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What’s so awe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s a rare celestial event, and a great excuse to step outside in the summer and get a glimpse of the stars in the middle of the day. People who have seen total eclipses say the experience moves them deeply and existentially. You suddenly feel as though you can see the clockwork of the solar system.
Elon Musk Likes Most Technology, But He Wants One Sector Regulated
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk has called artificial intelligence "a fundamental risk to the existence of human civilization."
Outgoing federal ethics chief: ‘We are pretty close to a laughingstock at this point’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Walter M. Shaub Jr., director of the Office of Government Ethics, told the New York Times that President Trump’s apparent disdain for long-established ethical norms has undermined the credibility of the United States around the world.
'Curious' baboon knocks out power to Zambian tourist town
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — A baboon in Zambia has interfered with machinery at a power station in a tourist town near Victoria Falls, knocking out power to tens of thousands of people for several hours.
Timber rattlesnake caught lingering near Massachusetts home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (AP) — Timber rattlesnakes are known to thrive in some rural areas of Massachusetts, but finding them in urban areas is almost unheard of.
Baboon causes power cut in Zambian tourist town
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A baboon plunged a Zambian tourist town into darkness on Sunday after tampering with equipment at a hydro-electric power station, the state electricity company said on Monday. The 108 megawatt power station in Livingstone, a hub for tourists visiting nearby Victoria Falls, is close to a national park but it is rare for animals to wander into the plant. Zesco Ltd, which owns the power station, said the baboon disturbed a high voltage transformer leaving about 40,000 customers without electricity for five hours.
Macron: My charm offensive may soften Trump's climate stance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
French President Emmanuel Macron says his glamorous Paris charm offensive on Donald Trump was carefully calculated — and may have changed the U.S. president's mind about climate change. Macron defended ...
6 cars stolen from driveways on same night in same town
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GREENWICH, Conn. (AP) — Police say six cars were stolen from people's driveways on the same night in the Connecticut town of Greenwich.
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin rolls out the red carpet for Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The second person to walk on the moon rolled out the red carpet for the red planet
A Chinese scientist thinks the country could be using nuclear fusion power in 50 years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Significant progress could be made on artificial sun technology by 2023 – and it could be used to generate clean energy for China in 50 to 60 years, a senior government nuclear scientist says. Song Yuntao, a lead scientist on the country’s largest fusion energy project, told the official Science and Technology Daily on Thursday that they expected to double the burn time of man-made sun every 16 to 17 months.
Tardigrades are the toughest animals on Earth. What would it take to kill them all?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If a cataclysm wipes out most of life on the planet — including humans — it’s likely that tardigrades will survive. Tardigrades have survived in the vacuum of space. In 2014, Japanese researchers thawed a group of tardigrades that had been frozen for 30 years.
How Much Does It Cost SpaceX To Reuse A Falcon Rocket?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Generally accepted practice shows that you have to re-use the booster or launch vehicle 5–10 times before you make your money back if you account for all the costs.
Forever's gonna start tonight: Wedding set for total eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — An astronomy buff and her fiance want to make sure nothing eclipses their Missouri wedding ceremony.
Bees at center of swarm, attack moved from suburbia to farm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
RAMSEY, N.J. (AP) — Police say that the New Jersey beehive at the center of an attack on a beekeeper and his wife has been moved to a farm.
Trump brushes off record low approval rating: ‘Not bad at this time’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president reacted to a new ABC News/Washington Post survey that shows his approval rating has slipped to 36 percent — the lowest of any president at six months into his presidency.
Florida driver survives crash when metal object falls on van
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A Florida man has survived a harrowing drive after a large piece of scrap metal fell from a tractor-trailer and crushed his van.
What is the Fermi Paradox? The strange mystery of why we can’t find E.T.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astrophysicists tell us that alien life should be plentiful. If that's the case, why haven't we found them yet? That's the Fermi Paradox. We break down this scientific conundrum in simple terms.
5 Health Benefits Of Being Silent For Your Mind And Body
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These are 5 benefits of silence and solitude, from improving memory to fighting insomnia.
California climate law backers look for support
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California lawmakers leading an effort to extend the state's signature climate change initiative made a last-minute appeal Saturday to critics on the left who say their plan doesn't do enough to reign in polluters.
Trump rails against Clinton’s emails amid Russia firestorm: ‘My son Don is being scorned’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president took to Twitter early Sunday to complain about the media’s coverage of Donald Trump Jr.’s controversial pre-election meeting with a Kremlin-connected lawyer who he thought had dirt on Hillary Clinton.
