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Humans have caused surprising changes to the planet that will be visible billions of years from now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Humans have only been on Earth for a minute fraction of the time the planet has existed. Yet...
Archaeologists go high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More than 2,500 years ago, an Athenian nobleman named Cylon -- the first recorded Olympic champion -- tried to take over the city of Athens and install himself as its sole ruler. According to Thucydides and Herodotus, Athenian and Greek historians who wrote about the coup, Cylon enticed an army of followers to enter the city and lay siege to the Acropolis. Now archaeologists in Athens believe they may have found some of the remains of Cylon's army in a mass grave in Phaleron, four miles (6 kilometres) south of downtown Athens.
So Many Critics of Economics Miss What It Gets Right
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The standard takedown has some merit. But the recent focus on hard data instead of theories is making a big difference.
These gorgeous posters of national parks will make you excited for the solar eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There’s still time to plan a trip to watch the rare solar eclipse, which will cut across the US on August 21. Artist and educator Tyler Nordgren, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Redlands in California​, saw an opportunity to use the National Parks to educate people about space science.
To infinity and beyond? US lawmakers advance 'Space Corps' plans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
US lawmakers on Friday advanced a defense bill that includes a provision to establish a new branch of the military -- dubbed "Space Corps" -- that would focus on space operations. The space force measure has met stiff resistance from the Trump administration, which says there's no need to establish another tier of military bureaucracy. The huge National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) spending bill, approved by the House of Representatives on Friday, includes an amendment that would create a Space Corps by taking functions currently under the Air Force and placing these in a separate command.
Another Grib Diamond Mine in Finland
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ZURICH, SWITZERLAND / ACCESSWIRE / July 13, 2017 / Yesterday, after market close, Arctic Star Exploration Corp. (TSX-V: ADD) announced to acquire 243 hectares centered around the 2 diamondiferous Black ...
The Sun Isn’t Special Among The Stars In The Universe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists used to think the sun was special in how its magnetic fields moved and how it erupted gas into space, but it turns out other stars are doing the same thing.
Space Corps Moves Forward Despite Opposition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The House Armed Services Committee introduced legislation for a new military branch for space, but they face opposition at every turn.
N. Korea likely has more plutonium than previously thought: monitor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New images of North Korea's main nuclear facility show that the isolated regime has apparently produced more plutonium for its weapons programme than previously thought, a US monitor said, as tensions soar over Pyongyang's ambitions. The respected 38 North website, a monitoring project linked to Johns Hopkins university, said Friday that thermal imagery of the Yongbyon nuclear complex appeared to show that Pyongyang had reprocessed spent fuel rods at least twice between last September and June this year. "The Radiochemical Laboratory operated intermittently and there have apparently been at least two unreported reprocessing campaigns to produce an undetermined amount of plutonium that can further increase North Korea's nuclear weapons stockpile," it said.
Moon dust collected by Neil Armstrong to be auctioned in NY
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — Moon dust that Neil Armstrong collected during the first lunar landing was displayed Thursday at a New York auction house — a symbol of America's glory days in space now valued at $2 million to $4 million.
'Unique:' Lion seen nursing leopard cub in Tanzania
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Newly released photographs from a Tanzanian wildlife area show a rare sight: a leopard cub suckling on a lion.
