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As Dems rush to endorse single
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Soon enough, the Republican Party’s seven-year crusade to slay the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. Obamacare) will come to an end. On Thursday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell unveiled yet another revision of the GOP’s fraught repeal-and-replace legislation, and the controversial bill will either find the 50 Republican votes it needs to pass the upper chamber of Congress in the next few days — or it will perish once and for all.
Bishop offers daily prayer for commuters in 'Summer of Hell'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROCKVILLE CENTRE, N.Y. (AP) — A Roman Catholic bishop is offering prayers to New York-area commuters facing what's been billed as a "Summer of Hell."
No Whining: Pope's humor intact despite rough few weeks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis hasn't lost his sense of humor despite a rough few weeks of clamorous exits of top Vatican officials and some other negative headlines.
For foreign reporters, hints of 'House of Cards' in 'Trump Show'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Sean Spicer, Steve Bannon, Stephen Miller – all are players in the palace intrigue known as the Trump White House. Chinese TV viewers can’t get enough of the “Trump Show,” and coverage of America in general, says Ching-Yi Chang, White House correspondent for Shanghai Media Group.
Sprint doesn’t want you to buy your next phone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Sprint wants you to lease your next smartphone.
Do you find this image disgusting? Scientists might now know why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Do you feel disgust – or terror – when you see clusters of circular stuff – like the image we’ve helpfully included on this page? There’s no cure, but scientists may have just worked out why you find clusters of round things so alarming – which is known as ‘trypophobia’. The University of Kent researchers believe it’s linked to anxiety about parasites and infectious disease.
TMO’s Recent Developments in the Small Molecule Research Field
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On July 10, 2017, TMO announced its collaboration with SRI International to enable researchers to carry out more effective and efficient small molecule research and analysis.
Astronomers just discovered the smallest star ever
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We typically think of stars as colossal balls of fusion-driven fire that absolutely dwarf everything else, but researchers just made a discovery that offers a slightly different perspective. A group of scientists from the University of Cambridge have detected a star that is so small, even one of our own planetary neighbors happens to be larger, and it's assumed to be the absolute smallest a star can possibly be. The star, which has been labeled EBLM J0555-57Ab, might not have a particularly interesting name, but it's an extremely important discovery all the same. For comparison, the star is just slightly larger than Saturn, and the gas giant Jupiter is even larger than it. In fact, the star is so small that it's thought that the researchers believe it is as small as stars can possibly be while still having the ability to facilitate hydrogen fusion. If the star were any smaller, the pressure at its core likely wouldn't be great enough to actually fuse hydrogen nuclei, making it a brown dwarf, which is often called a "failed star." But while the newly-discovered star is a lightweight, that's actually good news when it comes to the search for life. "The smallest stars provide optimal conditions for the discovery of Earth-like planets, and for the remote exploration of their atmospheres," Amaury Triaud of Cambridge's Institute of Astronomy said. "However, before we can study planets, we absolutely need to understand their star; this is fundamental." The TRAPPIST-1 system, which researchers recently revealed as being filled with seven potentially Earth-like planets, has a low-mass star at its center. That star, which is only about 30% larger than EBLM J0555-57Ab, is a prime example of why smaller stars are where we should be searching if we hope to find exoplanets that are potentially habitable.
Where does Trump's FBI nominee stand on tech privacy issues?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kurt the 'CyberGuy' shares insight on 'Fox & Friends'
NASA is testing the crew exit strategy for the Orion capsule
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ABC News' Kevin Quinn talks to NASA engineer Dustin Gohmert and Astronaut Sunita Williams about testing to land the Orion capsule in water or on land.
Japan flood death toll rises to 30
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The death toll from heavy rains and flooding in Japan's south has risen to 30, officials said Thursday, while rescue workers continued their efforts to find survivors. Heavy seasonal rains last week caused severe flooding that tore up roads and destroyed houses on the southern island of Kyushu, with hundreds of thousands of people forced to flee their homes. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe cancelled a visit to Estonia that was originally planned as the last leg of a European tour, flying to the region Wednesday to view the damage and console residents.
‘Must happen!’: Trump releases flurry of health care tweets while heading to Paris parade
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump fired off a string of tweets about health care while in France, where he is visiting French President Emmanuel Macron.
Trump, Macron share epic, never
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump’s unwieldy handshakes with other world leaders have long been closely watched, but at the close of his Paris visit Friday, he shared a truly striking hand maneuver with French President Emmanuel Macron. Trump and Macron began shaking hands as they were walking side by side but slowed to a halt, which is when Trump apparently yanked Macron’s arm, knocking him off balance.