New Jersey beekeeper, wife hospitalized after colony attacks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
RAMSEY, N.J. (AP) — Officials say a New Jersey beekeeper and his wife were hospitalized after the man's colony became aggressive and swarmed part of the town where the hive was located.
Macron: My charm offensive may soften Trump's climate stance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PARIS (AP) — French President Emmanuel Macron says his glamorous Paris charm offensive on Donald Trump was carefully calculated — and may have changed the U.S. president's mind about climate change.
What Does It Take To Wipe Out Life On A Planet?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Earth has undergone at least five mass extinctions in its history.
Are Ice Cream Alternatives a Healthy Dessert?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
More “healthy” frozen treats are appearing in the supermarket freezer case. Some labels play up their low calorie and low sugar count. Others sport claims about protein or fiber. If you're watchi...
Trump’s EPA has to decide whether it thinks Monsanto’s top weed killer causes cancer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Spraying chemicals on crops to provide protection from weeds and pests has become an essential tool for American farmers growing the world’s food. In the last several years, that practice has hit snags, as concern over whether an active ingredient in those chemicals—glyphosate—can be tied to cancer in humans. The outcome of the debate could…
Research team helps FAA with drones
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
FAA registers record number of drones
Only woman to win math equivalent of Nobel Prize dies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Maryam Mirzakhani, a Stanford University professor who was the first and only woman to win the Fields Medal in mathematics, has died
The Future Of Space Travel: Is Mercury Next?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The BepiColombo spacecraft will cruise for years before it reaches Mercury.
A farm shouldn't be a factory
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Most of today’s food is produced by industrial agriculture and that’s a problem.Industrialized agriculture essentially turns farms into a factories, requiring inputs like synthetic fertilizers, chemical pesticides, large amounts of irrigation water, and fossil fuels to produce outputs like genetically modified crops (corn, soy, wheat) and...
Physics can describe how inequality happens—but can it solve the problem?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you’re working several jobs and still struggling, it’s not your fault. In physics, there exists a basis for money and its flow, which could be why it’s often referred to as a stream of revenue. “Capital is measurable as energy consumed, or movement affected by fuel, food, and work. This unites economics and physics,”…
Why NASA Can't Land Humans On Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Wednesday, NASA’s chief of human spaceflight, William H. Gerstenmaier, spoke about the status of the agency's Journey to Mars mission.
We worked out what it would take to wipe out all life on a planet – and it's good news for alien hunters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hardy lifeforms such as tardigrades can survive almost anything.
Mars mission astronauts rehearse water landings off Texas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA astronauts training for a possible mission to Mars have been practicing water maneuvers in a mock-up Orion space capsule in the Gulf of Mexico
Study finds our Sun is like other stars, resolving mystery
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Our Sun is much like other stars, and not an anomaly because of its magnetic poles that flip every 11 years, scientists said Thursday. The report in the journal Science aims to lay to rest the controversy over whether our solar system's star is cyclic, like other nearby, solar-type stars. "We have shed light on a fundamental mechanism which determines the length of these cycles, which helps us understand the cycle itself over the long-term," lead author Antoine Strugarek, a researcher at the University of Montreal, told AFP.
New research shows how men and women experience depression very differently
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And this should be taken into account for treatment, say experts
Why Artificial Intelligence Should Be Scared Of AI
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Will the robots come to control us?
New Supercluster Of Galaxies Identified
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The supercluster— believed to be more than 10 billion years old —is four billion light-years away from Earth.
How does cloning work, anyway? Your guide to real
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have been able to clone animals and other organisms for decades now, but how many people understand how it works? Here's how the process works (and why it's trickier than you think).
