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In wake of U.N. speech, Kim calls Trump a ‘dotard.’ Trump fires back at ‘madman.’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un have unleashed personal attacks on one another after the U.S. commander in chief’s speech at the United Nations. “Kim Jong Un of North Korea, who is obviously a madman who doesn’t mind starving or killing his people, will be tested like never before!” Trump wrote Friday morning.
California TV viewers alarmed by apocalyptic emergency alert
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LAKE FOREST, Calif. (AP) — Some television viewers in southern California were startled when an apocalyptic emergency alert flashed on their screens.
Cops: 8
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
DARLINGTON, Pa. (AP) — Police say a drunken Pennsylvania man had an 8-year-old girl drive him around until someone saw the car moving recklessly and called 911.
What is antifa – and does its rise mean the left is becoming more violent?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Concerns about possible violence are surfacing again in the Bay Area as the University of California, Berkeley, gears up for “Free Speech Week.” The four-day event, hosted by a conservative student group, features controversial personalities from the so-called "alt right" – a coalition of groups that espouse white nationalism, anti-Semitism, and populism. The occasion follows counterprotests in Berkeley and other cities such as Portland that have given critics fodder to accuse leftist activists of stirring up violence in otherwise peaceful public gatherings. At the heart of the allegations is antifa, whose appearance at neo-Nazi and white nationalist rallies has led to heated, and sometimes nasty, confrontations. Q: What is antifa?
Blood Levels of Magnesium May Predict Dementia Risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The levels of magnesium in your blood may be linked to your risk of developing dementia later in life, a new study from the Netherlands finds. Compared with people in the study who had high or low levels of the mineral in their blood, those with levels in the middle range were less likely to develop dementia, according to the study, which was published online today (Sept. 20) in the journal Neurology. The findings "need to be confirmed with additional studies," but if they hold up, it's possible that blood tests to measure magnesium levels could one day be used to help determine who is at risk of developing dementia, Kieboom said.
Republicans Have a Bill to Repeal Obamacare. They Don't Know Exactly What It Will Do
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
No one is certain exactly just how many Americans will lose their insurance under Graham-Cassidy.
President Trump's Iran Deal Decision
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Morning Must Reads: September 21
The CCleaner Malware Fiasco Targeted at Least 18 Specific Tech Firms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The backdooring of security software CCleaner now appears to have been more of a targeted spying operation than a mere cybercrime scheme.
Google Paid HTC $1.1 Billion To Turn Itself Into a Phone Maker
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's not quite an acquisition, but Google's agreement with HTC fast-tracks its efforts to take over the gadget world.
Can anyone guarantee the security of personal data online?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Insight from Kiersten Todt, director of the Cyber Readiness Institute and fellow at the University of Pittsburgh's Cyber Institute
London's 143
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Even a "fatberg" — an enormous clotted, mass of fat and garbage found clogging a London sewer — deserves a second chance, and the biggest fatberg ever found in a British sewer recently got one. But once the oily mess is removed from its sewer home under London's Whitechapel neighborhood, it will be put to good use, and will be converted into about 2,643 gallons (10,000 liters) of biodiesel, officials with Thames Water, the agency tasked with removing the fatberg, announced yesterday (Sept. 18) in a statement. An infographic shows how far the Whitechapel fatberg extends underground — the length of two British football fields.
President Trump Stays Mum on Iran Nuclear Deal Decision
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump has called the deal the worst agreement ever negotiated by the U.S.
Here’s When Flights to Puerto Rico Will Start Again After Hurricane Maria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Many airlines are looking to bring back flight service soon
Hope fading for survivors as Mexico search enters third day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico waited anxiously on Thursday for signs of life in the rubble of collapsed buildings as a desperate search for survivors of a devastating earthquake entered a third day. Authorities put the death toll following Tuesday's 7.1 magnitude quake at more than 250 people, with the number expected to rise. Rescue workers scrabbled to remove tons of rubble at dozens of flattened buildings in the capital and across several central states.
One small teraflop: HPE’s supercomputer takes a giant leap on the space station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The most powerful computer ever sent into space proved its mettle this month by registering a processing speed in excess of a trillion floating-point calculations per second, a measure that’s known as a teraflop. “HPE’s Spaceborne Computer is the first high-performance commercial off-the-shelf computer system to run one teraflop at the International Space Station,” Mark Fernandez, Americas HPC technology officer at Hewlett Packard Enterprise and co-principal investigator for the project, said today in a blog post. The Spaceborne Computer project, pioneered by NASA and HPE, will put off-the-shelf equipment through its paces over the next year to study how well… Read More
Twitter Will Meet With Senate Intelligence Committee on Russia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For the first time, a social media company will provide answers in a public hearing about Russian efforts to swing the 2016 presidential election.
