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Elon Musk told Donald Trump what to do about the Paris Climate Agreement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trump administration may finally be nearing a decision on whether to stay in the Paris Climate Agreement.  Now we know that visionary businessman Elon Musk, who founded SpaceX, Tesla, and a new, mysterious tunnel-building firm called the Boring Company, is talking to President Donald Trump about what to do regarding this agreement.   Given his role in alternative energy, it's no surprise that Musk is in favor of the 2016 treaty. SEE ALSO: Elon Musk's Boring Company isn't waiting any longer The Paris agreement was negotiated under former president Barack Obama. And for the first time in decades of climate diplomacy, all nations agreed to take steps to cut emissions of planet-warming greenhouse gases based on their own timetables.  If the U.S. were to withdraw from the treaty, it's likely to have global repercussions, potentially encouraging other nations to relax their emissions reduction commitments or leave the pact entirely.  In a tweet on Monday night, Musk said he has spoken with Trump and is urging him to stay in the agreement.  @BigDAK54 I spoke directly with The President three weeks ago about Paris. Many others have too. Cautiously optimistic of a positive decision. — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) May 22, 2017 Musk is part of Trump's business advisory council, for which he has received considerable criticism. He says he is remaining on it as a way to ensure that a diversity of views on particular matters, including climate change, make it to Trump's desk. Various advisors have been vying for the president's ear on this landmark climate deal, from the secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, to chief strategist Steve Bannon. Some observers think the president will announce his decision about the Paris agreement later this week at the Group of 7 major industrialized nations' summit in Sicily. While there, the U.S. will come under pressure from world leaders like German Chancellor Angela Merkel and new French President Emmanuel Macron to act on global warming, as it is a clear priority for other major industrialized nations.  Trump, for his part, has called climate change a hoax, vowed during the campaign to "cancel" the Paris agreement, and on Tuesday proposed a federal budget that zeroes out funding for international climate change assistance programs. The budget also slashes spending for U.S. climate research at the Environmental Protection Agency, Energy Department, and other agencies. WATCH:
U.S. intelligence chief Coats sidesteps questions on Trump, Russians and Israel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats declined to confirm or deny news reports that President Trump reached out directly to him in an effort to undermine an FBI investigation.
Putting campaign rhetoric behind him, Trump will come face to face with the pope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president will meet the pope for the first time on Wednesday, but the two men sparred a number of times during the campaign.
Republicans and Democrats dismiss Trump’s budget as ‘dead on arrival’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump rolled out his 2018 budget Tuesday, and lawmakers from both parties wasted no time in pushing back, with many proclaiming it “dead on arrival” and saying it goes against many of Trump’s campaign-trail promises.
Police: Woman caused $350K in damage at ex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WOODSTOCK, N.Y. (AP) — State police have charged a 61-year-old New York woman with causing more than $350,000 in damage to artwork, antiques and other personal property at her ex-husband's home.
As Taiwan debates gay marriage, advocates eye influence abroad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As bills to legalize same-sex marriage made their way through the legislature last year, Taiwan seemed poised for a blast of international limelight – not so common for the island of 23 million. For LGBT advocates throughout Asia, the proposed law promised to be an exciting “first” for the region. For a groundswell of Taiwanese, it also represented one more step in Taipei’s years-long strategy of compensating for its diplomatic handicaps with “soft power” strength, bolstering its image as a place open to social change – particularly in contrast to mainland China, which claims sovereignty over Taiwan.
In Jordanian city hit by ISIS, old lessons on Christian
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Islamic State jihadists seized the Crusader castle in the heart of this southern Jordanian city in December, Maher Habashneh had just one thing in mind. Braving stray bullets from a firefight playing out in the city center between ISIS and an alliance of security forces and city residents, Mr. Habashneh rushed to the home of Waddah Amarien, where he stood guard until his childhood friend returned from Amman early the next morning. Habashneh, an unemployed university graduate, is Muslim, Mr. Amarien is Christian.
Is intelligence genetic? 40 genes linked to IQ discovered
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A total of 40 newly identified genes have been linked to intelligence in one of the largest studies of its kind. Previously, there were only a handful of genes with a robust link to intelligence. A study published in the journal Nature Genetics has now identified a total of 52 such genes, with 40 of them that had never been linked to intelligence previously.