Scientists just fit a GIF onto DNA, which might be the most important thing to ever happen to GIF
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
GIFs are the fundamental building blocks of our digital existence. Whether they are in texts, tweets, or articles, GIFs are now a staple of how we communicate in the modern world. But now GIFs are making their way to a new frontier: scientists have finally figured out how to store and retrieve them from bacterial DNA. SEE ALSO: A new video shows you exactly what it looks like when DNA replicates Researchers at Harvard Medical School used CRISPR, a new, incredibly precise and relatively cheap gene sequencing tool, to encode Eadweard Muybridge's 19th Century animation of a running horse, essentially the world's first GIF, inside bacterial DNA. ( Writers note: NyanCat would have been our choice.) While putting the animation on DNA is a feat within itself, impressively (and perhaps more importantly) researchers only made a few errors while sequencing the bacteria's genome to recreate the running horse. This means that the recording DNA can capture and replay events in the order in which they occurred. Their work, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health, was published this week in the journal Nature. While this sounds like a breakthrough for GIF kind — after all, we can't recall a GIF being used in quite this way before — there are much larger implications medical science here. "The point is not to store videos in bacteria," said Harvard Medical School neuroscientist Seth Shipman, in a video interview.  "We used the video because it's a good example of a complex piece of information that has both many parts to it (that is, many pixel values) and a time component that was organized over time. So, it was a good way for us to test if the CRISPR adaptation system that we're using could actually acquire enough information that we could go in and sequence the bacteria after we had encoded it and reconstruct the movie." Shipman and his team's choice of a GIF as DNA storage test media is not surprising when you look at their long-term goal of biological recording.  Scientists can only see so far into their human body and its systems. No one knows, for instance, how neurons, which start out unspecialized in young brains, develop into distinct types of neurons.  But what if a cell with access to the brain could watch and record that development from day one and then, when the brain is matured, be extracted and, through CRISPR genome sequencing, play back the entire evolution of a neuron? It's only a start but this bacterial-encoded gif could be on small step toward making that dream a reality. To test the time-based recording capabilities of biological DNA, Shipman's team fed in to the bacterial DNA strands the galloping horse GIF frame-by-frame over the course of five days. As Shipman explained it in the video, the frames were all retrieved in their proper order, which means they could play back the GIF and still see the galloping horse, not a disjointed jumble of events. The system "captures the timing information of different molecular events," he said. DNA typically stores the blueprint of biological organisms, but scientists have, in recent years, started investigating its data storage capabilities, especially the notion that you can store vast amounts of data in a molecule-sized space. Plus, when DNA is separated from a living organism, or that organism dies out around it, and the DNA dries out and is protected from the light (as it is in fossils), that data can be retrieved thousands of years later. The Harvard team also sequenced the image of a hand onto biological DNA and then retrieved it.Image: Harvard Medical SchoolRecent studies, though, have focused on synthetic DNA, which allows for similar storage in tiny spaces capabilities, but without the concern of data longevity outside an organism and in the light. Last year researchers stored an entire OK Go music video on synthetic DNA and earlier this year, scientists at Columbia University stored and retrieved megabytes of data on synthetic DNA.  Both methods, though were time-consuming and expensive. The integration of the CRISPR system holds out the promise of affordable and accurate storage and retrieval from biological systems. "This recent result is pretty exciting in that it used genomic DNA editing techniques to 'log' data and store it in a cell's genome," said Luis Ceze, an associate professor of computer science and engineering at the University of Washington who worked on the OK Go DNA Storage project. "This can enable cell-based 'living sensors' that log information." Ceze added, though, that the Harvard team's work is no way competitive with synthetic DNA storage systems. While Ceze hopes to build DNA-based storage that one day rivals our best Solid-State Drives, Shipman's work is about recording tiny bits of data in sequence within a cell. "You would not use it to store movies, but I would use synthetic DNA to store movies," said Ceze. Ultimately, researchers want to place these engineered cells inside living organism where they can automatically record events (or changes) and then remove the smart cells and decode the DNA-stored information for full, sequential play back. The currently technology, however, required Shipman's team to manually enter the information. No one has trained the DNA and host cells to record on their own. But that time is coming and, someday, our cells may be grabbing viral moments, literally, and playing them back as GIFs (or more). WATCH: This robot that can do 'the worm' could one day perform colonoscopies
Indonesia foils trade in vulnerable slow lorises
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Indonesian authorities have detained an alleged wildlife trafficker and seized nine protected slow lorises and a wreathed hornbill, an official said Friday. The threatened species had been smuggled from Java and Sumatra, a vast, jungle-covered island home to many rare animals. The 10 endangered animals are now under the surveillance of vets at the environment and forestry ministry.
What Families Need to Know About First Gene Therapy for Deadly Childhood Cancer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
An advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration earlier this week unanimously recommended approving a breakthrough genetic therapy to treat a rare but deadly type of childhood cancer. Here'...
Britain's Natural History Museum unveils huge whale skeleton
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LONDON (AP) — Britain's Natural History Museum in London suspended a gigantic skeleton of a blue whale in its main entrance Thursday, drawing attention to vanishing species in an environment under strain.
