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Scientists use gene
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside have introduced a new strain of red-eyed mutant wasp to the world — courtesy of cutting edge CRISPR gene-splicing technology.
Neil deGrasse Tyson Warns Science Denial Could 'Dismantle' Democracy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Renowned astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson urges Americans to become more scientifically literate in a short video he posted yesterday (April 19) on his Facebook page. In the video he titled "Science in America," Tyson comments on 21st-century attitudes toward science, explaining the importance of the scientific method and making the case that science denial could erode democracy. "I offer this four-minute video on 'Science in America' containing what may be the most important words I have ever spoken.
Fearless drone camera peers into an erupting volcano in Guatemala
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
British researchers working in Guatemala have been getting closer than ever to erupting volcanos thanks to advances in drone technology, and the attached cameras have been producing some stunning footage along the way.
Apple wants your applause for a mining goal without a plan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Please clap.  Apple wants to stop mining for rare Earth metals and other components that help its technologies work. The company announced this through its recently-released 2016 environmental responsibility report, and via a nice little rollout with the help of Vice.  Everything Apple builds, they say, will one day be made from recyclable materials such as copper, aluminum, and tin. No more digging up the Earth for cobalt, tantalum, tungsten and other rare earth metals. SEE ALSO: New drone footage gives us the best look at Apple's spaceship campus yet But Apple has no public timeline to complete this goal. Lisa Jackson, the company's vice president of environment, policy, and social initiatives, told Vice that company officials are a bit "nervous" because they don't have a plan, either.  Some of this seems fine — the goal, after all, is admirable, as it sets a higher target than Apple's competitors. It was even lauded (with caveats) by Greenpeace, an advocacy organization.  A man carries a bag of copper at a mine quarry and cobalt pit in Lubumbashi on May 23, 2016.Image: JUNIOR KANNAH/AFP/Getty ImagesAFP/Getty ImagesBut Apple is choosing not to take some steps that would speed up their timeline. First, Jackson said Apple is not about to make it easier for customers to repair their own phones.  She defended that stance with this: “I think trying to pretend that we can sort of make it easy to repair the product, and that you get the product that you think you’re buying — that you want — isn’t the answer.” Apple needs minerals mined from the ground to build its products, as do its rivals. Those products are held together with special screws and other pieces you can't find in the average repair shop. This is intentional.  It means Apple can make money when it sells you an iPhone and on your return to the Apple store after you've fumbled your phone down the stairs and lacerated its screen. Instead of being able to fix your phone with readily available generic parts, each broken iPhone means more mining for the creation of specialized items.  Either that, or iPhone owners decide to buy a new one, since the price of repairs often makes it more cost-effective to just get an updated device. If repairs were made easier, though, that would increase the longevity of Apple's products, which would in turn reduce the demand for mining.  Alas. Folks trying to buy iPhones in Amsterdam.Image: lex van Lieshout/Epa/REX/ShutterstockSpeaking of fewer phones, Apple has been accused of planning the demise of old devices, forcing the purchase of new ones. A December, 2015 lawsuit, for example,  alleged Apple knew a software upgrade could hamper its older devices. The company makes its recyclers shred old devices so they can't be reused. Whether you believe this is a deliberate move to create product obsolescence or not, the company does roll out new products with regularity, and it certainly doesn't discourage you from discarding your still more than functional iPhone for the shiny next edition.  Apple's environmental responsibility report acknowledges their mining goal will take "many years," and Jackson told Vice that only a marginal amount of the iPhone is currently built from recyclable materials. Perhaps that's why they haven't released a timeline and don't have a plan?  Thus far, Apple's touted recycling initiatives include "disassembly robots" that pull apart old iPhones for use in new ones, and a campaign "encouraging more customers to recycle their old devices through Apple Renew."  Again, fine, sure. These are good things that will benefit the environment. But when a seemingly major component of your anti-mining initiative is to ask customers to give you their old devices on top of regularly purchasing those devices and repairing said devices only at your shops, it feels a little like a goal that will be achieved on a timeline tied to profit, not speed. This is hardly sufficient for the most valuable company on Earth, which prides itself on its environmental ambitions.  WATCH: iPhone 8 rumors include a 'Smart Connector' for AR headset
Q&A: Could the Henrietta Lacks case happen today?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — What happened in the 1951 case of Henrietta Lacks, and could it happen again today?
