-public hiring process. Since last summer, the agency has narrowed down the pool of thousands of candidates for two rarely available astronaut slots, keeping the entire country informed about its selections. Apart from the basic qualifications—candidates…
Will vertical farming continue to grow, or has it hit the greenhouse ceiling?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As the world's population continues to balloon, the growing need for an advanced form of food production is needed now more than ever. But does a system of vertical farms solve this crisis or create a different set of problems?
Locals stumble across ancient Mayan god monument while clearing debris in Mexico
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Locals accidentally uncovered an ancient Mayan artefact while clearing debris on privately-owned land in the Mexican state of Chiapas. The monument, believed to be the head of the Mayan god of maize and abundance, dates back to the late classical period between 600 and 900 AD. Archaeologists of the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) identified the authenticity and antiquity of the artefact.
MUTT: Saving military lives and storming beaches
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Allison Barrie gives Fox News the inside scoop on how a new piece of military technology could be used to save countless lives
Neanderthals in California? Maybe so, provocative study says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A startling new report asserts that the first known Americans arrived much, much earlier than scientists thought _ more than 100,000 years ago
Baby whales 'whisper' to mothers to avoid predators: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Newborn humpback whales and their mothers whisper to each other to escape potential predators, scientists reported Wednesday, revealing the existence of a previously unknown survival technique. "They don't want any unwanted listeners," researcher Simone Videsen, lead author of a study published in Functional Ecology, told AFP. Male humpback whales also emit reverberating sounds to attract females during the mating season.
Heavy Drinkers May Not Handle Alcohol As Well As They Think
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Young adults who are heavy social drinkers may think they have a "tolerance" that lets them drink alcohol without it impairing their coordination, but a new study shows otherwise. The researchers found that after people who had been heavy drinkers for years consumed a high dose of alcohol, they fared no better than light drinkers when performing a complex task, akin to driving a car. Previous studies had found that heavy drinkers may develop a behavioral tolerance to alcohol, so that the more experience they have with drinking heavily, the less impaired they may act on some performance measures because their brain learns some ways to compensate on some tasks.
Ancient people left a frightening message for us, and scientists just found it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
10,000 years from now (assuming humans haven't been wiped out by a plague, space rock, or our own destructive tendencies), it'll probably be fairly easy for the average person to research what life was like in 2017. For us here today, finding out what life was like in 11,000BC is much more challenging, but by studying ancient stone carvings and pairing the somewhat confusing messages with archeological data, researchers believe they've discovered concrete evidence of an apocalyptic event that may have altered the future of mankind: a comet strike. The study, performed by a team of researchers from the University of Edinburgh (PDF), suggests that a potentially cataclysmic comet strike rapidly and dramatically altered the Earth's climate for hundreds of years, sending humanity into a mini ice age with nearly glacial conditions. The time period when this occurred is known as the Younger Dryas, and has been well documented thanks to ample evidence of the cooling found in core samples, but its cause has been theorized and debated for a long while. Now, thanks to stone carvings left by ancient people in modern day Turkey, researchers believe that a comet was the culprit. The carvings are remarkably preserved and appear to have been created to document an apocalyptic event which devastated the land. Figures depicted in the carvings, including apparently deceased, headless human bodies and other wildlife, were made at around the time the Younger Dryas began, suggesting that the event archived in stone could have been the same one that caused the thousand-year cold snap. The carvings were found at what is considered to be one of the oldest and most important temple sites on the planet, and for the images to appear there suggests that they have enormous historical significance. The Younger Dryas is often credited with pushing ancient humans to band together out of pure necessity, forming the foundation of modern agriculture and other huge advancements in civilization. The idea that a comet may have been responsible for pushing humanity forward is an extremely interesting, and potentially frightening possibility. The findings are far from an iron clad confirmation, but the timing matches up shockingly well, and would have to be a fantastic coincidence if the two events are actually unrelated.
Uber plans to test flying cars within three years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ambitious plan may take some consumer convincing; Fox News Headlines' Brett Larson reports
NASA’s latest image of the James Webb Space Telescope is beautiful
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scheduled to launch in 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope will be the most powerful telescope in existence, replacing NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, capturing infrared light from the first galaxies of the ancient universe.
