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The 401(k) Is Turning 40 Years Old. It’s Past Time We Change How Americans Save for Retirement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The provision that gives the name of America’s most popular retirement savings plan, section 401(k), will turn 40 this Tuesday. And in its first four…
Nervous System: Taking Biometrics at Face Value
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The process of identifying criminals through photographs dates back to the 19th century, but the introduction of software took Bertillon-style databases to the next level.
Birds inherited colorful eggs from dinosaurs, scientists say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you come across a bird nest there's usually a pretty good way of telling what kind of feathered friend was responsible for it, even if the bird itself isn't around. The color, size, and pattern of a bird's eggs is often unique to its species, and there's online tools and even entire books dedicated to classifying bird eggs so that bird watchers can easily identify them. But why does such a wide range of colors and patterns exist in the first place? In a new study published in Nature, scientists from Yale as well as the American Museum of Natural History and the University of Bonn explain that birds didn't develop colored eggs all on their own. No, it seems egg color is something that was passed down over millions of years from dinosaurs. At this point, the idea that birds are actually just what's left of dinosaurs is widely accepted, so it should be no surprise that researchers are working hard to determine what pieces of modern birds are actually leftovers from much more ferocious beasts that roamed the earth tens of millions of years back. The researchers in this particular study looked closely at various fossilized eggs from dinosaurs to see if they could detect what was once pigment. They discovered that some branches of the dinosaur tree had no pigment on their eggs, including sauropods and many other large, four-legged species. However, many theropod dinosaurs, which walked on their hind legs and are thought to be the direct ancestors of modern birds, did indeed have color patterns as well as speckles and spots on their eggs. "Birds were not the first [egg-layers] to produce coloured eggs," the researchers write. "As with many other characteristics, this is an attribute that evolved deep within the dinosaur tree and long before the spectacular radiation of modern birds." The team found that the diversity of color and patterns on the eggs of some dinosaurs species matches up surprisingly well with that of modern birds. Additionally, the mechanisms by which the eggs received their color seems to be identical between birds we see today and dinosaurs from millions of years ago.
Michael Portillo: What I learnt in the fetid sewers of Brighton
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Among the more enlightening experiences I have had recently is the hour I spent sloshing through the fetid sewers beneath Brighton. This subterranean visit was part of my work for a new book and television series, Portillo’s Hidden History of Britain, which are based on the premise that history does not reside solely in structures generally described as “historic” – cathedrals, castles, the former homes of the great and the good. I hope I succeed in demonstrating that you may equally find compelling and significant narratives – stories that alter or add to our understanding of history – in unprepossessing places: a Victorian sewer system; a Cold War bunker; derelict hospitals. From Brighton to Bradford, from Suffolk to Somerset, I have explored some remarkable buildings and structures that in different ways have helped to shed light on the way modern Britain has developed. In most cases the buildings have outlived their function and lie derelict, awaiting change in one form or another. One – the West Pier at Brighton – will vanish beneath the waves in the next few years. So the timing was crucial – I gained access before the original fabric of the building was destroyed and with it the evidence of past occupation and use. As a presenter on a mission, I was privileged to have permission to visit sites that are otherwise off-limits – though some remain open to the public in certain circumstances. Details of these sites are listed in the panel on the right.   I was privileged in another sense, for I was able to walk in the footsteps of important figures from history – though, in most cases, not ones you would have heard of. This was never truer than at Orford Ness, on the Suffolk coast, where men and women of extraordinary ingenuity and dedication carried out highly classified work in defence of the realm – over many decades, and entirely unknown to the general populace.  I was particularly fascinated to explore this windswept shingle spit and discover many things that I didn’t have a clue about while in government office. My acquaintance with the area goes back to my student days at Cambridge when I used to visit an excellent seafood restaurant, the Butley Orford Oysterage (still there) in the adjacent village of Orford. At that time, the early Seventies, the top secret operations taking place just across the river Alde were winding up.  