The Smallest Star Ever Found Is The Size Of Saturn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronomers have found the smallest star ever recorded, and it could teach them more about the small stars where we find all those potentially habitable exoplanets.
In debate over political speech, pastors say they fear the IRS ‘pulpit police’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As Washington struggles to come up with a new health care insurance system, Jim Garlow believes he has a solution, but he worries about sharing it publicly — simply because he is a pastor. Garlow, lead pastor of Skyline Church in La Mesa, Calif., blames a provision in the federal tax code known as the Johnson Amendment for what he calls the “self-censorship” of pastors across the nation. It forbids 501(c)(3) nonprofits, a category that includes most of the nation’s churches and other charitable organizations, from getting directly involved in elections.
Trump faces a ‘victory problem’ in Afghanistan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump, due to unveil his new strategy for fighting the war in Afghanistan, faces what some aides are calling a “victory problem” — how to define success in America’s longest war and sell the war-weary U.S. public on the possibility of sending a few thousand more troops into the nearly 16-year-old conflict. In recent days, White House officials have declined to say whether the new approach will roll out by mid-July — in keeping with a timetable Defense Secretary Jim Mattis laid out weeks ago. “We have a ‘victory problem,’” a senior administration official recently told Yahoo News, speaking on condition of anonymity to describe internal debates.
Giant Pandas Still Close To Extinction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fragmentation of habitat endangers giant pandas more than ever.
Nasa takes first high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An American spacecraft has taken the first high resolution photographs of Jupiter's most extraordinary feature, after soaring close to the crimson cloud tops of the Great Red Spot. Nasa's Juno probe passed just 5,600 miles (9,000) kilometres above the massive storm system which is wider than the Earth and may have been raging for more than 350 years. The close fly-by was completed during Juno's sixth scientific orbit of the solar system's biggest planet. The craft, which is specially strengthened to withstand Jupiter's ferocious radiation, gathered a wealth of data and images during the encounter which are being beamed to Earth. A combination of views of the Great Red Spot Credit: NASA/SWRI/MSSS AND NASA Juno principal investigator Dr Scott Bolton, from Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas, said: "For generations people from all over the world and all walks of life have marvelled over the Great Red Spot. "Now we are finally going to see what this storm looks like up close and personal." Jupiter's Great Red Spot from an altitude of 9866.1 km above Jupiter's surface Credit: NASA / JPL / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstädt  The 10,000 mile (16,000 km) wide Great Red Spot has been observed since 1830 but is thought to have existed for hundreds of years longer. In more recent times it has appeared to be shrinking. Juno swooped close to Jupiter and passed directly above the Great Red Spot on July 10, said the American space agency. An illustration of NASA's Juno spacecraft in orbit above Jupiter's Great Red Spot Credit: NASA/Reuters The spacecraft was launched on August 5 2011 from Cape Canaveral, Florida. On July 5 at 3.30am UK time, Juno logged exactly one year in Jupiter orbit, having travelled a total of 71 million miles (114.5 million kilometres) around the gas giant. Early results from the mission have shown Jupiter to be a turbulent world with a complex interior structure, energetic polar auroras and huge polar cyclones.
Ravens Can Make Plans for the Future, in Some Ways Surpassing Apes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ravens, crows and their relatives are incredibly smart. New research suggests that they can also plan for the future as well as great apes, an ability once thought to be uniquely human. In a study published in the journal Science, researchers Can Kabadayi and Mathias Osvath from Sweden’s Lund University gave ravens a battery of tests that have also been administered to great apes to prove that they have long-term planning abilities.
Farewell Dippy the dinosaur
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LONDON (Reuters) - London's Natural History Museum has installed a four-and-a-half-tonne blue whale skeleton to tower over the heads of visitors, replacing the remains of a much-loved diplodocus known as Dippy. The whale's bones, which were bought in 1892 for 250 pounds, have been suspended mid-air with the head lowered and jaw gaping as if it is about to scoop up tourists. The 25-metre (82-foot) long skeleton will greet people as they enter the building's Hintze Hall from Friday - a new display highlighting the institution's conservation work. ...
Australia senator's 3 election wins officially didn't happen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The deputy leader of an Australian political party announced Friday that he was ending his nine-year career in Parliament because he had discovered he had technically never been a senator.
