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Black woman who had trailblazing Navy career dies at 83
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Raye Montague, a trailblazing black woman from Arkansas who revolutionized the way the U.S. Navy designed ships, has died. She was 83.
Cherokee Nation Calls Elizabeth Warren's DNA Test 'Irrelevant'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Cherokee Nation called Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s DNA test to prove her Native American ancestry “inappropriate and wrong” in a statement Monday.
Trail Blazers, Seahawks owner Paul Allen dies at 65
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Allen was the Seahawks' owner for two decades and the Trail Blazers' owner for over 30. 
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
How Some Environmentalists Hope to Make Climate Change an Issue in the Midterms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Green groups are slamming a California congressman for repeatedly denying the science of climate change
Elizabeth Warren Just Shared a DNA Test Showing She Has Native American Ancestry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sen. Elizabeth Warren, whom Trump has called the "Fake Pocahontas," revealed a DNA test she says shows her Native American ancestry.
Palm's Weird New Tiny Smartphone Sidekick Says Something Sad About Our Phones
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Palm's smartphone sidekick exposes a gaping hole in smartphone makers' lineups
Climate deniers love to repeat this dead wrong talking point. Here's how to refute it.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Sunday morning, CNN anchor Jake Tapper asked U.S. Senator Marco Rubio whether he thought the changing climate on Earth today was "at least in part" caused by humans.  On live television, Rubio acknowledged that humans were partly responsible, and then immediately sowed some doubt into his answer. "I think many scientists would debate what percentage is attributable to man versus normal fluctuations," Rubio said.  This is misleading, at best, because there is no plausible debate.  In a variety of ways, scientists globally have repeatedly shown that the modern-day warming of our oceans and atmosphere is specifically attributed human activity — not volcanoes nor the sun. We've simply loaded the atmosphere with carbon-based gases that physically trap heat.   "The actual science indicates that climate change is responsible for all of the warming of the planet over the past century," Michael Mann, a climate scientist at Penn State University, said over email. Other natural factors — notably energy output from the sun and gases emitted from volcanoes — have in total actually gone in the opposite direction, noted Mann, even causing a minor amount of cooling, but certainly not enough to make a dent in the warming trend. Possible causes of radiative forcing: changes in solar activity, in volcanic activity or greenhouse gases. The latest US Climate Assessment shows how much each of these contributed. See https://t.co/q2dySg8xmb The human contribution is about 100%. That is: all of it. /2 pic.twitter.com/i6Ewprs7aQ — Stefan Rahmstorf (@rahmstorf) October 15, 2018 The scientific consensus about human responsibility for climate change is now staggering.  The notion that prominent politicians continually still question the attribution of our warming globe — and sometimes even the political motivations of scientists — is growing increasingly far-fetched, or simply absurd.   "Anyone who knows science knows that trying to get a lot of scientists to agree on something is like herding cats,"  Stefan Rahmstorf, head of Earth System Analysis at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, said over email. "The idea that many thousands of climate scientists, from all continents and all kinds of upbringing and political systems and persuasions, are all driven by the same political agenda, is the most silly conspiracy theory that I have heard," added Rahmstorf.  "There is a much simpler explanation for the overwhelming consensus among climate scientists about human-caused global warming: The scientific evidence for it is overwhelming." SEE ALSO: Climate change could threaten the world's beer supply. Do you care about global warming now? Scientists have a keen understanding of how much energy from the sun enters the Earth, as well as the amount of greenhouse gases volcanoes contribute to the atmosphere. These natural sources simply can't explain accelerated, modern-day warming. What's more, climate scientists have a good record of the how much industrial activity and land clearance — which removes forests that suck carbon out of the air — has occurred globally since the Industrial Revolution began, Jonathan Overpeck, a climate scientist at the University of Michigan, said over the phone.  "We know that the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is from human activity, primarily burning of fossil fuels and clearing of land, for a variety of reasons, all confirming each other," emphasized Overpeck. A prominent chunk of evidence is that the carbon in the air carries a telltale chemical signature. Great to acknowledge measurable changes @marcorubio but we aren't debating the cause of climate change as much as you think. Fossil fuels are dead plants, which prefer light carbon, which spiked with CO2 went up. It's definitely us. Remix from doi: 10.1002/jgrd.50668 @jaketapper pic.twitter.com/DQYP7qfhVo — Kris Karnauskas (@OceansClimateCU) October 15, 2018 "The chemical composition of the air has changed, and it's a fingerprint that reveals it has to be changing because of fossil fuel burning and land clearance — cutting down the forests," he said. There are two stable types of carbon, called isotopes, that naturally exist on Earth, a heavier and lighter type. "Plants like to consume the lighter isotope,"  Kristopher Karnauskas, a professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at Colorado Boulder, said in an interview.   