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'Excellent chance' US will stay in Paris agreement: Al Gore
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The United States has a better-than-even chance of sticking with a landmark 2015 global agreement on climate change, former US Vice President Al Gore said Friday. "I think that there's an excellent chance, far better than 50-50, that the United States will decide to stay in the Paris Agreement," Gore said during a roundtable discussion at this week's spring meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund.
Readers write: Power of science, regional change, enjoying and learning
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
John Yemma captures some of the stellar glow of science in his March 20 Upfront piece, “The pure spirit of science.” But the gleam of science goes well beyond the wonder of new discoveries and the excitement of dedicated workers. Scientific thinking provides a logical, inspired pathway to solve problems and trigger scintillating inspiration. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test?
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Thousands of scientists plan March for Science on Earth Day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More than 200 science organizations are planning 600 marches around the world, the first time scientists are marching in defense of science itself
Lyrids 2017: When And How To See The Lyrids Meteor Shower
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Lyrids meteor shower will be best visible this weekend.
Get your Sagan on with these 37 awe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Few things instill a sense of wonder quite like the final frontier. These 37 photographs show the beauty of Earth, our solar system, and far corners of the universe -- just in case you need to bring out your inner Carl Sagan.
AI app knows when couples are fighting, may someday predict (and prevent) conflict
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bickering isn’t abnormal but it’s often unproductive, so most people want to avoid petty fights with their partner if possible. Someday soon a smartphone app may help by predicting conflict before it occurs.
A 'Higher' State Of Consciousness?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have, for the first time, uncovered evidence of a "higher" state of consciousness — one induced by psychedelics like LSD and psilocybin.
Belgium's 'fairytale' bluebell forest victim of own beauty
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A carpet of bluebells bursts into flower in Belgium in a wonder of the natural world -- but one that is at risk of being trampled by tourists drawn to its beauty. At the start of spring the tall beech trees are still bare enough to let enough sunlight reach the forest floor and allow the flowers to bloom. Huge swathes of the 555-hectare (1,370-acre) woodland are covered in millions of the delicate purple flowers for as far as the eye can see.
Elon Musk Reveals More Details About Plans to Connect Computers to Brains
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tesla founder and Chief Executive Elon Musk said his latest company Neuralink Corp is working to link the human brain with a machine interface by creating micron-sized devices. Neuralink is aiming to bring to the market a product that helps with certain severe brain injuries due to stroke, cancer lesion etc, in about four years, Musk said in an interview with website Wait But Why. Artificial intelligence and machine learning will create computers so sophisticated and godlike that humans will need to implant "neural laces" in their brains to keep up, Musk said in a tech conference last year.
9 great jobs for people who want to save the planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You can earn a healthy salary and protect the environment at the same time.
Worthless mining waste could suck CO₂ out of the atmosphere and reverse emissions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists want to exploit a natural process of carbon storage.
Meet Steve, your new favorite astronomical phenomenon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Say hello to Steve.  Steve isn't a person. Steve is actually the unofficial name of a mysterious purple streak of light observed by some social media savvy skywatchers keeping an eye out for the northern lights.  SEE ALSO: I am so unreasonably jealous of this view of the southern lights The Alberta Aurora Chasers — a Facebook group devoted to the northern lights — caught sight of Steve in photos taken of the curtains of the auroras (and decided to name him).  The one issue is that no one was quite sure what Steve was. That is, until a high-powered spacecraft got involved.  One of the three European Space Agency's Swarm satellites actually flew through a Steve phenomenon, according to Eric Donovan of the University of Calgary.  The aurora.Image: NASADonovan matched up images taken of Steve from the ground with observations taken by the satellite and found something surprising.  “As the satellite flew straight though Steve, data from the electric field instrument showed very clear changes," Donovan said in a statement.  It looks like Steve is actually a flow of hot gas moving much more quickly than the air around it, and while there's still a lot more to learn about the astronomical phenomenon, this is a good start. And Steve's not all that rare. “It turns out that Steve is actually remarkably common, but we hadn’t noticed it before," Donovan said.  "It’s thanks to ground-based observations, satellites, today’s explosion of access to data and an army of citizen scientists joining forces to document it." The fact is that Steve couldn't have been discovered in earlier decades.  “In 1997 we had just one all-sky imager in North America to observe the aurora borealis from the ground,” Donovan said.  “Back then we would be lucky if we got one photograph a night of the aurora taken from the ground that coincides with an observation from a satellite. Now we have many more all-sky imagers and satellite missions like Swarm so we get more than 100 a night.” Thanks to these observations we know that auroras are created when charged particles from the sun bombard Earth's upper atmosphere, interacting with neutral particles and making them glow.  This creates the beautiful green and red curtains of the northern and southern lights. And also, we guess, Steve. WATCH: I am so unreasonably jealous of this view of the southern lights
Life Forms On Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When we finally find aliens living on an Earth-like planet outside our solar system, it might be swimming — because habitable exoplanets are probably completely covered in ocean.