Tennessee restricts use of Monsanto pesticide as problems spread
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Karl Plume CHICAGO (Reuters) - Tennessee on Thursday imposed restrictions on the use of dicamba, a flagship pesticide for Monsanto Co, becoming the fourth state to take action as problems spread over damage the weed killer causes to crops not genetically modified to withstand it. Dicamba is sprayed by farmers on crops genetically modified to resist it but it has drifted, damaging vulnerable soybeans, cotton and other crops across the southern United States. Arkansas banned its use last week and Missouri, which initially halted dicamba spraying, has joined Tennessee with tight restrictions on when and in what weather spraying can be done.
Does the World’s Top Weed Killer Cause Cancer? Trump’s EPA Will Decide
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Roundup has revolutionized farming. Now, human health and Bayer’s $66 billion deal for Monsanto depend on an honest appraisal of its safety.
The 7 best views of the Larsen C iceberg breaking off Antarctica
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A giant iceberg breaking off Antarctica is a disconcerting sight, but it's also fascinating to watch. One of the largest icebergs ever recorded finally broke free from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in northwest Antarctica, U.S. and European agencies monitoring the region confirmed on Wednesday. The 2,200-square-mile block is about the size of Delaware (or twice the size of Luxembourg) and contains a volume of ice twice the size of Lake Erie. SEE ALSO: One of the largest icebergs ever recorded just broke free of Antarctica The iceberg won't directly add to sea level rise, since it has already been floating in the water like an ice cube in a glass. But it may have significant future consequences. Floating ice shelves act like doorstops to the land-based glaciers behind them. As chunks of the ice shelves break away — as this iceberg did — it can weaken the shelves, eventually causing their collapse. This would allow glaciers to move faster into the sea, adding new water to the ocean and raising sea levels. For now, however, here are some of the best views of Larsen C iceberg splitting off: From 6 July to 12 July, #Sentinel1 caught the final days and eventual full break-off of the berg. #LarsenC pic.twitter.com/2kVVjx4Syk — ESA EarthObservation (@ESA_EO) July 12, 2017 Satellite images from ESA show the Larsen C Iceberg breaking off Antarctica.Image: STEF LHERMITTE Thermal wavelength image of Larsen C iceberg, July 12, 2017.Image: NASA WORLDVIEW The @nytimes on the #LarsenC monitoring with @CopernicusEU #Sentinel1 data https://t.co/F5mJ64sSSF pic.twitter.com/rFQpc3atne — ESA EarthObservation (@ESA_EO) July 12, 2017 Blog post with more details about the Larsen C iceberg calving: https://t.co/B094vfbTE6 pic.twitter.com/9ta8XGTMDN — Project MIDAS (@MIDASOnIce) July 12, 2017 Image: ESA Closeup image of the Larsen C Ice Shelf rift on Nov. 10, 2016.Image: NASAWhile this iceberg alone won't have a devastating effect, and the ultimate fate of Larsen C is far from known, it does point to the alarming possibility that Larsen C and other ice shelves could collapse in response to human-caused global warming. The Antarctic Peninsula has already experienced southward-moving ice shelf collapses in recent years. Image: climate signals"This is the big story that people need to think about. What we are seeing right now ... is part of a story where the sources of sea level awakened by climate warming get bigger and bigger with time," Eric Rignot, a professor of Earth System Science at University of California at Irvine and a researcher at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, recently told Mashable Science Editor Andrew Freedman. WATCH: Giant icebergs are a big tourist draw in Newfoundland, and a warning sign
Huge 75,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A huge black spot has appeared on the sun – and NASA has warned that it could blast solar flares towards Earth. The sunspot – AR2665 – is 75,000 miles wide, and its black ‘core’ is larger than Earth, according to NASA. Sunspots are darker regions on the surface of the sun which have intense magnetic fields – and this one is big enough to let off solar flares, NASA has warned.
Archaeologist Recreates Ancient Weapons in Lab
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An Ohio archaeologist is unveiling the mysteries of how humans first settled the Americas by re-creating ancient weapons. Professor Metin Eren at Kent State University runs a lab that experiments with replicas of ancient knives, arrows and pots. (July 13)
The Raspberry Shake 4D is a tiny seismograph that lets you monitor earthquakes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Building upon the success of last year's Raspberry Shake, which exceeded its initial Kickstarter funding goal by a whopping 1,400 percent, the Raspberry Shake 4D makes use of four precision sensors to monitor the Earth's vibrations.