More economists should use machine learning to do their jobs better
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Machine learning is reshaping nearly every aspect of our lives. From how we shop, to how we get places, to how we decide what TV shows to watch. Will it also reshape how we understand the economy? Harvard’s Sendhil Mullainathan is one of a small number of economists who has delved into the world of…
King Stallion: Ultra
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fox Firepower: Allison Barrie lays out the key new features that gives the King Stallion helicpoter a huge upgrade from its predecessor
15 Moving Photos That Show the Beautiful, Raw Reality of Childbirth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Childbirth is an incredibly powerful experience for parents-to-be. The Moment of Birth Contest is held to "support birth photographers from around the world and inspire more people to embrace the beauty of birth." Birth Becomes Her, the organization that held the contest, said over a hundred birth photographers from around the world entered.
50+ of the Cutest Couples Costumes for Halloween
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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8 Ways Digestive Problems Could Be Totally Screwing With Your Weight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It could explain why that number on the scale is rising.
3 Better, Slimmer Smoothies You Can Make At Home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Some smoothies are really just dessert in disguise. "I have fruit!" they beckon, "and ice! What could go wrong?" Hungry Girl Lisa Lillien knows the truth, and her recipes make you feel like you're indulging in a decadent treat — but for a very responsible number of calories.
How Uncertainty About GOP Healthcare Plans Harms Consumers Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
One of the biggest cliffhangers in Washington, D.C., right now is whether Senate Republicans will pass legislation to overhaul how health insurance works in the U.S. While GOP leaders are eager t...
Is it a stunt? Selfie
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Raw video: Woman appears to crouch down to take selfie before falling backwards knocking down art in domino effect causing $200,000 worth of damage
You'll Rethink Your Entire Existence After Looking at This 1 Mind
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ah, space: it's a limitless and utterly mesmerizing place filled with some of the most naturally beautiful phenomena. If you enjoy photos or GIFs of dying stars, you'll love this newest photo from NASA of the Crab Nebula.
O.J. Simpson's friend on what prison life is like for him
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"O.J.'s a showman, even in prison garb," Dr. Henry Johnson tells ABC News' Deborah Roberts.
The US isn’t going to launch a military Space Corps—for now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A handful of US lawmakers are pushing for the creation of a new branch of the American military solely focused on deploying extra-terrestrial power. The members of congress, led by Alabama representative Mike Rogers, have included a provision creating a new Space Corps in the bill authorizing the next year of American defense spending. The…
What 'Thrones' fans already know: Ravens can see ahead
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — More than 170 years after Edgar Allan Poe's fictional raven croaked, "Nevermore," scientists are reporting that real-life ravens think about the future.
Cook Islands creates huge Pacific Ocean marine reserve
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Cook Islands has created one of the world's largest marine sanctuaries, protecting a vast swathe of the Pacific Ocean more than three times the size of France. Environmentalist Kevin Iro, who first proposed the idea more than five years ago, said it was a landmark achievement that would help preserve the ocean for future generations. The Cook Islands has a population of just 10,000 and its 15 islands have a combined landmass of 236 sq km, barely the size of Washington DC.
Does this monkey want to attack you? Take our quiz and find out!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Would you know an angry monkey if you saw one? A friendly monkey? A monkey very seriously considering whether it’s necessary to bite the human staring at its face? No, to be honest, you probably wouldn’t. A recent study by researchers at the University of Lincoln found that we as a species are remarkably poor…
O. J. Simpson robbery case: Accomplice says Simpson asked him to bring a gun
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Walter Alexander, who pled guilty to conspiracy to commit the 2007 robbery, said O.J. Simpson asked if he could "get some heat."
Antarctica's new 1.1
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Earlier this week, a crack in Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf caused a 1...
Congressional committee deals setback to ‘death with dignity’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The House Appropriations Committee voted not only to defund the implementation of Death With Dignity, which had been expected by proponents, but to rescind the new law completely.
Taiwanese lawmakers launch water balloons, brandish chairs in floor brawl
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A fracas broke out on the Taiwanese parliament floor Friday as lawmakers exchanged blows over an infrastructure project for the second day in a row.
White House shakes up legal team as probe gathers steam
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Under intensifying fire over its handling of the Russia investigations, the White House is shaking up its legal team, bringing on board a veteran Washington criminal defense lawyer just as another high-profile attorney bows out of representing a senior official who is in investigators’ cross hairs. Ty Cobb, who has represented multiple figures in Washington scandals dating back to the Clinton administration, will be joining the White House staff at the end of this month as a special counsel to the president, charged with handling all legal and media-related issues relating to the Russia probe, sources said.