Arrow didn't kill Otzi the Iceman – instead he froze to death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ötzi the Iceman didn't die after being shot with an arrow – it's more likely that he froze to death, scientists have now said. Ötzi, also known as the Tyrolean Iceman, is one of the most famous mummies in the world.
This may be one reason people in China are becoming less happy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As societies become wealthier, they don’t necessarily become happier. It’s called the Easterlin paradox, named for happiness economist Richard Easterlin. He observed in 2012 that people in China appeared to be experiencing the paradox. They had reported more happiness overall in 1990, before the country’s economic transition, than they did two decades later, perhaps due…
President Trump congratulates NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, talks sending humans to Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The View" co-hosts discuss the president's goal to put a human on Mars, federal budget cuts and his relationship with the science community.
Donald Trump wants to put humans on Mars in three years, President announces in ISS livestream
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nasa's plan of a mission to Mars by the 2030s was already highly ambitious. It has been funded through a bill that Mr Trump just recently signed into law – which the astronauts had to remind him of during the video. It wasn't clear whether or not Mr Trump was joking about the new, highly ambitious target.
Scientists develop fluid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Kate Kelland LONDON, (Reuters) - Scientists in the United States have developed a fluid-filled womb-like bag known as an extra-uterine support device that could transform care for extremely premature babies, significantly improving chances of survival. In pre-clinical studies with lambs, the researchers were able to mimic the womb environment and the functions of the placenta, giving premature offspring a crucial opportunity to develop their lungs and other organs. Around 30,000 babies in the United States alone are born critically early - at between 23 and 26 weeks of gestation, the researchers told reporters in a telephone briefing.
Why Some Creative People Are More Attractive
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Showing a bit of creativity on your online dating profile could make you appear more attractive to potential dates, a new study suggests. In the study, people were asked to rate the attractiveness of individuals in photos who were said to have written a short piece of creative writing to display their creativity. The findings suggest that "creativity can enhance your attractiveness both as a potential date and as a potential social partner [or] same-sex friend," said study author Christopher Watkins, a lecturer in psychology at Abertay University in Scotland.
Research suggests comfort eating is triggered by nurture, not nature
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You may be all too familiar with the scenario: you’ve had a particularly grueling day at work, or you’re in the throes of a devastating breakup, and you reach for your favorite food for comfort. Scientists call this tendency “emotional overeating”, reacting to negative emotions such as stress or sadness, with the desire to eat highly palatable food. To find out more, we recently conducted two studies of emotional overeating in children from the UK and Norway.
‘Better you than me,’ President Trump jokes with NASA astronauts about urine in space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Monday, April 24, President Trump, Ivanka Trump and NASA astronaut Kate Rubins spoke to Cmdr. Peggy Whitson and flight engineer Jack Fischer of NASA on the International Space Station. The conversation took a lighthearted turn when Whitson told the president about experiments onboard aimed at getting drinking water out of urine.
'Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite' gets release date, story mode
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fox Gamer: Capcom announces the release date and collector's edition for the next installment of the fan-favorite fighting franchise
With Secret Airship, Sergey Brin Also Wants to Fly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Google co-founder is said to be working on an enormous dirigible in a Silicon Valley hangar.
