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Astronaut breaks record for most time in space by American
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronaut Peggy Whitson has another record under her space belt
Senate Russia probe flounders amid partisan bickering
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Senate Intelligence Committee's investigation into Russian meddling in the U.S. election, and whether any Trump associates were connected to it, has made little progress.
Trump fumes about supposedly ‘fake’ polls giving him a dismal approval rating
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president continues to rant about a pair of new surveys that show he is approaching his 100th day in office with the lowest approval rating of any president in more than 70 years.
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Mass starvation looms on the horizon, but robots may come to the rescue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
According to present estimates, a global food shortage crisis could occur by the year 2050. Scientists at Carnegie Mellon are using drones, robots and AI to revolutionize farming before we hit that point.
US astronaut Peggy Whitson breaks American spaceflight record
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.S. astronaut Peggy Whitson is smashing records left and right. Whitson, 57, broke the record for the most cumulative time in space by an American astronaut early Monday, streaking past the 534-day record held by Jeff Williams. The 879-day global record, held by Russian cosmonaut Gennady Padalka, still stands.
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Why science is searching Earth for the ingredients of alien life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some experimental biologists think the key components that could allow life to survive beyond our planet might be found right here on Earth.
How Elon Musk Started SpaceX
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The entrepreneur starts off by defining a goal and understanding what that goal is and why it is a good and valid goal.
KFC plans to send its new Zinger sandwich into space for some reason
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
While some may suggest that space is the best place for many of KFC's greasy offerings, the fast-food chain would certainly disagree and is instead using the vast expanse above our heads to promote its latest sandwich.
Science journal retracts 107 'fabricated' research papers by Chinese authors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An international publisher has retracted 107 research papers by Chinese authors, after finding out that the reports had been "compromised." The articles were published by the Springer Nature publishing company in the journal Tumor Biology, between 2012 and 2016. SEE ALSO: Doctors are treating brain cancer with an electric cap The publisher said it found that the papers, which are required to be peer-reviewed, had been submitted to reviewers who had fake email addresses. "We are retracting these published papers because the peer review process required for publication in our journals had been deliberately compromised by fabricated peer reviewer reports," Springer Nature said in a statement on RetractionWatch.com. The articles were submitted with the names of real researchers, but fabricated email addresses, Peter Butler, editorial director at Springer Nature for cell biology and biochemistry, was quoted in a report by state-run China Daily. After investigating and following up with the real reviewers, the latters confirmed to Springer Nature that they did not do the peer review. The authors involved in the incident all hail from Chinese organisations, with a large majority of the articles involving research in the field of cancer. WATCH: Scientists discovered a rare giant black worm monster in the Philippines
NASA’s Cassini spacecraft just caught a glimpse of Earth, all the way from Saturn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA and its spectacular space hardware often spend so much time checking out our planetary neighbors that we forget Earth offers some pretty cool photo ops as well. A brand new photo released by NASA is a great reminder of that, and it was shot all the way from Saturn, courtesy of the always reliable Cassini spacecraft just before it's scheduled to begin the most harrowing part of its entire years-long mission. The photo, which shows the Earth as a tiny bright dot in a black sea of space, was shot at a distance of 870 million miles. If you zoom in on the original photo you can even make out the Moon as a smaller dot to the left of our planet. The most spectacular part of the image is the fact that it was shot from between Saturn's rings, with the bold A ring seen above the Earth and bright F ring creeping into the original photo at the bottom. It's a great shot, but it's also somewhat bittersweet when you consider Cassini's immediate future. The craft is scheduled to begin its "Grand Finale" dives shortly, in which it will fly recklessly through Saturn's rings a total of 22 times until, on its final approach, it flies directly into the planet itself. That final act will destroy the spacecraft, which has already achieved far more than scientists could have ever hoped when it was launched way back in 1997. That last fateful dive is slated for September 15th, 2017.
March for Science held in cities around world calls for respect, funding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists and their supporters marched to protest what some called “an alarming trend toward discrediting scientific consensus and restricting scientific discovery."
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Commander of international space station set to break a big record
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronaut Peggy Whitson will hit a record of 666 days in space with more spacewalks than any other female astronaut when she lands in September.
