World News
IN SHORT
Saturday, October 20, 2018

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
First Man, Gravity, 2001: A Space Odyssey: When Auteurs Go to Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The emptiness of the cosmos, combined with the sudden malleability of time, has a way of bringing out the more experimental side of filmmakers.
Here's the List of Upcoming SNL Hosts and Musical Guests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Seth Meyers and Paul Simon are up next
What Made Neil Armstrong the Right Man to Be First on the Moon, as Told in 1969
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Initially, he didn't even want to be an astronaut
International Space Station crew has enough supplies for at least six months: Russian official
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The crew aboard the International Space Station (ISS) has enough fuel, oxygen, water, and food to last at least six months, Vladimir Solovyov, flight director of the Russian segment of the ISS, was cited as saying by Russian news agencies on Sunday. Russia has temporarily suspended all manned space launches after two astronauts made a dramatic emergency landing in Kazakhstan on Thursday due to the failure of the Soyuz rocket carrying them to the orbital ISS. "There are enough reserves on the ISS which provide the living environment.
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Appeared to Skirt Protocol at Princess Eugenie's Wedding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At the wedding of Princess Eugenie, Meghan and Harry broke protocol in one small way involving Prince William and Kate Middleton.
Scientists Just Discovered a “Lost World” of Volcanoes Hidden Deep in the Ocean
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers have discovered an underwater volcanic world filled with marine life off of the coast of Tasmania.
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
Antismoking laws gain local traction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce was convening experts and community leaders around a health initiative, the idea of raising the smoking age from 18 to 21 kept coming up. Within a mere two weeks, legislators in both Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan., passed ordinances in November 2015. “The amount of interest and the momentum behind this idea surprised even us,” says Scott Hall, senior vice president for civic and community initiatives, in a phone interview.
Another NASA space telescope shuts down in orbit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Another NASA space telescope has shut down and halted science observations.
A 19
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Over a matter of days in late September, Stef Lhermitte watched via satellite as a new, massive crack formed along the edge of Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier.  Just last year that glacier shed a Manhattan-sized slab of ice. But that particular iceberg was relatively small. Lhermitte, a geoscientist specializing in remote sensing at the Netherlands' Delft University of Technology, expects this latest rift, when it eventually breaks, to produce an iceberg roughly 30 kilometers wide by 10 kilometers across (19 miles by 6 miles). That would be Pine Island's sixth-largest calving event since 2001 — producing an iceberg five times the size of Manhattan.  A new 30 km long rift appeared across Pine Island Glacier since September indicating the upcoming calving of a ~300km² iceberg [1/n] pic.twitter.com/Dnh3YMKYIs — Stef Lhermitte (@StefLhermitte) October 4, 2018 "It is impossible to forecast, but I would expect it to calve somewhere this Antarctic summer [U.S. winter], but it is difficult to further fine-tune it," Lhermitte said over email. This calving event wouldn't be record-breaking, nor an immediate red alert. But it unquestionably perpetuates a troubling trend.  Like most of West Antarctica's ice shelves — the ends of glaciers floating over the ocean — Pine Island is retreating inland and thinning at an accelerated pace, said Lhermitte.  These ice shelves are hugely important; they hold back immense masses of Antarctic ice from flowing into the ocean, just like a plug or cork.  And this is a cork you don't want to remove.  SEE ALSO: Things in the middle of the Arctic are getting really strange "They’re like the cork in a bottle," Josh Willis, a NASA oceanographer who researches glaciers from aboard aircraft, said in an interview. "If you break off a shelf, they [glaciers] can speed up very quickly." Pine Island is already breaking off more ice than it can replenish.  