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Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Why the airline 'electronics ban' may not be discrimination
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
While policy's timing and targeted locations have raised eyebrows, the scholars who study terrorism aren't quite ready to equate the new policy – which bans any electronics larger than a cellphone from being carried on flights departing from 10 Middle Eastern airports – with discrimination. In their view, the "electronics ban" is consistent with how the US government has handled previous terrorist threats, and it may not stem from prejudice toward Muslims. “I think to immediately jump to the conclusion that this is connected with the travel ban is too far, too quick,” says Robert Pape, professor of political science at the University of Chicago who specializes in international security.
Passcode signs off
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Dear Passcode readers:
How Washington evaluates software vulnerabilities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In August, the National Security Agency (NSA) found itself scrambling to figure out how a group dubbed the Shadow Brokers obtained the agency’s alleged hacking tools, some of which they posted online and others they offered to the highest bidder. The startling breach not only revealed that the NSA seemed to rely on previously unknown security vulnerabilities – called zero-days – in Cisco and Fortinet commercial software to carry out digital espionage campaigns, it also exposed NSA tactics to foreign adversaries. It remains unclear whether the NSA used these tools for surveillance operations, but it appears the agency kept the flaws from the software vendors, depriving them of a chance to patch their systems.
North Korea missile launch toward S. Korea failed. How often does that happen?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The missile, launched from the eastern coastal town of Wonsan, “[appeared] to have exploded within seconds of launch,” the US Pacific Command said in a statement. American officials had been aware of the planned launch for several days, as they observed a rocket being moved and VIP seating being assembled in Wonsan, they told the Associated Press on Tuesday. The launch failure comes as the United States and South Korea engage in their annual “Foal Eagle” joint military exercises, which typically provoke a strong response from the North.
What is Facebook's responsibility when people broadcast crimes?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The apparent sexual assault of a Chicago teenager, broadcast on Facebook Live, has reignited debate about the feature and Facebook’s responsibility to address crimes. It was not until Monday, however, that her family learned that an apparent sexual assault on the girl had been broadcast on Facebook Live. None of the 40 viewers had reported the incident through Facebook’s content-review system, but a teenager mentioned the video to Reginald King, one of the girl’s relatives.
Smart gym bag promises to clean itself and everything inside it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Ever had the experience of opening your gym bag to be greeted by the smell of sweaty workout clothes? The folks behind new Kickstarter Paqsule think they’ve come up with a solution: a bag which cleans itself.
You can now search for a doctor using emoji, because 2017 is sorrow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Feeling heartburn? Just type ❤️. Zocdoc, an online service that helps you find doctors and schedule appointments, has revamped its search to be more user-friendly. It's calling the initiative "patient-powered search," and it's all about finding ways to help those in need speak naturally, according to the company's blog post. SEE ALSO: Google's new messaging app translates your voice into emoji  The revamp aims to address the "disconnect between medical speak and patients' own colloquial language—think 'gyno' not 'obstetrician-gynecologist.'" This also means you can search for doctors with emoji. There's 蠟 for allergies, ❤️ for heartburn and ✈️  for travel medicine. You can even use the   emoji to find and book with a gastroenterologist.  "We see it more as a fun addition to the experience, rather than a core feature of the product" a representative from Zocdoc said via email. Is this really necessary, though? The emojification of apps of every kind is far from new, and it's getting a bit ridiculous. While it's important especially in areas like health care to make experiences as user friendly as possible, we don't need Zocdoc to behave like our actual friends do. Forcing emoji into apps results in combinations like ☀️ for dermatologist and   for primary care physician—at which point, they're not even useful. Sorry Zocdoc, we give this one a . WATCH: Indulge your fear of heights with China's latest glass bridge
Snapchat is proving its street cred with TV advertisers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Snapchat desperately wants to carve out a piece of the $70 billion in brand spending that...