Questlove Dismisses ‘Alternative Facts’ at March for Science: ‘We Need to Work for Science’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Questlove Dismisses 'Alternative Facts' at March for Science
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Can Type 1 Diabetes Be Reversed?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Nearly 20 million Americans have diabetes, and another 86 million are at risk for developing it. Jane Ann says that a new program has done just that for her. Jane Ann was diagnosed with diabetes 15 years ago, when she weighed almost 300 pounds.
Psychic Lawyer Mark Anthony Tackles Unsolved Murder Case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Psychic medium and lawyer Mark Anthony joins The Doctors to talk about his unique mix of legal acumen and uncanny abilities. Mark claims that in his new book, “Evidence of Eternity,” he takes mediumship “into the 21st century, based on science, theoretical physics, human physiology, and evidence.” Science and religion, he says, are not mutually exclusive. Legally, a psychic revelation is considered hearsay and is not admissible in court, but Mark says that it can point police in the right direction to uncover concrete evidence.
Substitute Teacher Drunk on the Job?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A South Carolina substitute teacher alarmed students when she started vomiting uncontrollably in the classroom at 9:45 in the morning. She couldn’t walk and needed to be taken from the room in a wheelchair. But it wasn’t stomach flu – authorities found a box of wine in her handbag.
Myths about Narcolepsy Debunked
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Could you suffer from narcolepsy – and not even know it!? Learn the truth about a disease that affects about 200,000 people in the U.S. Sufferers can experience excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep paralysis, muscle weakness, hallucinations when falling asleep or waking up, and disrupted sleep. • Do people with narcolepsy sleep all the time?
Boy and Dog Share the Same Medical Condition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
With boundless loyalty, playfulness, and cuddles, a dog can be a kid’s best friend. And this is especially true for Carter, who suffers from vitiligo.
NASA’s Hubble telescope captured two galaxies in one epic photo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Since it left Earth on April 24, 1990, the Hubble telescope has delivered again and again stunning snapshots of the vast universe around us, and kept us in awe of the marvels of space. To mark the 27th anniversary of the telescope’s launch, NASA has released this epic image of two galaxies captured in one…
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Space May Be Next Frontier for Earth's Crude Oil Giants: Analyst
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Middle East has an outsize impact on energy here on Earth. One analyst thinks some regional powerhouses may leverage that role into the development of natural resources in space.
New research suggests your ability to forgive—or not—is actually biological
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Forgive and forget is advice easier for some people to follow than others. But a newly published neuroscience study has given those who hold onto grudges a good excuse: It seems the ability to forgive is linked to the size of a specific area in the brain. The research, published in Scientific Reports earlier this…
Geeks vs government
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The technology which underpins the internet's security has always been disputed.
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
A Mideast rivalry worth watching
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At the heart of many Middle East conflicts lies a fierce rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia. Both now have leaders eager to win over young people with fundamental reform. For Saudis, that leader is Mohammed bin Salman, the deputy crown prince who is barely over 30.
6 Cool Exoplanets That Might Support Aliens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Not all exoplanets are created equal — some are much more likely to be harboring alien life.
Black Holes Are Bigger Than You Thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In order to turn the Sun into a black hole, you must compress all of the matter you see in the flaming ball of plasma above into a certain size.
Cassini begins final journey towards Saturn as Nasa puts probe on path to destruction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists at Nasa have placed space probe Cassini into a new orbit of Saturn that will mean it is destroyed by the gas giant's harsh atmosphere in September 2017. For the next five months, Cassini will explore the region between Saturn and its rings, where no man-made artefact has ever previously been. After 12 years of exploration and incredible discoveries Cassini's fuel reserves are almost empty and scientists don't want to risk it crashing on either Titan or Enceladus in case there is life on either moon that might be contaminated.
Scientists and their supporters march in favor of actual facts in DC
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“Americans with Disabilities Act, or Ada Lovelace?” he says. It’s just shy of 9AM in Washington DC, where thousands of scientists, researchers, academics, doctors, students, and concerned citizens are gathering on the damp grass surrounding the landmark. Scientists have been planning a March on Washington since late January, shortly after Donald Trump took office.