This means the ice plug is retreating back to land, ultimately becoming more vulnerable to weakening, or collapse. This would likely let loose rivers of ice into the sea, which would eventually mean yards — not feet — of sea level rise.  Accelerating ice loss in Antarctica.Image:  IMBIE/PLANETARY VISIONS"In West Antarctica there have been a bunch of famous ice shelves that have collapsed completely — and the glaciers upstream accelerated," said Willis, noting events like the dramatic Larson B ice shelf collapse.  But glaciers like Pine Island hold back much more Antarctic ice, so scientists like Lhermitte are watching closely. He receives satellite images of these glaciers, sometimes multiple times each day, so he can observe any changes — like new massive cracks forming over the ice.  It's important to note, however, that these Antarctic glaciers regularly shed ice into the sea. "They’re breaking off all the time," said Willis.  But Pine Island appears to be shedding ice more quickly than it has in the past. "In the past it has been every 6-10 years, but in recent years the calving events seem to be more frequent (2015, 2017, potentially 2018-2019)," noted Lhermitte.  "What really matters over time is whether the ice breaks off faster than it advances," added Willis. "The short answer is, yes, it's retreated quite a ways." Pine Island Glacier: the movie. From Oct 2014 to recent calving in 108 #sentinel1 images @CopernicusEU @ESA_EO pic.twitter.com/oYKvelCKPd — Stef Lhermitte (@StefLhermitte) October 13, 2017 Getting consumed from beneath The plight of the mighty West Antarctic glaciers is largely caused by relatively warm ocean waters eating away at the floating ice shelves, from beneath.  "Oceanic melting (from the bottom) plays an important role in this process," said Lhermitte, but also notes that's it's quite important where the glacier is able to "ground" itself on the seafloor after these calving events. If this 19-mile long crack should rupture, Pine Island's grounding line — where the ice meets the seafloor — will may move further back. This puts the shelf at further peril: Eventually, it will run out of real-estate.  Relatively warmer waters eating away at ice shelves.Image: GiphyBut just how fast this will happen is the million, or trillion, dollar question. "We really don’t know for sure how fast they’re going to collapse," said Willis. As for the looming break-off of another considerable chunk of ice from Pine Island, it's certainly meaningful — but it's not yet an alarm bell. "Not every one is a red alert," said Willis. "But trust me, one of them will be, and I'll be sure to let you know." WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?    
Africa's Youngest Billionaire Was Abducted in Tanzania
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gunmen abducted Mohammed Dewji outside of a hotel gym in Dar Es Salaam
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
What Neil Armstrong Biopic First Man Gets Right and Wrong About the Moon Landing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ryan Gosling's turn as the first man on the moon holds up to the truth
Trump touts his dealmaking skills after meeting American pastor freed from Turkey
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump, welcoming an American clergyman on his return to the U.S. after a two-year imprisonment in Turkey, took credit for his release and blamed President Obama for not getting him out sooner. “For Andrew, it’s been a very interesting day,” Trump told reporters who were called to the White House to witness the repatriation of Andrew Brunson, an evangelical Presbyterian from North Carolina. Brunson, who had been living and preaching in Turkey for more than two decades, was arrested October 2016 on suspicion of involvement in a coup attempt against the country’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan.
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
It's Time for Environmentalists and the Energy Industry to Work Together
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The climate is changing too quickly to argue
Mister Rogers Movie Crew Member Dies After Falling From Two Story Balcony
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A crew member working on a Mister Rogers biopic reportedly died in Mount Lebanon, Pennsylvania after falling from a two-story balcony.
