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23 Summer Nail Designs to Start Perfecting Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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‘Expect more turbulence’: Five ways climate change will affect air travel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s an inconvenient truth that jetting off to foreign shores for your holidays directly contributes to the very climate change that, according to some scientists, could have a considerable impact on aviation. From longer flight times and more expensive plane tickets to an increase in turbulence, here are five ways a warming planet could impact air travel. 1. More delays and cancellations Last month, American Airlines was forced to cancel dozens of flights from Phoenix, Arizona because it was too hot. With the mercury rising to 120C, the airline claims some smaller jets were unable to leave the tarmac. Why? Well, hot air is thinner air, which makes it harder for some planes to generate enough lift. “When you get in excess of 118 or higher, you’re not able to take off or land,” Ross Feinstein, a spokesman for American Airlines, told the New York Times. Researchers warn disruptions like these are likely to become more common as the planet warms. Last month dozens of flights were cancelled due to high temperatures Credit: GETTY 2. Increased turbulence Bad news for nervous flyers. Incidents of severe air turbulence are likely to get worse as climate change takes hold, scientists claim. “When we think of global warming we’re usually thinking about the fact that it’s getting warmer at ground level, but in fact the temperatures are changing higher up in the atmosphere including where planes fly at 35,000ft,” said Dr Paul Williams, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Reading. “The atmospheric winds and temperatures up there are very strongly tied together and therefore the winds are changing in response to the temperature. As the climate changes the odds of encountering turbulence on your flight are increasing.” At a glance | Turbulence According to a study led by Dr Williams, transatlantic flights will be particularly prone to rising temperatures due to the effect climate change is having on the jet stream.    “Our study finds that the jet stream winds along the flight route between London and New York are getting stronger because of climate change – they are getting 15 per cent stronger in winter,” he said. “This increase in the jet stream winds is going to have an impact on people’s flights.” 3. Longer flights Climate change is not just making turbulence more common; according to 2015 study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, rising temperatures are also increasing flight times. Scientists linked a small increase in return journey times of long-haul flights with an increase in the variation of the jet stream, the high altitude air that flows from west to east. Just one minute’s extra flight time would mean jets spend approximately 300,000 hours longer per year burning roughly a billion additional gallons of jet fuel, they said, thus adding to the problem. Scientists claim climate change is already increasing flight times Credit: GETTY “Upper level wind circulation patterns are the major factor in influencing flight times,” said Kris Karnauskas, associate scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. “Longer flight times mean increased fuel consumption by airliners. The consequent additional input of CO2 into the atmosphere can feed back and amplify emerging changes in atmospheric circulation. “We already know that as you add CO2 to the atmosphere and the global mean temperature rises, the wind circulation changes as well – and in less obvious ways. “The airline industry keeps a close eye on the day-to-day weather patterns, but they don't seem to be concerned with cycles occurring over a year or longer.” 4. More expensive tickets Damage and delays caused by turbulence is estimated to costs US airlines alone between $150m ($113m) to $500m (£377m) annually. Therefore, if cases of severe air turbulence increase – and if planes have to burn more fuel to counter fiercer winds – passengers could reasonably expect to pay more to fly. Passengers aboard Etihad flight pray for their lives during severe turbulence 01:37 5. More weight restrictions There is little pilots can do to avoid lumps and bumps in the skies: clear air turbulence is not visible to the naked eye, isn’t detectable on radar and can’t be accurately forecasted. However, according to Steve Allright, a British Airways pilot, one thing they can do is cruise at higher altitudes, though there are restrictions preventing them from doing so. “Our endeavours to fly at an altitude that has been reported as smooth may be prevented by several constraints such another aircraft occupying that level, or the weight of the aircraft at that time,” he said. If planes need to fly higher to avoid turbulence then they would need to be lighter, which means the weight of the aircraft – and possibly passengers' luggage – could invite greater scrutiny. Best of | Travel Truths
U.S doctor: Treatment 'worth trying' in UK sick baby case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LONDON (AP) — An American doctor testifying in the case of a British couple seeking the right to take their critically ill infant to the United States for treatment said Thursday it was worth trying an experimental therapy that has only recently emerged.
California governor scrambles for support on climate deal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gov. Jerry Brown painted a bleak picture of a state ravaged by climate change and consumers facing higher costs for food and gas as he implored state lawmakers Thursday to grant his request to extend the ...
Quake hits off North Korea but experts rule out nuke test
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A magnitude 5.9 earthquake off North Korea early Thursday jolted watchers of the country's weapons development but experts say it was not caused by a nuclear test.