What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding
The burger of the future comes from crickets, not cows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Agriculture has come a long way in the past century. We produce more food than ever before -- but our current model is unsustainable, and as the world’s population rapidly approaches the 8 billion mark, modern food production methods will need a radical transformation if they're going to keep up. But luckily, there’s a range […]
Michael Bloomberg called 'bullsh*t' on this energy technology
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Michael Bloomberg, an outspoken environmentalist and former New York City mayor, had some harsh words for carbon capture and storage, the unproven technology that proponents say will turn fossil fuels into "clean" energy sources. "Carbon capture is total bullshit" and "a figment of the imagination," Bloomberg said on Monday, addressing a crowd at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance summit in New York. SEE ALSO: The Kentucky coal mining museum switches to solar power Carbon capture involves taking the emissions from coal and natural gas-burning power plants and industrial facilities, then burying the carbon deep underground or repurposing it for fertilizers and chemicals. The idea is that by trapping emissions before they enter the atmosphere, we can limit their contribution to human-caused climate change. Climate experts say it will be next to impossible to eliminate the world's emissions without carbon capture systems. The International Energy Agency has called the technology "essential," given that countries are likely to keep burning coal, oil, and natural gas for decades to come. Michael Bloomberg, billionaire, former NYC mayor, prominent environmentalist and major coal critic.Image: joe raedle/Getty ImagesBut to Bloomberg and other critics, that's precisely the problem. By investing billions of dollars into carbon capture, countries can effectively delay the inevitable — the end of fossil fuels — and postpone investments in genuinely cleaner energy, such as wind and solar power. So far, only a handful of carbon capture projects even exist around the world, and many of them have faced steep cost overruns and delays. The Kemper Project in Mississippi — billed as America's "flagship" carbon capture project — is more than $4 billion over budget and still not operational. Yet President Donald Trump and many coal industry leaders talk about carbon capture as if it's already solved the nation's energy challenges. If we have "clean coal," why invest in alternatives? Bloomberg has also used aggressive language to express disdain for the coal industry. "I don't have much sympathy for industries whose products leave behind a trail of diseased and dead bodies," he wrote in his new book, Climate of Hope, which he co-authored with former Sierra Club executive director Carl Pope. "But for everyone's sake, we should aim to put them out of business," Bloomberg said. Scott Pruitt, head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, speaks with coal miners in Pennsylvania.Image: ustin Merriman/Getty ImagesThe billionaire media mogul has donated some $80 million to the Sierra Club to help the environmental group shut down coal-fired power plants as part of its Beyond Coal campaign. More than 250 U.S. coal plants have shut down or committed to retire since the campaign began in 2011. Many of those closures came as natural gas prices plummeted, prompting utilities to ditch coal, and as federal clean air and water rules made it too costly to upgrade aging coal plants. Of the nation's more than 500 coal plants, only 273 now remain open, and Bloomberg's philanthropy arm and the Sierra Club are working to shutter those, too. The former mayor also recently announced a new coal-related donation. Bloomberg told the Associated Press that he plans to donate $3 million to organizations that help unemployed coal miners and their communities find new economic opportunities. Bloomberg Philanthropies highlighted the struggles of miners in a new film, From the Ashes, to be featured at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York this week. Coal miners "have paid a terrible price," he told the AP. WATCH: Documentary 'From the Ashes' shows U.S. coal communities in a new light
Court removes obstacle to releasing wolves in New Mexico
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DENVER (AP) — A federal court on Tuesday removed an obstacle to the U.S. government's plan to release more endangered wolves in New Mexico over the state's objections, but it was not clear whether additional animals would be reintroduced under the Trump administration.
Radiohead Just Got a New Species of Venezuelan Ants Named After Them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In South America, there are ants capable of farming their own food that are known in the scientific community as Sericomyrmex, or "silky ants." Researchers from the Smithsonian recently discovered three new species of these fungus-eating insects, which differ from other Sericomyrmex because the female ants are covered in what Phys.org describes as a "white, crystal-like layer" with an as-of-yet unknown function. …
A psychologist explains why changing your life isn’t as hard as you think
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When Sheryl Sandberg’s husband died unexpectedly two years ago, she was devastated. In her new book Option B, coauthored with organizational psychologist Adam Grant, Sandberg recounts her process of discovering resilience in the face of loss and upheaval. The story of Sandberg—Facebook’s chief operating officer, a mother of two, and the author of Lean In—might…
'Breakthrough' bending wave technology turns your smartphone's display into one big loudspeaker
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Never mind getting rid of the headphone jack – what if your next mobile phone came without a speaker? It seems like an unthinkable proposition, however according to one company this could be the future of smartphone audio. UK-based tech firm Redux has developed a new type of surface audio technology which it claims removes the need for the frequently underwhelming micro speakers found in smartphones by instead channelling sound through the display.
Scientists name new species of fungus
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new species of ant discovered in the Venezuelan Amazon has been named after Radiohead, Phys.org reports. Ana Ješovnik and Ted R. Schultz from the Smithsonian Institution’s Ant Lab recently discovered three new ant species from the genus Sericomyrmex, and named one species Sericomyrmex radioheadi.
