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Tour the International Space Station With Google Street View
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A gravity-free Google Street View has landed…on the International Space Station (ISS). The search engine on Thursday announced that anyone can now see inside the ISS using its popular map tool, Street View. Launched in 2007, the technology feature in Google Maps and Google Earth provides 360-degree views from different positions—previously limited to streets around the world.
Evolution: Brains and Grandchildren Drove Emergence of Menopause in Women
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Why this is has long baffled scientists, with many evolutionary theories as to why women go through menopause emerging over the years. One of the most prominent theories is known as the grandmother hypothesis. This says that as the cost of reproduction increases with age, resources become better spent in helping current offspring to reproduce themselves—to help rear grandchildren, for example.
What Would You Say To An Extraterrestrial?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have a plan for responding to signals from a planet outside our solar system: Keep calm and send dog videos.
We still have no idea why humans speak over 7,000 languages
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The thatched roof held back the sun’s rays, but it could not keep the tropical heat at bay. As everyone at the research workshop headed outside for a break, small groups splintered off to gather in the shade of coconut trees and enjoy a breeze. I wandered from group to group, joining in the discussions.…
Researchers in Cambodia find nest of rare riverine bird
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — Wildlife researchers in Cambodia have found a breeding location for the masked finfoot, one of the world's most endangered birds, raising hopes of its continuing survival.
This mud volcano has been erupting for more than a decade — and scientists are still puzzled about the cause
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The world’s most destructive mud volcano was born near the town of Sidoarjo, on the island of Java, Indonesia, just over 11 years ago – and to this day it has not stopped erupting. The mud volcano known as Lusi started on May 29, 2006, and at its peak disgorged a staggering 180,000 cubic metres of mud every day, burying villages in mud up to 40 metres thick. The worst event of its kind in recorded history, the eruption took 13 lives and destroyed the homes of 60,000 people.
Neil Armstrong's moon bag sells for $1.8 million at auction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Taylor Harris NEW YORK (Reuters) - A bag used by U.S. astronaut Neil Armstrong to bring the first samples of moon dust back to Earth was sold to an anonymous bidder for $1.8 million at an auction in New York on Thursday marking the 48th anniversary of the first moon landing. The bag, which for years sat unidentified in a box at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, was bought by a person who bid by telephone and did not wish to be named publicly, auctioneer Sotheby's said. Auctioneers had expected the bag to fetch between $2 million and $4 million.
The Battle for the Moon Begins
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An increasing number of nations and companies are headed there. One group says the UN needs to start making more rules before it’s too late.
SpaceX plans to relaunch a rocket just 24 hours after it lands
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX, the pioneering force behind reusable rocket technology, has already proven to the world that single-use rockets will one day be a thing of the past, but the company clearly isn't done honing its recovery and refurbishing techniques. Head man, and possible future super hero sent back in time to usher humanity into a new technological golden age, Elon Musk revealed his company's plans for the immediate future of its first stage rocket reuse program. It seems that Musk has some seriously insane plans for shortening the turnaround between a rocket's launch recovery and its subsequent flights, and he wants the whole process to take less than 24 hours. Speaking at the ISS R&D event today, Musk spoke about SpaceX's targeted 24-hour turnaround time which he hopes to achieve as soon as 2018. He noted that the plans are already in place for making that epic feat a reality, and expanded on the notion that recovering the first stage of the rocket is really just the beginning. The fairing, which sits at the very top of the rocket and provides some aerodynamic stability while also offering protection of the payload as it launches into space, is a rather pricey piece of hardware. Coming in at between $5 million and $6 million, the component is potentially salvageable, and Musk revealed that SpaceX is getting closer than ever to landing and recovering the fairing for refurbishing as well. Likewise, the company plans on trying to recover the second stage of the rocket in certain circumstances as well, which would further reduce cost and speed up launch timelines.