Trump: Mexico will pay for the border wall — ‘eventually’ and ‘in some form’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president says he may not approve a government funding bill this week if it does not include funding for a “badly needed border wall” that he claims Mexico, “in some form,” will “eventually” pay for.
Police pick up adorable intruders: A pair of pygmy goats
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BELFAST, Maine (AP) — Police in Maine have picked up some adorable intruders after two miniature goats escaped from their home and wandered the streets.
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
A Mold Allergy Might Be Making You Miserable
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Are you having episodes of sneezing accompanied by a drippy or stuffy nose? Are your eyes, lips, mouth, or nose itchy? If you're experiencing those kinds of allergy symptoms even when pollen coun...
Happy Earth Day. Enjoy It While You Last.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The planet will probably be fine (after some catastrophes, maybe without humans).
Apple, Inc. Could Soon Compete With SpaceX
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sadly, we're not talking about an Apple Rocket.
London joins 500 cities and hosts a March for Science to celebrate knowledge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists and their supporters, including celebrities such as Peter Capaldi, marched through London and around 500 other cities worldwide today (22 April) to celebrate Earth Day 2017 and the quest for knowledge. Many scientists, including climate change experts, fear the election of President Trump and the so-called post-truth era could undo many of the advances achieved by science. Scientists and academics across the world feel under attack, with the possibility of funding being withdrawn and their positions undermined, by a trending view encapsulated by Michael Gove's comment that the public has "had enough of experts".
How Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos Is Funding Blue Origin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
81 million shares of Amazon.com stock give him ready access to start-up capital.
The science march is about 'hope' for a fact
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In cities all over the world Saturday, scientists and fans of fact and reason have come out in droves to support science.  But what, exactly, are they marching for?  SEE ALSO: Google Doodle uses furry animals to deliver an Earth Day message We went to the New York City March for Science to ask people exactly what brought them into the streets to march in support of science. Graduate student Laura Menocal, who studies immunology, said she was marching because she's seen the value of research into deadly diseases.  "I've worked closely with pediatric oncologists and I've seen the pain that families go through when they lose loved ones, but research and science gives them hope that one day nobody will have to endure this pain anymore," Menocal said.  "So to defund science and to cut science is to take away hope from these people and I'm not okay with that." Some protesters came out to the march for their children. "It's important for us to teach our son about the importance of fighting for any cause that you really believe in. I think that it's alarming that [people are] politicizing facts in science and I think we got tired of shaking our fists at the news station," Uzo Aneke-Corona, marching with her son Azeka and husband Charles, said.  Many people at the New York event explained that they were inspired to attend the march due to the imminent threat of human-caused climate change.  "We really care a lot about climate change largely because we are Christians and we think that we've been put here to care for God's earth and God's people. The two go hand in glove," John Elwood, of Andover New Jersey, said. "I'm out here today because I know that climate change is real, and I feel that because our current government situation going on, they aren't going to do a lot to help the environment," said Lina Petronino, a 15-year-old from New Jersey.  "And especially on a day like Earth Day, I feel I should be representing my world and the people that work toward supporting it."  Hands! #ScienceMarch #marchforscience pic.twitter.com/bM6c4YlIX5 — Miriam Kramer (@mirikramer) April 22, 2017 The Trump administration has been rolling back numerous policies aimed at cutting greenhouse gas emissions, while also drastically reducing funding for climate research across the federal government.  ‍#marchforsciencenyc #marchforscience #ScienceMarch pic.twitter.com/6ha21boYTt — Miriam Kramer (@mirikramer) April 22, 2017 Today, we're at the #MarchForScience promoting the progress of science and the useful arts of engineering. pic.twitter.com/VJJKSMahD3 — Bill Nye (@BillNye) April 22, 2017 Many protesters cited the Trump administration's actions as their main impetus for marching.  "I'm a graduate student in biomedical engineering and I've done a lot of research, so for me, this is really important because scientific funding of research is something that I think is really crucial and it affects all different aspects of things further on, so public health and medicine, jobs, things like that," Alyssa Weissman, who lives in upstate New York, said.  