Trump says 'something could happen' on Paris climate accord
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
US President Donald Trump said Thursday that "something could happen" regarding the Paris climate accord following his decision to withdraw from the landmark global agreement to limit climate change. Trump was speaking at a joint news conference with his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron, who had earlier said he hoped to persuade the US leader to change his mind. "Something could happen with respect to the Paris accord," Trump said, six weeks after announcing that the United States would abandon the 2015 pact.
Senate Judiciary Committee to request Trump Jr.’s testimony
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Senate Judiciary Committee will request Donald Trump Jr.’s testimony on the heels of the bombshell discovery that he met with a Russian lawyer in 2016 in order to receive damaging information about his father’s campaign opponent, Hillary Clinton. Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, the chairman of the committee, told CNN on Thursday he and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., were preparing a letter to Trump Jr. inviting him to testify. Feinstein separately told CNN she would like Trump Jr. to appear before the committee as soon as next week.
Trump defends son’s talk with Russian lawyer: ‘Most people would have taken that meeting’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump said during a press conference in Paris that most people would have the campaign meeting his son attended with a Kremlin-linked lawyer.
Trump praises Xi, mum on Chinese dissident’s death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Thursday lavished praise on Chinese leader Xi Jinping, calling him “a friend,” “a terrific guy,” as well as a “good man” and “a great leader” who “loves China” — and saying nothing about the death of that country’s best known dissident, Liu Xiaobo.
Trump tells French president’s wife: ‘You’re in such good shape’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump complimented 64-year-old Brigitte Macron’s appearance following a welcome ceremony and tour of a museum near Elysee Palace, calling her “beautiful.”
Senate GOP pushes health care bill to the right and vows to vote next week
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Senate Republicans unveiled a new health care bill Thursday that incorporated concerns from conservative senators while giving little to moderate holdouts in their caucus concerned about Medicaid cuts. A few hours after meeting with the entire Republican caucus to debut the new bill, it looked unlikely that Senate Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has the votes to even begin to debate on the legislation early next week — his desired timeline.
Trump is back in Europe: Why the continent suddenly appeals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Who would have imagined that Donald Trump would take such a liking to Europe – and especially to France – so quickly in his presidency? Recommended: More than Bastille, Bonaparte, and brie: Test your knowledge of France with our quiz! Ostensibly, Mr. Trump and first lady Melania Trump are on a quick, barely 48-hour jaunt to the City of Lights because France’s new president, Emmanuel Macron, invited them to take part in the July 14 Bastille Day festivities – the pièce de résistance of which is a grand military parade down the Champs-Élysées.
Do the US and Russia need clearer rules of engagement?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Barely a week after Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin sat down in a bid to iron out their differences, the effort appears to be in tatters. The scandal engulfing Mr. Trump's administration, over its alleged election collusion with Russia, has grown so intense that leading Russian foreign-policy specialists say they fear the very principle of US-Russia rapprochement is in danger of being thrown out with the Trump bathwater. Three key deals that seemed to be struck at the meeting – to work out joint rules for security in cyberspace, a ceasefire in southern Syria, and a new US push to support the Minsk accords in Ukraine – are already floundering.
Using a taro patch in Hawaii, this couple teaches the islands’ values to youths
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Dean and Michele Wilhelm dreamed of creating a space that was restorative and healing for others, perhaps a relaxing retreat for couples or families. At the same time, the family began cultivating community through gatherings around traditional Hawaiian food. It became clear that taro farming was just the way for the couple to realize their dream.
MIT Media Lab uses machine learning to analyze how neighborhoods improve
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers at MIT and Harvard used a computer vision system to analyze more than a million pairs of streetscape photos taken seven years apart. These results were then used to test theories about urban revitalization. 