Michael explored Britain for his new book and television series – Portillo’s Hidden History of Britain Credit: Getty After decades of the tightest security the armed military police had been deployed elsewhere and in time much of the site would be reclaimed by nature. Orford Ness is, indeed, now a nature reserve, a haven for marsh harriers and rare flora, owned by the National Trust. The only binoculars you will find there today belong to birdwatchers, not men with guns. But the extraordinary buildings that litter this remote coastal sliver of shingle and marsh cannot be erased. Colossal and bizarre, with names straight out of science fiction (the Pagodas, Cobra Mist), they are testament to the top-secret, often hazardous military experimentation and research that took place here. They also contribute to a landscape that counts among the most other-worldly and sinisterly memorable in Britain.  Even among the assortment of pavilions, bunkers and concrete groundworks, the two so-called Pagodas stand out. With their raised roofs they put one in mind of ancient temples, but their purpose was entirely practical – they were Vibration Test Buildings where Britain’s nuclear bombs were subjected to procedures designed to gauge their ability to withstand extreme environmental pressures.  This much I was at least vaguely aware of before visiting Orford Ness. But while there I gleaned an even more startling piece of information. For Portillo’s Hidden History of Britain I arranged to meet men and women who were witnesses to history – ordinary people who were caught up in extraordinary events. In one of the Pagodas on Orford Ness I spoke to a former civilian engineer with the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment who told me that sometimes (and contrary to official policy) the bombs being tested contained both high explosives and fissile material (ie capable of a nuclear reaction). 'Could “Orford Ness” have become a byword for nuclear catastrophe?' Credit: Getty That sounds risky to me. Could “Orford Ness” have become a byword for nuclear catastrophe? My witness claimed that the chances of such an event occurring were vanishingly small, but military research and planning are as susceptible to error and mishap as any aspect of civilian life. Another site I investigated is the village of Imber on Salisbury Plain. At the end of 1943, as Allied forces prepared for D-Day, the War Office ordered Imber’s inhabitants to leave so the Army could use the site for tank and target practice. Some villagers claimed they were told they could return to their homes at the end of the war, but this never happened. Were they lied to, fobbed off, or the victims of a misunderstanding?  Portillo’s hidden picks Unravelling these questions provided one of the most poignant stories. It was also a memorable experience to actually visit the village. It lies in the middle of the Salisbury Plain Training Area, surely the most physically dangerous spot in Britain, where the Army fires live ammunition and tanks drive at combat speed on military exercises. The road there is littered with signs warning of “unexploded military debris”.   Accessible on only a few designated days a year, the village is pretty much shot to pieces. A forlorn air hangs over its broken buildings and cartridge-strewn streets. But its spirit is not quite extinguished, living on in the still-intact Norman church, and in the descendants of Imber’s final inhabitants who gather there every year to celebrate its past.  Salisbury Plain was used for tack and target practice during the Second World War Credit: istock Another site that affected me, for very different reasons, in the course of my research was Shepton Mallet prison in Somerset. When it closed in 2013 it was Britain’s oldest working prison, having been in continuous use for 400 years, so it had a few stories to tell (not least about the notorious Kray twins who were incarcerated there when it was a military “glasshouse”). But I wasn’t entirely happy at the thought of entering its grim precincts because being banged up is, literally, the stuff of nightmares for me – I have a recurring anxiety dream about being locked in a prison cell.  In the event I met a real lifer – a man who lived my nightmare for real every day for more than three decades. The interview he gave me was the most moving I have heard since I started in television. So the moment when I entered a cell and closed the door, contemplating the reality of being stuck there for up to 17 hours a day, stays with me. I had no such qualms about opening a hatch in a pavement in Brighton and descending into the bowels of that seaside city. Orford Ness is now a nature reserve Credit: Getty Beneath gaudy and glamorous Brighton, with its Royal Pavilion and its Regency Squares, lies a network of sewage tunnels, 44 miles (71km) of them either walkable or navigable by boat. They were built in the early 1870s as a means of improving the public health at a time when the rapidly expanding resort was blighted by outbreaks of cholera and other waterborne diseases. Brighton’s sewerage system is a typically ambitious Victorian concept, realised by a brilliant feat of precision engineering.  