A Transgender Surgical Journey
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A patient and a provider share their personal stories.
Drug companies risk Trump's wrath as they march for science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This Saturday's March for Science is trying hard to be a nonpartisan event, but some may not see it that way.
Want to own a town? Tiny Oregon community for sale for $3.5M
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
TILLER, Ore. (AP) — In the tiny, dying timber town of Tiller, the old cliche is true. If you blink, you might actually miss it.
Extremely unlikely twist of fate reveals supernova's secrets through gravity lens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a very rare series of events, scientists have captured a view of a ''standard candle'' Type Ia supernova through a gravity lens. If an object – such as a supernova – is positioned in exactly the right place behind the gravity lens, then it can be magnified. This is exactly what happened when astronomers observed the supernova iPTF16geu through the gravity lens of a galaxy 2 billion light years away.
Shrimp from the Sahara sounds crazy, but it may be the future of aquaculture
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The world's oceans are polluted and overfished, and wild seafood populations are dwindling -- but luckily, there's a revolutionary new seafood farming technique on the rise that might ensure we never run out of shrimp.
A New State Of Matter: 3D Quantum Liquid Crystal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The material, which falls somewhere between a solid and a liquid, could help overcome challenges in the field of quantum computing.
Investing in a 'not going to take this anymore' sentiment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Credit Suisse's Nannette Hechler shares her views on investing in megatrends.
Bill Nye: Trump would win reelection if he embraced climate change action
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Bill Nye the Science Guy said President Trump would likely be reelected if he were to take up arms against climate change.
Trump stuns Twitter with patriotic, yet curious, video celebrating American freed from Egypt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Donald Trump shared a video on his Twitter page that had production values that didn’t quite line up to the highest office in the land.
O'Reilly and changing a culture of sexual harassment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Fox News was forced to part ways with their wildly successful host Bill O’Reilly this week, many pointed out an all-too-common problem in many American businesses: a culture that tolerates sexual harassment. Thirty years after the Supreme Court ruled such behavior a form of illegal discrimination in the workplace, there remain significant gaps between the nation’s social ideals and the realities on the job. To change workplace culture, many professionals say, it's not so much policies or training that make a difference but the tone established by leaders.
12 Photos That Prove Suri Cruise Is Katie Holmes' Mini
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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The Original Cast of 'Dirty Dancing', Then and Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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I Ate Like Julianne Hough for a Week and I Regret Nothing (Except One Thing)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
I'm really not OK with what she considers "dessert".
This Incredibly Raw C
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The human body is horrifying and beautiful.
Shawn Johnson East Opens Up About Her "Stressful" First Year of Marriage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The Olympian and her NFL player hubby spent more time apart than together.
Dad of 5 Girls Flips Out After Learning His Wife Just Gave Birth to a Boy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"It wasn't a case of being excited," said his wife. "We were both stunned."
12 Struggles Only Moms With Anxiety Will Understand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Which kid WOULD you save first in a fire?
The Story Behind This Rainbow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The butterfly has a special meaning.
6 Creative Ways to Use Nut Butters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
There’s a sublime pleasure in spreading peanut, almond, or cashew butter on a slice of bread—and let us suggest fig jam on toasted seven-grain—but there are many other delicious ways to use nut b...
21 Pieces of Wisdom Every Mom Needs to Give Her Daughter Before She Grows Up
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"You'll know if someone loves you if they want to hear about your day, even if it was boring."