Revealed: the world's 'laziest' countries (and the UK does better than you might think)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study has revealed the world's laziest countries, with Britain, surprisingly, nowhere near the worst offenders.   In one of the biggest surveys of its kind, statistics collected from the smartphone data of over 700,000 people across the world recorded the amount of steps they took each day.  Britain, often referred to as the 'Fat Man of Europe' and predicted to have the highest obesity rates on the continent by 2025, posted an above-average 5,444 steps per day, which equates to a little less than three miles. That pales in comparison to Hong Kong, which was shown to have the world's most avid walkers, with the average citizen taking 6,880 steps daily. Britain was also beaten by China, Ukraine, Japan and Russia, who comprised the rest of the top five. However, 5,444 steps per day compares favourably to the 3,513 steps per day taken by people in Indonesia, which was shown to be the world's laziest country. Likewise America, where people take an average of 4,794 paces a day, according to the research undertaken by scientists at Stanford University in California.  In fact, Britain took significantly more than the global average of 4,961 steps, suggesting that prominent figures such as Madonna and Liam Fox have been wrong to accuse Brits of laziness in the past. Average daily steps Before we get too excited, we should note that the findings, published in the journal Nature, may not have much bearing on a country's obesity levels. Earlier this year a study showed that the 10,000-step target to tackle obesity was a myth. As each body had different needs, taking more steps each day could benefit some while having little effect on others.  Activity inequality – the gap between activity levels within a country – is believed to be a more important indicator of a nation's weight.  Tim Althoff, who worked on Stanford's project, told the BBC: "Sweden had one of the smallest gaps between activity rich and activity poor. It also had one of the lowest rates of obesity." America has one of the highest levels of activity inequality, with Britain also near the top.  The study analysed over 68 million days' of steps using a special app called Argus, which participants downloaded on their smartphones.  100 motivational quotes that will help you achieve (almost) anything  
How to Freeze the Decline of Earth's Endangered Species
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For the first time, scientists successfully cryopreserved fish embryos.
‘Sully’ Sullenberger wants to save the FAA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Then-US Airways Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger III prepares to testify before the House Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, Dec. 16, 2009. One of the things Congress must do in the next two months is pass legislation reauthorizing the existence of the Federal Aviation Administration, which regulates air traffic in the United States and is operating under a law that expires Sept. 30. Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger, who famously piloted US Airways Flight 1549 to an emergency landing in the Hudson River in 2009, has some serious concerns about how these bills would affect the safety of aviation and access to air travel.
Education Dept. official apologizes for comments on sexual assault
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Education Department’s top civil rights official has apologized for her characterization that 90 percent of campus sexual assault accusations investigated by the federal government under Title IX stem from drunken regret or the fallout of a broken romance.
Trump visits Macron in Paris
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After a formal welcome ceremony in Paris, President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron will hold a bilateral meeting later in the day.
Typo in Wendy's restaurant sign is divine comedy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Wendy's customers rarely have anything meatier to contemplate than whether to get a single, a double or perhaps try the chicken.
California bank robbery suspect found inside couch at home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
VENTURA, Calif. (AP) — Police say a bank robbery suspect was arrested after officers found him hiding inside a couch at his Southern California home.
Cambodia bans overseas exports of coastal sand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cambodia has outlawed sand exports from a coastal region where it has been primarily funnelled in huge quantities to Singapore, a move met with scepticism from activists who said previous bans on the destructive industry had failed to take root. Environmental groups have long accused Cambodia of running damaging and corrupt sand dredging operations along the southwest coast and the Mekong river. Most of the sand has been shipped to Singapore to fuel the wealthy city-state's rapid expansion -- a resource plunder that activists say has devastated local Cambodian communities and ecosystems.
Sully Sullenberger wants to save the FAA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
US Airways Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger III prepares to testify before the House Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, Dec. 16, 2009. One of the things Congress must do in the next two months is pass legislation reauthorizing the existence of the Federal Aviation Administration, which regulates air traffic in the United States and is operating under a law that expires Sept. 30. Captain Chesley Sullenberger, who famously piloted US Airways Flight 1549 to an emergency landing in the Hudson River in 2009, has some serious concerns about how these bills would affect the safety of aviation and access to air travel .
Kellyanne Conway sparks instant meme with signs mocking Russia firestorm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump’s special counselor appeared on Fox News to push back against critics who say Donald Trump Jr.’s meeting with a Kremlin-connected lawyer is proof the Trump campaign tried to collude with Russia. And she brought props to make her case.
Tinder kick
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
KENT, Ohio (AP) — Two Ohio college students are set for an epic Tinder date in Hawaii that's been three years in the making.
Man trapped in ATM slips notes to customers begging for help
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas (AP) — Police say a Texas man who became trapped inside an ATM slipped notes to customers via the receipt slot pleading for them to help him escape.
'Sixth extinction' of wildlife faster than feared: scientists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The sixth mass extinction of life on Earth is unfolding more quickly than feared, scientists have warned. More than 30 percent of animals with a backbone -- fish, birds, amphibians, reptiles and mammals -- are declining in both range and population, according to the first comprehensive analysis of these trends. "This is the case of a biological annihilation occurring globally," said Stanford professor Rodolfo Dirzo, co-author of a study published on Monday in the peer-reviewed US journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
Antarctica just shed a 1.1
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A 1.1-trillion-ton iceberg has calved off Antarctica, into the Southern Ocean. The block of ice...