Duplicated across the country, such projects continue to underpin much of contemporary Britain, from sewers to railways, and bridges to tunnels. Visionaries such as Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Joseph Bazalgette (who designed London’s sewers) tend to monopolise this story of Victorian improvement and expansion. Few people have heard of John Hawkshaw, the engineer responsible for Brighton’s sewers, but he also built the Severn Tunnel and parts of the London Underground system. Such figures, largely forgotten now, conceived an infrastructure that was perfect in its fine detail and intended to last for a century or more; as it has.  Britain's 20 best secret attractions I should also point out an irony that pleases me greatly. Brighton’s sewers were far better built than many of the flashy squares and terraces above them, which were knocked up using shoddy materials. Hawkshaw’s brick-lined tunnels represent hidden history in a true sense – invisible, taken for granted. But wherever I ventured, pointing my torch into neglected corners and trying to make sense of what I saw, I found fascinating, often unsuspected stories about the shaping of modern Britain.  The second TV series of Portillo’s Hidden History of Britain, made by Transparent Television, continues on Channel 5 on Fridays at 9pm Interview by Nigel Richardson
Police Investigate Mysterious Deaths of Saudi Sisters Found Duct
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Police found the fully clothed bodies of 16-year-old Tala Farea and 22-year-old Rotan Ferea washed up on rocks near the Hudson River on Oct. 24.
Meet The First Black Woman To Earn A Nuclear Engineering Ph.D. From Nation's Top Program
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ciara Sivels knew she was going to make history, but she really wanted to
Rotten shark made you queasy? A vomit bag for every guest at the Disgusting Food Museum
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
"It tastes like chewing on a urine-infested mattress," said Samuel West, who, as curator of the Disgusting Food Museum, knows a thing or two about unpleasant victuals. "It's a fermented sort of rotten Icelandic shark," he says. "Anthony Bourdain, the late TV personality, called it the single most disgusting thing he'd ever eaten, and I totally agree with him." From spicy rabbit heads to fruit bat soup, the collection, now on display in the Swedish city of Malmo, aims to challenge perceptions of taste and help visitors contemplate why one culture's abomination is another's delicacy.
Family thinks bones under home are missing father
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BROOKHAVEN, N.Y. (AP) — A New York family says they've found human bones in their basement, and they believe the remains are that of their patriarch who disappeared half a century ago.
To the Moon and beyond: Airbus delivers powerhouse for NASA's Orion spacecraft
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Europe's Airbus said on Friday it had delivered the "powerhouse" for NASA's new Orion Spaceship that will take astronauts to the Moon and beyond in coming years, hitting a key milestone that should lead to hundreds of millions of euros in future orders. Engineers at the Airbus plant in Bremen, Germany on Thursday carefully packed the spacecraft into a special container that will fly aboard a huge Antonov cargo plane to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a first step on its way to deep space. In Florida, the module will be joined with the Orion crew module built by Lockheed Martin, followed by over a year of intensive testing before the first three-week mission orbiting the Moon is launched in 2020, albeit without people.
Indian firework sellers fume over festival 'eco
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rajesh Tyagi stands outside his decades-old fireworks stall in Delhi's old quarter, fuming over a court ruling that allows him to sell only "eco-friendly" fireworks for the Indian capital's largest festival. "There is no such thing as a green firecracker in India," says an exasperated Tyagi, in an empty alleyway usually buzzing with customers buying rockets and bangers ahead of Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights. The Supreme Court has ruled only environmentally-friendly crackers -- that emit less smoke and soot than normal ones -- can be sold in the Indian capital, in a last-ditch bid to curb smog in the world's most polluted major city.
Palau to ban sunscreen as it tries to save its coral reefs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — In an attempt to protect the coral reefs that divers so admire they have dubbed them the underwater Serengeti, the Pacific nation of Palau will soon ban many types of sunscreen.
The CIA's communications suffered a catastrophic compromise. It started in Iran.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
From around 2009 to 2013, the U.S. intelligence community experienced crippling intelligence failures related to the secret internet-based communications system, a key means for remote messaging between CIA officers and their sources.