Review: 'Apollo 8' tells thrilling story of moon mission
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Apollo 8: The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon" (Henry Holt), by Jeffrey Kluger
How the Net Neutrality Debate Affects Your Internet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted last week to start dismantling 2015 rules that regulated internet service providers the same way as utilities. The debate swirls around two related issues: whether the internet is a public utility, and how (or if) to ensure a concept known as net neutrality. Net neutrality is the framework for an internet in which all data is treated equally.
Gore says Trump can't stop climate movement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CANNES, France (AP) — Donald Trump cannot stop the climate movement despite the president's efforts to roll back environmental protections, former U.S. Vice President Al Gore said Monday.
U.S. intelligence chief Coats sidesteps questions on Trump, Russians, Israel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats declined to confirm or deny news reports that President Trump reached out directly to him in an effort to undermine an FBI investigation.
Missing earring halts Philadelphia TV weather forecast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A Philadelphia meteorologist has a TV news anchor to thank for finding an earring that fell off during her live forecast.
'I will drink the martini': BoE's Carney tricked by email hoaxer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Bank of England Governor Mark Carney poked fun at the drinking habits of one of his predecessors before realizing he had fallen victim to an email prankster this week. Carney was drawn into the simple hoax when he replied to an email believing that he was talking to the head of the BoE's internal oversight body, Anthony Habgood. A BoE spokesman confirmed the exchange.
Manchester attack: three questions to consider
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In what has become an all-too-familiar occurrence, an apparent terrorist attack has once again struck the European public, this time at a concert by American singer Ariana Grande in Manchester, England, attended by thousands of pre-teen and teenaged girls. At the time of writing, the death toll was at 22, with more than 50 injured in what has been described as a suicide bombing just at the foyer of the Manchester Arena. Media reports and recent patterns suggest that the perpetrator is likely another radicalized, lone-wolf attacker, perhaps inspired by the so-called Islamic State, which has already claimed responsibility.
Is Russia prepping for space war? 3 mystery satellites reactivated but no one knows what they can do
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russia has reportedly reactivated three mysterious satellites, which remained idle over the past year or so, after they were launched into space between 2013 and 2015. After their initial launch, the three satellites reportedly shifted their orbits dramatically, exhibiting an unusual ability of manoeuvrability for small spacecraft. The trio of satellites, reportedly known by their codenames Kosmos-2491, Kosmos-2499 and Kosmos-2504 remained inactive for over a year.
Baby bump: China eatery in Japan soars on pregnant panda hopes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Swelling hopes for a baby panda in Tokyo have bumped up the stock price of a Chinese restaurant chain in the area, with locals setting their sights on a flurry of tourists. Eleven-year-old Shin Shin, who was brought to Ueno Zoo from China, has been showing signs of pregnancy since last week after mating with male Ri Ri in February, according to zoo officials. Giant pandas are notoriously clumsy at mating, with males said to be bad at determining when a female is in the right frame of mind and often befuddled at knowing what to do next.
Time travel: a conversation between a scientist and a literature professor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Simon John James and Richard Bower chat about differing conceptions of what it is to travel through time.
Woman trying to buy birthday card trapped inside CVS
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
TITUSVILLE, Fla. (AP) — A woman trying to buy a birthday card called police when she was accidentally barricaded inside a CVS store in central Florida.
What's that fowl smell? Truck spills chicken parts in Maine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — There's a fowl smell wafting through Maine's largest city.
Healthy Shopping Strategies for Vegans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
About 3.7 million Americans follow a vegan diet, which is stricter than a vegetarian diet in that it eliminates all animal products—not just meat, poultry, and fish but also dairy, eggs, and even...
Do Online Grocery Stores Really Deliver?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
We rated four online grocery stores for customer satisfaction, based on 1,721 reader responses.* Each operates a little differently. AmazonFresh, FreshDirect, and Peapod deliver from their own re...
What Food Labels Mean—€”and Don'€™t
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
We all want healthier foods, but reading labels won't always help you spot them. Many terms are defined and regulated by the Food and Drug Administration or the Depart­ment of Agriculture, depend...
The Supermarket of the Future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It could be five to 10 years before the supermarket of the future, as envisioned by designers and marketers, is common. But those experts believe it’s a matter of when, not if. Here's what you mi...
Faster, Fresher, Cheaper: The Grocery Shopping Revolution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Marie Henry cares a lot about the food her family eats. During growing season in her town of East Nottingham Township, Pa., the 35-year-old stay-at-home mom walks down the street to her Amish nei...