LinkedIn is a getting a Facebook
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
LinkedIn has announced Trending Storylines, a new section for web and mobile that shows news and content it thinks you’ll find relevant and interesting. In some ways, it's more useful than Facebook's newsfeed.
Mars colonisation: SpaceX and Nasa working together to identify landing spots
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk-led SpaceX has said it is in the process of identifying landing spots on Mars and is getting help from Nasa in doing so. Space X's Mars colonisation plan was slated to kick off in 2018 but is going to be delayed to 2020. Paul Wooster of SpaceX said their team is working with scientists at Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to identify and finalise several potential landing sites, one of which looks particularly promising at the moment.
Navy Builds Ramjet Missile with Model Rocket Engines and a Credit Card
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The result is propulsion for a long-range deep strike missile, developed in six months.
Donald Trump signs law that backs Nasa plans to send people to Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Donald Trump has signed a bill that funds Nasa’s plans to send people to Mars for the first time. It is also the first time in seven years that there has been an authorisation bill for Nasa, according to Republican Senator Ted Cruz, a chief sponsor of the bill. Mr Cruz joined several astronauts and other politicians in the Oval Office to watch the President sign the bill.
Tony Robbins: To be truly successful, avoid these 3 mental traps
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Even a great strategy won't get you anywhere unless you change your thinking too.
Watch Lava From This Hawaiian Volcano Set the Ocean on Fire
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This bright flow of lava from Kilauea poured into the Pacific Ocean for days this week, causing explosions of steam and sending chunks of rock flying into the air.
Trump on the health care vote: ‘I hope that it’s going to all work out’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
WASHINGTON — President Trump drummed up support for the GOP health care bill and expressed optimism it will pass a House floor vote in a Tuesday night speech before an audience of Republican members of Congress, donors and loyalists.
Pelosi on health care fight: ‘Next 48 hours will be all hands on deck’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., was asked by CNN’s Anderson Cooper on Tuesday whom she considers the current leader of the Democratic Party. “Well, President Obama was the president of the United States until a matter of weeks ago.
Viral video imagines Elmo getting fired over PBS budget cuts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A viral online video imagines lovable "Sesame Street" character Elmo getting fired due to budget cuts to PBS.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Remarkable 430m
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The invertebrate is malacostracan, measuring just 8.9mm long, is 1.3mm wide at its widest point and has 10 legs, according to a paper in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The fossil has been named Cascolus ravitis, in a play on the name of the British naturalist and broadcaster David Attenborough. Cascolus is a Latinisation of the meaning of the surname Attenborough – "a fortified place" in Old English. Ravitis is a mixture of the Latin for Leicester, where Attenborough grew up, life (vita) and messenger (commeatis).
Thousands of huge ‘gas bubbles’ appear in the ground
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thousands of huge bulges have appeared in the ground in Siberia – and scientists believe that up to 7,000 bubbles full of ancient gas about to explode. The ‘bubbles’ are thought to be caused by global warming – which causes permafrost beneath the ground to thaw and release methane. When the vast bubbles explode, they leave large craters in the landscape – and may releasee methane gas into the atmosphere, according to the Siberian Times.
A boom in medical tourism to Mexico predicted if Obamacare ends
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A woman enters a dentists’ office in Tijuana, Mexico. Data from a U.S. government survey suggests that 150,000 to 320,000 Americans list health care as a reason for traveling abroad each year. Because Medicare offers virtually no coverage for dental work, Mexican border towns like Nogales have become go-to destinations for affordable, quality dental care among seniors and snowbirds from southern Arizona, California, and Texas.
Police: Man checks out of hospital, steals ambulance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
EAST MEADOW, N.Y. (AP) — Authorities on Long Island say an 83-year-old man has been arrested after checking himself out of a hospital and stealing an ambulance.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
New Tool to Stop ISIS From Trafficking Artifacts: A Liquid Tracking Device
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A team of Syrian archaeologists in Turkey received a box in January that could have been meant for a detective agency: It contained small bottles, brushes, a sprayer and an ultraviolet light. Inside the bottles was a traceable liquid that the team hopes will deter looters from targeting Syrian artifacts, or help authorities track the artifacts if they disappear—cutting off a reported source of revenue for ISIS. A month later, the archaeologists smuggled the box across the Syrian border and brought it to a museum in Ma’ara, where they used brushes to apply the liquid to treasured mosaics.