How Microsoft Research AI Hopes to Take on Google
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new research lab, dubbed Microsoft Research AI, is aimed at advancing learning systems.
Gov. Brown makes dire plea to save California climate law
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gov. Jerry Brown warned Thursday of a California ravaged by forest fires, disease and mass migration if lawmakers fail to renew the state's signature program to fight climate change, which he called "a ...
Hyperloop One's 'big breakthrough': Full system nails first vacuum tube test run
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The firm says it's one step closer to bringing the Hyperloop to reality after its "Kitty Hawk moment".
Sources: Trump lawyers knew of Russia emails three weeks ago
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump’s legal team was informed more than three weeks ago about the email chain showing that his son Donald Jr. met with a Kremlin-connected lawyer last June, two sources familiar with the handling of the matter told Yahoo News.
Raccoon gets busy in backseat of convertible, giving birth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SARASOTA, Fla. (AP) — A pregnant raccoon decided to get busy in the backseat of a convertible — giving birth.
What the Latest GOP Healthcare Reform Plan Means for You
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
On Thursday, Senate Republicans unveiled their latest proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act, including a new provision, among others, that would allow insurers to sell bare-bones plans with...
Climb aboard Blue Origin’s rocket for a (simulated) space ride
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Blue Origin is aiming to take paying tourists to the edge of space in the next 18 months, but you can experience the spectacular ride well before then -- and for a fraction of the cost.
We’re getting closer to understanding what animals’ facial expressions really mean
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists are starting to be able to accurately read animal facial expressions and understand what they communicate. Facial expressions project our internal emotions to the outside world. Reading other people’s faces comes naturally and automatically to most of us. Without your best friend saying a word, you know—by seeing the little wrinkles around her eyes,…
Scientists expect 'significant' algae bloom on Lake Erie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A "significant" harmful algae bloom is expected to form in western Lake Erie this summer, though it probably won't be as large as some previous formations that posed health risks and hampered tourism, scientists said Thursday.
We make fake poo in a laboratory – to improve sanitation in Bangladesh
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's a dirty scientific job – but it could save lives.
Study suggests ravens are great at planning ahead
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
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This Is the Smallest Star Ever Discovered
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Saturn-sized object straddles the line between a planet and a star.
Americans Are Really Bad at Drawing These 3 States
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
While some of the results were to be expected, other states were surprisingly confounding.
Trump praises Xi, initially mum on Chinese dissident’s death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Thursday lavished praise on Chinese leader Xi Jinping, calling him “a friend,” “a terrific guy,” as well as a “good man” and “a great leader” who “loves China” — and saying nothing about the death of that country’s best known dissident, Liu Xiaobo.
No one has ever died from a pot overdose, but the DEA is taking no chances
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Studies suggest that legalizing marijuana for medical purposes correlates with lower numbers of opioid prescriptions and overdoses. The DEA remains unmoved.
Dem who actually won a special election: We don’t need more career politicians
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Oklahoma state senator Michael Brooks, a rare Democrat who's won a special election, has a message for his party: voters reward a focus on local issues.
Grievance filed over mowing goats at university in Michigan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
KALAMAZOO, Mich. (AP) — A union has filed a grievance in response to Western Michigan University's hiring of goats to clear 15 acres (6.07 hectares) of woodland on campus.
Insect attack! US West is battling crop
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Farmers in the U.S. West face a creepy scourge every eight years or so: Swarms of ravenous insects that can decimate crops and cause slippery, bug-slick car crashes as they march across highways and roads.
Texas ATM's choices: deposit, withdraw, release trapped repairman
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A Texas repairman found that one of the hardest parts about being trapped while servicing a bank's automated teller machine was convincing customers coming for cash that he was stuck. "Most people thought it was a joke," Corpus Christi police spokeswoman Gena Pena said on Thursday.
Eels from overturned truck slime cars on Oregon highway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
DEPOE BAY, Ore. (AP) — A truck hauling eels overturned on an Oregon highway, turning the coastal road into a slimy mess.
Why GOP Senate bill is ‘a long way’ from repealing Obamacare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For more than seven years, Republicans have been promising voters they would repeal the Affordable Care Act. The bill that GOP senators unveiled on Thursday is very far from that promise. Yes, some Obamacare measures are out, like the individual and employer mandates.
What 100 Calories of Frozen Treats Looks Like
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Walk through your supermarket's frozen food aisle or stroll down a beach boardwalk on a hot day, and it can be challenging to ignore the tantalizing array of ice pops, ice cream sandwiches, and o...