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How to Get That Master Bedroom Feel No Matter How Small Your Space Is
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hit the snooze button.
The Truth campaign took down teen smoking. Now it's going after JUUL.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
JUUL is the vape giant that went from zero to $16 billion in three years. Truth Initiative is the largest anti-smoking organization in the United States. Both the company and the non-profit claim to have the same goal: helping smokers quit tobacco cigarettes. But Robin Koval, CEO and president of Truth Initiative, hasn't been shy about slamming JUUL.  SEE ALSO: Juul vapes will contribute to a dangerous e-waste crisis "The fact that JUUL is acting like, 'What, young people are using JUUL? We never intended that to happen,' is a little disingenuous," she said.  Oh yes, that. Teenagers love JUUL. Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat are filled with #juul references. These days, downtime at college is basically all about posting Stories of yourself JUULing to Drake.  The devices are sleek, small, and everywhere. There’s no need to refill them with liquid — just pop in a new JUULpod. They even recharge via USB. Unlike some vapes, they deliver a lot of nicotine. The company says each JUULpod contains 5 percent nicotine, about as much as a pack of cigarettes. Early on, the company reached plenty of young people on social media with ads of models living their best #vapelife.  The blowback from parents and the press has been severe. In response, JUUL removed models from its feeds, which now only feature ex-smokers sharing their stories. It committed $30 million to fighting underage use of its products. The company also has a secret shopping program to carry out "random compliance checks" to make sure retail stores aren't selling to minors.  Lol is this facts or nah? All i know is i like my juul! . . . . . #juulmemes #juulvapor #juuling #juulgang  #juulcentral #juulgang #juul #doit4juul #doitforstate #doit4state #juulpods #juulvapor #vaporizer #vapeporn #juulnation #vapefam #juultricks #vapelife #vapenation #juulskins #vapeon #smoke A post shared by Juul Candy (@juulcandy) on Aug 10, 2018 at 12:37am PDT Koval wants JUUL to do more. She dismissed the $30 million that JUUL is spending as a "rounding error" for a company that just raised $1.2 billion from investors.  "Frankly, if they really wanted to do something to impact youth sales, they could voluntarily comply with all of the rules that got postponed until 2022," she said.  During the Obama administration, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) determined that e-cigarette makers would have to submit their products for review by this summer. Trump administration officials delayed that deadline until 2022, saying that it didn't want to stifle innovation.  JUUL said that it supports "effective legislation and regulation," but hasn't stated support for the FDA rules. And the company has spent $240,000 on lobbyists in hopes of influencing e-cig regulations, according to Wired.  And not everyone is convinced that $30 million will keep young people from trying JUUL. "Tobacco companies have a long history of creating and promoting their own programs which they say are for 'youth smoking prevention,'" said Pamela Ling, professor at the University of California, San Francisco. Those programs were simply "PR tools to avoid regulation," she said. And JUUL could be following the same strategy.  "As far as I know, there is no published evidence that the JUUL youth program actually decreases youth use of JUUL." Then there's the issue of teen-friendly flavors, most notably mango and "fruit medley." Koval wants them off the market. JUUL insists fruity flavors help smokers who "don't want to be reminded of the tobacco-taste of a cigarette."  Helping smokers quit is a noble goal, of course. A study published earlier this year by University of Michigan researchers concluded that the "benefits outweigh the risks" when it comes to vaping — essentially, they save more lives by helping smokers quit than cost lives by hooking new smokers with nicotine.  Tobacco kills more than 7 million people each year, according to the World Health Organization. Several experts — including Koval — say it's better for people to vape than smoke tobacco cigarettes. But do they actually help people quit? Some studies say they're effective. On the other hand, a Georgia State University study from July found no evidence that vape use helped adult smokers quit at higher rates than smokers who didn't vape.  For teens, the stakes are even higher. Nicotine addiction could "harm the developing adolescent brain" and cause attention and mood disorders, said Adam Leventhal, director of the University of Southern California's Health, Emotion, & Addiction Laboratory. And earlier this year, a report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine found evidence that vaping could lead teenagers to try traditional tobacco cigarettes — the ultimate nightmare for anti-smoking activists.  JUUL said it would widely release mint and "Virginia Tobacco" JUULpods with less nicotine at 3 percent in October.  That's still enough nicotine to addict non-smokers. And there's another problem.  Leventhal said while lower nicotine levels could decrease the risk of teens getting addicted, JUUL is only releasing those new products in flavors teens don't like.  "Their sweet flavors like mango, fruit medley, and crème brulee are most popular among kids," he said.  JUUL is also entering the U.K. market, which limits nicotine levels to 1.7 percent.  "Why don’t they launch that here?" Koval said. "Clearly, they know that the product is going to be a lot more addictive with higher levels of nicotine, and that’s been the tobacco industry model since year one." That's not the kind of thing JUUL wants to hear. Underage use is the dark stain on an otherwise fairytale success story, and the company is determined to battle the perception that it's profiting from teen addiction.  "Amazon's Choice."Image: Amazon"JUUL is intended for current adult smokers only. We cannot be more emphatic on this point: no minor or non-nicotine user should ever try JUUL," the company said in response to the Truth Initiative's concerns.  So far, the government has taken minor action. The FDA sent a letter to JUUL and other e-cigarette makers in May requesting internal documents "to better understand the youth appeal" of their products. JUUL said it has complied with the FDA's request.  Tech companies could also do more to stop the spread of JUUL. Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat should provide more data on who is creating and consuming JUUL content, Koval said. And Amazon could stop selling skins — stickers that wrap around JUUL vapes — on its site. At the very least, it could remove the ones featuring cartoons and video games, including Rick and Morty and Fortnite.  "I don’t think young people are taking up JUUL because they want to get addicted to nicotine," Koval said. "They think it looks cool, it’s new, it comes in different flavors, and everyone is doing it."  With the help of those edgy "truth" ads, Truth Initiative saw teenage cigarette use in the U.S. drop from 23 percent in 2000 to less than 6 percent in 2018. It would be a shame if a product designed to help smokers quit actually stalled, or even reversed, that progress.  WATCH: Kids under the age of 21 are getting their hands on JUULs
Lombok lifted 10 inches by quake that killed nearly 400
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TANJUNG, Indonesia (AP) — Scientists say the powerful Indonesian earthquake that killed nearly 400 people lifted the island it struck by as much as 25 centimeters (10 inches).
Albania hit by magnitudes 5.4 and 5.1 tremors; homes crack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TIRANA, Albania (AP) — Northern Albania was struck Saturday by two earthquakes with preliminary magnitudes of 5.4 and 5.1, damaging scores of buildings, authorities said.
Why the U.S. Military Should Fear "Ramjets"
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ramjets have made somewhat of a comeback in military technology recently. While ramjets powered many anti-air missiles throughout the Cold War, more recent designs eschewed them in favor of multi-stage rocket boosters or simply more powerful rockets.
Michael Avenatti's Message to Iowa Democrats 'When They Go Low...We Hit Harder'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Avenatti was the closing speaker at the Democratic Wing Ding in Clear Lake
Residents split in goose dispute in Long Island village
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BRIGHTWATERS, N.Y. (AP) — Residents of a Long Island village are divided over what to do about a glut of goose droppings around town.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
MONEY Answers Your Burning College Questions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kaitlin Mulhere covered Money's Best Colleges list. She has the answers to your questions about all things college.
What Weed Actually Does to Your Brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here's what it looks like before, during, and after.
4 Women File Lawsuit Against Nike Alleging Unequal Pay
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They also claimed that the work environment allowed sexual harassment
‘Mourning’ orca whale seen carrying body of calf 17 days after its death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An apparently grieving orca whale has been spotted carrying the body of her child 17 days after initially sighted doing so. Tahlequah, who scientists refer to as J35, was most recently observed pushing the body of her child Wednesday by Canadian scientists off the coast of the Olympic Peninsula. Orca whales are known to carry the bodies of their dead children for up to a week, but researches say the length of this grief is unusual.
Giant Solar Drone Breaks Record for Longest Continuous Flight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The company's Zephyr drone stayed airborne for 26 days.
The Space Force, Like Trump, Is a Consummately American Grift
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It probably won’t ever exist, and if it does, it will be a mostly land-based bureaucracy
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Review: Spike Lee's BlackKklansman Is the Movie We Need Right Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Spike Lee has made great movies (25th Hour), bold, memorable, topical ones (Do the Right Thing, Malcolm X) and a few you’ve probably forgotten (Da…
Law Professor: Progressives Are Regulating Away the Equality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Writes law professor John O. McGinnis
Farmers in war
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After his wheat crop failed and wells dried up, Ghulam Abbas sold his animals and joined thousands of other farmers migrating to cities as Afghanistan's worst drought in living memory ravages the war-torn country. A huge shortfall in snow and rain across much of the country over the normally wet colder months decimated the winter harvest, threatening the already precarious livelihoods of millions of farmers and sparking warnings of severe food shortages. Like hundreds of farming families in Charkint village in the normally fertile northern province of Balkh, Abbas, 45, has moved with 11 family members to the provincial capital Mazar-i-Sharif to find work.