Florida eco
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With a farm-to-table restaurant, driverless shuttles, homes built with the latest green techniques and a massive solar farm to offset energy use, Florida's first sustainable town is now open for business. The buzz about Babcock Ranch, an eco-friendly city of the future and the largest development of its kind in the United States, drew more than 15,000 people out this month for a peek. "We are building a new town from the ground up and that just doesn't happen very often," said Syd Kitson, a retired American football player who dreamed up the vision for Babcock Ranch over a decade ago.
There are 11 newly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's time for you to look up at the sky more often. If you did, you might catch a volutus, or roll cloud, which looks like a tube that appears to be spinning along its horizontal axis. Or perhaps you'll get really lucky, and see a dramatic-looking asperitas cloud, from the Latin word for roughness. These resemble a rough sea's surface, as seen from underwater.  The volutus and asperitas are but two of the 11 new cloud classifications included in the new edition of the International Cloud Atlas that the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) will publish online on Thursday.  SEE ALSO: Global warming made Australia's record-breaking, sizzling summer 50 times more likely This is the first update to the cloud atlas since 1987, and some of the new clouds featured were the subject of concerted, multi-year lobbying campaigns. This also marks the first time the guide is being published online.  That's right — there are cloud lobbyists. Well, sort of, anyway. The Cloud Appreciation Society, a group of about 43,000 cloud enthusiasts scattered throughout 110 countries, has pushed for the recognition of asperitas as a new type of cloud since 2006.  Gavin Pretor-Pinney, the society's founder, said that these clouds first came to his group's attention more than a decade ago, when a dramatic display occurred in the skies above Iowa. He describes such clouds as resembling a turbulent sea as viewed from below the water's surface.  “I wasn’t ever really expecting the new classification of cloud to really become a newly classified cloud under the WMO,” Pretor-Pinney said in an interview. He said the society helped document the asperitas formation using an iPhone app called Cloudspotter that allows users to take pictures of clouds and guess what types are in the image. Experts then respond to them with the proper classification.  “The important thing... is that this gave us a great body of examples of the asperitas formation, taken in different places around the world,” Pretor-Pinney said. So far, the group has gathered 280,000 cloud images through the app, he said. In addition to the asperitas classification, the new atlas also contains new names for clouds that were already well-known to weather geeks around the world, including the Kelvin-Helmhotz cloud and the hole-punch cloud, also known as a fallstreak hole. Officially, these will now be known as fluctus and cavum, respectively, though meteorologists may exhibit a fondness for  the less formal terminology.  A roll cloud, now formally known as  a volutus cloud. Image: Dan Bush/Missouri Skies Another "accessory cloud," which is well-known to tornado chasers, will now have the Latin name flumen. Chasers call it a "beaver's tail," owing to its shape and placement within a severe thunderstorm. In addition, the new atlas puts forward five  "special clouds" with tongue twisting names like "cataractagenitus," "flammagenitus," "homogenitus" and  "silvagenitus." These clouds are created by localized factors such as large waterfalls, heat from wildfires and engine exhaust from high-flying aircraft, which are also known as contrails.  Pretor-Pinney, who has written a book about clouds, thinks deeply about the cultural significance of the formations above.  “The sky is of course the most chaotic and boundless of nature’s displays. It’s the reason why we love it, the sense of it being free and unboundable," he said. "Of course, humans like to contain things, we like to contain things in our minds especially…. That is what this classification system, this naming system is all about.” “Clouds mock our ability to do that because they're in constant flux, a constant change.” Even with the new cloud types, there's no reason to worry: The 10 main cloud species you learned in school will remain the same, including cumulus, stratus and cirrus. Pretor-Pinney says the new cloud atlas will help people focus on what's going on above them, which given the wealth of stressful political news lately, may be a much-needed break.  “I think it’s good for your soul,” he said of cloud watching.  While the atlas has value in providing a standardized way of classifying clouds that will be used by weather observers worldwide, it may also help turn more eyes skyward. “Ultimately from my point of view, in terms of the general public, it’s about getting people more engaged with the sky.” WATCH: Turbulent shelf clouds put on specatcular show over Sydney
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Why Feeling Tired May Be Harmful to Your Health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Do you ever feel tired for no reason? When it happened to viewer Kaeche one time too many, she reached out for answers.