Will the Rohingya Exodus Be Aung San Suu Kyi's Fall From Grace?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi was long hailed as the hero of human rights in her homeland. But the forced exodus of nearly half a million minority Rohingya has changed that
Huge sea turtles slowly coming back from brink of extinction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sea turtles are lumbering back from the brink of extinction, a new study says.
President Trump Says He Expected a Health Care Bill on His Desk As Soon as He Got Into Office
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It hasn’t worked out that way," he remarked shortly after
Communication in Puerto Rico paralyzed after mobile networks knocked out by Hurricane Maria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The mobile phone network in Puerto Rico is either mostly unavailable or has entirely failed, according to numerous reports from people trying to get in touch with relatives and loved ones.  Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico on Wednesday as a Category 4 storm, the most intense in nearly a century. Power is out on the entire island, and cellphone towers were reportedly knocked over—leaving the prospect that communication on the island could be a continuing problem.  A T-Mobile spokesperson confirmed outages on Puerto Rico. "Puerto Rico has experienced widespread devastation from Hurricane Maria that knocked out power and services across the board. We’re working as fast as we can to get customers back online," the spokesperson said in an email. An AT&T spokesperson also confirmed that its network had been damaged. “We are closely monitoring our network in Puerto Rico and assessing the full effects of Hurricane Maria.  Storm damage is significant across the region and commercial power is unavailable, both of which can affect our ability to provide service.  We are coordinating with local authorities and deploying resources as rapidly as possible to assist in restoration and recovery efforts as quickly as conditions allow," the spokesperson said in an email. The Federal Communications Commission reported on Thursday afternoon that almost all of the cell sites on Puerto Rico were out of service.   .@FCC communications report shows that 95.2% of cell sites are out of service in #PuertoRico after hurricane #Maria https://t.co/EU1D8wuoJ9 pic.twitter.com/mWNlK1BeyN — Carmen Scurato (@CarmenScurato) September 21, 2017 Numerous people posted on social media that they were still unable to reach people on the island through their mobile phones.  Puerto Rico's power & cell service is literally out everywhere on the island there's no way to check on my fam — ᴎᵄ࿆†࿊ (@xo_keiline) September 21, 2017 No power and cell service in Puerto Rico means it's impossible to get updates on loved ones there. Praying everyone is safe. — Jason Davis ⚽礪 (@davisjsn) September 20, 2017 Right now we are having issues in Puerto Rico with all cell cites being affected by the hurricane at this time. — Sprint Care (@sprintcare) September 21, 2017 Some have reported being able to find some service. Thursday morning. We are ok and so is our house. Puerto Rico has suffered extensive damage. Internet and cell spotty. #HuracanMaria — David Gasser (@dfgasser) September 21, 2017 Internet access on Puerto Rico also appears to be mostly out, as detailed by Dyn Research. It released an image showing that DNS queries– outgoing internet traffic from the island, in other words–just about stopped after the hurricane hit. DNS queries from #PuertoRico near zero as of 11:30 UTC 20-Sep. #HurricaneMaria causing islandwide power and internet failures. pic.twitter.com/ANaZv1QLxr — Dyn Research (@DynResearch) September 21, 2017 Good samaritans had begun to coalesce around a hashtag—#MeUnoAyudar—offering people on Puerto Rico with internet access the chance to contact people.  If you're in #puertorico and have access to internet, DM or comment and I'll call your family to let them know you're ok  #MeUnoAyudar — Mimi Lopez (@mimilopez) September 21, 2017 Si estás en #PuertoRico y tienes internet pero no llamadas, me ofrezco para llamar a tu familia y avisar  #MeUnoAyudar — Mimi Lopez (@mimilopez) September 21, 2017 WATCH: Here's everything you need to know about the new Apple Watch
Gab, the social network of the 'alt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A social networking website popular with white supremacists faced a fresh round of controversies this week after it banned the former system administrator of the neo-Nazi Daily Stormer from using its services. It also faced a deadline from its domain registrar in Australia, which said it would delist the site over its controversial content.
Better late than never? Library book returned 78 years later
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ATTLEBORO, Mass. (AP) — It took nearly 80 years, but a book borrowed during the Great Depression has been returned to a Massachusetts public library.