And every fossil fuel burned on Earth, whether it's oil, coal, or natural gas (methane), is formed from old, decayed plant material.  Tellingly, the carbon being emitted into skies today is the "lighter" type of carbon — meaning plants sucked it out of the air, long ago.  Now, human activity is releasing this carbon back into the atmosphere, where it's easily detected. "We come along in the last hundreds of years, dig up these old dead plants, and burn them," said Karnauskas. "And we would expect to see whatever they were consuming enter our atmosphere." Temperatures compared to the average in 1884. Blues indicate cooler than average.Image: nasa Temperatures compared to the average in 2017. Reds and yellows indicate warmer than average.Image: nasa Since the beginning of widespread industrial activity in the mid-1800s, the proportion of this lighter isotope has been on a dramatic rise.  "It's funny we need to go to this length to convince people CO2 is going up," said Karnauskas. "You can’t get around the ironclad proof this is us, from this isotopic ratio." Still, prominent politicians like Rubio and President Donald Trump either fail to understand climate science, or apparently ignore it. "Marco Rubio is irresponsible for peddling climate change denier talking points," said Mann. "They need to replace Rubio with a senator who will actually do something about climate change rather than make excuses for not doing anything." While many U.S. politicians continue to stumble, scientists don't. "He's [Rubio is] challenging a scientific underpinning that has been established over and over and over again," noted Karnauska. "Now, there's a high degree — we call it extremely high degrees of confidence —  that's just about as strong as anything in science — that the C02 is causing global warming and is the dominant cause of global warming," said Overpeck. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?
More Than Me CEO Katie Meyler Temporarily Steps Down
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Four days after ProPublica published a story about the charity, its board chairman has also resigned, multiple groups are conducting independent investigations and Liberians are outraged
White St. Louis Realtor Fired After She Was Recorded Refusing to Let Black Neighbor Into His Apartment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A white woman refused to allow her black neighbor into her building and now she’s been fired from her job.
Stephen Hawking's warning that genetically altered superhumans could wipe out the rest of us doesn't mention a likely characteristic of the
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Sunday Times published an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's posthumously-published book "Brief Answers to the Big Questions" in which the esteemed scientist warned that genetically-enhanced humans could become a dominant overclass. This is a concept that has been explored in science fiction, and emerging technologies combined with rising inequality could lead to such a dystopian outcome. Hawking doesn't write that the first humans to take advantage of genetic modification will be the ones who can afford it, but it's hardly a stretch to expect the ultra-rich to become the first super-humans.
Climate change? It comes and goes, Trump says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump, a longtime climate change skeptic, said Monday on a tour of hurricane damage in the southern United States that "something" is happening -- but that the change is not permanent. It is going to go back and forth," Trump said while visiting Georgia, which was damaged by Hurricane Michael last week.
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
Apollo 17 moonwalker Harrison Schmitt stirs up a buzz with climate change views
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON, D.C. —  I didn’t invite Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt to get his views on climate change, but that’s the topic that created the most fireworks here today at the ScienceWriters2018 conference. The title of the session was “Apollo Plus 50,” and the focus was the past and the future of America’s space program in light of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo moon missions. Fifty years ago today, for example, Apollo 7’s astronauts were putting NASA’s moonship to the test for the very first time in Earth orbit. Schmitt’s an expert on this subject, primarily because he was the… Read More
18 in '18: How First
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"If we had voted in the 2016 election, the results would have been so different."
President Trump Marvels at Hurricane Michael Damage in Florida
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump marveled at the roofless homes and uprooted trees he saw Monday while touring Florida Panhandle communities ravaged by the force of Hurricane Michael.