USAF honored at 2017 Royal International Airshow Tattoo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fox Firepower: The US Air Force celebrated its 70th Birthday at the 2017 RIAT event, showing off a wide range of outstanding aircraft including the B-52 Stratofortress, B-2 bomber and the U-2 spy plane
Elon Musk clarifies that AI regulation should follow observation and insight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk made headlines over the weekend with comments calling for government controls around artificial intelligence, which he has said repeatedly he believes is an existential threat to humanity if left unchecked. Musk was at the International Space Station R&D conference today, and during a fireside chat explained more about his views on...
Congressman Asks NASA if There’s an Ancient Civilization on Mars. For Real
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Updated | A Republican congressman from California on Tuesday asked members of a NASA panel if there had been ancient civilizations on Mars. Addressing a NASA scientist testifying before the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, U.S. Representative Dana Rohrabacher said, “You have indicated that Mars was totally different thousands of years ago,” according to a video posted to YouTube. In his answer, Ken Farley, a project scientist on NASA’s Mars 2020 Rover mission team, corrected Rohrabacher by saying the evidence shows that Mars was different billions—not thousands—of years ago.
Abraham Lincoln mystery solved by enhanced tech
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers in the UK use enhanced 'N-Gram Tracing' to solve a longstanding mystery over a letter written during the Civil War
DeepMind’s founder says to build better computer brains, we need to look at our own
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a review published in the journal Neuron today, Hassabis and three co-authors argue that the field of AI needs to reconnect to the world of neuroscience, and that it’s only by finding out more about natural intelligence can we truly understand (and create) the artificial kind. The review takes a tour through the history and future of AI, and points out where collaboration with the field of neuroscience has led to new discoveries. AI researchers will be inspired by what they learn about natural intelligence, while the task of “distilling intelligence into an algorithmic construct [could] yield insights into some of the deepest and most enduring mysteries of the mind.” How’s that for win-win?
Did A Dwarf Planet Crash Into Mars?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Why does Mars look so weird? A dwarf planet may have crashed into it as it was forming, and threw everything out of whack.
World's plastic waste could bury Manhattan 2 miles deep
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — Industry has made more than 9.1 billion tons of plastic since 1950 and there's enough left over to bury Manhattan under more than two miles of trash, according to a new cradle-to-grave global study.
Tomb Of King Tutankhamun’s Wife’s Likely Discovered, Archaeologists Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists say that the tomb of King Tutankhamun’s wife, Ankhesenamun, is likely to have been finally discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings.
Stop Talking About Your Generation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Of course millennials and boomers are different. Maybe we should consider the economic conditions they grew up in to see why.
What is Virgin Galactic and how much will it cost to travel to space? 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Virgin Galactic is the world’s first commercial spaceline company - but when will its first spaceflight be and how much will it cost to travel to space?  What is Virgin Galactic? Today's SpaceShipTwo test flight is complete! For the first time, we tested VSS Unity's unique re-entry system, called 'the feather,' in flight. The test was a success, and both vehicles and all crew are now safely back on terra firma. We'll have more images and video soon. You can read more at https://virg.in/1feather A post shared by Virgin Galactic (@virgingalactic) on May 1, 2017 at 12:02pm PDT Commercial spaceline Virgin Galactic is funded by Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Group, its aim is to send incredibly rich tourists into space within the next few years. Founded in 2004, the team includes rocket scientists, engineers and designers from around the world. What can Virgin Galactic passengers expect? Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson  Credit: Bloomberg  Virgin Galactic passengers will depart from Spaceport America, the world’s first purpose-built commercial spaceport. It was opened in New Mexico in 2011. WhiteKnightTwo, a jet-powered cargo aircraft, will climb to an altitude of 50,000 feet before releasing SpaceShipTwo, a spacecraft that will bring passengers on the final part of the journey. SpaceShipTwo will travel at approximately three and a half times the speed of sound, propelling the vehicle and passengers to space. We're gearing up for a #SpaceShipTwo flight test. It's always an in interdisciplinary effort, drawing on the talents of our pilots, engineers, mission controllers, space wrenches, and more. Preparation for the test is proceeding well, and SpaceShipTwo and WhiteKnightTwo are now headed out to the end of runway. A post shared by Virgin Galactic (@virgingalactic) on Feb 24, 2017 at 9:07am PST “After the rocket motor has fired for around a minute, the pilots will safely shut it down,” Virgin Galactic say. “Having just experienced a thrilling, dynamic rocket ride, the dramatic transition to silence and to true weightlessness will be a profound moment for our astronauts as they coast upwards towards space.” Richard Branson unveils new Virgin Galactic passenger spaceship 00:55 The amateur astronauts will then leave their seats to experience weightlessness. The whole experience is expected to last two hours. The spacecraft is expected to carry six passengers and two pilots. Once SpaceShip Two has reentered the earth’s atmosphere, the vehicle’s wings will be returned to their normal configuration, and the spaceship will glide back to the original runway.  How high will Virgin Galactic go? A WhiteKnightTwo flight is a good way to start the morning (and for some people at the far right of the photo, an interesting sight during a morning yoga session!). Flight number 204 is now in the books. A post shared by Virgin Galactic (@virgingalactic) on May 19, 2016 at 11:39am PDT Virgin Galactic will carry passengers to an altitude of 110km (68 miles) to the edge of space. That’s over the Karman line (an altitude of 100km), which represents the boundary between the earth’s atmosphere and outer space. When will the first commercial spaceflight be? Virgin Galactic Credit: PA Branson initially hoped that Virgin Galactic would carry tourists into space by 2011, but now refuses to give a definitive launch date. “Well we stopped giving dates,” he told The Telegraph in April. “But I think I’d be very disappointed if we’re not into space with a test flight by the end of the year and I’m not into space myself next year and the programme isn’t well underway by the end of next year.” Accidents A crash in 2014  Credit: Reuters  Three workers died in an explosion during testing of SpaceShipTwo in 2007. In 2014, a Virgin Galactic spaceship exploded in mid-air, killing a test pilot and seriously injuring another. Co-pilot Michael Alsbury died after inadvertently unlocking the spaceship’s braking mechanism 14 seconds too early during a test flight causing catastrophic structural failure, US safety investigators ruled. Test flights of SpaceShipTwo resumed in 2016. How much will it cost to travel to space? Stephen Hawking plans Virgin Galactic space trip 00:27 A lot, at least initially. A seat on a Virgin Galactic flight will cost you $250,000, which has to be paid up-front as a deposit. More than 700 people have signed up so far, including celebrities Brad Pitt, Ashton Kutcher, Angelina Jolie, Tom Hanks and Paris Hilton, reports say. At a glance | Virgin Galactic
Total Solar Eclipse 2017: Bill Nye on How, When, Where and Why to Watch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A total solar eclipse is coming to a sky near you for just one performance this August, and Bill Nye wants everyone to get out and see it. Nye, the CEO of the Planetary Society, is a mechanical engineer who became a popular television host and educator as “the Science Guy” in the 1990s. Newsweek spoke to Nye about his plans and tips for the momentous celestial event he believes will blow viewers’ minds and change them forever.
Indian Poultry Farms Are Breeding Drug
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Indian poultry farms aren’t just rearing chickens — they’re also breeding germs capable of thwarting all but the most potent antibiotics, researchers found.