US should stay in Paris climate accord: energy secretary
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The United States should stay in the Paris climate accord but renegotiate it, Energy Secretary Rick Perry said Tuesday, alleging that some European countries were not doing enough to curb emissions. A decision is expected by President Donald Trump next month on whether or not to stay in the landmark 2015 Paris Agreement limiting global carbon emissions, signed by 194 countries. "I'm not going to say I'm going to go tell the president of the United States, 'Let's just walk away from the Paris accord'," Perry said during the Bloomberg New Energy Finance conference in New York.
‘Cooper’s Treasure’ Star on Why He’s Televising His Secret ‘Treasure Map From Space’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“Cooper’s Treasure” is currently being discovered by viewers, and there’s good reason to board the sea-bottom series. The Discovery show follows the underwater expeditions of Darrell Miklos, who just might have the most valuable and unique treasure map in the world — or rather, from out of this world. Here’s the backstory: Miklos’ friend Gordon Cooper was one of NASA’s first seven astronauts in the 1950s.
Can Collisions Between Protons Create Quark
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists associated with the ALICE collaboration at CERN's Large Hadron Collider have observed possible signatures of this hot and dense plasma even in collisions between protons.
Very hungry caterpillars could be the answer to the Earth's massive plastic bag problem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Spanish biologist and amateur beekeeper may have discovered a way to deal with some of the trillion plastic bags humans use and toss annually — and the answer lies in the humble caterpillar. Or, more specifically, the Galleria mellonella, or wax moth. SEE ALSO: Roads made from recycled plastic are paving the way to a greener tomorrow Federica Bertocchini, from Spain's Institute of Biomedicine & Biotechnology of Cantabria, was actually working away at her side hustle—beekeeping—when she made the discovery that could make a huge dent in Earth's plastic problem. Finding a bunch of wax moths in her hives, where they were busy munching on the wax that her bees need to make honeycomb, she dumped the pesky critters in a plastic bag. On her return, she discovered they'd eaten their way out of the bag. Teaming up with biochemists Paolo Bombelli and Christopher Howe, she aimed to find out if—and how—the creatures were truly digesting the plastic. Their results were published in Current Biology Monday, and could have important ramifications in the fight against environmental waste. Essentially, the team discovered "the fast bio-degradation of polyethylene (PE) by larvae of the wax moth Galleria mellonella, producing ethylene glycol." When a film of PE was left with wax worms, holes started appearing within 40 minutes. As the graphic below shows, a high street grocery bag was riddled with holes after just 12 hours in the presence of some 100 worms. Overall, 92mg of plastic disappeared—far more than the previous record for bacteria, 0.13mg. The team also smeared the unsavory-sounding "worm homogenate" onto PE films, which showed the special enzymes produced by the worms helped break down the plastic. Life always finds a way. And be it to eat & digest polyethylene #plastic bags, like these wax moth caterpillars https://t.co/DH4bYokIlt pic.twitter.com/kaMceb38aS — Current Biology (@CurrentBiology) April 24, 2017 "What allows the wax worm to degrade a chemical bond not generally susceptible to bio-degradation?" the study asks. "The answer may lie in the ecology of the wax worm itself. They feed on beeswax, and their natural niche is the honeycomb; the moth lays its eggs inside the beehive, where the worms grow to their pupa stage, eating beeswax. Beeswax is composed of a highly diverse mixture of lipid compounds, including alkanes, alkenes, fatty acids and esters." In other words, these worms are built to devour compounds similar to those found in plastic bags. But forget notions of huge armies of worms unleashed into your discarded grocery bags.  "The idea would be to not use the worms," Bertocchini says. “Maybe we can find the molecule and produce it at high-scale rather than using a million worms in a plastic bag.” However, not everyone is impressed with the discovery. Marine biologist Tracy Mincer from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute told National Geographic he believed reducing plastic production and increasing recycling was more important than finding ways to break it down after the event.  “Polyethylene is a high-quality resin that can be up-cycled in many ways and can fetch up to $500 per tonne,” he told the publication. “In my opinion, although this is an amazing natural history story and wonderful academic exercise, it is not a solution for disposing of polyethylene as this is throwing away money.” Another researcher from Michigan State University also voiced concern. Ramani Narayan told The Atlantic the evidence that waxworm paste produces ethylene glycol is "tenuous at best." The fight against our plastic infestation continues. WATCH: Scientists have created edible water orbs that can help replace plastic bottles
7 things that make mosquitoes bite you more
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mosquitoes choose their prey — you, perhaps — based on a bunch of factors. But there's...