Stephen Hawking's warning that genetically altered superhumans could wipe out the rest of us doesn't mention a likely characteristic of the
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Sunday Times published an excerpt from Stephen Hawking's posthumously-published book "Brief Answers to the Big Questions" in which the esteemed scientist warned that genetically-enhanced humans could become a dominant overclass. This is a concept that has been explored in science fiction, and emerging technologies combined with rising inequality could lead to such a dystopian outcome. Hawking doesn't write that the first humans to take advantage of genetic modification will be the ones who can afford it, but it's hardly a stretch to expect the ultra-rich to become the first super-humans.
EU's new Baltic fish catch quotas anger environmentalists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The ministers meeting in Luxembourg said they were on target to protect Baltic Sea fishing communities while ensuring long-term fish stocks but campaign group Our Fish disagreed. Member state ministers set the quota for western cod at 9,515 tonnes for 2019, an increase of 70 percent over this year, even though the European Commission, the EU executive, called for limiting the increase to 31 percent.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Are Going Down Under. Here’s What to Know About Britain's Tangled Role in the Region
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What the Duke and Duchess of Sussex encounter in Oceania will be inextricably linked to the legacies of the sometimes painful past
Will Rick Scott’s playbook withstand a potential Democratic wave?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Florida Gov. Rick Scott has won two hard-fought elections over the past decade by spending heavily on TV early in the race, building a lead and then withstanding a late rally from his opponent. Scott grabbed a lead in the race in late June but fell behind over the past month. Scott, a Republican, is trying to unseat incumbent Sen. Bill Nelson, a Democrat serving his 18th year in the Senate.
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
Trump Says Saudi King Told Him He 'Denies Any Knowledge' of Missing Journalist's Fate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump said Monday he had spoken to King Salman of Saudi Arabia, and that he had personally denied any knowledge of the fate of disappeared journalist Jamal Khashoggi
Ariana Grande and Pete Davidson Are No Longer Engaged
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It was way too much too soon"
The Anthropocene Era Is Killing Us
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Our bodies evolved in a different geological era, and as we stand upon the crest of yet another, humans are showing signs of the stress these changes are placing on us.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Will Travel to Zika
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The couple reportedly sought medical advice ahead of the trip
How to Fix the House of Representatives in One Easy, Radical Step
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Everyone knows the House has 435 seats. But should it have nearly 1,000?
Jeff Bezos predicts we'll have 1 trillion humans in the solar system
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Blue Origin's aim is to lower the cost of access to space, Jeff Bezos said during a surprise appearance at Wired's 25th anniversary conference. Bezos said he will spend a "little more" than $1 billion annually to support Blue Origin. "I won't be alive to see the fulfillment of that long-term mission," Bezos said at the Wired 25th anniversary summit in San Francisco.
'It's the Legacy of Slavery': Here's the Troubling History Behind Tipping Practices in the U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The custom in the years around the Civil War
Ignorance of land type puts real estate at risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Oct. 15 (Notimex) - After conducting a study on the type of soil, the academic of the Autonomous University of Queretaro (UAQ, for its acronym in Spanish), Eduardo Rojas Gonzalez, proposed to incorporate the figure of Geotechnical Expert in the Construction Regulations of the State of Queretaro, where there is a growth of social interest housing. The researcher said it is necessary to have better construction procedures, more efficient methods of foundation and analyze the consequences of not making an appropriate design of the process in the structures, which can cause the buildings to present cracks, fissures and fractures. In a statement, the UAQ reported that for this work, Rojas Gonzalez, under the Faculty of Engineering, won the Alexandrian Award 2018, given by this institution in the category of Natural and Exact Sciences. He pointed out that several construction companies that come to the entity do not know the characteristics of the ground and, therefore, some housing projects have problems in their structure. He also considered that it is necessary for companies to have advice and studies of soil mechanics, since it is common that structures such as houses of social interest have defects. This puts the inhabitants at a disadvantage, since currently the guarantee of real estate its only for one year and, for various reasons, should be extended to at least 10 years. For example, it indicated that expansive soils have a volcanic origin, so the eruptions of the Cimatario volcano that covered the valley of Queretaro with ashes and magma, with the passage of time and weathering (chemical transformation of rocks in the soil) gave rise to the formation of this type of soil. It pointed out that there are also collapsible soils, which are mainly in slopes and hills of the Queretana zone and are due to a very loose accommodation of soil particles. "If we build on that soil, when it is dry it is hard, the structures do not present any problem. But if there is a significant amount of rain or a leak of water, it gets wet, then a collapse occurs, which translates into a sudden settlement of the structure; on the other hand, the expansive has a dilatation behavior, that pushes the structure upward," it explained. For this reason, it is necessary that the Construction Regulations of the State of Queretaro recognize the figure of Geotechnical Expert, as it exists in Mexico City for 18 years, which is responsible for the good behavior of the foundation of the structures during its time of guarantee. "What we are proposing is that Geotechnical Experts be graduated from a master's degree in Soil Mechanics that has sufficient knowledge to make a design that is efficient, economical and safe for problematic soils," it emphasized. NTX/DGG/LCH/PAP
EU agrees to sharply boost Baltic cod catch quotas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
European Union ministers agreed on Monday to sharply boost catch quotas for western Baltic Sea cod next year but put lower limits on fishing of western herring. The ministers meeting in Luxembourg said they were on target to protect Baltic Sea fishing communities while ensuring long-term fish stocks for the 28 EU member countries.