The Fear Factory: How Robert Mercer's hedge fund profits from Trump's hard
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Renaissance Technologies has invested in firms that operate private prisons and immigrant detention centers, investments apparently based partly on President Trump’s plans and the ability to influence them. And it's all legal.
A Private War Shows What It’s Really Like to Report on War
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rosamund Pike 'nearly inhabits' the life of Marie Colvin, famed foreign correspondent who died while reporting in Syria, in 'A Private War'
How Meghan Markle Made a Case for Sustainable Fashion on Her Royal Tour
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She was spotted wearing everything from Stella McCartney to Reformation
A Japanese Pilot Was Arrested After Being Caught Nearly 10 Times Over Legal Alcohol Limit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A test revealed 189mg of alcohol in his blood, nearly 10 times the U.K.'s legal limit
There’s a Reason Scientists Keep Talking About Race and Sex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s hard to escape promotions for DNA tests promising to reveal your true identity in the form of a percentage breakdown of groups that used to be called races. Then, last week, the media presented a Trump administration memo proclaiming that “Sex means a person’s status as male or female based on immutable biological traits identifiable by or before birth…” and in response, the New York Times ran an op-ed explaining why sex is not binary. It’s not surprising that some people would wonder if science is being distorted by political correctness.
Another NASA spacecraft runs out of steam, 2nd this week
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA has lost a second spacecraft this week, ending a fruitful mission in the asteroid belt.
Amazing Experiments with Science Bob Pflugfelder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Science Bob teaches Jimmy about thermodynamics, physics, and they a create a chemical reaction that results in awesome exploding pumpkin fountains.
These Are the Game of Thrones Halloween Costumes That Should Rule the Realm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Which of these costumes deserves to sit on the Iron Throne?
The Gary Hart Biopic The Front Runner Is a Real Winner
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'Whether you’ve been following politics for three years or 30, you’ll learn something from The Front Runner'
The Migrant Caravan as Political Bandwagon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As the migrant caravan makes its way closer to the U.S., President Trump uses this event to rally political points ahead of midterm voting.
Brazil environment ministry condemns Bolsonaro plan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brasília (AFP) - Brazil's environment ministry said Wednesday that far-right President-elect Jair Bolsonaro's plan to merge it with the agriculture ministry is "reckless" and will undermine not only environmental protection but economic growth. Bolsonaro's team confirmed Tuesday he would combine the two ministries, drawing condemnation from activists who warned the move would subordinate environmental regulation to agrobusiness in a country that is home to some of Earth's most vital natural resources, including the Amazon rainforest. "Weakening the environment ministry's authority at a time when concern over the climate crisis is intensifying would be reckless.
4 days until the midterm elections: Where things stand
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Oprah Winfrey hits the campaign trail in Georgia for Stacey Abrams, and a super-PAC hits Beto O'Rourke over alleged support of the migrant caravan.
The Most Over
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From Bella Hadid to Lupita Nyong'o
23andMe Can Now Tell You How You May Respond to Some Drugs. But Experts Are Wary
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But experts are wary
Little Girl Loved Michelle Obama's Portrait So Much She Made It Her Halloween Costume
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She went viral staring at Obama's portrait in the National Portrait Gallery
Musk shakes up SpaceX in race to make satellite launch window
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SEATTLE/ORLANDO, Fla. (Reuters) - SpaceX Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk flew to the Seattle area in June for meetings with engineers leading a satellite launch project crucial to his space company's growth. Within hours of landing, Musk had fired at least seven members of the program's senior management team at the Redmond, Washington, office, the culmination of disagreements over the pace at which the team was developing and testing its Starlink satellites, according to the two SpaceX employees with direct knowledge of the situation. Known for pushing aggressive deadlines, Musk quickly brought in new managers from SpaceX headquarters in California to replace a number of the managers he fired.
6 Ways to Instantly Be a More Positive Person
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Being positive doesn’t always come naturally. If you want to reap the benefits of a more positive life, here’s what experts suggest you do.