Scientists just unearthed an absolutely terrifying new sea creature
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's hard to imagine that, after thousands of years of cataloguing every living thing we come across, humans are still discovering new animals, but when it comes to the ocean there's just so much space to cover that it's easy to miss things. Researchers led by Northeastern University professor Dan Distel just made history by unearthing the first living example of a creature that scientists have had a hard time finding for hundreds of years. It's called a Giant Shipworm, and it's absolutely bizarre. The "worms," which are actually part of the mollusk family, live inside thick, calcified tubes buried under the sea floor, allowing just two small tips of its body to be seen. The creature feeds almost exclusively on hydrogen sulfide, which is processed by bacteria inside its gills and converted to carbon that the worm then utilizes. The most striking aspect of the discovery is just how odd the shipworms actually look. Measuring an average of three feet long, the mollusks look like long slippery black rubber tubes with little to no defining features or recognizable body parts. The rigid shells in which they live are said to be as heavy as a tree branch. Researchers have known that these worms exist for some time thanks to their durable tubes that remain long after the worms die, but have never actually found a living specimen until now. Scientists now set about learning how the species reproduces, their life cycles, and other crucial information needed to paint an accurate picture of the creatures.
Trump bemoans ‘ridiculous standard’ of judging presidents by first 100 days
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump is complaining about the “ridiculous standard” of judging an administration on its first 100 days.
Trump predicts Paris attack will sway French election
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump predicted on Friday that a deadly shooting on the famed Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris would have “a big effect” on French elections.
Clinton knocks Trump on LGBT rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers remarks at the annual LGBT Center dinner on April 20, 2017, in New York City. The Center gave Clinton its Trailblazer Award. Clinton was receiving an award at a fundraiser for The Center, an LGBT community center in New York City, where she made the critical remarks.
Vienna bartender appeals fine for public belching _ and wins
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
VIENNA (AP) — He who burps loudest laughs best — at least in this case.
In Balkans, a fragile order grows brittle, threatening stability
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In this bucolic corner of northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina, Mr. Tomasevic can still afford to be indifferent to international affairs. Almost two decades after the guns of war fell silent in the Balkans, marking the end of Yugoslavia’s breakup, renewed tensions are bubbling up, threatening a carefully calibrated order that has yielded an increasingly brittle stability. Recommended: Think you know Europe?
Is the tumult of France's presidential race a sign of longing for lost grandeur?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
If there has been one constant in France's 2017 presidential campaign, it has been the repeated rise of the outsider who comes out of nowhere to scramble political assumptions and electoral math. The latest example is Jean-Luc Mélenchon. This week, he's breathing down the necks of both his far-right counterpart and longtime frontrunner Marine Le Pen and young centrist Emmanuel Macron, the two favorites to advance.
Giant shipworm loses its shell and invades our nightmares
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists find a living specimen of a 5-foot-long mollusk to dissect for a new study.
Bluetooth devices that put private information at risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kurt the 'CyberGuy' shares tips for keeping data secure
Coin flip decides new president of southern Illinois village
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MARION, Ill. (AP) — A coin flip has decided who will lead a tiny southern Illinois town after an election this month ended in a tie.
Massachusetts man sentenced for burial plot sale scam
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WOBURN, Mass. (AP) — A Massachusetts man has pleaded guilty to selling unused burial plots that had already been purchased by other people and pocketing the cash.
Cops: 10 pounds of pot wrongly sent to Pennsylvania pastor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
YEADON, Pa. (AP) — Police are trying to determine who shipped 10 pounds of marijuana from California to a pastor in the Philadelphia suburbs.
Correction: Monaco
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MONACO (AP) — In a story April 20 about a flying car, The Associated Press reported erroneously the driving range of the AeroMobil vehicle. It is 700 kms (435 miles), not 100 kms (62 miles).
Buyer wanted: Tiny Oregon town for sale
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
In the tiny, dying timber town of Tiller, the old cliche is true. If you blink, you might actually miss it. But these days, this dot on a map in southwestern Oregon is generating big-city buzz for an unlikely ...
Scientists find footprint of unknown ancient reptile in Spain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have discovered a fossilised footprint from about 247 to 248 million years ago in the Pyrenees mountains in Spain which they believe was made by a previously unknown species of reptile. The footprint was found among a series of tracks made by the ancestors of crocodiles and dinosaurs, a group known as archosauromorphs, the researchers from the Autonomous University of Barcelona and the Catalan Institute of Palaeontology said in a statement. The researchers said the footprints suggest the tracks which they found in the Pyrenees mountains in northeastern spain on the border with France were made by animals that used all four limbs to walk and often also left marks with their tails.
European salamander at risk of extinction: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Europe's already endangered salamander population faces extinction due to a new, virulent fungus that also poses a broader threat to biodiversity, according to a new study. "The fungus presents a 'perfect storm'," said senior author An Martel, a professor at Ghent University in Belgium. Following an outbreak in 2014, a team of biologists led by Ghent University monitored a colony of vulnerable salamanders for two years, leading to the grim discovery of the pathogen's fatal impact.