Man Dies from Extremely Rare Disease After Eating Squirrel Brains
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A man in New York developed an extremely rare and fatal brain disorder after he ate squirrel brains, according to a new report of the man's case. In 2015, the 61-year-old man was brought to a hospital in Rochester, New York, after experiencing a decline in his thinking abilities and losing touch with reality, the report said. An MRI of the man's head revealed a striking finding: The brain scan looked similar to those seen in people with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a fatal brain condition caused by infectious proteins called prions.
Earth's Magnetic Fields Could Give Lightspeed Warning of Incoming Earthquakes and Tsunamis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Natural disasters leave clues in the Earth's magnetic fields. Two scientists are working to decode them.
German Police Free Hostage From Train Station After She Was Held For 2 Hours
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The entire station, one of the biggest in the nation, had been evacuated
Facing doubts from women voters, Tennessee’s Phil Bredesen opens up about his wife's kidnapping
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The centrist Democrat speaks out about his wife's kidnapping, explaining that protecting women is very personal to him.
Blue states' rights: California’s 'Queen of Green' fights Trump to set stricter pollution rules
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Mary Nichols, the chair of California Air Resources Board, is engaged in a tense feud with the Trump administration over her state’s ability to regulate its air quality.
Think tanks reconsider Saudi support amid Khashoggi controversy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The push to disassociate from Saudi Arabia has proven complex for Washington’s most prominent public policy institutions.
Nacho Cheese or Cool Ranch? Doritos lure rogue pig back home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HIGHLAND, Calif. (AP) — Deputies in California have used Doritos to lure a pig "the size of a mini horse" back home.
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.
A lesson from the Sears bankruptcy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Once called the colossus of retailing, Sears filed for bankruptcy on Monday. While the Sears name may yet reemerge in smaller form, its demise offers a cautionary tale – and not just on the need for constant innovation in business. While Sears was long a trusted brand name, it never was a vital center in the local communities that it served.
Migration roils global politics, even as it ebbs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In 2018, the United States is set to take in fewer political refugees than in any year since 1977. President Trump is revoking the protected status Washington has offered for decades to more than 400,000 immigrants who fled turmoil in their home countries. In Hungary, border guards have withheld food from rejected Afghan and Syrian asylum seekers to convince them to drop their appeals.