Liposuction for a Perkier Bustline?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains graphic images that may be disturbing. Parents are advised that these images may not be suitable for young children.
Tattooing Your Pets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A Russian tattoo artist may have taken his vocation a little too far – he gave his pet cat, named Demon, four large tattoos. Demon is a hairless cat, so the ink will always show.
Suicides on Social Media!?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Teens and young people have been killing themselves or making suicide attempts and live-streaming the event via social media. Psychiatrist Dr. Domenick Sportelli joins The Doctors to discuss the phenomenon and how to prevent it. “The fact that live-stream suicides are becoming, in a way, a new norm – very disturbing,” says ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork.
6 Things To Know About Male Eating Disorders
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
You might not know it, but eating disorders are common among men. Watch the video to learn more about the condition.
Healing Crystals for 'Down There'!?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains mature subject matter. Viewer discretion is advised.
Ancient quakes may point to sinking risk for part of California coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Tom James SEATTLE (Reuters) - The Big One may be overdue to hit California but scientists near Los Angeles have found a new risk for the area during a major earthquake: abrupt sinking of land, potentially below sea level. The last known major quake on the San Andreas fault occurred in 1857, but three quakes over the last 2,000 years on nearby faults made ground just outside Los Angeles city limits sink as much as three feet, according to a study published Monday in the journal Scientific Reports. Seismologists estimate the 800 mile-long San Andreas, which runs most of the length of the state, should see a large quake roughly every 150 years.
Scientists find how using "satnav" switches off parts of brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - If you have long feared that using a "satnav" navigation system to get to your destination is making you worse at finding the way alone, research now suggests you may be right. Scientists studying what satnavs do to the brain have found that people using them effectively switch off parts of the brain that would otherwise be utilised to simulate different routes and boost navigational skills. Publishing the findings in the journal Nature Communications on Tuesday, the researchers said that when volunteers in an experiment navigated manually, their hippocampus and prefrontal cortex brain regions had spikes of activity.
I Feel Safe in My Lab Coat, Even Though I Shouldn’t
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lab coats aren’t designed with women’s bodies in mind, but I still love mine. I’m a scientist, and when I work with dangerous chemicals in the lab, I wear something called a bunny suit. It’s not nearly as sexy as it sounds. For starters, there’s no formal bow tie or fluffy cottontail; instead, imagine an adult onesie that’s made of plastic. (Actually, the fabric is similar to weather-resistant house wrap, as seen on HGTV.) It’s soft and velvety and creates a sweaty little greenhouse that traps heat and somehow wicks moisture toward my body. The cut is extremely unisex. ...
Ancient Greece: 2,500
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists in Greece have discovered the remains of an ancient port, where Greek naval forces may have gathered before engaging in the historic battle of Salamis with Persian troops in 480 BC. The battle of Salamis is the first great naval battle recorded in history and one of the most important ever fought by the ancient Greeks. Taking place during the Greco-Persian Wars, it is remembered as a real exploit on the part of Greek naval troops, as they managed to defeat a much larger Persian fleet.