Even more historic NASA flight footage is up on YouTube
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in California has a trove of old flight footage — like 1940s old.  The videos have always been available but hidden away on the Edwards, California-based center's website. More recently a lot more of the historic videos, like test flights from the 1970s and into the '90s and early 2000s, have been moved onto YouTube. SEE ALSO: Two NASA astronauts just completed a last-minute spacewalk outside the Space Station In just the past few days, the center's YouTube page has been filling up fast. Armstrong's social media manager Rebecca Richardson said in a phone call Wednesday that older legacy videos are being migrated to YouTube in a big push to put the archival footage on a more searchable and accessible platform. So far just over 300 videos have been migrated over since earlier this year. The center, which was previously named Dryden before changing to Armstrong in 2014, has 500 videos total that it eventually will house on its YouTube page and the NASA website.  Richardson said some videos are really short with just a few seconds of footage and pretty old so the quality isn't perfect. But that makes it almost better.  "We have a following who love the older content," she said. Like these clips from 1947 showing the initial flight of the D-558-I aircraft. Or this 1962 home video of an M2-F1 "flying bathtub" model filmed by now-deceased NASA engineer Dale Reed. Here's a test drop of the plane which led to wingless flying vehicles that helped with Space Shuttles research. Other popular videos show NASA's X-planes, like the one from the late 1950s at the top of this page showing the X-1, flight tests, and anything related to life-saving technology, Richardson said. Here's a 1976 landing test of the Space Shuttle Enterprise, which never flew in space. "Anybody that’s interested in airplanes is fascinated by all of it," she said. Take a look through the historic playlists and watch history take off. WATCH: This is the proper way of eating pudding in space
MH370 search reveals hidden undersea world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The painstaking search for missing flight MH370 has uncovered a previously unknown undersea world of volcanoes, deep valleys and soaring ridges, according to detailed maps released by Australia. Although no trace of the Malaysia Airlines plane was found during the search in the southern Indian Ocean -- the most expensive ever of its kind -- large volumes of data showing a detailed picture of the sea floor had to be collected to guide the probe. "It is estimated that only 10 to 15 percent of the world's oceans have been surveyed with the kind of technology used in the search for MH370," Geoscience Australia's environmental geoscience chief Stuart Minchin said late Wednesday.
Rare birth of endangered hairy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The population of one of the world's rarest species has been boosted with the birth of a northern hairy-nosed wombat joey, Australian wildlife officials said Wednesday. The joey emerged from its mother's pouch at the Richard Underwood Nature Refuge in Queensland state, which was established just eight years ago and is one of only two known colonies remaining. Queensland Environment Minister Steven Miles said wildlife officers had been closely observing the mother for the past 10 months.
Belgian doctors pin hope on large brain collection to treat diseases
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A psychiatric hospital in Belgium is home to one of the world's largest collections of human brains, which researchers say could hold the key to developing new treatments for diseases such as psychosis, schizophrenia and severe depression. The Duffel Psychiatric Hospital's more than 3,000 brains of diseased psychiatric patients had been part of an even larger brain collection started more than 40 years ago by British neuropathologist John Corsellis. The London hospital that stored the brains had run out of space and needed to find a new home, eventually agreeing last year to send them to the Duffel hospital in northern Belgium.
This Cave Holds a Spectacular Record of 5,000 Years of Tsunamis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Benjamin Horton remembers being in Southeast Asia just months after the devastating 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. “They were still dealing with a disaster,” he says. “The roads were in a terrible state.” But in those days, the formerly niche field of tsunami research had taken on new urgency. Horton, who studies sea levels at Rutgers University and Nanyang Technological University, was just one of dozens of researchers who came in search of answers: Had this happened before? Would it happen again?
Moon dust heading to auction after galactic court battle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — A bag containing traces of moon dust is heading to auction — surrounded by some fallout from a galactic court battle.
Fire racing near Yosemite park destroys dozens of structures
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MARIPOSA, Calif. (AP) — A surging wildfire raced through California mountains and foothills west of Yosemite National Park on Wednesday, forcing thousands to flee tiny, Gold Rush-era towns, destroying 29 structures and wafting a smoky haze over the park's landmark Half Dome rock face.
Elon Musk suggests SpaceX is scrapping its plans to land Dragon capsules on Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Today, Elon Musk suggested that SpaceX will abandon its plans to land the company’s Dragon capsule on Mars — a mission the company had been aiming to do as early as 2020. SpaceX will not fully develop the landing technique it was going to use to land the Dragon on Mars. Known as the Red Dragon mission, the capsule was meant to lower itself to solid ground using engines embedded in its hull, and then touch down gently on landing legs in a method known as propulsive landing.