A Shopping Guide for Science Nerds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On April 22nd, thousands of scientists and their supporters will march in Washington, DC and in more than 420 cities around the globe in what is expected to be the world’s largest public demonstration in the name of science. Meanwhile, President Donald Trump continues to roll back environmental protections, scrub climate change data from government websites, and slash budgets from the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. According to LiveScience, the March for Science started as an idea on Reddit, grew across Facebook and Twitter, and eventually garnered support from over 170 organizations, like the Center for Biological Diversity and the Society for Neuroscience.
Elon Musk on mission to link human brains with computers in four years: report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Neuralink is aiming to bring to the market a product that helps with certain severe brain injuries due to stroke, cancer lesion etc, in about four years, Musk said in an interview with website Wait But Why. "If I were to communicate a concept to you, you would essentially engage in consensual telepathy," Musk said in the interview published on Thursday. Artificial intelligence and machine learning will create computers so sophisticated and godlike that humans will need to implant "neural laces" in their brains to keep up, Musk said in a tech conference last year.
Incredible pictures from 3,500
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Luxor's west bank, an Egyptian archaeological mission working at DraaAbulNagaa necropolis has unearthed the funerary collection of a New Kingdom tomb built for a nobleman called Userhat. Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities has announced the discovery, saying that the tomb was characteristic of the tombs of noblemen from that period - T-shaped with an open court leading into a rectangular hall, a corridor and an inner chamber. The archaeologists worked hard to remove more than 450 metres of debris to create a passage to the entrance of the tomb.
After three weeks, French artist succeeds in hatching eggs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
French artist Abraham Poincheval, who famously spent a week inside a rock and two weeks inside a bear sculpture, has succeeded in hatching chicken eggs after incubating them for some three weeks. Poincheval embarked on his latest project in late March of imitating a mother hen by incubating some 10 eggs with his own body heat inside a glass vivarium at Paris' Palais de Tokyo contemporary art museum. Earlier this year, the artist spent a week inside a block of stone, while in 2014, he lived in a hollowed-out bear sculpture for two weeks.
Yo, Adrian! Pet shop from 'Rocky' films demolished
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A Philadelphia storefront featured prominently in the "Rocky" films has been demolished.
Cord Blood Could Help To Restore Brain Function In Elderly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Stanford University School of Medicine study conducted with mice offers clues into a possible treatment method for dementia.
March for Science not about Trump, organizers say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Organizers insist that the demonstrations -- anchored by a major rally in Washington on Earth Day, April 22 -- are not aimed specifically at US President Donald Trump or any political party. Rather, they say, the goal is to defend the vital role of evidence and scientific research when formulating public policies, and to speak out against travel restrictions that prevent the free flow of information and expertise. "The organizers of the march have taken great pains to say this is not partisan, it is not about any particular public official or political figure," Rush Holt, a physicist and former US congressman told reporters on a conference call, noting that scientists are "often reticent" to wade into the political fray.
A Nearby Rocky Planet Is the Newest Possible Home for Alien Life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This new, big, dense planet is rocky, like Earth, and has the right temperatures for water.
American, Russian cheered as they reach Intl Space Station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Soyuz space capsule has delivered an American astronaut making his first space flight and a veteran Russian cosmonaut to the International Space Station
Woolly Mammoth Fossils Show Bone Diseases Before Extinction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Before woolly mammoths went extinct, they suffered terrible bone diseases like ones humans develop today.
NASA’s Opportunity Headed To Next Martian Destination
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The rover, which has been on Mars since 2004, is leaving the “Cape Tribulation” and is moving toward “Perseverance Valley,” both part of the western rim of Endeavour Crater.
Anthill 12: Don't remember this
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This episode of The Anthill podcast delves into the world of memory. We talk to psychologists, historians and political scientists about how and why we remember some things and forget others.
What to do if an asteroid comes our way
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If an asteroid strikes, don’t head for the hills, or the windows: Head for the basement. A study aimed at sorting out the effects of a catastrophic asteroid impact found that violent winds and pressure shock waves would be the biggest killers, accounting for more than 60 percent of the lives lost in simulated scenarios. “This is the first study that looks at all seven impact effects generated by hazardous asteroids and estimates which are, in terms of human loss, most severe,” Clemens Rumpf, a senior research assistant at the University of Southampton in Britain, said today in a news release… Read More
The Real Reason Investors Can’t Get Enough of Tesla
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Real Reason Investors Can’t Get Enough of Tesla
China launches first cargo spacecraft as part of space station goal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China launched its first cargo spacecraft on Thursday, taking another step towards its goal of establishing a permanently manned space station by 2022. President Xi Jinping has prioritized advancing China's space program to strengthen national security.