Worldwide Google walkout over sexual harassment, racism and pay inequality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
More than 1,000 Google employees and contractors in Asia and Europe staged brief midday walkouts on Thursday, with more expected to follow at offices worldwide, amid complaints of sexism, racism and unchecked executive power in their workplaces.In a statement late Wednesday, the organizers called on Google parent Alphabet Inc. to add an employee representative to its board of directors and to internally share pay equity data. They also asked for changes to Google’s human resources practices intended to make bringing harassment claims a fairer process.Google Chief Executive Sundar Pichai said in a statement that “employees have raised constructive ideas” and that the company was “taking in all their feedback so we can turn these ideas into action.”Hundreds of workers filed out of its European headquarters in Dublin shortly after 11 a.m. local time, while organizers shared photographs on social media of hundreds more leaving Google offices in London, Zurich, Berlin, Tokyo and Singapore. (Reuters)See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Twitter and Tumblr.
RISE UP: CELEBRATING YOUNG LEADER ACTIVISTS – Kian Tortorello
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
From the civil rights movement to the Vietnam War protests and the fight for women’s rights, the youth of America have been at the forefront of leading and advocating for social change, and the young people of today are no different. In a new series titled Rise Up: Celebrating Young Leader Activists, Yahoo News profiles five up-and-coming leaders from the Gen Z and millennial generations, with our fourth installment featuring 17-year-old Kian Tortorello-Allen of Mount Kisco, NY. Although he never knew his name, Kian Tortorello-Allen hasn’t forgotten the trans high school senior he looked up to in the eighth grade.
Trump, stoking caravan fears, says troops will fire on migrants if they 'throw rocks'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump warned the caravan of Honduran migrants making its way toward the southwest border of the United States that if they began to "throw rocks" they might expect a hostile reception from U.S. troops.
20 Christmas Drinks for Those Not Looking to Booze
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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DNA sequencing giant Illumina just bought rival Pac Bio for $1.2 billion — here's why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Illumina just paid $1.2 billion for Pacific Biosciences, to help it retain its dominant position in the DNA sequencing space, biotech experts say. Illumina, which is valued at more than $45 billion, makes the machines that companies from 23andMe to Ancestry rely on for their sequencing. Illumina ILMN , the company that makes the machines that sequence the vast majority of human genomes, is buying a smaller competitor called Pacific Biosciences PACB for $1.2 billion.
11 New Books to Read This November
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From timely thrillers to a highly anticipated memoir
Skeletons unearthed in giant UK train line excavation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tucked beside one of London's busiest railway stations, a small army of archaeologists dig through clay as they clear a burial site of 40,000 bodies to make way for a new train line. It is one of Britain's largest ever digs, and one of more than 60 archaeological sites that have emerged during the construction of a new high-speed rail link from London to Birmingham. Dozens of archaeologists in high-visibility orange suits and hard hats swarm one section of the plot under an 11,000 square-metre roof that protects them from the rain and prying eyes.
Forget ‘Repeal and Replace.’ The One Issue Unifying Americans Is Affordable Health Care
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Anxiety over the rising cost of insurance has become a defining issue in the 2018 election
Just Five Countries Hold Most of the World's Remaining Wilderness, a New Report Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Earth's last wildernesses are at risk of "disappearing completely," researchers said
Russia targets Dec 3 for first manned ISS launch since accident
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russia hopes to launch three crew for the International Space Station on December 3, the first manned blast-off since an accident this month, the Roscosmos space agency said Wednesday. Russia, the only country able to ferry astronauts to the orbiting science lab, suspended all launches after a Soyuz rocket failed on October 11 just minutes after blast-off -- the first such incident in the history of post-Soviet space travel. On the rocket destined for the ISS will be Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko, Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques, and NASA's Anne McClain.