Ridiculous solar eclipse lodging costs will make you want to watch it online
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The total solar eclipse in August will only darken skies above parts of the U.S. in its line of totality for barely 3 minutes, but for that brief time, people are shelling out big money for hotels, campsites, cruise ships, and more. SEE ALSO: New solar eclipse simulator shows you what to expect this summer On Aug. 21, the first total solar eclipse will cross over the entire continental U.S. since 1918. This is a big deal for astronomers, scientists, and everyone else eager to see the moon pass across the sun.  Hotels, home rental sites like Airbnb and Craigslist, and tourism boards in places geographically lucky to fall along the eclipse's path are capitalizing on the rare solar event that's attracting visitors from all over.  The total solar eclipse's path of totality.Image: nasa$2,000 for 3 minutes Craigslist and Airbnb listings are out of control for the solar eclipse, stuffed with overpriced student apartments and backyard spaces.  Even Oregon's state parks are going for ridiculous prices with many camp sites completely booked. The state parks foundation auctioned off 30 additional campsites that went went for $60,000. That's more than $300 per person if every campsite has six people. A typical campsite any other time of the year is $20 a night. In the Corvallis and Bend areas in Oregon, camp sites and RV stays in backyards and open spaces are going for $100 to pitch a tent for the night and $200 for an RV site. Another Oregon campsite is even pricier with $200 nightly rates to pitch a tent and $250 for an RV site. A private Oregon ranch, meanwhile, is charging $1,500 to bring an RV to the property. Airbnb has 31,000 guests who've booked stays for the night of Aug. 20 ahead of the big day in places on the eclipse path, a company spokesperson said. Nashville and Charleston, South Carolina, are hosting the biggest numbers with nearly 8,000 and more than 2,300 bookings, respectively. At least in Lincoln City, Oregon, where the eclipse begins, 85 listings were still available at time of writing. At other spots across the path it's getting tougher (and pricier) to even find somewhere to stay. Some of the priciest Airbnb listings near the start of the eclipse in Madras, Oregon, are going for upwards of $2,000 a night. A room in a small town in Oregon is available for $500. The per night rates at a house rental in Casper, Wyoming is $8,000, while tent camping on a 3-acre lot in Idaho Falls, Idaho is $200.  This is getting out of hand.  Unlikely hot spots Image: NASA’s Scientific Visualization StudioTo get a sense of eclipse mania look no further than Carbondale, Illinois. The small university town is all in for the eclipse. The southern Illinois city happens to be where the eclipse will last the longest: a full 2 minutes and 38 seconds. Jannika Lopez, the eclipse assistant coordinator from the city's tourism bureau, said the university, Southern Illinois University (SIU), has been preparing for Aug. 21 for the past three years. Now the city is planning events for the expected 55,000 viewers. The city usually has a population of 26,000. "For us we’re not terrified or nervous," Lopez said during a phone call. Instead, city officials are framing the influx of sky-gazers as a college graduation weekend — times three. "We can handle it." SIU is hosting a ticketed event with NASA broadcasting live from the stadium and Bill Nye will check in on the Jumbotron. In downtown Carbondale, the city is turning off all the lights even though it will be early afternoon, 1:20 pm CT, when the total eclipse arrives. Only a few hotels have availability left more than a month out. Get ready for the August 21, 2017 solar eclipse! Find out what you'll see based on location. Watch: https://t.co/cUZHxm8lcX #Eclipse2017 pic.twitter.com/rPBrm2qPw6 — NASA (@NASA) June 21, 2017 More big names outside of pop science are coming to the Midwest town for the natural wonder. Ozzy Osbourne is performing his '80s hit Bark the Moon at peak totality at a nearby music festival aptly named Moonstock. Moving eastward, the entire state of Tennessee is gearing up for the eclipse even if only parts of the state is on the path.  Kevin Triplett, commissioner of tourist development for the state, said in a phone call that his department has been planning for the big day for over a year. As many as 1.4 million people are expected to attend events throughout the state. A viewing event in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park sold out almost instantaneously.  "Everyone is getting the eclipse bug," Triplett said. The eclipse ends near Charleston, South Carolina, so the southern city has jumped on the eclipse bandwagon as well for its minute and a half of darkness with hotel packages and viewing events.  Eclipse overload on the cheap It's not just expensive house rentals and overpriced campsites for the rare eclipse sighting; there's also a special Royal Caribbean eclipse cruise for $1,000 and a $4,000 five-day Oregon getaway with Packing for Mars author Mary Roach and UC Berkeley astronomer Steven Beckwith. But for the rest of us far from the path of totality or stuck in an office on a Monday, the internet offers a plethora of ways to see what's happening up in the sky. Instead of heading to Carbondale with the rest of eclipse-obsessed tourists, you can stream the peak totality or simulate what will happen — no camping or $200 Airbnb fees required. Even if you're not right on the path or nearby, anywhere in continental America will experience at least a partial eclipse — so it's still worth it to step outside and safely observe the phenomenon. Carbondale, Illinois, is so much easier to get to from your browser.Image: SCREENGRAB/MEGAMOVIE PROJECTNASA has a separate website dedicated to all things solar eclipse. The Great American Eclipse has become something of a clearinghouse for eclipse details and a competitor site Eclipse 2017 is trying to get in on the surge in web traffic and includes a list of cities in the eclipse path. Apps like this total eclipse timer are an option for people to follow along on their smartphones, while The Weather Channel will use AR and other high-tech design to show the darkening sky on TV and online. NASA is also streaming the whole thing, and UC Berkeley teamed up with Google to create a simulator to tee everyone up for the real deal. For something under 3 minutes, this is taking over. At least it leaves plenty of time to prep for the next one in 2024. WATCH: Watch clouds move above Saturn's largest moon in new NASA video
4 fears an AI developer has about artificial intelligence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If AI keeps improving until it surpasses human intelligence, will a superintelligence system (or more than one of them) find it no longer needs humans?
