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Why people drink tomato juice on planes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Have you ever noticed why tomato juice is such a popular drink on planes? There is a scientific reason behind it and it's all to do with the impact of cabin pressure on our senses. It’s about 30 percent more difficult to detect sweet and salty tastes, according to a 2010 study by the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics in Germany. In other words, at altitude, our sense of taste is dulled.
Elon Musk Wants To Link Human Brains With Computers With His New Company, Neuralink
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is now heading another company, Neuralink, which wants to connect human brains with computers.
There are 12,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Deep under the surface of the world’s oceans, thousands of seamounts provide vital habitats for marine life. Learn all about them-and how you can help protect them.
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Icelandic language at risk; robots, computers can't grasp it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
REYKJAVIK, Iceland (AP) — When an Icelander arrives at an office building and sees "Solarfri" posted, they need no further explanation for the empty premises: The word means "when staff get an unexpected afternoon off to enjoy good weather."
The March for Science stretched all the way to the North Pole
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trump administration's assault on scientific evidence and research funding may have triggered the March for Science, but the more than 500 events around the world on Saturday demonstrated that the movement is truly global.  The marches began Friday night in Oceania, with events in New Zealand and Australia. As Saturday dawned, the marches spread to Europe, with major gatherings in Berlin, Geneva, and London, among other locations.  SEE ALSO: EPA chief calls historic climate treaty a 'bad deal' because this is our life now There were even marches, albeit small ones, in Greenland and the North Pole, where climate scientists are deployed studying the rapidly melting land and sea ice.  Here are some scenes from around the world.  Chicago: This is what it looked like as more than 40K people took to the streets of Chicago for the #MarchforScience: https://t.co/FZ0gR51DOS pic.twitter.com/R7OzGdBnSK — NBC Chicago (@nbcchicago) April 22, 2017 New Zealand: Go science! #ScienceMarch Auckland pic.twitter.com/T7uRNYW8m2 — Jesse Mulligan (@JesseMulligan) April 22, 2017 Great turn out for the #auckland #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/IcHExFggo0 — Steph Borrelle (@PetrelStation) April 22, 2017 Australia: Around 3000 people attended @ScienceMarchSyd earlier today, on the same day Mike Pence was in town: https://t.co/OmtG1gqecX #MarchForScience pic.twitter.com/fullU7T0lB — Nature News&Comment (@NatureNews) April 22, 2017 Iceland: Checking in from the Reykjavík March for Science #globalmarchforscience #iceland pic.twitter.com/62BPZkaymK — Volta Coffee (@true_volta) April 22, 2017 Greenland: Keep Greenland cool  #marchforscience #ScienceMarch @SciMarGreenland pic.twitter.com/6sMN9T8MF0 — Tasha Snow (@TashaMSnow) April 22, 2017 Hungary: Marš se kreće prema Zrinjevcu. #marchforscience #zagreb pic.twitter.com/DYFmJdDULT — Duje Kovačević (@dujekovacevic) April 22, 2017 Germany: "I can't believe I'm protesting for reality." At Berlin's #sciencemarch #sciencemarchBER #chemistsmarch pic.twitter.com/0aMq9z7YX1 — sarah everts (@saraheverts) April 22, 2017 Italy: pic.twitter.com/Vu9rmRnSuQ — Science March ITALY (@ScienceMarchIT) April 22, 2017 England: Scene from the London "March for Science" event.Image: Natasha Quarmby/REX/ShutterstockUganda:  Y'all! The #marchforscience in Uganda is beautiful!!! #globalmarchforscience pic.twitter.com/85IW6JG5Sa — Lucky Tran (@luckytran) April 22, 2017 The North Pole: March for Science North Pole Edition https://t.co/9A3UGtNpLz pic.twitter.com/PtQLYtMK5G — Bernice Notenboom (@BerniceNot) April 21, 2017 It remains to be seen how this global show of support for science, reason, and facts can be channeled into action going forward, but the turnout on Saturday has been impressive by any measure.
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Meet Steve, The Mysterious Aurora In Earth’s Sky
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Meet Steve, the purple streak of light that appears during the aurora borealis and, until recently, stumped astronomers.
New Animal Discovered: Species Across the Planet Died As This Ancient Reptile Thrived
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The new species might be an ancestor to crocodiles and dinosaurs, researchers said in the study released in the journal PLoS One Wednesday. Researchers from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona in Spain, who discovered the new reptile footprints, suggested that the species, named Prorotodactylus mesaxonichnus, walked on four limbs. The footprints discovered were considerably small—about a foot-and-a-half long—suggesting the reptile may have belonged to the Euparkeria, a sub group of archosauromorphs that resided in Poland, Russia, China and South Africa around the same time period.