California farm region plagued by dirty air looks to Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — California's vast San Joaquin Valley, the country's most productive farming region, is engulfed by some of the nation's dirtiest skies, forcing the state's largest air district to spend more than $40 billion in the past quarter-century to enforce hundreds of stringent pollution rules.
Aborigines in Australia longer than previously thought: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Aboriginal people have been in Australia for at least 65,000 years, longer than previously thought, roaming the area alongside giant megafauna, scientists said in a finding that sheds fresh light on when modern humans left Africa. Australian Aborigines are believed to be custodians of the oldest continuous culture on the planet, but when they first arrived has been a contested issue. A key site in the debate is Madjedbebe, a remote rock shelter in northern Australia's Kakadu region that is the oldest-known human occupation area in the country.
'Salvation': Why the EPs call the asteroid drama a 'science fact' show
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Salvation: Why the EPs call it a science fact show
'Cute' Japanese Drone Sends Back Photos From Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The one-of-its-kind drone — Int-Ball — has been designed to take photographs and videos of astronauts while they are in the space.
Distant Kuiper Belt Object Observed By New Horizons NASA Team In Argentina
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA researchers with the New Horizons team captured new images of a Kuiper Belt object over the weekend.
'Peculiar' radio signals emerge from nearby star
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some very "peculiar signals" have been noticed coming from a star just 11 light-years away, scientists in Puerto Rico say. The mystery has gripped the internet as speculation mounts about the potential for a discovery of alien life on the red dwarf star known as Ross 128 -- despite the best attempts of astronomers to put such rumors to rest. "In case you are wondering, the recurrent aliens hypothesis is at the bottom of many other better explanations," said a blog post by Abel Mendez, director of the Planetary Habitability Laboratory at the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo.
I’m a Great CEO and I'm Not a Loud Powerhouse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
I’m a Great CEO and I'm Not a Loud Powerhouse
Rosie O’Donnell under fire for promoting Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rosie O’Donnell tweeted a link to an online Trump-killing game, ‘Push Trump Off a Cliff Again,’ sparking backlash
How the Trump administration boosts internet security
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The former Executive Director of the President's Commission on Enhancing National Cybersecurity Kiersten Todt speaks out on 'Special Report'
'Couldn't even see the sun': Fire races near Yosemite park
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A surging wildfire raced through California mountains and foothills west of Yosemite National Park on Wednesday, forcing thousands to flee tiny, Gold Rush-era towns and wafting smoky haze over the park's ...
MH370 search data unveils fishing hot spots, ancient geological movements
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Tom Westbrook and Jonathan Barrett SYDNEY (Reuters) - Detailed sea-floor maps made during the unsuccessful search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, released by Australia on Wednesday, could help increase the knowledge of rich fisheries and the prehistoric movement of the earth's southern continents. High-priced fish such as tuna, toothfish, orange roughy, alfonsino and trevally are known to gather near the seamounts, where plankton swirl in the currents.
First Humans in Australia Arrived Thousands of Years Earlier Than We Thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The first humans arrived in Australia up to 15,000 years earlier than previously thought, scientists have announced. During excavations of the Madjedbebe rock shelter in northern Australia, researchers have found thousands of artefacts, including stone tools, grinding stones and hatchets, showing humans must have been at the site at least 65,000 years ago. The findings, published in Nature, have major implications for our understanding of early human migration beyond Asia, why Australia’s megafauna went extinct, and, potentially, if these early humans interacted with Homo floresiensis, the mystery “hobbit-like” species found only on the Indonesian island of Flores.
Risky business for fish in oil
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Coral reef fish are more likely to engage in risky behaviour and be unable to identify predators if they swim in waters contaminated with petroleum-based oil, researchers said. "The fish were unable to identify friend from foe and they stopped travelling in groups," study co-author Jodie Rummer from Australia's James Cook University's ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies said. The research, which the scientists described as the first of its kind, focused on larvae -- the juvenile stage when fish are especially vulnerable -- and on six fish species from Australia's Great Barrier Reef.