The RNC Has Spent Almost $200,000 on Donald Trump Jr.'s Legal Fees For the Russia Investigation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump Jr. recently testified in private to Senate investigators that he did not collude with Russia
North Korea Compares Donald Trump's Threat to a 'Dog Barking'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Following Trump's comments at his debut U.N speech
NASA trying to save victims of natural disasters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fox Firepower: Allison Barrie shares a closer look at F.I.N.D.E.R, a revolutionary technology, developed by NASA, that can help rescue someone, whether they are conscious or not, using the person's heartbeat
Do All Animals Sleep? Brainless Jellyfish Still Need Rest, Study Finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cassiopea jellyfish are nicknamed "upside down" jellyfish thanks to their preferred tentacles-up pose. The jellyfish are called Cassiopea, nicknamed "upside-down" jellyfish for their preference to hang out in shallow waters near the seafloor with their tentacles up. Cassiopea are intriguing to scientists because they have a nervous system, but a very simple one—instead of a centralized brain like ours, they have a network of nerves spread through their bodies. Throughout the day and night, the jellyfish pulse their bells (the non-tentacle portions of jellyfish), creating currents around their bodies.
Donald Trump Said 'Nambia' When He Meant Namibia. Here Are 4 Things to Know About It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The nation is one of the world's top diamond producers, among other things
Cassini captured mysterious 'glitch' on Saturn's rings before death dive
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cassini sent home one last batch of photos from Saturn before plunging to its death Friday and among them was an attempt to record a mysterious object embedded in the planet's rings, otherwise known as "Peggy."
Iraqi Kurds to vote on independence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The outcome of the vote, almost certain to be "yes," is likely to further rattle a region still engulfed in the fight against the Islamic State group. Baghdad and Iraq's neighbors Iran and Turkey — which worry it will encourage their own sizable Kurdish populations — have all demanded it be called off.
Kurds to vote on independence, potentially splitting Iraq
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Kurdish people are taking an enormous step to claim their own country in northern Iraq. A referendum vote to secede from the country and become an independent Kurdistan will take place on September 25.
Lead in Flint's water linked to decline in birth rate, study finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The lead contamination of the Flint, Mich., water system that began in 2014 has shown up in the blood of thousands of children across the city, and public health officials are keeping a watch out for possible health and behavioral effects. According to the research of health economics professors Daniel Grossman of West Virginia University and David Slusky of the University of Kansas, after the city’s water source was switched to the Flint river in 2014, fertility rates among Flint residents decreased by 12 percent, while fetal death rates increased by 58 percent.
Letter from Mexico: Lessons in a quake zone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Back in 2013, I was in Mexico City for a work trip when the light fixtures started swaying in a ground-floor hotel restaurant. In the United States, we’re taught to find a sturdy table to crouch under, or a doorframe to stand in when the earth starts to tremble. So, I did just that, throwing my hands up against one of the hulking doorways of the 1920s building.
The big question: Will cancer immune therapy work for me?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Dennis Lyon was a genetic train wreck. Cancer was ravaging his liver, lungs, bones and brain, and tests showed so many tumor mutations that drugs targeting one or two wouldn't do much good. It seemed like very bad news, yet his doctors were encouraged.
Five ways ancient India changed the world – with maths
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
High school students can blame ancient India for quadratic equations and calculus.
Melania Trump Urges Adults to Teach Children About Cyberbullying 'By Our Own Example'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The First Lady condemned bullying both "online and in person"
Mother Wakes Up to Find House Burning and Her Infant and 2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The man hanged himself shortly after
Photos from Puerto Rico reveal the devastating power of Hurricane Maria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This year has been a historic one for hurricanes, with major storm after major storm churning through the Atlantic. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Jose, and Maria all reached "major hurricane" (Category 3 or above) status as they spun through those warm waters.  And as these storms have lashed not only the U.S. mainland but many of the smaller islands that populate the Caribbean and the Atlantic, we've been reminded of what a devastating and destructive force nature can be.  SEE ALSO: Reports: Hurricane Maria leaves Puerto Rico entirely without power Puerto Rico is no different. The small island of 3.4 million people was still cleaning up from being side-swiped by Irma when Maria slammed into it on Tuesday, engulfing nearly the entire island with hurricane-force winds. Now the clean up begins anew and we're reminded once more of the raw power of these storms, of he widespread damage they can cause.  