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Five frozen, gutted tigers found in Vietnam
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Five frozen tigers have been discovered in a Vietnamese man's freezer with their organs removed, according to official reports Tuesday, in a country seen as a global hub for the illegal wildlife trade. Tiger organs and bones are used for medicinal purposes in the communist country, where a thriving local market drives the illegal sale of animal parts including ivory and rhino horn. The five tigers were discovered in the central province of Nghe An on Monday, according to a report from the official provincial newspaper.
Scientists find how using 'satnav' switches off parts of brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - If you have long feared that using a "satnav" navigation system to get to your destination is making you worse at finding the way alone, research now suggests you may be right. Scientists studying what satnavs do to the brain have found that people using them effectively switch off parts of the brain that would otherwise be utilized to simulate different routes and boost navigational skills. Publishing the findings in the journal Nature Communications on Tuesday, the researchers said that when volunteers in an experiment navigated manually, their hippocampus and prefrontal cortex brain regions had spikes of activity.
Tomb of Jesus reopens after original burial place uncovered for the first time in centuries
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Church of the Holy Sepulchre has announced the completion of its extensive renovations to the tomb of Jesus. The religious site in Jerusalem has been under reconstruction since May 2016 but work finally came to an end on 20 March. The project was carried out by a team of Greek specialists who reconstructed the Edicule — the protective structure over the shelf on which the body of Christ is said to have rested following his crucifixtion.
Latest missile test shows North Korea likely developing an ICBM that can hit the US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korea has likely mastered the technology to power the different stages of an intercontinental ballistic missile and may show it off soon, analysts say, but is likely still a long way from being able to hit the mainland United States. North Korean state media announced its latest rocket-engine test on Sunday, saying it would help North Korea achieve world-class satellite-launch capability, indicating a new type of rocket engine for an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM). The test showed "meaningful" progress, a spokesman for South Korea's Defence Ministry said on Monday, with the firing of a main engine and four auxiliary engines as part of the development of a new rocket booster.
Twisting arms for Obamacare repeal, Trump warns Republicans the voters are watching
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
With a crucial vote on the GOP’s Obamacare replacement looming, President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell warned that Republican legislators who don’t support the bill would face electoral consequences. “I honestly think many of you will lose your seats in 2018 if you don’t get this done,” said Trump after a Tuesday meeting with Republican legislators, according to multiple sources in the room.
Gorsuch refuses to comment on legality of religious litmus test for entry to U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Asked whether it would be legal to apply a religious litmus test to people entering the United States, Judge Neil Gorsuch said Tuesday that he was unable to comment since courts are currently litigating that issue. “That’s an issue that’s currently being litigated actively, as you know,” Gorsuch responded to Sen. Pat Leahy, D-Vt., declining to answer while taking questions during the Supreme Court nominee’s second day of Senate hearings. Gorsuch was referring to President Trump’s travel ban, which critics say is a scaled-back version of his campaign promise to temporarily bar all Muslims from entering the U.S.
Cops: Cocaine trafficker lived in public housing for elderly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
TAUNTON, Mass. (AP) — A 74-year-old Massachusetts man living in public housing for the elderly faces drug trafficking charges after police say they found cocaine valued at about $150,000 in his unit.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
In Gorsuch hearings, questions of religious liberty and the law
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Of all the people to speak on the first day of what promises to be a grueling week of hearings, Judge Neil Gorsuch – the man whose confirmation to the US Supreme Court is being deliberated – was notably concise. “In my childhood it was God and Byron White,” he said, referencing the former Supreme Court justice whom he clerked for. Indeed, “God and Byron White” could be a succinct description for the lines of inquiry Republicans and Democrats can be expected to take when the Senate Judiciary Committee begins questioning Judge Gorsuch Tuesday. As the minority, Democrats can't boycott him the way Senate Republicans did with Judge Merrick Garland, nominated by former President Obama.
Google is making it easier to plan your night in or out
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Google has updated its Android and iOS apps to make it easier to find what you want as fast as possible. Google (GOOG, GOOGL) wants to make searching the web on your smartphone a bit easier with new shortcuts for its Android, iOS and web apps. The shortcuts, which will appear just below the search bar in the Google app, will provide users with quick access to things like the weather, entertainment, places to eat and drink and sporting events in your area.
New Zealand parrot has 'infectious laugh'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers have found that New Zealand's kea parrot has the avian equivalent of an infectious laugh -- a call that when heard prompts others to drop everything and have some fun. Kea live in alpine areas and are renowned in New Zealand for being intelligent and mischievous, often called "the clown of the mountain". Austrian researcher Raoul Schwing found the kea has a "play call" distinct from its other vocalisations, which caused other parrots to start playing spontaneously.