How to Save Time and Money Food Shopping
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports asked experts as well as our Facebook followers for their best time- and money-saving food shopping tips. Pick a few of these tactics to try in the coming weeks; you could shave ...
Scientists just created the world’s first lab
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Two breakthrough studies have demonstrated for the first time that it's possible to grow the stem cells that produce blood inside a lab. The work could help treat patients with a variety of blood disorders.
Fossils cast doubt on human lineage originating in Africa
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Fossils from Greece and Bulgaria of an ape-like creature that lived 7.2 million years ago may fundamentally alter the understanding of human origins, casting doubt on the view that the evolutionary lineage that led to people arose in Africa. Scientists said on Monday the creature, known as Graecopithecus freybergi and known only from a lower jawbone and an isolated tooth, may be the oldest-known member of the human lineage that began after an evolutionary split from the line that led to chimpanzees, our closest cousins. The premolar was found in south-central Bulgaria in 2009.
Astronomers use the music of the spheres to track TRAPPIST
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An international research team led by a University of Washington astronomer has worked out the intricate dance of seven planets circling an ultracool dwarf star known as TRAPPIST-1, nailing down the coordinates of the outermost world in the process. The astronomers found that all seven exoplanets follow stable orbits thanks to a regular pattern of gravitational interactions, known as orbital resonance. And they determined conclusively that the seventh planet, called TRAPPIST-1h, is too cold for life – although it was could have been warmer in its ancient past. The calculations, laid out today in the journal Nature Astronomy, will go down as… Read More
Coach is bringing '70s space vibes with new NASA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If your 2017 fashion icons aren't Ellen Ripley, the kid from The Shining, or Luke Skywalker in that orange jumpsuit, you need to catch up.  If they are, then zoinks are you going to want everything from Coach's new NASA-themed collection, Coach Space, which is riddled with retro designs and colors. It's a good year for those who can pull off a lot of citrus tones. Bonus points if your hair's already feathered. Items like the Dylan bag say "there's no dirt in space, so go ahead and buy white leather." SEE ALSO: The latest beauty trend out of Instagram will have you looking like you're wearing Cheetos dust Image: CoachFor slightly more commitment, you can space-rock (meteorite) the Space varsity jacket— science kids deserve recognition too, ok? Image: CoachItems like the Rogue purse let everybody know that yeah, you went to space camp and yeah, you completed all the badges and then some.  Image: coachIs your look is more "I'm 8 years old and my dad made us spend winter alone in a haunted hotel, also I love space"? Coach has got you covered. Image: coachMaybe you can remember the names of all the stars within 100 lightyears of Earth, but remembering where you left the keys to your rocket? Another story entirely. Enter the SPACE bag charm.  Image: CoachThis collection brings the colorful, powerful explorer out whether you're an astrophysicist or a casual stargazer.  WATCH: Almost 20 years later, 'Titanic' gets a retro remake
Lean
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nepalese mountain guides have a physiology that uses oxygen more efficiently lowlanders.
Newfound ‘alien megastructure’ star leaves scientists baffled
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You're forgiven if the name KIC 8462852 doesn't ring a bell. It's a far-off object, thought to be a star, which was only just discovered in late 2015, but it's already managed to totally confuse researchers in its extremely brief stint on the scientific stage. The star has continually exhibited extremely odd behavior, and has been repeatedly observed experiencing huge dips in brightness that don't seem to have any readily available explanation. Now, the star has been spotted performing the same dimming trick as it has in the past, and scientists are throwing out some extremely wild theories.  KIC 8462852, otherwise known as "Tabby's Star" or "Boyajian's Star" depending on where you look, was caught in the act this past weekend, dimming in brightness by about three percent, which is a large enough change to be easily detected. Normally, the dimming of a star at regular intervals would indicate the presence of a planet in orbit, but there doesn't seem to be any pattern to the of dimming exhibited by KIC 8462852. Researchers have thrown forth many possible explanations, including other, non-planetary celestial bodies passing in front of the star which are obscuring our line of sight, such as comets, and even the possibility that whatever is floating around the star isn't a naturally-occurring object at all, but instead a massive alien structure. As the research and observations continue, scientists around the globe are hoping that spectral readings will give them a clue as to what, if anything, passed in front of the star. Whatever the object happens to be, it's an exciting time for sky-gazers.
'Winged' snake species from 5 million years ago discovered
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new species of snake that lived 5 million years ago was discovered at a fossil site in Tennessee
How Much Pee Is in that Swimming Pool?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
What could be better on a hot day than jumping into a cool, refreshing swimming pool full of water -- but what if water isn’t the only thing in there?
