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Rick Perry, the man in charge of America’s nukes, weighs in on Texas A&M student election
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Energy Secretary Rick Perry, right, accompanied by Vice President Mike Pence, speaks during a swearing-in ceremony in early March. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry, the man in charge of America’s supply of nuclear weapons, took the time Wednesday to criticize Texas A&M’s election for student body president. Perry’s complaint was about the process by which Bobby Brooks, who would become the first openly gay student president in the university’s history, won the election last month.
‘America is stronger’: Obama defends Affordable Care Act ahead of GOP House vote
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Barack Obama signs the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in the East Room of the White House in Washington seven years ago. Former President Barack Obama released a statement on the seventh anniversary of having signed the Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law — providing an impassioned defense of his landmark health care bill as it’s under fierce attack. The statement from the Office of Barack and Michelle Obama was sent out Thursday morning, ahead of an expected House Republicans vote on the American Health Care Act (AHCA), which would essentially repeal and replace the 2010 law commonly known as Obamacare.
London Mayor Sadiq Khan dismisses Trump Jr.’s Twitter jab following attack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
London Mayor Sadiq Khan declined to respond to an insult from U.S. President Trump’s son hours after a terrorist attack at the Houses of Parliament at the Palace of Westminster on Wednesday. “You have to be kidding me?!” Trump Jr. wrote. Trump Jr. mischaracterized Khan’s statements as if he had said that terrorism is an inevitable consequence of living in a big city and that nothing could be done.
McCain: Nunes’ action as intelligence committee chair ‘very disturbing’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Nunes, the California Republican who heads the House intelligence committee, called a press conference Wednesday to announce that he had informed the White House that Trump transition communications may have been subject to “incidental collection” in the course of surveillance of other targets, possibly foreign. Nunes faced severe criticism from both sides of the aisle for making the information available to the press and the White House before briefing other members of his own committee, which is currently investigating suspicions of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.
Tim Allen, conservatives in Hollywood, and Nazi Germany
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Tim Allen feels it’s so tough to be a conservative in Hollywood, it’s like living in Nazi Germany. “Tim, have you lost your mind?” Steven Goldstein, the executive director of organization, said in a statement.
In swift response to London terror attack, eight suspects arrested as Parliament resumes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As Londoners seek to resume business as usual, a police investigation of Wednesday’s attack continues. In the attack, a man driving an SUV plowed into a crowd of pedestrians on Westminster Bridge, killing two people and injuring approximately 30, police indicated. The attacker then fatally stabbed a police officer on Parliament’s grounds before being shot by police.
Scientists At Large Hadron Collider Discover Five New Particle States
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The discovery of the excited states of the charmed omega baryon could uncover new secrets about this type of particle and the quarks that make it.
For nearly 130 years, we've been getting dinosaurs' family tree all wrong
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The traditional view of dinosaurs' family tree has its branches all in the wrong places, a palaeontological study argues, calling for a radical shake-up of how we view dinosaurs' evolutionary past. Dinosaurs have historically been divided into two groups: the Ornithischia, which have bird-like hips, and the Saurischia, which have reptile-like hips. The Saurischia was divided up into the carnivorous Theropoda – including Tyrannosaurus rex – and the herbivorous Sauropoda, including Brontosaurus.
Real images of Mars used for stunning fictive flyover video
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
While humans aren’t able to visit Mars just yet, a video gives us a remarkable picture of what it would look like if we could. Astronomy enthusiast Jan Fröjdman created a fictive flyover video of the planet, rendered from real photos. “This film is not scientific,” he writes in the text that accompanies the video.
Is 90 the New 80? Most 90
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Few 90-somethings in the study showed signs of depression or cognitive problems, although they took a lot of medications and had difficulty getting around, according to the findings, released today (March 20) in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. "These data provide a snapshot of Americans' health at age 90, which will help our health care system prepare for the needs of long-lived adults," said the study's lead author, Michelle Odden, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Oregon State University. The findings suggest that, despite experiencing chronic diseases and disability, Americans over the age of 90 could adapt to their changing health needs and remain positive about their health, Odden told Live Science.