Harry Reid, Nevada governor push bipartisan energy effort
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Two key players in the Republican and Democratic parties in Nevada are teaming up to host a clean-energy talk as the White House abandons a worldwide agreement to curb climate change and states are moving to the forefront of the fight.
Donald Trump Jr., Sub
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Donald Trump Jr. and his siblings appear never to have learned anything their dad couldn’t teach them in the warm safety of a penthouse.
No bull: Trooper answers bovine call but animal escapes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOILING SPRINGS, S.C. (AP) — A young bull remains on the loose despite a South Carolina Highway Patrol trooper's best efforts to corral him.
Aerospace guru explains why SpaceX reuses rockets – and it’s not to save money
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX's reusable rocket technology has been hailed as the future of space travel, and even the Russians have admitted that the company seems to be on to something, but when it comes to return on investment, one of SpaceX's founding team members says that launching the same first stages multiple times isn't actually where the company sees the boost to its bottom line.  Jim Cantrell is the CEO of Vector Space Systems. He's worked for NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab and was a founding member of both SpaceX and the Google Lunar X Prize-winning Moon Express. When it comes to the space industry, he's the kind of guy who you should listen to, and in a recent response to a Quora question about exactly how much money SpaceX is saving by reusing its Falcon rocket, Cantrell revealed the real reason (he believes) the company has pursued reusable hardware so vigorously isn't actually to save money, but to increase the number of launches the company is able to perform. "Reusability allows a marked increase in flight rates," Cantrell explained. "Reverse engineered financial models of SpaceX show that to reach a good strong positive cash flow, they need more than the traditional 10–12 launches per year that sized rocket has demonstrated. Reusability should easily double the amount of flights possible from a mere production and logistics standpoint." As far as the discounts being offered to clients whose devices and cargo is being launch on "flight-proven" rockets, "I am thinking that very few, if any, of the SpaceX Falcon 9 first stages are going to be re-used for more than 3 or so flights," Cantrell said.  "SpaceX will therefore not break even on the reusability portion of the equation."
No need to worry, just hundreds of thousands of fire ants forming living towers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have made a terrible, yet fascinating, discovery: fire ants can form into living towers to survive flooding.  SEE ALSO: Giant rafts of fire ants are somehow surviving South Carolina floods The insects have shown their survivor instincts before by forming rafts made up of thousands of ants, as seen above in footage captured in Texas last month.  These bugs are determined to survive — and it doesn't just stop at rafts. A study out Wednesday from researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology found fire ants cluster together to form towers of hundreds of thousands of ants more than 30 ants high, all to escape floods. The study, published in Royal Society Open Science , says the ants have evolved to link their bodies to keep colonies together. Sticky pads at the bottom of their feet help build the structures that protect the bugs from rain and water. In their lab, the researchers filmed ants building 26 different towers to see how they built the structures without getting crushed and to see what the towers looked like. They found that it took the ants about 25 minutes to build the towers that are wider at the bottom than at the top. It appears fire ants emulate structures like the Eiffel Tower in Paris and not your typical skyscraper. Fire ants form a tower in a Louisiana swamp.Image: royal society open science The New York Times put together a video about the ants' building skills, which grossed out and simultaneously impressed most of the internet. Fire ants are probably the only animal I hate a little bit. But I def respect them https://t.co/GoALfrqEvN — Lea Grie (@LeaGrie) July 12, 2017 I didn't think I'd make it thru this video cause shit like this makes me itch but my inner nerd wouldn't let me look away https://t.co/Zzt0QhOedI — Liv Yang (@LIVxWEST) July 12, 2017 This is honestly my worst nightmare. https://t.co/hh3EPVA0P1 — Katherine McCully (@skmccully) July 12, 2017  Sleep tight.  Video credit: Facebook/Ron Wooten via Storyful. WATCH: This prosthetic is an extra thumb you never knew you needed
Microsoft Creates New AI Lab to Take on Google's DeepMind
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Microsoft Corp. is setting up a new research lab focused on artificial intelligence with the goal of creating more general-purpose learning systems.
A 1.1
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One of the largest icebergs ever recorded has broken free of Antarctica. A crack in an Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf is responsible for calving the colossal new iceberg, which is roughly the area of Delaware state and the volume of Lake Michigan. Researchers noticed the distinctive rift in Antarctica's ice in 2010, which has grown rapidly since 2016.
Afghan girls will be allowed into US for robotics contest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials will allow a group of Afghan girls into the country to participate in an international robotics competition after President Donald Trump intervened, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders confirmed Wednesday, ending a saga that had sparked international backlash.