Tiny predator is Top Gun of the insect world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A tiny fly, the size of a grain of rice, could be the Top Gun of the insect world after Cambridge scientists identified its remarkable ability to detect and intercept its prey mid-air, as Stuart McDill reports.
Rocket launch startup Rocket Lab snags $75 million new funding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Privately owned Rocket Lab, a Los Angeles- and New Zealand-based startup poised to begin small satellite launch services this year, has closed a Series D financing round of $75 million, company officials said on Tuesday. Data Collective, a venture capital fund based in San Francisco, led the round, with additional investment from Promus Ventures, an undisclosed investor, and existing investors Bessemer Venture Partners, Khosla Ventures and K1W1, said Rocket Lab founder and chief executive Peter Beck.
Watch live: Gorsuch Supreme Court confirmation hearings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Day two of confirmation hearings for Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, get under way on Tuesday morning, when members of the Senate Judiciary Committee begin questioning the federal judge from Colorado. Yahoo News Senior National Affairs Reporter Liz Goodwin is in Washington, D.C., covering the hearings on Capitol Hill. (See her recap of day one here.) Watch all of the testimony live beginning at 9:30 a.m. ET in the player above, and follow all of Yahoo News’ instant analysis in the blog below.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
B.R.A.I.N. Biotechnology Research And Information Network AG: BRAIN AG expands patent protection for Aurase(R) enzyme for the treatment of chronic wou
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DGAP-News: B.R.A.I.N. Biotechnology Research And Information Network AG / Key word(s): Patent21.03.2017 / 08:30 The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.
Bill Gates Has Started a New Crusade to Save the World
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bill Gates Has Started a New Crusade to Save the World
‘Nanoweapons’ the size of insects pose a bigger threat than nuclear missiles, expert warns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tiny insect-sized ‘nanoweapons’ currently under development by the world’s superpowers could pose a bigger threat than nuclear weapons – and could even wipe out the human race. Physicist Louis del Monte claims that superpowers are already secretly working on such weapons – and there’s a one in 20 chance they’ll wipe out the human race by 2100. Perhaps more alarmingly, terrorists may be able to get their hands on insect-sized robots – which could be used to poison food and water supplies.
China approves fewer GMO crop imports, hampering trade: U.S. industry group
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Dominique Patton BEIJING (Reuters) - China is approving fewer new biotech crops for import than before, hampering the launch of new products globally and hurting trade, an American industry group said on Tuesday. China does not permit the planting of any genetically modified varieties of staple food crops amid deep-seated consumer opposition. The number of annual approvals has fallen to just one last year, down from three in previous years, according to China's agriculture ministry.
In rural Colorado, the only hospital for miles worries about its future under ACA repeal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
DELTA, Colo. — Delta County Memorial Hospital has been around for as long as Ed Sisson can remember. When he was a kid, it was a small, single-story building a few streets off the main downtown strip, with a handful of doctors and a couple of dozen beds, a godsend for patients unable to make the drive of roughly an hour from here to Grand Junction, the largest nearby city.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
B.R.A.I.N. Biotechnology Research And Information Network AG: BRAIN AG expands patent protection for Aurase(R) enzyme for the treatment of chronic wou
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DGAP-News: B.R.A.I.N. Biotechnology Research And Information Network AG / Key word(s): Patent21.03.2017 / 08:30 The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.
Stephen Hawking is going into space thanks to Richard Branson
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stephen Hawking has been studying, theorizing, pondering, and writing about the universe and everything that makes it tick for decades upon decades, and now he'll finally get his chance to head into the great unknown for himself. Hawking just revealed that he's booked a flight on Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic, thanks to the latter's offer to help the renowned physicist and cosmologist make his dream of spaceflight a reality. "My three children have brought me great joy, and I can tell you what will make me happy: to travel in space," Hawking said in an interview on Good Morning Britain. "I have already completed a zero-gravity flight which allowed me to float, weightless. But my ultimate ambition is to fly into space. I thought no one would take me, but Richard Branson has offered me a seat on Virgin Galactic and I said yes immediately." Neither Hawking nor Branson have given specifics about the plan to get the researcher, who suffers from a form of ALS, into space, but as Virgin Galactic has yet to set its plan of regular commercial flights in motion, it could be a while. The company's SpaceShipTwo craft is designed to give passengers a taste of real spaceflight without the hassle of becoming a NASA astronaut. The ship is launched from a carrier plane at altitude, cruises out of the planet's atmosphere where it hangs out for a few minutes as passengers enjoy the view and the feeling of weightlessness, and then descends back to Earth where it lands much like an airliner.
Croc horror: Love lost after Aussie teen reptile stunt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a bid to woo Sophie Paterson, Lee de Paauw jumped into Johnstone River at Innisfail in Queensland state early Sunday morning. De Paauw, 18, was lucky to escape with only two broken bones and stitches after the reptile released its grip when he landed punches on its head. Despite the brazen act, Paterson said she would visit de Paauw if work demands allowed, but she added that there were no plans for the two to date, telling reporters he was "too young for me".