Arctic sea ice plunges to record winter low after freak polar 'heatwaves'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Welcome to the new normal: For the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter season, scientists said Wednesday.  Arctic sea ice cover reached its annual peak extent on March 7, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) said, at 5.57 million square miles. This is the lowest in the 38-year satellite record, and very likely far longer than that based on other data. This year's peak was about 37,000 miles less than the 2015 record. When compared to the 1981-2010 long-term average, sea ice extent this year was a staggering 471,000 square miles below the average annual maximum. This means a chunk of ice about the size of Texas, California and Kentucky combined was missing from the top of the world.   SEE ALSO: There are 11 newly-classified clouds, and all of them are breathtaking The record came at the end of one of the strangest winters that Arctic climate researchers have seen in modern times, with at least four instances in which unusually mild air swept across the entire Arctic from the North Atlantic or Pacific Oceans, bringing the North Pole to near or just above the melting point. See those oranges and reds? That shows much above average temperatures for the Oct-Feb 2016-17 period. Image: nsidc NSIDC scientists said air temperatures across the Arctic Ocean averaged more than 4.5 degrees Fahrenheit above average for the five months from October through February, with a series of "extreme winter heat waves" observed as well. Temperatures were even higher, averaging 9 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than normal over large sections of the Chukchi and Barents Seas, the NSIDC found. Arctic sea ice also hit a record low seasonal peak for sea ice volume, which is a measure of the thickness of the ice. This record indicates that the ice cover present in the Arctic is young and thin, and therefore more susceptible to melting during the upcoming spring and summer, possibly leading to another record low sea ice extent in September. The last three months were the warmest winter (Dec-Feb) in the #Arctic since record keeping began. pic.twitter.com/LyDPqZhTUl — Robert Rohde (@rarohde) March 11, 2017 For the season, the Arctic region had the warmest winter on record, according to Berkeley Earth, an independent group that assesses global surface temperature data.  The record warmth across the Arctic, along with the low sea ice extent and volume, is surprising even the most seasoned Arctic researchers.  "All I can say here is that I've been studying Arctic weather patterns for 35 years and have never seen anything like what we've experienced over the past two winters," said National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) director Mark Serreze, in an email.  "Maybe this is just natural variability, but if so, it is a type of natural variability that I am unfamiliar with." The record-warm Arctic temperatures and anemic sea ice cover came during the warmest year on record for the Earth as a whole. The Arctic has been warming at about twice the rate of the rest of the world.  Arctic temperature spikes seen on a chart showing Arctic average temperatures in 2017 compared to previous years. Arrows point to 2 of the spikes. Image: zack labe/mashable As sea ice melts it exposes darker ocean waters beneath it to incoming solar radiation, causing the water temperatures to rise. These milder ocean waters then melt more ice while increasing air temperatures as well, which in turn goes on to melt more ice and snow, exposing more darker surfaces, and so on.  This phenomenon is known as Arctic amplification, and it is having repercussions both throughout the Arctic and beyond.  Not quite Las Vegas The new adage among Arctic specialists is a twist on the Las Vegas slogan: "What happens in Arctic does not stay in the Arctic."  #Arctic sea ice maximum and #Antarctic minimum both at record low this year. https://t.co/RnAmDjJUqk pic.twitter.com/4P5QzYDF3S — NSIDC News (@NSIDC) March 22, 2017 Research has shown that Arctic sea ice loss may be changing weather patterns across large portions of North America, Europe and Asia. A study published on March 15 found that sea ice loss is linked to worsening "airpocalypse" events in China, where smog smothers major cities for days, sickening millions.  The absence of fall sea ice cover just north of Russia favors more fall snowfall in parts of Siberia, which influences the placement of high and low pressure areas in ways that contributes to air stagnation across eastern China, the study found. Until recently, the steepest losses of Arctic sea ice were seen in the summer and fall. But scientists say that winter trends indicate that the sweeping changes taking place in the Arctic are rattling winters there too. "It is certainly unusual to have 3 winters in a row with very warm Arctic temperatures and record low sea ice conditions," Julienne Stroeve, a senior research scientist at the NSIDC, said via email. "While the winter ice cover has been changing more slowly, these last 3 winters suggest perhaps that the autumn/winter is also starting to respond more." Temperature trends since 1950, showing the fastest warming in the Arctic. Image: berkeley earth The record low winter peak in Arctic sea ice does not mean the upcoming summer melt season will set a record as well. For example, 2016 set a similar record during March but fell short of a record low in September due to weather conditions that favored the retention of sea ice cover in parts of the Arctic.  "The 2017 melt season is starting off in a deep hole," Serreze said. "Will we hence see a new record low ice extent this September? Possibly, but a lot depends on the weather patterns this coming summer,  which we can't predict." Arctic sea ice is declining in all months of the year, with the steepest drop in the summer and fall. Projections show that by the middle of the century the Arctic Ocean could be seasonally ice-free, opening it up to more shipping activity, transits of military vessels as well as fishing and oil and gas drilling activities. Record low seasonal peak sea ice volume has been set in 2017. Image: piomas/university of washington "I think having three consecutive years of low wintertime max records is noteworthy. Additionally, observing long-term sea ice losses in all months is an important factor in a warming Arctic," said Zack Labe, a graduate student at the University of California at Irvine. Walt Meier, a NASA research scientist, explained the situation more bluntly.  "We’re ending the winter growth season with the sea ice in the worst shape we’ve seen it in our satellite record," he said in an email. "... I’d say the Arctic sea ice is more fragile than it's ever been at this time of year. If we get any kind of extreme summer weather conditions conducive to ice loss, we may well be looking at a record low this summer." Record low in Antarctica, too Meanwhile, in the Antarctic, sea ice also set a record low. On March 3, Antarctic sea ice extent hit just 815,000 square miles, the NSIDC found, which was the lowest in the satellite era.  Unlike in the Arctic, though, where sea ice loss is attributable to a mix of human-caused global warming and natural variability, the influences on Antarctic sea ice are more poorly understood.  The geography of these two regions are, in fact, polar opposites, with the Far North situated as an ocean surrounded by land, whereas Antarctica is a continent ringed by sea ice cover at its edges.  "The record lows are not surprising, given Antarctic sea ice extent’s high variability," the NSIDC said in a press release. "Just a few years back, extent in the region set record highs." In both the Arctic and Antarctic, sea ice melt does not raise sea levels because the ice is already floating. However, the loss of sea ice cover has sped up warming in the Arctic, which has accelerated the melting of glaciers in Greenland and other areas. WATCH: NASA timelapse shows just how quickly our Arctic sea ice is disappearing
Will Democrats filibuster Gorsuch? Republicans don’t think so.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing comes to a close, the clock is ticking for Senate Democrats to decide whether they'll take the unusual step of filibustering his nomination.
From POW to Nobel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The University of Washington says the first Nobel laureate in its history, Hans Georg Dehmelt, has passed away in Seattle at the age of 94 after a long illness. Dehmelt won a share of the Nobel physics prize in 1989 for his work with ion traps, a type of apparatus that uses an array of electromagnetic fields to isolate electrically charged atoms and subatomic particles, and hold them in place for highly accurate measurements. “Hans Dehmelt put the UW Department of Physics on the map as a nationally competitive, top-tier department,” UW physicist Blayne Heckel said today in a news release. “His… Read More
Boom Supersonic raises $33M to build the fastest airplane for passenger flight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Boom Supersonic has raised a new $33 million Series A round, which it says is enough to build and fly its first supersonic jet, the XB-1 demonstration and testing craft, which will be a 1/3-scale prototype version of the supersonic airliner it will eventually build and sell to air fleet customers. The final Boom jet aims to be able to make the...
Butchered human bones point to cannibalism in Mesolithic Spain 10,000 years ago
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Human bones and skulls discovered in a cave in southern Spain bear traces of having been butchered and consumed by other humans. This is the first time that archaeologists find evidence of cannibalism occurring in the region 10,000 years ago. A team of archaeologists from the University of Valencia had been conducting excavations there when they discovered 30 different human bones deep in the cave as well as three skulls.