NASA’s Dawn spacecraft just ran out of fuel and now it’s dead
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was only just yesterday that NASA announced its Kepler space telescope had officially been declared dead, and now there's another long-running mission that has also met its demise. Today, NASA revealed that the Dawn spacecraft, which was studying some of the larger objects in our Solar System's asteroid belt, has also run out of fuel. The craft, which launched back in 2007, had already outlived its planned lifespan, so this news isn't entirely unexpected, but the fact that it comes immediately after the death of the Kepler telescope is something of a sad coincidence. The Dawn orbiter has been flying around the dwarf planet Ceres for some time now. Back in July, the machine shot back some really fantastic images of the surface of the tiny world: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hth3nKGKTFc Dawn's engineers reported that it missed its scheduled communication check-ins two days in a row, and indicating that it had finally exhausted the supply of fuel that was projected to run dry as early as a couple of years ago. Now that it's no longer capable of communicating, much less maneuvering, it is expected to remain in orbit around Ceres for decades or longer. “Today, we celebrate the end of our Dawn mission – its incredible technical achievements, the vital science it gave us, and the entire team who enabled the spacecraft to make these discoveries,” NASA's Thomas Zurbuchen said in a statement. “The astounding images and data that Dawn collected from Vesta and Ceres are critical to understanding the history and evolution of our solar system.” As NASA explains, the spacecraft has traveled an incredible distance during its 11+ years in space. By the time the spacecraft ran out of fuel it had around 4.3 billion miles under its belt. The spacecraft itself may indeed be dead, but Dawn's contribution to science is far from over. The incredible amount of data sent back by the craft during its many years in space still holds secrets that scientists hope to find in the coming years.
Sri Lanka's President Reconvenes Parliament Amid Political Deadlock
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sri Lanka's president summoned parliament to meet next week as pressure grows for him to resolve the leadership crisis
NASA's Dawn asteroid mission ends as fuel runs out
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dawn, a NASA spacecraft that launched 11 years ago and studied two of the largest objects in the asteroid belt, has ended its mission after running out of fuel, officials said Thursday. Scientists have known for about a month that Dawn was essentially out of hydrazine, the fuel that kept the spacecraft's antennae oriented toward Earth and helped turn its solar panels to the Sun to recharge. When the spacecraft missed scheduled communications with NASA's Deep Space Network on Wednesday and Thursday, the space agency formally declared it dead.
Conspiracy theorists try, fail, to smear Robert Mueller with sexual misconduct claim
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Two conservative activists revealed at an inauspicious press conference in Northern Virginia what they (but few others) deemed to be credible allegations of rape against special counsel Robert Mueller.
68 Photos That Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Jon Snow and Daenerys Cozy Up for Winter in First Official Game of Thrones Season 8 Photo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's finally here, Game of Thrones fans
Scientists Are Using Satellite Technology to Track Whales from Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
British researchers have been able to identify species of whales from 385 miles above the Earth's surface
'My Eyes Are Now Wide Open': Kanye West Says He Was 'Used' and Vows He's Done With Politics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
West has been increasingly vocal of his support of President Trump
Darth Vader and Elvis spotted on the International Space Station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some 250 miles above Earth, the Halloween spirit is in impressive, weightless form. After spending 147 days in space, the three crewmembers currently aboard the International Space Station decided to have a little Halloween fun, high above the planet.  European astronaut Alexander Gerst — who is typically a geophysicist and flight engineer — transformed into Darth Vader and tweeted a picture of the charismatic crew to mark the holiday. Meanwhile, Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopyev dressed as rockabilly legend Elvis, while NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor — a flight surgeon — donned a mad-scientist's attire.  Having a scary day in space. The crew of the International @Space_Station wish you a happy #Halloween! #Exp57 @AstroSerena #SergeyProkopyev pic.twitter.com/ezU94btds9 — Alexander Gerst (@Astro_Alex) October 31, 2018 "Having a scary day in space," tweeted Gerst.  Space station astronauts and cosmonauts have donned costumes in past years as well. In 2017, six astronauts joined the party, including Wolverine and Spiderman.  SEE ALSO: 3 small moon rocks are coming up for auction. Here's why. But this year there were just three crewmembers playing dress up, after a mid-October rocket failure forced three astronauts to automatically abort their launch aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket.  Fortunately, their escape from the failed rocket resulted in a safe landing. Though, it was a violent, dramatic, and truly frightening, moment in spaceflight.  WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?
How The Internet Can Make Hate Seem Normal — And Why That's So Dangerous
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Social media platforms can offer a platform for hate speech and similar content, helping to push violent language into the mainstream