'Genius' TV series shows drama of Albert Einstein's life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Philosopher, humanitarian and physicist Albert Einstein is the subject of new TV series "Genius," which delves into the drama and passion of the man who developed the theory of relativity and helped initiate the U.S. effort to build an atomic bomb. Executive producer Ron Howard told reporters at the TV show's launch at the Tribeca Film Festival that he had always been fascinated by Einstein. "But I never realized how many twists and turns and, you know, there were in his life, and how much drama there was," Howard said on Thursday.
Here’s some amazing science instagram accounts you can follow to support the March for Science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Science is cool. There’s really nothing more exciting than getting some awesome knowledge dropped on you, and these Instagrams will help you follow…
Even Trump's Earth Day message was anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump just released a statement for Earth Day, and it doesn't seem like he really loves the Earth?  Along with some faint praise of America's "abundant natural resources and awe-inspiring beauty," Trump used Earth Day to talk about jobs.  "Economic growth enhances environmental protection. We can and must protect our environment without harming America's working families. That is why my administration is reducing unnecessary burdens on American workers and American companies, while being mindful that our actions must also protect the environment," Trump said.  Are those vague allusions to the Trump administration's move to revive the Keystone pipeline? Or to slash federal funding for scientific research? Or gut the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) greenhouse gas emissions rules? .@realDonaldTrump Earth Day msg is unusual, defends policies aimed at economic growth, says science depends on "robust debate." pic.twitter.com/XI6ovznOAs — Andrew Freedman (@afreedma) April 22, 2017 The White House statement didn't mention climate change, national parks, the EPA or anything else scientific that's been threatened or ignored by the Trump administration. Nor did it mention the many thousands of people who participated in the March for Science in Washington, D.C. and around the world on Saturday, many in direct response to the Trump administration's anti-science stances.  In fact, the statement also included a line frequently used by those who deny the overwhelming evidence showing that human emissions of greenhouse gases cause global warming.  "My Administration is committed to advancing scientific research that leads to a better understanding of our environment and of environmental risks," Trump said.  "As we do so, we should remember that rigorous science depends not on ideology, but on a spirit of honest inquiry and robust debate," Trump said.  He followed up with this tweet later in the day.  I am committed to keeping our air and water clean but always remember that economic growth enhances environmental protection. Jobs matter! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 22, 2017 Lost on the president are two actual mainstays of science, which are research and observation. To Trump and those in his administration, climate science and other extremely well-researched topics are counted as ideologies, and put up for debate. "This April 22nd, as we observe Earth Day, I hope that our Nation can come together to give thanks for the land we all love and call home," Trump said.  Wouldn't that be great?  Andrew Freedman contributed reporting. WATCH: An all-electric flying car just made its first flight and it's as cool as it sounds
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
All the best (and geekiest) signs from Marches for Science around the world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists and science enthusiasts alike took to the streets Saturday (Earth Day!) to support a worthwhile cause: facts.  And you had to know the signs were going to be amazing. Here are a few of the best — and, of course, the geekiest — signs from not only the March for Science in D.C., but marches and rallies around the world. Because reason rules. SEE ALSO: Here's why thousands of scientists are (and aren't) marching on Saturday Mobile science lab. #MarchForScience pic.twitter.com/DFLlHj2m0F — Sean Carroll (@seanmcarroll) April 22, 2017 Sine game  pic.twitter.com/S81UrJpY24 — Alison Griswold (@alisongriswold) April 22, 2017 "Geez" #ScienceMarch SF pic.twitter.com/XXdKv7pi1c — Peter Aldhous (@paldhous) April 22, 2017 @darth @anamariecox sled dog marching for science #marchforscience #ScienceMarch #RM4S pic.twitter.com/8EYyN3fF2V — Ale Livas Dlott (@alivasdlott) April 22, 2017 Signs on the mall. #marchforscience #scienceisessential pic.twitter.com/ZhVCn8tKvu — Am Geophysical Union (@theAGU) April 22, 2017 The oceans are rising