Trump himself has called climate change a hoax, and Scott Pruitt, his EPA administrator, isn't convinced that carbon dioxide emissions are the main cause of global warming, even though overwhelming scientific evidence exists to show that it is. "I'm here to support science in the face of the attacks by the Trump administration and Scott Pruitt's EPA," Erika from Brooklyn said.  Some people expressed concern that the White House might limit the availability of scientific data online, which is a concern that has swept across the scientific community in recent months.  "I really enjoy science and I have always been an inquisitive person. I appreciate the fact that I can just go online and look up anything I need to know. i don't want to see that go away," Lucy, 15-years-old, said.  People are also sharing their reasons for taking part in the marches on social media using the hashtag #WhyIMarch.  I marched today because science is the best process we have for propelling society into a future of health, wealth, and security. #whyimarch — Louisa (@OttoLouisa) April 22, 2017 Science saves lives #publichealth #humanrights #whyimarch #marchforscience #earthday #raleighsciencemarch pic.twitter.com/uSqhLKwZBc — Stacey Williams (@Stacey24541) April 22, 2017 I march because I value knowledge! #WhyIMarch #ScienceForThePeople pic.twitter.com/DEmVX4mYDI — Emily Marquez (@EmilyAtPAN) April 22, 2017 All in all, the reasons protesters have taken to the streets today show there is a large group of people who feel their interests have been largely ignored by the Trump administration and many members of Congress.  It's a brain hat! #marchforscience #ScienceMarch pic.twitter.com/V5TBO2VWRU — Miriam Kramer (@mirikramer) April 22, 2017 Instead of staying home this Saturday, these scientists and supporters of science marched in the hopes that their voices will be heard by lawmakers who they feel should enact policies based on scientific evidence, not ideology or emotion.  "I think it's just to show solidarity with scientists and non-scientists that we would like a society that's driven by evidence-based research and just have a future that really appreciates the role that science plays especially in the United States,"  graduate student Maeva Metz said.  "That's one of the fundamental things that founded our country and we just want to see that continue through for many generations to come."  WATCH: Giant icebergs are a big tourist draw in Newfoundland, and a warning sign
Elon Musk is working on 'consensual telepathy'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The billionaire tesla CEO's new startup, Neuralink Corp, wants to merge our brains with machines.
Polls: Trump approaches 100 days with lowest job approval rating in more than 70 years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president has the lowest approval rating of any commander in chief at this point since at least 1945, a pair of new surveys published Sunday found.
Just a minute: FIU baseball tops Marshall in a speedy finish
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BECKLEY, W.Va. (AP) — Who says baseball is slow?
How Trump's Syria strike could affect North Korea, Egypt attacks must not divide Christians and Muslims, Improving protection of older people'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"The bombing of one of Bashar al-Assad’s airfields must have sent premonitions through the minds of Kim Jong-un and his generals: they could be next," states an editorial. "The deployment of significant American naval assets to the South China Sea must also represent evidence to the North Korean leadership that Donald Trump wants to send a message to all of his nation’s enemies in the world: don’t mess with America.... The more the North Koreans believe he might [bomb North Korea], the more circumspect they ought to be.
Scientists and their supporters march in favor of actual facts in D.C.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“Americans with Disabilities Act, or Ada Lovelace?” he says. It’s just shy of 9AM in Washington D.C., where thousands of scientists, researchers, academics, doctors, students, and concerned citizens are gathering on the damp grass surrounding the landmark. Scientists have been planning a March on Washington since late January, shortly after Donald Trump took office.
Earth was hit with a devastating comet strike around 11,000 BC, ancient stone carvings reveal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ancient stone carvings, found in what is widely considered to be "the world's first temple", have revealed that the planet was likely hit with a devastating comet strike over 13,000 years ago. According to researchers, who analysed symbols on carvings found on a pillar called the Vulture Stone in Turkey's Göbekli Tepe temple, a swarm of comet fragments hit the Earth in around 11,000BC. Researchers suggest that the historical event may have sparked the rise of civilisation.
Help astronomers find aliens, get an awesome model exoplanet as a reward
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronomers at the Planet Foundation want your help observing nearby exoplanets for life, seeking support via a Kickstarter campaign launched this week. They’re building a series of telescopes on the Hawaiian island of Maui.
Study: Whale and boat collisions may be more common
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A group of marine scientists says collisions of whales and boats off of the New England coast may be more common than previously thought.