Taiwan: Earliest Catholic grave in Asia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Investigation of the earliest Spanish settlements in Taiwan, dating from the 1620s, has revealed the earliest European-style burial discovered so far in Asia-Pacific. The body is an adult male buried in a Catholic cemetery at the 17th Century Spanish settlement of San Salvador de Isla Hermosa on the Taiwanese island of Heping Dao (Peace Island), which was occupied between 1626 until 1642. "It's the first time we have such an old European grave uncovered in Asia-Pacific as a whole.
First U.S. bumble bee added to endangered species list
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The rusty patched bumble bee became the first wild bee in the continental United States to gain federal protection on Tuesday when it was added to the government's list of endangered and threatened species. The bee, once widely found in the upper Midwest and Northeastern United States, was listed after U.S. President Donald Trump's administration lifted a hold it had placed on a plan for federal protections proposed last fall by the administration of former President Barack Obama.
Gorsuch Supreme Court confirmation hearings: Day 2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Confirmation hearings for Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, were under way Tuesday, with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee questioning the federal judge from Colorado. Yahoo News Senior National Affairs Reporter Liz Goodwin was in Washington, D.C., covering the hearings on Capitol Hill. Yahoo News’ instant analysis from the day’s proceedings is the blog below.
Gorsuch hearing puts spotlight on medical aid in dying
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As Supreme Court nominee Judge Neil Gorsuch faces a Senate confirmation vote, a 2006 book he authored arguing against assisted suicide and euthanasia is receiving renewed attention, and so is the related, although distinct, practice of medical aid in dying. The husband of the late Brittany Maynard, who ended her own life with medication in 2014 after being diagnosed with a terminal brain tumor, says Gorsuch would alter his views if he saw the reality of the practice. “The experience that I went through … if Neil Gorsuch or anyone in his position had seen firsthand what medical aid in dying is, he would probably have a much different opinion,” Dan Diaz said in an interview with Yahoo News Global Anchor Katie Couric.
Tuesday’s top moments from the Neil Gorsuch confirmation hearings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Day two of confirmation hearings for Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee for the Supreme Court, was eventful, as members of the Senate Judiciary Committee questioned the federal judge from Colorado. WASHINGTON — Gorsuch said he was never asked by Trump to promise to overturn the landmark Supreme Court case protecting a woman’s right to an abortion and would have promptly walked out on the president if he had. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., asked Gorsuch on the second day of his confirmation hearing if the president had ever made Gorsuch promise to vote to overturn the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision if he were confirmed to the Supreme Court.
Gorsuch frustrates Democrats at confirmation hearing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Gorsuch testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., March 21, 2017. WASHINGTON—During a 10-hour grilling from senators Tuesday, Judge Neil Gorsuch offered few hints as to his judicial philosophy, frustrating the Judiciary Committee’s Democrats in a polished and calm performance. The 49-year-old Colorado judge also repeatedly insisted he would maintain his independence from President Donald Trump, and said no one in the administration had asked him to promise to rule a certain way on cases once he got to the court.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
One Way to Avoid Getting Hooked on Prescription Painkillers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Taking prescription painkillers such as Percocet or Vicodin for more than a few days sharply increases your risk of getting hooked on the drugs, according to a new study just out from the Centers...
15 Supplement Ingredients to Always Avoid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
With the help of an expert panel of independent doctors and dietary-supplement researchers, Consumer Reports identified 15 supplement ingredients that are potentially harmful. The risks include o...
5 Heart
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Ready to get down and groove? Follow along for a heart-pumping, fat-blasting workout you’ll actually have fun doing. 
France to probe Fiat for emissions cheating
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
French investigating magistrates will open a probe into carmaker Fiat Chrysler for suspected cheating in diesel emissions tests, judicial sources said on Tuesday. The investigation follows a recommendation from the French anti-fraud office and will be run by public health magistrates, they said. France is already investigating global heavyweight Volkswagen and French champion Renault for allegedly fitting engines with devices designed to fool emissions test equipment, making cars seem less polluting than they actually were.