and so are we. #earthday #sciencemarch #sciencemarchnyc #resistance #theresistance pic.twitter.com/6akQPuCJFq — Richard Hine (@richardhine) April 22, 2017 Big crowd here at #marchforscience NYC pic.twitter.com/54WAXESuoi — Michael McCoy (@mmccoyatcen) April 22, 2017 "Let's PAWS for a moment of SCIENCE" - favorite poster so far! #marchforscience #marchforsciencenyc pic.twitter.com/6zdlHt1d4c — Kathryn Guarini (@kwguarini) April 22, 2017 #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/Xi545HgEQk — Pamela Baker (@PamBakes) April 22, 2017 Hands! #ScienceMarch #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/bM6c4YlIX5 — Miriam Kramer (@mirikramer) April 22, 2017 omg #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/mo8sRb7646 — Sarah Emerson (@SarahNEmerson) April 22, 2017 ‍#marchforsciencenyc #marchforscience #ScienceMarch pic.twitter.com/6ha21boYTt — Miriam Kramer (@mirikramer) April 22, 2017 Susan Stevenson came to NYC from San Diego to #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/Zpcxw1KOGC — Virginia Hughes (@virginiahughes) April 22, 2017 "There is no Planet B" #sciencemarch #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/SwnrYWBHvn — Miriam Kramer (@mirikramer) April 22, 2017 Me and the Doctor! #marchforscience #wibblywobblytimeywimey pic.twitter.com/0AiS6kWBfW — Gareth Redmond-King (@gredmond76) April 22, 2017 This one made me giggle. @ScienceMarchDC #marchforscience #PrincessBride #asyouwish pic.twitter.com/V1W4iRm1z4 — Michael Halpern (@halpsci) April 22, 2017 Signs ready! #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/Buvy2JFTfI — lynn sprott (@lynnsprott1) April 22, 2017 #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/72duXY0mKp — MarchForScience Aust (@ScienceMarchAu) April 22, 2017 Signs #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/nqWCYzmD0U — Miriam Kramer (@mirikramer) April 22, 2017 Facts matter. So does diversity. More diversity = better, smarter solutions (scientifically proven) #EarthDay #marchforscience #marginsci pic.twitter.com/0uu39GJ4Yh — Nadav Gazit (@nadav_gazit) April 22, 2017 The Doctor is in. #ScienceMarchLdn #sciencemarch #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/lceZQc7bVn — Scruffagette (@scruffagette) April 22, 2017 Favourite banner so far #MarchForScience #ScienceMarchLdn pic.twitter.com/0KyOhkAERX — Jennie Evans (@jennieep) April 22, 2017 The revolution will be peer-reviewed! @KateShawOnline #marchforscience @ScienceMarchPT pic.twitter.com/yBzGfImTQT — Katarina (@katliketread) April 22, 2017 Just finished helping my daughter make her 1st #MarchforScience sign. pic.twitter.com/g8NKclxZdE — ShootUpW/God (@ShootUpwithGod) April 22, 2017 WATCH: An all-electric flying car just made its first flight and it's as cool as it sounds
Advocates fan out in global show of support for science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists, students and research advocates rallied from the Brandenburg Gate to the Washington Monument on Earth Day, conveying a global message of scientific freedom without political interference and spending necessary to make future breakthroughs possible.
The Latest: Thousands join global rallies for science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists, students and research advocates are marking Earth Day by conveying a global message about scientific freedom without political interference
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
This is what happened to the scientist who stuck his head inside a particle accelerator
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What would happen if you stuck your body inside a particle accelerator? The scenario seems like the start of a bad Marvel comic, but it happens to shed light on our intuitions about radiation, the vulnerability of the human body, and the very nature of matter. Particle accelerators allow physicists to study subatomic particles by…
Hubble Spies On Two Spiral Galaxies To Celebrate Its 27th Birthday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The spiral galaxies, NGC 4302 and NGC 4298, are located 55 million light-years from Earth in the northern constellation of Coma Berenices.
Farming for the future: How one company uses big data to maximize yields and minimize impact
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Foris.io has a mission: Make farms more productive and protect the environment while doing it. With a combination of hardware and machine learning from IBM, Foris.io aims to change the way we farm.
Yes, science is political
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Over the past few weeks, we’ve gotten notes from Verge Science readers wondering why news from the incoming Trump administration has seeped into our science coverage. The scientific method consists of generating a hypothesis, attempting to disprove the hypothesis through testing, and accumulating those tests to come up with shared knowledge.