Car Accident Survivor Proposes to Girlfriend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Parents are advised that these images may not be suitable for young children. Kayla was getting ready for a special anniversary dinner with Jemasio when she got the call telling her about his accident. Kayla rushed to the scene and saw the wreckage, and thought “Nobody could survive that,” she says.
Runner Explains How She Fought off Attacker!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Seattle resident Kelly tells The Doctors how she defended herself from an assailant. “I’m training for a marathon right now,” Kelly explains, “And I was about four miles from my house when I stopped to use the bathroom.” Kelly began feeling uneasy and turned to see a man behind her. The attacker threw her to the floor and tried to undress her – and, Kelly says, “I just turned into a savage beast.” She began swearing and screaming threats at him, then pulled free and made her way into a bathroom stall.
How to Be a ‘FAB’ Mom!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The Parenting Lifestyle Expert for CBS Los Angeles, Jill Simonian, is here to tell new moms how to get FAB – Focused After Baby!
Woman with a Mouthful of Baby Teeth!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
“I’ve been hiding something my whole entire life,” says Tyrica, “and it’s really starting to get to me now.” Her secret? She still has her baby teeth. Can The Doctors give her something to smile about?
Skip the Juice for Babies Under 1, Pediatricians Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the past years, the AAP has said that children younger than 6 months old should not consume any fruit juice, and has recommended limits for older infants and children. One reason behind the recommendation is that fruit juice offers no nutritional benefit for young children, according to a statement from the group, published online today (May 26) in the journal Pediatrics. It is still fine for children older than 1 to drink fruit juice in small quantities, the group said.
MIT's 'living cell' shirt reacts to sweat to help cool you down
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Engineers in the MIT Media Lab have developed Biologic, the technology behind a breathable workout suit with flaps that ventilate when a wearer sweats thanks to a lining of living microbial cells.
Oklahoma school apologizes for Hitler yearbook quotation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The principal of an Oklahoma high school apologized after its yearbook featured a quotation attributed to Adolf Hitler.
Ethiopia: 3.3 million
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The well preserved remains of a 3.3 million-year-old Australopithecus Afarensis have revealed that the spine of these early hominins was more similar to ours than to that of extant African apes. It counted 12 thoracic vertebrae, like the spine of modern humans, instead of 13. Recovered in the mid-2000s in Ethiopia, the skeleton is that of a small child, who was probably two or three at the time of death.
Device Purifies Air and Creates Energy All at the Same Time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A small innovation could have a big impact on air pollution. In Belgium, researchers have engineered a device that uses sunlight to purify polluted air and produce hydrogen gas that can be stored and used for power. "We couple both processes together in one device," Sammy Verbruggen, a professor of bioscience engineering at the University of Antwerp, told Live Science.
Ultrathin Loudspeaker
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers at Michigan State University have developed a sheet-like device — known as a ferroelectret nanogenerator, or FENG — that acts as a loudspeaker and microphone and can generate energy from human motion, such as swiping a finger across a screen. "It's a device that you can roll up and put in your pocket and then get somewhere and unroll and put it on a screen or a window or any platform and use it as a both a microphone and loudspeaker," said Nelson Sepulveda, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Michigan State University, and the primary investigator of the new study published online May 16 in the journal Nature Communications. Last December, Sepulveda and his team detailed the main component of this device, the FENG, in the journal Nano Energy.
Scientists successfully grow human blood stem cells in a lab for the first time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Two breakthrough studies have demonstrated for the first time that it's possible to grow the stem cells that produce blood inside a lab. The work could help treat patients with a variety of blood disorders.
Silicon Valley is getting interested in healthcare — here's why that could be a good thing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Major tech companies are eyeing the healthcare world. Amazon is seriously considering entering...
Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mount Everest is a grueling, deadly place for many adventurers. Beyond the steep terrain, bone-chilling temperatures, and fierce weather, the air is so thin that your body can begin to shut down. That is, unless you're a Sherpa. Members of the Nepalese ethnic group have evolved over generations to withstand the oxygen-deprived atmosphere high in the Himalayas, a new study found.  SEE ALSO: Now you can climb Mount Everest in VR Sherpas are, biologically speaking, extremely efficient at producing the energy they need to reach such heights, even where oxygen is scarce, according to research published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  Their cells are akin to fuel-efficient cars that can travel farther on less fuel. A porter fetches the ladders to help fix the route for climbers attempting to reach the summit of Mount Everest.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockScientists say the findings not only help explain Sherpas' mountain-climbing prowess — they may also lead to new ways of treating oxygen deficiencies, called "hypoxia," in hospital patients. "By understanding how Sherpas are able to survive with low levels of oxygen, we can get clues to help us identify those at greatest risk in [intensive care units] and inform the development of better treatments to help in their recovery," Michael Grocott, a co-author of the study and professor at the University of Southampton in England, said in a press release.  Grocott is the chair of Xtreme Everest, a 10-year-old initiative by doctors, nurses, and scientists to study how our bodies respond to the extreme altitude on Mount Everest. Their ultimate goal is to improve outcomes for critically ill patients. With a 29,029-foot-high peak, Everest is the world's highest mountain. Everest Base Camp is around 17,600 feet, which is plenty high enough to sicken unadjusted visitors. An aerial photograph of Everest Base Camp.Image: Paula Bronstein/Getty ImagesAt those altitudes, where oxygen is scarce, the body is forced to work overtime to make sure the brain and body receive enough oxygen to function. Often, the body will produce more red blood cells, which carry blood to our organs and thicken the blood. As a result, blood flows more slowly and blood vessels are prone to tightening, which can cause dangerous build-up of fluid in the lungs and other risks. Mountain climbers can combat this by bringing oxygen supplies and ascending slowly, giving their bodies time to adjust. Sherpas, however, don't need such a boost.  Previous studies have shown that Sherpas produce fewer red blood cells at higher altitudes. They also produce higher levels of nitric oxide, a chemical that opens blood vessels and keeps blood flowing, which in turn gives them more energy to climb. Sherpas' remarkable physical skills, along with their local expertise, have made them the go-to guides and porters for international expeditions. It's an imperfect arrangement, however. Nepalese guides in recent years have protested poor pay and unsafe working conditions, and in 2014, they went on strike after 16 colleagues were killed in an avalanche. People attend a prayer service in New York City for Sherpa victims of the April 18, 2014, avalanche on Mt. Everest.Image: eric thayer/Getty ImagesFor Monday's study, a research team led by scientists at the University of Cambridge followed 15 Sherpas and 10 "lowlanders" — researchers living in non-high altitude areas — as they gradually ascended to the base camp. The lowlanders took samples, including blood and muscle biopsies, at three different times: in London, for the baseline measurement; upon arrival to base camp; and after two months working at base camp.  They compared those samples to those of the Sherpas, all of whom lived in relatively low-lying areas, and none of whom were "elite" high-altitude climbers. Sherpas' baseline measurements were taken in Kathmandu, Nepal. At baseline, Sherpas' mitochondria — the parts of human cells that respire to generate energy — were already more efficient at using oxygen to produce ATP than those of lowlanders, the samples revealed. ATP, or molecule adenosine triphosphate, is the energy that powers our bodies. A porter walks with a massive load towards Everest Base Camp near Lobuche, Nepal.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockSherpas' measurements hardly changed once they reached the base camp, suggesting they were born with such biological traits. Lowlanders, meanwhile, saw their measurements change as their bodies acclimatized and began to mimic the Sherpas'. After two months at camp, Sherpas also produced more phosphocreatine, an energy reserve that acts as a buffer to help muscles contract when no ATP is available. Lowlanders, by contrast, saw their phosphocreatine levels crash.  And, unlike lowlanders, Sherpas did not experience a rapid increase in free radicals, which are molecules created by a lack of oxygen that can potentially damage cells and tissues. "Sherpas have spent thousands of years living at high altitudes, so it should be unsurprising that they have adapted to become more efficient at using oxygen and generating energy," Andrew Murray, the study's senior author and a senior lecturer at the University of Cambridge, said in the press release.  "When those of us from lower-lying countries spend time at high altitude, our bodies adapt to some extent to become more 'Sherpa-like', but we are no match for their efficiency," he said. WATCH: Drone captures breathtaking footage of Norwegian mountains
This $3 Million Machine Tests Car Chassis While They're Sitting Still
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ever seen a car corner at 1.00 g while it's not moving?
Mississippi lawmaker apologizes for lynching comment over removing Confederate statues
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Pushback against the removal of Confederate monuments flared up again when a state representative spoke out harshly against those responsible.
Gingrich disproves the whole Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The District of Columbia police say Rich, who was shot in the back at 4 a.m. near his home in northwest Washington, was the victim of a botched robbery.