ADB warns climate change 'disastrous' for Asia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A business-as-usual approach to climate change will be "disastrous" for Asia, undoing much of the phenomenal economic growth that has helped it make vast inroads against poverty, the Asian Development Bank said in a report released Friday. A continued reliance on fossil fuels will see the world's most populous region face prolonged heat waves, rising sea levels, and changing rainfall patterns that will disrupt the ecosystem, damage livelihoods and possibly even cause wars, it said. "Unabated climate change threatens to undo many of the development advancements of the last decades, not least by incurring high economic losses," the report from the Manila-based bank said.
Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Two Apollo-era computers and more than 350 tape reels have been recovered from a deceased engineer's basement, according to NASA. The computers are two big to be moved manually, and the tapes likely have little historical significance.
Tardigrades are the toughest animals on Earth. What would it would take to kill them all?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If a cataclysm wipes out most of life on the planet — including humans — it’s likely that tardigrades will survive. Tardigrades have survived in the vacuum of space. In 2014, Japanese researchers thawed a group of tardigrades that had been frozen for 30 years.
Scientists just teleported an object into space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In Star Trek, Captain Kirk ‘beams up’ to the starship Enterprise at the flick of a switch – and this week, the idea became reality. Chinese scientists announced that the Chinese Micius satellite had detected the first object ‘teleported’ from Earth to orbit – a single light particle, or photon. How does ‘quantum teleportation’ work?
PSA: You might want to look up at the sky on Sunday night
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you're free on Sunday night and you live within a certain range of northern latitudes, you might want to look out a window.  Meteorologists are predicting an aurora borealis, or northern lights show.  Do you live where the #Aurora may be visible Sunday night?Don't forget to check the cloud forecast! https://t.co/VyWINDk3xP #AuroraBorealis pic.twitter.com/gmggkmScDv — NWS (@NWS) July 14, 2017 The northern lights are the result of our sun's solar storms, which emit streams of charged particles that can reach Earth. Magnetic fields from the north and south poles pull the particles into the upper or occasionally lower atmosphere, where they collide with neutral particles.  The result? A majestic, glowing sky. Oftentimes, the northern lights are only visible at higher latitudes (like in Scandinavia during the summer), but occasionally — as is the case this time, apparently — they'll reach lower down the northern hemisphere.  The southern hemisphere can get light shows too, but those southern lights are called aurora australis.  If you look at the National Weather Service's map of the upcoming aurora borealis, you can see if the lights are expected to be visible from where you are. Parts of New England, the upper Midwest, the northwest, and Canada should definitely be able to see the lights on Sunday.  WATCH: These tiny foods look just like the real thing
Ick
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Portland is well-known as a tree-hugging, outdoorsy city, but the river that powers through its downtown has never been part of that green reputation.
America’s Top Young Scientist finalist finds radical way to test water quality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gitanjali Rao is competing to be America's Top Young Scientist with "Tethys," a radical new device that tests water quality using carbon nanotube arrays and a smartphone. Her invention could change the way water is tested in the future.
Research as art: revealing the creativity behind academic output
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Research is not just about producing papers.
Chemists create Star Wars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers have demonstrated new 3D projection technology which allows for the creation of three-dimensional light structures, viewable from 360 degrees. Just don’t you dare call them holograms!
Top scientists sue Salk Institute for gender discrimination
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Two top scientists are suing their employer, the Salk Institute, alleging that they and other women have suffered long-term gender discrimination at the renowned California research center.