How to get involved in tomorrow’s March for Science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
First it was the women, and their allies. Then the scientists, and the believers in science: On April 22, Earth Day, a March for Science will take place in Washington, DC, and more than 500 other cities around the world, as “the first step of a global movement to defend the vital role science plays…
‘Science not silence’: Thousands rally in New York to take aim at ‘alternative facts’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Protest signs and photos of Science March in New York, one of many Earth Day rallies around the world defending science in the era of President Trump.
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Science Fact or Fiction? 10 Space Myths From Movies and TV
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Countless films and TV series take place in space, but they're not always accurate. These are some of the most common fictional space myths.
Scientists Are Discovering How the Power of Suggestion Works on the Brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.
The Top Gene
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Illumina is investors' best buy in this category.
The world’s largest X
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The world’s largest x-ray laser is one step closer to completion after researchers at Germany’s Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) announced they have passed a major milestone.
George Takei, Lin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As hundreds of Marches for Science took place around the globe, science-loving celebrities sounded off on social media to show their support. A few marched themselves (looking at you, Peter Capaldi). Others, unable to make it, sent messages of encouragement and thanks to participants. Bonus: Lin-Manuel Miranda's message involved a dog. Yes, if nothing else, we can take comfort in the fact that many celebrities appear to know that, indeed, there is no Planet B. Whew! SEE ALSO: Attend the March for Science without ever leaving your couch Today, we're at the #MarchForScience promoting the progress of science and the useful arts of engineering. pic.twitter.com/VJJKSMahD3 — Bill Nye (@BillNye) April 22, 2017 Sending love and gratitude to everyone at the #MarchForScience today!!!!! Thank you for standing up for TRUTH. — kerry washington (@kerrywashington) April 22, 2017 A shout out to all those today who #MarchForScience. The truth is out there. Embrace it. Cherish it. Protect it. — George Takei (@GeorgeTakei) April 22, 2017 Happy Earth Day, everyone! I myself, like some science! #marchforscience #earthday2017 pic.twitter.com/FrkqHa9wz6 — Thora Birch (@1107miss) April 22, 2017 Beaker is making his @ScienceMarchDC sign. #marchforscience #ScienceMarch pic.twitter.com/AIEYDyEAar — Michael Halpern (@halpsci) April 22, 2017 As the #MarchForScience commences, sources tell me Trump has made his pick to replace Vivek Murthy as Surgeon General: Dr. Leo Spaceman. pic.twitter.com/GawcdZFsPL — Nik Dodani (@nikdodani) April 22, 2017 A post shared by Questlove Gomez (@questlove) on Apr 22, 2017 at 8:48am PDT Yes. Yes, you are #ScienceMarch pic.twitter.com/LfWvai4ABp — Mara Wilson (@MaraWilson) April 22, 2017 WATCH: An all-electric flying car just made its first flight and it's as cool as it sounds
Could coconuts reveal the secrets of the great Alcatraz escape?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As if the 1962 breakout from the "inescapable" prison wasn't already nuts, researchers now hope to find the truth with help from fruit.
French presidential contender Emmanuel Macron’s unique love story
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
French Economy minister Emmanuel Macron and his wife Brigitte Trogneux arrive at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, to attend a dinner in honour of Spain’s King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia, June 2, 2015. As France prepares to hold the first round of voting in their presidential election Sunday, one prominent far-right candidate is receiving attention for her populist, nationalist policies — and her political resemblance to President Trump in the U.S. Still, another has a profile that seems, at least to Americans, quintessentially French. Emmanuel Macron is a 39-year-old former investment banker and economy minister and current favorite in the election, which, after Sunday’s voting, will almost certainly be decided in a May 7 runoff. Considered a centrist candidate, Macron is running under the banner of the En Marche! (Forward!) movement, which he founded in 2016 after leaving the Socialist Party.
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Federal funding for basic research led to the gene
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Call us naïve, but we believe — as an immunologist and biochemist attempting to perfect and deploy gene-editing advances to cure disease — that Democrats and Republicans alike can be united by a shared drive for scientific exploration and life-saving discoveries. Over the past century, American political leaders have encouraged young people to ask these fundamental questions, invested in their training to become scientists, and given them tools to translate questions into innovation. In these moments, whatever our politics, we all hope to reach for the most powerful medicines, which continue to result from the relentless pursuit of scientific knowledge.