Mysterious shapes and patterns discovered in Arctic and Antarctic sea floor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thousands of kilometres of the Arctic and Antarctic sea floors have been charted in an ambitious and highly detailed atlas of the polar seabed. Several strange shapes gouged out of the sea floor reveal some of the more dramatic periods of the poles' past. What we do know about the seabed here on Earth is perhaps at its scantiest in the remote polar regions.
Donald Trump congratulates record
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After spending more than a year and a half living in space throughout her career, astronaut and International Space Station commander Peggy Whitson has received a congratulatory call from President Donald Trump to commemorate her record breaking time in orbit. During the chat they also happened to discuss drinking urine. “It’s really not as bad as it sounds,” Ms Whitson told Mr Trump about the recycling program on the International Space Station that converts astronaut urine into drinkable water.
Tinder wants you to swipe right on this rhino to help save his species
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The world's most eligible bachelor is coming to Tinder — and he may not be who you expect. In a new campaign launched Tuesday, Tinder has partnered with the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in central Kenya to introduce users to Sudan, the last known male northern white rhino in existence. The platform hopes to save Sudan's species from extinction. SEE ALSO: 9 incredible ways we're using drones for social good As the last hope for all northern white rhinos, 42-year-old Sudan is one of the most protected animals on the planet, surrounded by armed guards at all times. He lives at the conservancy with the only two female northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu. But he's been unable to breed with Najin and Fatu due to a number of issues, including old age and a low sperm count.  Image: TinderThrough Sudan's Tinder profile — complete with an adorable profile photo — Tinder and the Ol Pejeta Conservancy hope to raise a hefty $9 million to fund in-vitro efforts in lieu of natural breeding to save the northern white rhino. "As a platform that makes millions of meaningful connections every day, raising awareness about Sudan the Rhino and the importance of finding his match seemed like something we could support in a really impactful way," a Tinder spokesperson told Mashable. "We've heard countless stories about Tinder babies, but this would be the first match to save a species." Any users who see ads on Tinder could potentially see Sudan the Rhino in their card stack. When users swipe right on Sudan, they'll receive a message that features a link to donate, which would help fund ongoing research focusing on "assisted reproductive technologies." Scientists are currently testing ways to use in-vitro fertilization on Najin and Fatu, as well as female southern white rhinos with Sudan's stored sperm, hoping to achieve white rhino pregnancies to support population growth.  Southern white rhinos aren't endangered, but they are a different subspecies from northern white rhinos. These offspring, then, wouldn't be 100 percent northern white rhino, but experts say that option is better than extinction. And there are currently 17,000 southern white rhinos in existence, meaning chances of success are much higher. White rhino populations around the globe have been severely threatened by poaching, with hundreds killed each year by illegal hunters. The animals are killed for their horns, which are traded illegally and used in traditional Asian medicines to treat a range of illnesses. They're particularly vulnerable to poaching because they're relatively unaggressive and travel in herds. Sudan at the Ol Pejeta Conservacy in central Kenya.Image: Glyn Edmunds / REX / ShutterstockIf successful, this would be the first time scientists carry out artificial reproduction in rhinos. They hope to establish a herd of 10 northern white rhinos after five years.  "Saving the northern white rhinos is critical if we are to, one day, reintroduce rhinos back into Central Africa," said Richard Vigne, CEO of the Ol Pejeta Conservancy. "They contain unique genetic traits that confer upon them the ability to survive in this part of Africa. Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized." This isn't Tinder's first foray into supporting social good causes. Recently, the dating app let any user allocate $100 to a women-focused charity on International Women's Day. In 2014, the company partnered with Amnesty International to bring awareness to child and forced marriage around the globe through a series of in-app ads. WATCH: The last Sumatran rhino left the U.S. to save his species
Citizen scientists discover new type of aurora
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists still don't know what caused the mysterious phenomenon 'Steve'.