Vice News Takes One Giant Leap With ‘The New Space Race,’ A New Live Show On Twitter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With billionaires like Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos re-igniting interest in space exploration, VICE News is tapping into that enthusiasm with the launch of The New Space Race, a live Twitter show about the next frontier. Twenty-four-year-old nuclear physics prodigy Taylor Wilson will host the program, which follows the scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab as they prepare for InSight’s historic Mars landing on Nov. 26. The 13-episode series concludes with a live broadcast…
Why the Trump Administration and Turkey Don’t Win in Pastor Andrew Brunson’s Release
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brunson’s release may remove one irritant in the Turkish-American relationship. But there are many others, and both sides come off poorly, writes Henri Barkey
Mexican researcher receives the Young Scientist Award 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Oct. 12 (Notimex).- The Mexican scientist Enrique Castro Camus, of the Optical Research Center (CIO), was awarded the Young Scientist Award 2018 (Young Scientist 2018) awarded by the International Society for Infrared Waves, Millimeter and Terahertz (IRMMW-THz Society, for its acronym in English). This recognition, which is granted to scientists under 40 years of age who have made innovative contributions in the areas of interest of this society, was conferred thanks to their research for the development of terahertz spectroscopy techniques and their applications. The prizewinner is a doctor of physics, specialist in physics of the subject condensed by the University of Oxford. He is a full-time researcher at the CIO, in León, Guanajuato and is part of the National System of Researchers (SNI). Castro Camus has among its projects the development of an early diabetic foot diagnosis method unique in the world, which uses spectroscopic images of the soles of the feet to evaluate how well hydrated the person's skin is. It is expected to perform more extensive clinical tests and to be implemented as a diagnostic method in health institutions, according to the information agency of the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt, for its acronym in Spanish). "We found that this method is a very good indicator of how deteriorated the patient is. We have worked with doctors, in particular with Dr. Irving Salas and some colleagues from the Institute of Security and Social Services of State Workers (ISSSTE, for its acronym in Spanish) in León and we are currently working with the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition in Mexico City," said the award-winning researcher. Also, in the area of ​​plant biology, the scientist's team works in collaboration with the Institute of Biotechnology (IBt, for its acronym in Spanish) under the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM, for its acronym in Spanish) in a project to monitor the hydration behavior of plants. The project has the potential to open up new opportunities for understanding the physiology of plants, as well as to seek the creation of new specimens of food-importing plants that can be grown in arid areas where water availability is limited. The lines of study of Enrique Castro also include the humanities, since it collaborates with specialists of the School of Michoacán (Colmich, for its acronym in Spanish), the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH, for its acronym in Spanish) and with the School of Conservation and Restoration of the West (ECRO, for its acronym in Spanish) in the inspection of objects belonging to the cultural heritage of Mexico, using terahertz spectroscopy, as well as other international collaborations for studying sculptures and ceramics. NTX/MSG/JCG
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
How Neil Armstrong's Moon Spacesuit Was Preserved for Centuries to Come
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ahead of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11's landing, the Smithsonian Institution hired restoration scientists preserve Neil Armstrong's spacesuit
FDA Calls Out Vaping Company for Putting Erectile Dysfunction Drugs in Its Products
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cialis and Viagra are FDA-approved but not to be added to e-cigarette liquids
11 Infant Corpses Found Hidden in Detroit Funeral Home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"They were in a cardboard box stuffed away from a stairwell"
March to the Polls rally in Chicago draws thousands
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Thousands of people have marched through downtown Chicago to express their displeasure at President Donald Trump and encourage voters to go to the polls for next month’s midterm election.
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
The Crucial Connection Between The Romanoffs and the True History of Russia’s Last Imperial Family
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here's what a scholar of the real Romanovs thinks about the show's concept
Every NASA Mission Should Be Looking for Alien Life, Scientists Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Searching for signs of alien life should be part of every future NASA mission, researchers wrote in a new report. Individually and together, these areas of expertise help to piece together the puzzle of how life could emerge and evolve on worlds other than Earth, and recent advances in the field — particularly in the last three years — demand a new strategy that will fortify astrobiology's role in NASA missions, NASEM representatives said in a statement.
This New Tool Can Help Parents Find the Best Sport for Their Kids
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Football or lacrosse? Swimming or tennis? Here's how to choose
'The Party Is Much Bigger Now.' Read Donald Trump's Interview With TIME on His Effect on the GOP
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It’s like really a party for the working men and women in this country"
The CW's Charmed Reboot Is So Political, It Forgot to Be Fun
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the most ham-fisted moment of the pilot, a character not only reads a prophecy detailing a cataclysmic moment “when the weakest of men reaches ill-gotten glory” but provides a translation: “Suffice to say it’s your current president.”