28 Sweet Ways to Say "I Love You"
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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The 35 Best Hairstyles for Curly Hair
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Elon Musk lays out plans to meld brains and computers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Billionaire behind new startup Neuralink
Cormac McCarthy explains the brutal, beautiful neuroscience of the unconscious
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When Cormac McCarthy writes an essay on the origin of language and the history of the unconscious mind, you can expect to find yourself wiser after reading it. The author, who has a cult fanbase for his novels The Road, All the Pretty Horses, and No Country For Old Men, doesn’t disappoint in his new…
What does Antarctica look like to a humpback whale? Now we know, and it’s incredible
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Let’s go for a swim! Well, not actually. We’re talking more of a virtual underwater tour, but equally gratifying nonetheless. As The…
NASA Pushes Hunt For Life In Chile’s Atacama Desert
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If life can be found in the driest non-polar desert on Earth, it would be a significant step toward searching for signs of life on other planets or moons.
Proposed cuts in US climate science reverberate worldwide
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The gutting of US-funded climate science would cripple research agendas worldwide and hamper the global fight against climate change, say scientists outside the United States, some of whom will take to the streets Saturday to make that point. US President Donald Trump has called for drastic cutbacks across multiple federal agencies that track and analyse climate by gathering data from satellites, the deepest ocean trenches, and everything in between. Tens of thousands of scientists are set to converge on Washington DC in protest, with hundreds of smaller marches planned in cities around the world.
Trump praises far
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump predicted on Friday that a deadly shooting on the famed Champs-Élysées avenue in Paris would have “a big effect” on French elections.
Ronald Reagan’s son defends O’Reilly, asks if men should ‘sue for sexual arousal’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Michael Reagan speaks at a rally for Republican Senate candidate Sharron Angle in 2010. Michael Reagan, son of late Ronald Reagan, defended disgraced Fox News host Bill O’Reilly, who was ousted this week after advertisers boycotted the show en masse amid a sexual harassment scandal. The firestorm started after the New York Times revealed that O’Reilly and the network had shelled out $13 million in settlements to various women who had accused him of sexual harassment.
For sale: Tiny Oregon town, including 6 houses, closed store
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
TILLER, Ore. (AP) — In the tiny, dying timber town of Tiller, the old cliche is true. If you blink, you might actually miss it.
AP PHOTOS: Remote Oregon town for sale for $3.5 million
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Almost an entire Oregon town is for sale for $3.5 million - or about $3.9 million if you also want the local elementary school, which is a separate deal. The tiny community of Tiller, encircled by the ...
British lawmakers say high heel workplace ban is a step too far
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Calls to introduce a law barring employers from requiring female employees to wear high heels at work were shot down by British Parliament Friday, which found that existing legislation was “adequate” in its scope to curtail workplace sexism.
Those obituaries for Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
There is no doubting why Donald Trump, America’s 45th president, chose to hang a portrait of Andrew Jackson, the seventh president, in the Oval Office: He sees himself as the political heir to the nation’s first populist president. Last week, on one day alone, President Trump reversed himself on closing the Export-Import Bank, labeling China a “currency manipulator,” and canning Janet Yellen as chair of the Federal Reserve. The “globalists,” including economic adviser Gary Cohn and son-in-law Jared Kushner, were ascendant; Steve Bannon, chief policy strategist and keeper of the populist-nationalist flame, was on the outs.
On the way to colleges: 40,000 doses of opioid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
As the U.S. government and health care providers grapple with the exploding rates of opioid abuse across the country, the Clinton Foundation has expanded its partnership with Adapt Pharma, maker of Narcan nasal spray, by donating 40,000 doses of the opioid overdose reversal drug to colleges and universities throughout the United States. Narcan, a brand of the generic drug naloxone, is used for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose.
NASA puts $50M into creating fusion thrusters, space robots and more
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fusion-driven rockets, remote control systems for space robots, and satellites that build themselves up in orbit are among the made-in-Washington projects getting a share of $49.9 million in NASA grants. Seven businesses in Washington state will benefit from NASA’s latest round of Small Business Innovation Research grants and Small Business Technology Transfer grants, announced today. The two programs, known as SBIR and STTR, are aimed at encouraging the development of commercial innovations that could come in handy for NASA’s space missions. “The SBIR and STTR program’s selection of nearly 400 proposals for further development is a testament to NASA’s support… Read More