Humans threaten crucial 'fossil' groundwater: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Human activity risks contaminating pristine water locked underground for millennia and long thought impervious to pollution, said a study Tuesday that warned of a looming threat to the crucial resource. This suggests that deep wells, believed to bring only unsullied, ancient water to the surface, are "vulnerable to contaminants derived from modern-day land uses," study co-author Scott Jasechko, of the University of Calgary, told AFP. Groundwater is rain or melted ice which filters through Earth's rocky layers to gather in aquifers underground -- a process that can take thousands, even millions, of years.
Royal Society: We must take action on AI machine learning to safeguard our futures
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Royal Society is calling for governments, academia and industry to work together urgently to ensure that machine learning develops into a technology able to benefit the UK as a whole, as an antidote to fear mongering about the future dangers of artificial intelligence. The UK's science academy has spent a year and a half working on the report, entitled "Machine Learning: the power and promise of computers that learn by example", in order to find out how the UK general public views machine learning.
Converting coal would help China's smog at climate's expense
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BEIJING (AP) — China's conversion of coal into natural gas could prevent tens of thousands of premature deaths each year. But there's a catch: As the country shifts its use of vast coal reserves to send less smog-inducing chemicals into the air, the move threatens to undermine efforts to rein in greenhouse gas emissions, researchers said Tuesday.
Technology Is Killing Iceland’s Language
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Technology doesn’t speak Icelandic, so it’s in danger of being lost to history.
Astronaut breaks US space record, gets call from Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Astronaut Peggy Whitson broke the U.S. record Monday for most time in space and talked up Mars during a congratulatory call from President Donald Trump.
UNEP chief confident US will not ditch Paris climate deal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The UN's environment chief is confident that the United States will not pull out of the Paris climate deal and expects a decision from Washington next month. Erik Solheim told AFP in an interview on Monday that even if the United States withdraws, China and the European Union will step in and take the lead to implement the global agreement on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
Bill Maher Wants Everyone to Stop Talking About Colonizing Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We hear a lot about putting America first. Let's put Earth first."
Astronaut Peggy Whitson holds records for longest time in space by an American
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Whitson is the first woman to command at NASA, take eight space walks and orbit nearly 250 miles above the Earth.
Even penguins marched (well, waddled) for science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What's better than clever protest signs? Protest penguins. On Saturday, as thousands of people joined the March for Science worldwide, a group of penguins waddled in solidarity at the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California. The aquarium shared the "March of the Penguins for Science" via Facebook Live. The post had nearly 1.7 million views by mid-afternoon on Sunday. The March for Science movement was born in response to President Donald Trump's "clear anti-science actions," organizers said in January.  The Trump administration has vowed to slash funding and staffing for federal scientific agencies. Top officials have repeatedly expressed hostility and skepticism toward robust, peer-reviewed, widely accepted research — including the scientific consensus on human-driven climate change. SEE ALSO: The science march is about 'hope' for a fact-based future But the fear that science and reason are under attack isn't confined to the United States.  On April 22 — Earth Day — scientists and their supporters showed up at more than 500 events around the world, from the North Pole all the way down to the real land of the penguins: Antarctica. Das war der #marchforscience in Ny-Ålesund #ArktisFotos: Rodolphe Merceron/AWIPEV pic.twitter.com/5frqKER212 — AWI Medien (@AWI_de) April 22, 2017 A team of German researchers with the Alfred Wegener Institute braved below-freezing temperatures to carry pro-science signs and bang drums across the icy Antarctic landscape. In one photo, they held a sign with a quote from Marie Curie, the Nobel Prize-winning chemist. It read, "Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more so that we may fear less." WATCH: Penguin gets custom wetsuit to keep her warm
Scientists discover a new kind of light in the sky and call it ‘Steve’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The phenomenon was spotted by the University of Calgary’s Eric Donovan, who noticed it in photographs that had been posted on a Facebook page. The Facebook group had described it as a proton arc, but Professor Donovan knew proton auroras aren’t visible.