The 17
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Mya has been unable to eat and digest food since she was in sixth grade. Finally, specialists discovered the root of Mya’s uncontrollable vomiting – a syndrome known as rumination. “My body and my brain pretty much learned whenever food hits my stomach, it needs to get rid of it,” says Mya.
Meet the Adorable Dog That Helps Manage Diabetes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Five-month-old Honey is a yellow Lab puppy, and she’s being trained as a diabetic alert dog. Honey is being trained with samples of Sophia’s saliva taken when she’s at different blood levels. When Honey recognizes the target level on a cotton pad, she gets praise and a treat! She’s even being trained to monitor Sophia’s night-time levels.
Not Guilty by Reason of Brain Tumors?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
“In this case,” says criminal defense attorney Sara Azzari, “to find him guilty of vehicular manslaughter there has to be gross negligence. “This case is so sad,” ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork responds. “However, we are seeing more and more individuals who use a medical excuse for committing crimes.
Nude Photo Scandal Rocks High School
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains mature subject matter. Viewer discretion is advised.
Man Beats Deadly Pancreatic Cancer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
When Jim was diagnosed with stage 3 pancreatic cancer two years ago, it sounded like a death sentence. When he visited the doctor, he received a diagnosis of stage 3 pancreatic cancer – and was told that the survival rate for all pancreatic cancers was one percent. “It felt like, literally, someone turned me inside out,” says Debby, Jim’s wife of 40 years.
From home to outer space, the new Google Earth is full of things to do
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Google launched a major update for Google Earth that not only redesigned the interface, but also added rich visual content from partners such as BBC Earth and Sesame Street. Here's how you can easily lose hours exploring the planet.
Scientists Are One Step Closer to Turning on the World's Largest X
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Once it is ready, it will capture images of structures and processes at the atomic level.
Chilly justice: Man ticketed for warming up car loses case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROSEVILLE, Mich. (AP) — Warming up your car in the driveway might be a Michigan winter tradition, but a judge says it's not legal in a Detroit suburb if no one's behind the wheel.
Pogue's Basics: How to create a search
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Among its thousands of features, macros are power-user tools that could benefit a lot of people. You hit Record Macro, you do something — a search and replace, let’s say — and then you can play back that macro later. Actually, search and replace is a bad example — Microsoft Word cannot, in fact, record and play back a search/replace.
Planet enlists machine learning experts to parse a treasure trove of Amazon basin data
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Planet, the satellite imaging company that operate the largest commercial Earth imaging constellation in existence, is hosting a new data science competition on the Kaggle platform, with the specific aim of developing machine learning techniques around forestry research. Planet will open up access to thousands of image 'chips,' or blocks...
Cassini To Make Its Final Close Flyby Of Titan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
During the upcoming flyby, the spacecraft will, among other things, look for changes in Titan's methane lakes and seas.
Robots, chefs hope to bring invasive lion fish to restaurants near you
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Ben Gruber LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - As it turns out, some of the best cooks in the world think lionfish, a venomous predatory fish which is breeding out of control and destroying marine ecosystems in the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, is delicious. The chefs gathered in Bermuda on Wednesday for a competition dubbed the "Lionfish Throwdown" where they challenged one another to come up with the tastiest solution to the problem of invasive lionfish. "Lionfish are going to keep spreading, and it's not going to stop unless people step in and do something about it." Native to the Pacific Ocean, lionfish have no natural predators in Atlantic waters and females can spawn nearly 2 million eggs per year.
David Attenborough explaining rocks in VR will be incredibly calming
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Famed British naturalist David Attenborough is going to become a virtual reality “hologram” with the help of UK broadcaster Sky and London’s Natural History Museum. Attenborough will appear in a VR experience titled Hold the World, which will let viewers navigate the museum’s collection, picking up and examining rare items.
Explorer Shackleton's great grandson drives car across Antarctic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
British tech entrepreneur Patrick Bergel has become the first man to drive a car across the Antarctic, completing the feat 100 years after his great grandfather, explorer Ernest Shackleton, failed to cross the icy continent on foot. Bergel encountered minus 28-degrees Celsius (minus 18F) temperatures during his 30-day trip across the 5,800km (3,600 miles) stretch in a five-door car fitted with extra large wheels and snow track grips. The 46-year-old's modified 2.2 liter diesel car was engraved with the names of the crew members who accompanied his great grandfather Shackleton on his failed bid to cross the Antarctic a century ago.