North Korea engine test may be prelude to partial ICBM flight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Ju-min Park SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korea has likely mastered the technology to power the different stages of an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) and may show it off soon, analysts say, but it is likely still a long way from being able to hit the mainland United States. North Korean state media announced its latest rocket-engine test on Sunday, saying it would help North Korea achieve world-class satellite-launch capability, indicating a new type of rocket engine that could be compatible with an ICBM. The test showed "meaningful" progress, a spokesman for South Korea's Defence Ministry said on Monday, with the firing of a main engine and four auxiliary engines as part of the development of a new rocket booster.
Good luck coins prove fatal for Thai "piggy bank" turtle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A 25-year-old Thai sea turtle died from blood poisoning on Tuesday, never recovering from an operation to remove 915 coins from her stomach, thrown into her pool for good luck, veterinarians said. The green turtle named Omsin, "piggy bank" in Thai, underwent a seven-hour-long operation this month to remove 5 kg (11 lb) of coins which she had mistaken for food. "Her cause of death is blood poisoning," one of the vets told reporters.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
In day of testimony, 'Russia problem' deepens for Trump White House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Russia is a serious problem the White House can’t just tweet away. If nothing else, the Kremlin is probably pleased with its effort to sow discord and division in US politics, agreed FBI Director James Comey and National Security Agency Director Adm. Mike Rogers at the House Intelligence Committee hearing. “Absent some change in the dynamic, this is not likely to stop,” said Adm. Rogers of Russia’s multi-pronged effort to influence American elections.
Bone surgery for El Salvador's last male jaguar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Vets in El Salvador's zoo carried out an operation Monday to clean up a bone infection in the country's last male jaguar, an 18-year-old named Greco. The head of the zoological park in San Salvador, Virna Ortiz, said the operation to clean the leg's marrow, followed by chemotherapy, could only slow the infection but not cure the animal. The park's biologist, Raul Miranda, said Greco and his female companion Flacucha were star attractions for visitors.
Jeff Bezos does a deep dive into bearings in Blue Origin’s BE
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What’s the difference between ball bearings and hydrostatic bearings? You should have more of an inkling after checking out Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos’ latest update on the development of Blue Origin’s BE-4 rocket engine. The engine is undergoing testing for use not only on the New Glenn rocket that Bezos’ space venture is planning, but also on United Launch Alliance’s next-generation Vulcan rocket. The BE-4 is designed to provide 550,000 pounds of thrust, propelled by liquid oxygen and liquefied natural gas. Bezos says that kind of thrust should be enough to send a payload on the first leg of a trip… Read More
China's demand for medicine fuels African donkey slaughter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Under a cloudless sky in South Africa's northwestern farming region, donkeys still amble along muddy paths, pausing to nibble on grass, oblivious to the threat from a demand for Chinese medicine. The gelatin found in the animals' skin has made them a target, leading to a growing wave of donkey slaughtering in several African countries, as gangs seek to fuel a lucrative, and in South Africa illegal, trade. Around Mogosani village, in South Africa's North West province, residents say syndicates catch the animals in grazing fields and pens.
Who's happy, who's not: Norway tops list, US falls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you want to pursue happiness, grab a winter coat. A new report shows Norway is the happiest country on Earth, Americans are getting sadder, and it takes more than just money to be happy. What makes ...
'You know there's crocs there' says teen bitten after jumping in river
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
(Reuters) - An Australian teenager who was bitten by a crocodile when he jumped into a river in northern Queensland on a dare is now recovering in hospital and looking forward to a date with the British backpacker he was trying to impress. Lee De Paauw, 18, had met Sophie Paterson while drinking at with a group of friends into the early hours of Sunday morning at a backpackers' hostel in Innisfail in northern Queensland. According to local media, De Paauw told Paterson that backpackers were more likely to get eaten by crocodiles than Australians, and was ready to back up his words.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Find out How a 64
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
At an age when many women are enjoying their grandchildren, a woman in Spain has just given birth to healthy twins. Reportedly, the 64-year-old new mom conceived via in-vitro fertilization (IVF) during a trip to the U.S.
Marcia Gay Harden Shares Her Mother’s Struggle with Alzheimer’s
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Oscar winner Marcia Gay Harden plays Dr. Leanne Rorish on CBS’ “Code Black” and is one of the stars of the new "Fifty Shades of Grey" movie. “My mother has Alzheimer’s,” Marcia shares. Plastic Surgeon Dr. Andrew Ordon lost his mother to Alzheimer’s disease as well.