An image acquired by the GOES-13 satellite at 1:15 pm local time  of Hurricanes Maria in the Caribbean (bottom) and Jose (L, top) in the North Atlantic Ocean.Image: NASA Earth Observatory HANDOUT/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock Hurricane Maria Landfalls in Puerto Rico San Juan September 20, 2017.Image: Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images A picture shows rocks swept by strong waves onto a road in Le Carbet, on the French Caribbean island of Martinique, after it was hit by Hurricane Maria, on September 19, 2017.Image: LIONEL CHAMOISEAU/AFP/Getty Images A parking lot is flooded near Roberto Clemente Coliseum in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 20, 2017, during Hurricane Maria.Image: HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. San Juan September 20, 2017.Image: Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images A stranded pleasure boat is pictured in Goyave on September 19, 2017 in the French territory of Guadeloupe, after the passage of Hurricane Maria.Image: CEDRICK ISHAM CALVADOS/AFP/Getty Images A woman who voluntarily left her house to take refuge is seen at the Roberto Clemente Coliseum in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 19, 2017, prior to the arrival of Hurricane Maria.Image: HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images A road is flooded in Saint-Pierre, on the French Caribbean island of Martinique, after it was hit by Hurricane Maria, on September 19, 2017.Image: LIONEL CHAMOISEAU/AFP/Getty Images Residents seek shelter inside Roberto Clemente Coliseum in San Juan, Puerto Rico, early on September 20, 2017, as Hurricane Maria passes the island.Image: HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images Trees block the streets after Hurricane Maria at Escambron Beach in San Juan, Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017.Image: Pablo Pantoja/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images Flooded roads are seen as Hurricane Maria hits Puerto Rico in Fajardo, on September 20, 2017.Image: RICARDO ARDUENGO/AFP/Getty Images Trees are toppled in a parking lot at Roberto Clemente Coliseum in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 20, 2017, during the passage of the Hurricane Maria.Image: HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images A man passes through a door at Roberto Clemente Coliseum in San Juan, Puerto Rico, which suffered damages from wind on September 20, 2017.Image: HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images Residents of San Juan, Puerto Rico, deal with damages to their homes on September 20, 2017, as Hurricane Maria batters the island.Image: HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images
Dems Push for a Digital Ad Crackdown to Stop Foreign Meddling
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As Facebook falls under more scrutiny for Russia's ad buys, Congress eyes regulation.
A Way Forward in the North Korea Crisis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There is nothing the US can do to North Korea that will lead to its renunciation of its nuclear weapons program.
Gab, the social network of the ‘alt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A social networking website popular with white supremacists faced a fresh round of controversies this week after it banned the former system administrator of the neo-Nazi Daily Stormer from using its services. It also faced a deadline from its domain registrar in Australia, which said it would delist the site over its controversial content.
Trump unveils new sanctions targeting North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Following up the forceful statement he made at the U.N. on Tuesday, the president announced a new executive order applying further restrictions on North Korea and firms that do business with the country.
Police: Shop owner fires warning shot, gets stolen beer back
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
COCOA, Fla. (AP) — Police say a Florida gas station owner chased a man and fired a warning shot, forcing him to return some stolen beer.
Prosecutors: Texas lawmaker spent $51K on online psychic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A Texas lawmaker apparently spent more than $51,000 of her own money on an online psychic, showed up for work at the Capitol impaired by medication and hid a cellphone from investigators, prosecutors allege in a court filing this week.
ISIS has planted a ticking bomb that is hard to defuse: traumatized children
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In camps for internally displaced persons and in the war-torn towns and villages of western Iraq, there is one legacy of the so-called Islamic State’s brutal reign whose magnitude experts and authorities are only beginning to understand: traumatized children. From the stateless children of ISIS members, to child soldiers and the tens of thousands indoctrinated in ISIS schools, a generation of young Iraqis has been traumatized and radicalized by the nihilistic jihadist group. Unless authorities and the international community work to help reintegrate these children into society, including by providing counseling and psychiatric care, experts warn that Iraq and Syria will face a generational “time-bomb” of extremism, deliberately planted by ISIS, that could one day again threaten regional stability.
Is it the Kremlin’s turn to get WikiLeaked?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It’s been seven years since WikiLeaks chief Julian Assange threatened to drop an information bombshell on the Kremlin that would show Russians the inner workings of their government and business world. WikiLeaks went on to publish hundreds of thousands of secret US diplomatic cables and, more recently, a huge trove of emails from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager. Recommended: Sochi, Soviets, and czars: How much do you know about Russia?
Aid to North Koreans? The idea has roots.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In a surprise move that seems at odds with Washington’s threatening stance toward North Korea, the government of South Korea announced Sept. 21 that it plans to resume humanitarian aid to its neighbor. It also seems to contradict the ratcheting up of sanctions by the United Nations Security Council against the Kim regime in Pyongyang. The $8 million of assistance offered by President Moon Jae-in is aimed at helping close to a million children and pregnant women who are suffering from a recent drought in North Korea.
44 Spooktacularly Simple Halloween Crafts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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The SEC Says Its Filing System Got Hacked and the Data Possibly Used for Illegal Trades
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The revelation comes as Americans continue to grapple with the repercussions of the massive, months-long hack of Equifax
Republicans Eye Last
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a startling reversal of fortune over the last week, G.O.P. lawmakers have resuscitated a new effort to dismantle the Affordable Care Act.