Thousands join March for Science to fight 'alternative facts'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thousands of people joined a global March for Science on Saturday with Washington the epicenter of a movement to fight back against what many see as an "assault on facts" by populist politicians. Hundreds streamed onto the Washington Mall for a festive day of music, speeches and teach-ins by scientists disturbed by the rise of so-called "alternative facts" around crucial issues like climate change following the election of Donald Trump. At a time when the Earth has marked three consecutive years of record-breaking heat, and ice is melting at an unprecedented rate at the poles, risking massive sea level rise in the decades ahead, some marchers say it is more important than ever for scientists to communicate and work toward solutions to curb fossil fuel emissions.
Should social media networks do more to police content?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Facebook vows to do better job
Russia's secret
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stem subjects - science, technology, engineering, maths - have an image problem. But not in Russia.
As orbit becomes more crowded, risk from space debris grows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Decades' worth of man-made junk is cluttering up Earth's orbit, posing a threat to spaceflight and the satellites we rely on for weather reports, air travel and global communications
Icelandic language at risk; robots, computers can't grasp it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When an Icelander arrives at an office building and sees "Solarfri" posted, they need no further explanation for the empty premises: The word means "when staff get an unexpected afternoon ...
A direct hit from a large asteroid wouldn't be pretty
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A major asteroid safely passed us this week. Whew! Had it made impact it could have been just as bad as in a Hollywood movie.
Attend the March for Science without ever leaving your couch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Saturday, tens of thousands of scientists and fans of reason will take to the streets in more than 500 demonstrations planned around the world as part of the first-ever March for Science.  But even if you can't make it to a march in person, a livestream of the festivities in Washington, D.C., has you covered.  SEE ALSO: Here's why thousands of scientists are (and aren't) marching on Saturday A webcast set to go live at 10 a.m. ET Saturday will broadcast the rally ahead of the march in Washington, D.C., for any and all who want to participate but had to stay home for one reason or another.  You can watch the webcast — which will feature rally speeches and entertainment by Questlove, Bill Nye, members of Congress and many others — provided through the Earth Day Network, in the window below. At the moment, science in this country is seemingly under threat from the Trump administration itself.  If President Donald Trump has his way, as outlined in his budget blueprint, the Environmental Protection Agency's budget would be cut by more than 31 percent and many other science funding agencies would face massive cutbacks as well.  The March for Science is designed to make the voices of scientists and science supporters known to policymakers around the world. "Science is a vital feature of a working democracy, spurring innovation, critical thinking, increased understanding, and better, healthier lives for all people," the March for Science states on its website. "By marching in Washington, DC and around the world, we take one of many steps to become more active in our communities and in democratic life." WATCH: Giant icebergs are a big tourist draw in Newfoundland, and a warning sign
Supply ship named for John Glenn arrives at space station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A supply ship bearing John Glenn's name has arrived at the International Space Station
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Hubble team celebrates telescope’s 27th birthday with a double scoop of galaxies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s traditional for the team behind the Hubble Space Telescope to release a jaw-dropping picture to celebrate the anniversary of the observatory’s launch in April 1990, and this year’s image might well rate a double jaw drop. The science team’s greeting card for Hubble’s 27th birthday features side-by-side views of two spiral galaxies much like our own Milky Way galaxy, seen from two angles. The edge-on galaxy at left, NGC 4302, is about 60 percent of the Milky Way’s size and contains about 10 percent of our home galaxy’s mass, the Hubble team says in today’s image advisory. The galaxy… Read More
I Will March for Science on Saturday — So Should You
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump’s cuts to pure science and vital agencies risk generational damage to the pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness.
The new Oprah movie about Henrietta Lacks reopens a big scientific debate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Henrietta Lacks — her fictional HBO character (left) and the real woman behind the cells that changed science. When you get surgery or have a mole removed, and there’s leftover tissue or blood, there’s a chance that it might not be discarded. This practice went on for decades without much controversy — until the bestselling book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot came along in 2010.
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
New Warning on Giving Kids Codeine or Tramadol
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The Food and Drug Administration warned that cough and pain medications containing codeine or tramadol should not be given to children after reports that the drugs caused life-threatening breathi...
When You Need a Geriatrics Doctor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The population of older Americans is exploding, but there’s a shortage of the very doctors trained specifically to treat them, according to the American Geriatrics Society. Geriatricians are boar...
Using wearable technology to detect conflict in couples before it occurs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Several teams of researchers at USC have joined forces for a study aimed at detecting vital signs to help stem conflicts in couples before they occur. Couples were brought into the lab, equipped with wearable sensors, given smartphones for recording data and sent out on their way.The study largely took place outside of the lab, with...