Chandra X
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Even as experts worked on ways to get the Hubble Space Telescope back doing science, another one of NASA’s Great Observatories in space — the Chandra X-ray Observatory — went into safe mode as well. NASA said the 19-year-old X-ray telescope put itself into hibernation on Oct. 10, possibly due to an issue with its gyroscopic pointing system. A gyro failure was behind the 28-year-old Hubble’s transition to safe mode last week. Due to the glitch, Chandra swapped critical hardware operations to backup units and pointed its solar panels to soak up the maximum amount of sunlight, while pointing its mirrors… Read More
Norman Rockwell's Vision of the Four Freedoms Left Some People Out. These Artists Are Trying to Fill Those Gaps
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was no surprise that Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms paintings were a hit. Though the Office of War Information had turned down the set as…
A DNA database with 2% of the population can be used to find almost anyone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Joseph James DeAngelo, who authorities believe to be the “Golden State Killer” responsible for 12 homicides and 51 rapes across California between 1974 and 1986, was arrested in April at the age of 72 at a point when the case was so old that many believed the killer would never be caught. DeAngelo was arrested…
Melania Trump: I Have More Important Things to Worry About Than My Husband's Alleged Infidelity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It is not concern and focus of mine"
As sea ice melts, some say walruses need better protection
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice.
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
U.S. Air Force's New Rocket Deals Put These Stocks in Focus
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.S. Defense Department's push to develop domestic launch systems could boost the country's aerospace industry.
The First Mice Bred from 2 Dads Died Gruesome Deaths—But They May Hold Clues to Saving Endangered Species
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The First Mice Bred from 2 Dads Died Gruesome Deaths—But They May Hold Clues to Saving Endangered Species
President Trump's Midterm Strategy: Dominate the News
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump is looking to influence the 2016 elections with a strategy he knows well: dominating the news.
Biosphere 2 legacy lives on more than quarter century later
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ORACLE, Ariz. (AP) — They lived for two years and 20 minutes under the glass of a miniature Earth, complete with an ocean, rain forest, desert, grasslands and mangroves. Their air and water were recycled, and they grew the sweet potatoes, rice and other food they needed to survive.
Humanitarians see surge in climate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The number of climate-related disasters around the world is growing rapidly, humanitarians warned Friday, urging more efforts to prepare and build resilience to looming changes on a warming planet. Climate shocks are already driving displacement, causing many to go hungry and are sparking or exacerbating conflicts around the globe, humanitarian workers said, cautioning that the situation is quickly deteriorating. "With climate change, the shocks and hazards are multiplying," Elhadj As Sy, Secretary-General of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), told AFP in an interview.
As sea ice melts, agency says harm to walruses not proven
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice.
You’re never too old to be a genius
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nobel prize season is always exciting and humbling for economists. It is wonderful to see great research honored. But it is also a little depressing because it is a stark reminder of how unproductive your youth probably was. Prizes often aren’t awarded until the winner is in their 50s or 60s, but it is usually…
Lawmakers Want to Hold China Accountable Over Abuses in Xinjiang. Here's What to Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lawmakers are calling for sanctions on China over the mass internment of Muslims in Xinjiang. Here's what to know
In hurricane
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico Beach (Etats-Unis) (AFP) - In devastated Mexico Beach, where Hurricane Michael unleashed its most violent rains and winds, residents are taking stock of the damage, reuniting with their loved ones -- and bracing for what will be a long, difficult clean-up operation. Charles Smith, 57, has run the beachfront Gulf View Motel for 34 years. "Maybe FEMA will help me out -- I would appreciate that," he said, referring to the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
In Iowa, Cory Booker's early work sets him apart
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Cory Booker has begun laying extensive groundwork in the key presidential primary state ahead of many of the other high-profile potential 2020 hopefuls.
Planned Parenthood plans for a post
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Abortion-rights advocates are preparing for the likelihood that the Supreme Court in the near future may curtail, or completely overturn, Roe v. Wade. Their strategy focuses on securing abortion rights in individual states.
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.