MIT researchers can now track AI’s decisions back to single neurons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
AI researchers had a breakthrough when they became able to practically replicate in their machines what we believe to be one of the most basic functions of the human brain: thought is generated by the combined activity of clusters of connected neurons. They’re now left in the same position as the neuroscientists who first proposed…
MIT Media Lab uses machine learning to quantify neighborhood change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers at MIT and Harvard used a computer vision system to analyze more than a million pairs of streetscape photos taken seven years apart. These results were then used to test theories about urban revitalization. 
Even some in White House are frustrated by the stonewalling on Donald Jr.’s meeting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Deputy WH press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders responds to questions about Donald Jr.’s meeting with a Russian lawyer with defensiveness and obfuscation.
Trump’s Paris trip is poised to give a clear win to France’s Macron
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump heads to Paris, France, to celebrate Bastille Day with French President Emmanuel Macron, who is poised to get a win out of the occasion.
How to Keep Your Liver Healthy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
You’re probably familiar with at least some of the factors that affect your heart—blood pressure and cholesterol, for example. But how much do you know about the state of your liver? It might som...
New Study Reveals The Diets That Help You Live Longer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Can eating certain healthy foods consistently help you to live longer? According to a new study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, the answer is yes. Researchers at the H...
Humans want equality, researchers found—as long as the rich stay rich and the poor stay poor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Human beings largely object to income inequality and are willing to correct injustice—unless, of course, it rattles their status quo. That’s the conclusion of a recent study looking at how far people would go to redistribute resources between the haves and have nots. Participants fiercely objected to “when winners become losers and losers become winners,”…
A frozen chunk of land that scientists thought would never thaw is melting — and the effects could be catastrophic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There seems to be an ever-growing list of ominous consequences of melting ice— especially...
Surge in crop circles caused by drone users, police say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A recent surge in crop circles is being caused by drone users who upload their aerial footage on social media, a police force has said as it announced a crackdown on farm vandals. Wiltshire Police issued the warning to the public yesterday following a spate of incidents in recent months, which officers said was being fuelled by scammers who generate publicity online in order to make money from advertising. So far this year the force has been alerted to 16 incidents, with a recent circle in Alton Barnes measuring 200 acres in diameter. However, the true number is thought to be far higher because many farmers do not come forward. Speaking to The Daily Telegraph, rural crime officer Marc Jackson said Wiltshire had been disproportionately affected due to its proximity to Stonehenge, adding that they were most commonly reported near to cultural heritage sites and busy main roads. Drone films crop circle formation in Russia 00:00 “They might seem harmless but they actually have a huge negative impact on the hardworking landowners and farmers whose crops are damaged,” he continued. “Creating a crop circle is criminal damage and an offence. Often immediately after a crop circle appears, people will arrive with a drone to photograph it. “Individuals using a drone in the immediate time after a crop circle, may be connected to the group who have created the circle. The footage is quickly circulated on social media to generate interest and on websites that charge for advertising space. “It has also been known for individuals to pose as part of a charity or as the landowner at the site of crop circles and attempt to take 'donations' from people viewing it.” Pc Jackson added that the damage results in a significant loss of revenue for farmers, who are also forced to deal with trespassers who later flock to view them. Echoing Wiltshire Police’s warning, the National Farmers’ Union said crop circles posed a “considerable nuisance” and members of the public should refrain from giving vandals the desired publicity. “Although there have been attempts to set up ‘honesty’ schemes to compensate farmers for their losses, these have largely been unsuccessful,” a spokeswoman added. “We would ask those responsible  to stop and for spectators not to come and look unless it is with the express permission of the landowner.”
White House launches preemptive strike on CBO, anticipating report on health care bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price, left, and Keith Hall, director of the Congressional Budget Office. Awaiting a new Congressional Budget Office score on the latest rewrite of the Republican health care bill expected next week, the White House has launched an attack on the nonpartisan group. It disputed projections that 22 million more Americans would be without health insurance by 2026, compared with keeping Obamacare.
In Mosul, the war is never over, even when the shooting stops
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As the battle for Mosul nears its end, the city is devastated and its wounds may never heal. Photojournalist Diego Ibarra Sánchez shares a look through his lens.
‘We were both drunk’: How a top civil rights official describes most Title IX campus rape accusations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A top civil rights official in the U.S. Department of Education said “90 percent” of campus sexual assault accusations have questionable validity.
Cop: Woman nabbed for drugs demands them back, is rearrested
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SALEM, N.H. (AP) — Authorities say a New Hampshire woman arrested for drug possession returned to the police station to demand the drugs be returned to her, and she was rearrested.