Are Your Kids Bad for Your Heart?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Children are believed to bring joy to our hearts – but do they also bring heart disease? ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork explains that a recent study of 500,000 individuals found that the number of children parents had affected their risk of coronary heart disease. Watch: Can Mammograms Detect Heart Disease?
Woman Addicted to Working out Exercises 8 Hours a Day!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Erin’s eating is disordered as well. “I don’t feel like I have an issue with food,“ Erin claims, but then she reveals that she had an eating disorder at age 15. “Food is also a problem,” Dr. Foster tells her.
Double Drunk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
In Livingston County, Michigan, a 36-year-old mother was reportedly stopped on a Sunday afternoon at 3 p.m. and charged with driving while intoxicated with her two small children in the car.
The Wonder Material That May Make Spray
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Imagine a future when solar cells can be sprayed or printed onto the windows of skyscrapers or atop sports utility vehicles -- and at prices potentially far cheaper than today’s silicon-based panels.
Scientists use big data to develop a ‘promising’ blood test for autism disorder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists at New York’s Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed an algorithm that can accurately predict whether a child has an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It's based on a blood sample.
How Aristotle Created the Computer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The history of computers is often told as a history of objects, from the abacus to the Babbage engine up through the code-breaking machines of World War II. In fact, it is better understood as a history of ideas, mainly ideas that emerged from mathematical logic, an obscure and cult-like discipline that first developed in the 19th century. Mathematical logic was pioneered by philosopher-mathematicians, most notably George Boole and Gottlob Frege, who were themselves inspired by Leibniz’s dream of a universal “concept language,” and the ancient logical system of Aristotle.
Mass Effect Andromeda
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
‘Mass Effect: Andromeda’ invites you to strap in for another space opera. “Space is big,” beloved author and interdimensional traveler Douglass Adams noted in his seminal towel-seller, “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.” “You just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big,” he wrote, hammering home the point that when it comes to bigness, even our new president has nothing on the universe. The team behind the blockbuster “Mass Effect” trilogy managed to capture the epic scope of the big unknown while keeping our eyes trained on the intimate interactions between characters, a space opera in its truest — and, in terms of video games, among its best — form.
White House defends President Trump’s golf habit and argues it’s different from Obama’s
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
During his daily briefing on Monday, White House press secretary Sean Spicer insisted that President Trump uses his time on the golf course productively. Spicer’s comments came in response to a question from Yahoo News noting that Trump has visited the golf course at least 10 times since taking office eight weeks ago, even though for years he criticized former President Barack Obama for golfing. Spicer said there were “two things” to point out in response to the question.
White House tries to shift discussion amid FBI director’s testimony
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
White House press secretary Sean Spicer, reacting to news from the first day of House Intelligence Committee hearings into the 2016 election, tried to steer reporters away from questions about possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian officials — and onto the administration’s preferred topic, news media leaks about intercepted conversations involving fired National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. Spicer’s customary daily press briefing took place in the afternoon as FBI Director James Comey and National Security Agency head Mike Rogers were still testifying. Earlier in the day, Comey said he had “no information” to support Trump’s claim that his predecessor, President Obama, wiretapped his campaign — a widely anticipated statement that did not lead to a retraction by the White House.
FBI probe of Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The FBI’s counterintelligence investigation into possible coordination between the Trump campaign and the Russian government, confirmed by FBI director James Comey in congressional testimony Monday, began as early as late July — just weeks after a former British spy briefed bureau agents about evidence he had collected about such ties, sources tell Yahoo News. Christopher Steele, a former British MI-6 intelligence officer who specialized in Russian operations, had been hired as an investigator by an opposition research firm (initially retained by Trump’s Republican primary opponents and later by supporters of Hillary Clinton). According to one of the sources, it was Steele who first alerted FBI agents on July 5 to evidence he had compiled that advisers to the Trump campaign and Kremlin officials were in contact about the 2016 election.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Pope Francis asks forgiveness for Church's 'sins and failings' during Rwandan genocide
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Pope Francis issued an apology to Rwanda on Monday for the "sins and failings of the Church" during the nation's 1994 genocide, saying he hoped the belated sentiment might help heal wounds as the country moves forward. During a meeting with Rwandan President Paul Kagame, Pope Francis for the first time blatantly acknowledged that Catholic officials have "succumbed to hatred and violence, betraying their own evangelical mission" during the genocide, according to a statement from the Vatican. Recommended: Think you know Africa?
Health Buzz: The New Nike VaporMax Running Sneaker
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Health got a first look at Nike's new VaporMax Running Sneaker, and we're spilling all the details. In this video, learn all about the running shoes that are certain to be the season's hottest running gear.
How to Fight Heartburn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Watch this video to learn the seven best foods to eat, which ones to avoid, and lifestyle changes you can make to help quell your heartburn.