Year after coup, Turkey's opposition on the march. But to where?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The crowd stretched for as far as the eye could see: the biggest flag-waving Turkish opposition rally in many years. Recommended: Think you know Turkey? This weekend marks the anniversary of last summer’s failed coup, which Erdoğan’s critics say he has exploited to fortify his own power and crack down on a range of political opponents.
Best lesson yet in Brazil's anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Barack Obama once called him “the most popular politician on earth.” But on July 12, former Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva was sentenced to almost a decade in prison for corruption and money laundering. Known widely as Lula, he is the biggest fish caught so far in a graft probe that has spread across dozens of countries and snared dozens of politicians. The current Brazilian president, Michel Temer, also faces corruption allegations while his predecessor, Dilma Rousseff, was impeached last year under a cloud of suspicion over a massive kickback scheme involving the state-owned oil company Petrobras.
Protect Yourself From Fungal Infections This Summer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
During the carefree days of summer, you might not think twice about walking around barefoot at the pool or relaxing on the beach all afternoon in a damp bathing suit. But beware that both moves c...
Microsoft Surface Laptop review: A great notebook with one small flaw
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The back-to-school shopping season is just around the corner, and Microsoft (MSFT) is hoping its new Surface Laptop will be the computer you or your child brings to the classroom. Starting at $999, the Surface Laptop is Microsoft’s attempt to fight back against the growing popularity of Google’s (GOOG, GOOGL) low-cost Chromebooks and Apple’s (AAPL) own MacBook line. The Surface Laptop also marks the debut of Microsoft’s new Windows 10 S operating system, a more security- and performance-minded variant of Windows 10.
NASA Can’t Afford to Put Humans on Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Colonizing Mars has long captivated the human imagination, and NASA is no exception. The American space agency has made landing humans on Mars a high priority of its exploration programs and under bipartisan 2010 legislation pledged to develop the capabilities to send humans to the planet by the 2030s. The head of NASA’s program on human exploration of space, William Gerstenmaier, said on Wednesday that with its current budget the agency simply cannot afford the cost of propelling a manned spacecraft to Mars.
Neil Armstrong's Bag of Moon Dust, Worth Millions, Will Be Sold at Auction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Moon dust collected by Neil Armstrong during the first lunar landing was displayed Thursday at a New York auction house
Q&A: California looks to keep landmark climate policy alive
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Jerry Brown is racing to persuade lawmakers to extend his state's signature program to confront climate change.
New artificial spider silk can absorb 70 percent of the energy in impacts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Move over, Spider-Man! Researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed artificial spider silk that’s not only super-stretchy and impressively strong, but also sustainable and non-toxic.
GoPro wants to reunite lost camera with its owner
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Company looking to find family
Stranded elephant saved in dramatic sea rescue 8 miles from shore
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
For members of the Sri Lankan navy, a routine morning patrol took an unexpected turn on Tuesday when a elephant was spotted struggling to stay afloat after having been pulled miles off the coast by currents.
White House publishes profanity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Public comments on the voter fraud commission released by the White House late Thursday were overwhelmingly, and in many cases profanely, critical of the project. The Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity posted on its page on the White House website, without comment or explanation, 112 pages of emails received through July 11, commenting on the organization’s request for states to send them voter information. “Please note that the Commission may post such written comments publicly on our website, including names and contact information that are submitted,” read a blog post published Thursday on the White House’s site.
Amid the rubble of Mosul, bitter memories and the stench of death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Bodies of dead Islamic State fighters still lay in the streets of west Mosul. The stench of death, a mixture of bodily waste and rotting flesh, mingled with the smell of garbage that hung in the air. As Iraqi forces extend their control over the city, killing or chasing away remaining ISIS fighters, they encounter reminders of the regime imposed by the militant cleric Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who declared a new Islamic caliphate at the Great Mosque of al-Nuri.
The 4 senators who could thwart the revised Senate health care bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Yahoo News’ Health Care Declassified series provides continuing coverage of the Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare. With the latest incarnation of the Senate plan to dismantle the Affordable Care Act unveiled Thursday, the scramble is on for GOP leaders to seek out the half dozen undecided lawmakers and win them over. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W. V., Rob Portman, R-Ohio., Dean Heller, R-Nev. and Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, have said they are undecided after also expressing major reservations about the first version of the bill.