NASA’s one last hope for reviving the Opportunity rover may rest with Mars itself
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With NASA's Hubble and Chandra spacecraft both choosing the same week to malfunction, it's obviously been a trying time for space agency engineers who are working tirelessly to keep space hardware up and running. In fact, last week was so rough on NASA that it was easy to forget the fact that the Opportunity rover is still sitting lifeless on the Red Planet. NASA has been keeping a close eye on Opportunity — well, as close of an eye as you can when the rover refuses to actually communicate — but in a new update the space agency offers a tiny glimmer of hope. With the dust storm that doomed Opportunity now long gone, the last hope for the rover may rest in a different Mars weather phenomenon. For the past several weeks, NASA has been sending plenty of signals to rover in the hopes that the aging hardware will finally snap out of its funk. The rover entered a low-power default state when a massive dust storm swallowed Mars and cut off light from Opportunity's solar panels. Scientists remain hopeful that the rover still has some life left in it, but warn that it's possible the rover is indeed dead. One of the final hopes for NASA engineers is that the rover's solar panels were simply caked with dust when it was swallowed up by the storm. If that is the case, the only thing that could possibly save the rover's only power source would be if that dust was blown away, and as luck would have it the coming season is perfect for doing just that. "A windy period on Mars — known to Opportunity's team as "dust-clearing season" — occurs in the November-to-January time frame and has helped clean the rover's panels in the past," NASA explains in a new update post. "The team remains hopeful that some dust clearing may result in hearing from the rover in this period." If the solar panels are covered in dust and can't generate enough power to recharge the rover's batteries, a steady flow of wind could solve that problem. NASA is hoping that the rover's panels will clear enough that the vehicle wakes back up and begins sending messages back home once more, but if it doesn't we might finally see the end of a mission that has already outperformed NASA's wildest expectations.
Remember Palm? It's Back With a Tiny Sidekick for Your Gigantic Regular Phone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A San Francisco based start-up tech company, Palm Ventures Inc., has a device That is described as an homage of the Palm Pilot, called simply ‘Palm’.Time's Mercer Morrison has the story.
Will Meghan and Harry's Royal Baby Have Dual U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's not as simple a question as you might expect
Trump Says Saudi King Told Him He 'Denies Any Knowledge' of Missing Journalist's Fate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Trump said Monday King Salman of Saudi Arabia had personally denied any knowledge of the fate of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.
Prost, ganbei, cheers: Climate change means less beer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you crave a pint (or two) at the end of a hard day, brace yourself: climate change is poised to make your favourite lager, ale or IPA more scarce and pricey. On current trends, a crescendo of heatwaves and droughts will periodically cause sharp declines in barley yields, a crucial ingredient in most beer, according to a study published Monday. "Decreases in the global supply of barley lead to proportionally larger decreases in barley used to make beer," said lead author Dabo Guan, a professor of climate change economics and the University of East Anglia in Britain.
Protests as fracking begins in UK
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Anti-fracking protesters took to the streets on Monday as work began on Britain's first horizontal shale-gas well after the High Court in London dismissed a last-minute request for an injunction. Energy firm Cuadrilla said it had started hydraulic fracturing on Monday at its Preston New Road site in Lancashire, northwest England, with workers having to file past around 200 demonstrators. "Hydraulic fracturing of both horizontal exploration wells is expected to last three months after which the flow rate of the gas will be tested," said a Cuadrilla spokesman.
Unpacking Elizabeth Warren's DNA test, including her Native American ancestry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The senator made it clear in a video about the results that she took the test in response to political scrutiny about her heritage.
Warren releases DNA test showing 'strong evidence' of Native American ancestry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Monday released the results of a DNA test that the Massachusetts Democrat said proves she has Native American ancestry.
Facing doubts from women voters, Tennessee’s Phil Bredesen opens up about an assault on his wife
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
JOHNSON CITY, Tenn.—On a December morning nearly thirty years ago, Phil Bredesen had just gotten to work at his office in downtown Nashville when his phone rang. The call was purposely vague—the officer didn’t want the businessman to panic—but something had happened to Bredesen’s wife, Andrea Conte, and he told him to come to the hospital right away. “I thought she had been mugged,” Bredesen, the former Tennessee governor who is now running for U.S. Senate, recalled in an interview last week.
NAFTA’s replacement will have to do, Untangling the Skripal poisoning case, In US tariff talks, Japan should push principles of free trade, Sexual a
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“The North American free-trade agreement was ... stitched back up without major damage to the Canadian economy...,” writes Campbell Clark. “The peace treaty worked out [recently] isn’t going to be a glowing ode to the principles of free trade.... The deal ... doesn’t have so-called poison-pill demands that the U.S. made last October.... Could [Prime Minister Justin] Trudeau have done better if the Canadian team hadn’t been pushed aside when the U.S. and Mexico started to hammer out the framework of an agreement in summer? It’s hard to know.... It’s not the ‘win-win-win’ deal Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland kept talking about during negotiations.