Fishermen find an 18
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lightning struck twice for the crew of the trawler ship Cú na Mara. On Tuesday, they caught their second rare giant squid in the waters off the Dingle coast in Ireland, two months after their first. SEE ALSO: Researchers found the body of a 25-foot-long shark, and it's grim but strangely beautiful The Cú na Mara had been trawling the area where they had found their first giant squid when they landed their surprise second. The sea monster was 18 feet from top to longest tentacle— 2 feet shorter than the first squid the crew caught in May.  "When we opened the net we couldn't believe it, that it was another one," said the captain of the Cú na Mara, Patrick Flannery, in an interview with RTE. "The lads were very excited. What are the chances of two in the one year?" Another Giant Squid landed in Dingle. Only 7th recorded in Ireland in 350 years. Amazingly 4 have been caught by Flannery family! @rtenews pic.twitter.com/1gWBYZr045 — Seán Mac an tSíthigh (@Buailtin) July 18, 2017 The crew's giant squid landing in May was the first in Dingle in 22 years. "Only seven have been recorded [in Dingle] since records began almost 350 years ago," said Marine Biologist Dr. Kevin Flannery. "The very first giant squid recorded in Ireland was also landed in Dingle, when fishermen brought one ashore in 1673." Legends told of a sea creature that sunk ships and drowned fishermen.Image: wikimedia commons/Mary Evans Picture Library/AlamyThe elusive giant squid has been the subject of sea lore throughout history. The ancient Norse legend of a sea monster called the Kraken told of a tentacled beast with the power to capsize ships and drag fishermen to their water graves. It's now widely accepted that the tales originated from sightings of humongous giant squids. Like many myths, the gory details of these accounts are likely to be untrue. However, it's difficult to know how these giant sea monsters live and behave. Sightings of this deep-ocean dwelling animal are extremely rare. The largest giant squid on record was 59 feet in length and weighed almost a ton.  The Cú na Mara's latest catch is an exciting achievement as each giant squid landing presents a scientists with the opportunity to learn more about this mysterious creature of the deep. WATCH: Algae emitting eerie blue glow makes this beach look otherworldy
You Might Be Able to Outrun a T. Rex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New research suggests the fearsome predator couldn't run much faster than an average human.
Boy finds 1.2 million
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In November 2016, Jude Sparks, now 10, was on an outing with his family near their New Mexico home when he tripped over what he thought was a cow skull. Now, researchers at New Mexico State University are preserving the discovery, which was identified as a Stegomastodon -- a mastodon-like or elephant-like animal. "I imagined through my own mind of being 9 years old and finding something like that and how incredible it would be," dad Kyle Sparks.
New Horizons' Pluto flyover highlighted in a fresh new video from NASA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A team of scientists from the New Horizons mission have released detailed maps of Pluto and its moon, Charon, along with new digitally rendered videos created using topographical data collected during the spacecraft's flyovers.
Air Force secretary hints at military space applications for Stratolaunch super
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stratolaunch, the six-year-old space venture backed by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, says it’ll use the world’s biggest airplane to launch small satellites into orbit – but what kind of satellites? The company’s executives have always said the Pentagon could be a payload customer, but when Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson visited Stratolaunch’s super-hangar at the Mojave Air and Space Port in California on Monday, it threw a spotlight on how important military contracts could be. The twin-fuselage Stratolaunch plane, nicknamed Roc, is designed to carry as much as 550,000 pounds of payload up to an altitude of about 30,000 feet… Read More
I’m a Great CEO and I’m Not a Loud Powerhouse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
My STEM education gave me a different approach.
Helicopter or lawnmower? Modern parenting styles can get in the way of raising well
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With the pressure on parents rising, we could all learn something from the concept of 'good enough parenting' proposed half a century ago.
Elon Musk: We need a lunar base to help 'fire up' the pub...
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Speaking at the International Space Station Research and Development Conference on Wednesday, Tesla and SpaceX Founder Elon Musk said we need to build a base on the moon to help support missions to Mars and to spur public support for space exploration.