Monsanto known for controversial chemicals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From "Agent Orange" and DDT to genetically modified crops, Monsanto has long been associated with controversial chemicals, but a US court order for it to pay damages because one of its herbicides may cause cancer could open the door to thousands more claims against the company. A California jury on Friday ordered the US agrochemicals giant -- which was taken over by Germany's Bayer in June -- to pay nearly $290 million in compensation to a groundskeeper diagnosed with cancer after he repeatedly used Monsanto's weed killer, Roundup. The lawsuit built on 2015 findings by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, part of the UN World Health Organization, which classified Roundup's main ingredient glyphosate as a probable carcinogen.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Where On Earth Is The Riddler?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Welcome to The Riddler. Every week, I offer up problems related to the things we hold dear around here: math, logic and probability. There are two types: Riddler Express for those of you who want something bite-size and Riddler Classic for those of you in the slow-puzzle movement. Submit a correct answer for either, and […]
These Tiny Seaworms Light Up to Make Love
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists are studying the biology behind this mesmerizing mating ritual, first spotted by Christopher Columbus.
Hothouse Earth: seven things you can do to stop it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'Hothouse Earth' is not a sure thing – yet. Here's what you can do about it.
U.S. Navy wants to ‘weaponize slime’ to stop enemy ships
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers at Utah State University have been awarded a U.S. Navy contract to create synthetic weaponized slime, which could be used to fire at enemy vessels to stop them in their tracks.
Australia Man Finds Fossils From Ancient 'Megatooth' Shark Twice The Size of a Great White
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The extinct shark is known as the Great Jagged Narrow-Toothed Shark.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Crazy Rich Asians Is More Than Glitz and Glamour. It’s Groundbreaking for People Like Me
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The movie is a love letter to southeast Asia—and a major step forward for Asian representation
'She's Clearly Reacting to a Loss': Experts Say Killer Whale Carrying Her Dead Calf for 17 Days May Actually Be Grieving
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"This is unusual behavior. It's not normal. We haven't seen it before"
Here’s how Stanford scientists measured the speed of death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For the first time, scientists at Stanford University have been able to observe the speed at which death spreads across a cell once the self-destruct "trigger wave" has been initiated.
Canadian Police Charge Suspect in Shooting That Left 2 Police Officers and 2 Civilians Dead
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Matthew Vincent Raymond, 48, was charged with four counts of first-degree murder
Why apes can't talk: our study suggests they've got the voice but not the brains
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Our research supports the idea that human speech abilities comes down to our brain power.
Argentina’s Abortion Vote Was a Stepping Stone Not a Setback
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Despite Argentina’s senators closing a door to women’s rights, the movement opened a huge window to the entire continent and beyond
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
President Trump Jabs FBI, Saying He May 'Get Involved' Over Andrew McCabe Texts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“FBI said they won’t give up even one (I may have to get involved, DO NOT DESTROY). What are they hiding?”
Ships set sail from Seattle on a NASA mission to trace sea creatures’ carbon trail
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After seven years of preparation, two research vessels are heading out of Seattle to begin a 40-day voyage to track how tiny organisms in the ocean affect the world’s carbon balance — and it’s a bittersweet moment for one scientist who’s staying behind. “People ask me, ‘Are you happy?’ ” Paula Bontempi, EXPORTS program scientist at NASA Headquarters, said today at Seattle’s Pier 91, hours before departure. “I don’t know. Are you happy when your kids go off to college?” It’s graduation time for the EXPORTS oceanographic campaign, jointly funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation. EXPORTS stands for Export… Read More
Heavens to shine with new ‘star’ as first space sculpture prepares for launch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Look up into the night sky towards the end of October and you may catch sight of a brand new ‘star’ twinkling in the cosmos. The tiny speck of light is not the offspring of a seething nebula, but the world’s first space sculpture, which will orbit the Earth for three weeks this autumn. The length of a football field, and the shape of an elongated diamond, the ‘Orbital Reflector’ artwork is the brainchild of US artist Trevor Paglen and will be launched on board on one of Elon Musk’s SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets. Floating around the planet once every 90 minutes, 350 miles from the surface, the satellite will be visible in Britain about four times a night as the sun reflects off its shiny surface after dusk and before dawn. Trevor Paglen, Prototype for a Nonfunctional Satellite (Design 4; Build 4), 2013, Mr Paglen, whose work seeks to highlight mass surveillance and data protection, said he wanted people to look up into the night sky with a renewed sense of wonder and consider their place in the universe.  It will be the first satellite to exist purely as an artistic gesture. The idea of putting art in space was originally devised by the Russian artist Kazim Malevitch, who envisaged arking works that would circle the world, which he called ‘sputniks.’ The name was eventually adopted for the world’s first satellite. The new work, is a reflective, inflatable sculpture affixed to a small satellite that will orbit the earth for several weeks before disintegrating upon re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere. Trevor Paglen “It’ll look like one of the stars in the Big Dipper but slowly moving across the sky,” Mr Paglen said. “It will be in what's called a sun-synchronous orbit, and will slowly fall to earth from there, eventually burning up harmlessly as it gets close to earth. “This is extremely logistically intensive project - it definitely isn't something that an artist can just do in their studio. “Space is actually really really big, and it's extremely unlikely that it will collide with anything else. The main thing to worry about is it deploying successfully around other satellites. We've been working with the launch provider to come up with a plan to mitigate against any accidents there.” The sculpture will be seen at dawn and dusk as it reflects the Sun's rays  The sculpture has been built by Global Western aerospace from a super lightweight material which on on launch is packed inside a small box-like spacecraft, known as a CubeSat. It will be launched by SpaceX from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California at the end of October. The rocket will initially dock at the International Space Station where the CubeSat will be taken on board. At the correct time it will be deployed into space, where it will then release the artwork which inflates into a huge reflective balloon. Back on Earth, people wanting to see it will be able to put their location into a ‘star map’ on the website to find out when Orbital Reflector will fly over. Mr Paglen said he wanted to highlight how many satellites are circling the Earth. It isn't the first time he has sent a work of art into space. Previously he launched ‘The Last Pictures’ a collection of 100 images intended to represent human history onto a geostationary satellite in 2012. Orbital Reflector is co-produced and presented by the Nevada Museum of Art. An early prototype of the artwork currently hangs in the museum.
New Zealand Announces Plan to Ban Single
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Friday, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced plans to phase out single-use plastic bags over the next year in order to “look after our environment and safeguard New Zealand’s clean, green reputation.”
California Wildfire Victims Face Higher Rebuilding Costs Because of President Trump's Tariffs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The cost of imported lumber, drywall, nails and other materials have all risen
NASA astronaut says he saw something ‘organic, alien
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The truth is out there
Rolex Wants You to Put Its Watches In Harm’s Way
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you ever get the chance to visit the headquarters of The Explorers Club on Manhattan’s Upper East side, and can get past the giant stuffed polar bear and a sled from a 1909 North Pole expedition, be sure to look at the flags. The Explorers Club counts as members such luminaries as Dr. Sylvia Earle, Captain James Lovell, James Cameron, and many, many more names you’d likely recognize.
Flash floods kill 37 in India's tourist hotspot Kerala
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Flash floods in Kerala have killed 37 people and displaced around 36,000, Indian officials said Saturday, after heavy monsoons led to landslides and overflowing reservoirs across the southern state. Kerala, famed for its pristine palm-lined beaches and tea plantations, is battered by the monsoon every year but the rains have been particularly severe this season. The army has been roped in for rescue efforts in Kerala after two days of heavy rain drove authorities to open the shutters of 27 reservoirs to drain out the excess water.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
President Trump Says He's Doubling Steel and Aluminum Tariffs 'With Respect to Turkey'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Turkey vowed retaliation 'without delay'
Work Emails May Be Taking a Toll on Your Mental Health — And Your Relationship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here's another reason to unplug
At Least 72 People Got Sick After Swimming at a Minnesota Campground, Officials Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They seem to have cryptosporidiosis
Authorities Investigate the Circumstances Surrounding 'Suicidal' Employee Who Stole a Plane
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The incident points to one of the biggest potential perils for air travel
'Suicidal' Airline Employee Stole a Plane and Performed Stunts Before Crashing Near Seattle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A “suicidal” airline employee stole an empty Horizon Air turboprop plane, took off from Sea-Tac International Airport and was chased by military jets
Charlottesville on high alert on the anniversary of white supremacist violence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A group of anti-fascist activists rallied peacefully in downtown Charlottesville as the city marks the anniversary of last summer's white supremacist violence. Saturday marks a year since white nationalists marched through the University of Virginia campus with torches, clashing with a group of counterprotesters. The following day, a much larger gathering of white nationalists near a downtown park erupted into violence.
Imran Khan’s priority will be fixing Pakistan’s economy, A plan for Greece after major wildfires, As the Syrian war draws to a close, a glimmer of
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[Pakistani Prime Minister-elect Imran] Khan cannot be faulted for any absence of zeal during the preparatory process, leading up to the polls, to go about [the] task [of fixing the economy],” writes Iftekhar Ahmed Chowdhury. “In his election manifesto issued early July, he entitled his aspirations as the ‘Road to New Pakistan’.... To his ... contemporary constituency, he explained the model as being similar to the politico-economic culture prevalent in Scandinavia.... Alas, the road to a ‘New Pakistan’ appears to be extremely uneven, unusually steep, and full of potholes.
Trying to Be Happy Is Making You Miserable. Here's Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We may be overemphasizing happiness