We might have to completely redraw the dinosaur family tree
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new fossil study challenges 130 years of thinking about how dinosaurs evolved.
Why deaf people can have accents, too
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
People suffering hearing loss learn to speak through a combination of lip-reading and watching for visual clues.
Travel Tips From a Real Space Tourist: Get Ready to Feel Awful
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In space, no one can hear you ask for more Sudafed.
GSK and Regeneron to mine gene data from 500,000 Britons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's GlaxoSmithKline and U.S.-based Regeneron Pharmaceuticals are embarking on a joint project with UK Biobank, the world's most detailed biomedical database, to hunt for new clues linking genes and disease. By analyzing genetic variations and health in 500,000 middle-aged and older Britons, the partners said on Thursday they hoped to identify promising leads for new medicines. The aim is to analyze DNA from an initial 50,000 samples by the end of 2017, using Regeneron's large gene sequencing center in New York.
Can Chimps Live As Long As Humans?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If famine or a leopard doesn’t kill them first, it’s possible for a chimp to live as long as some humans.
Our future mobile device screens might be made of silver
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers have created thin, transparent layers made out of the precious metal suitable for touch screens.
Rosetta tracks massive landslide on Comet 67P
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A landslide on comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko triggered a plume of dust to be ejected, revealing pristine ice hidden beneath the surface. In July 2015, the Rosetta spacecraft observed an outburst from the comet. To understand what happens on the surface at the point of these outbursts, an international team of researchers studied an event on Comet 67P.
Bacteria may be the key to future 3D
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands have developed a new process that enables them to 3D print a range of materials -- such as a form of graphene -- using bacteria.
New idea shakes up dinosaur family tree for T. Rex and pals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study dramatically rearranges the family tree of dinosaurs
The new normal: Arctic sea ice hits record low for 3rd straight winter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Welcome to the new normal: For the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter season, scientists said Wednesday.  Arctic sea ice cover reached its annual peak extent on March 7, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) said, at 5.57 million square miles. This is the lowest in the 38-year satellite record, and very likely far longer than that based on other data. This year's peak was about 37,000 miles less than the 2015 record. When compared to the 1981-2010 long-term average, sea ice extent this year was a staggering 471,000 square miles below the average annual maximum. This means a chunk of ice about the size of Texas, California and Kentucky combined was missing from the top of the world.   SEE ALSO: There are 11 newly-classified clouds, and all of them are breathtaking The record came at the end of one of the strangest winters that Arctic climate researchers have seen in modern times, with at least four instances in which unusually mild air swept across the entire Arctic from the North Atlantic or Pacific Oceans, bringing the North Pole to near or just above the melting point. See those oranges and reds? That shows much above average temperatures for the Oct-Feb 2016-17 period. Image: nsidc NSIDC scientists said air temperatures across the Arctic Ocean averaged more than 4.5 degrees Fahrenheit above average for the five months from October through February, with a series of "extreme winter heat waves" observed as well. Temperatures were even higher, averaging 9 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than normal over large sections of the Chukchi and Barents Seas, the NSIDC found. Arctic sea ice also hit a record low seasonal peak for sea ice volume, which is a measure of the thickness of the ice. This record indicates that the ice cover present in the Arctic is young and thin, and therefore more susceptible to melting during the upcoming spring and summer, possibly leading to another record low sea ice extent in September. The last three months were the warmest winter (Dec-Feb) in the #Arctic since record keeping began. pic.twitter.com/LyDPqZhTUl — Robert Rohde (@rarohde) March 11, 2017 For the season, the Arctic region had the warmest winter on record, according to Berkeley Earth, an independent group that assesses global surface temperature data.  The record warmth across the Arctic, along with the low sea ice extent and volume, is surprising even the most seasoned Arctic researchers.  "All I can say here is that I've been studying Arctic weather patterns for 35 years and have never seen anything like what we've experienced over the past two winters," said National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) director Mark Serreze, in an email.  "Maybe this is just natural variability, but if so, it is a type of natural variability that I am unfamiliar with." The record-warm Arctic temperatures and anemic sea ice cover came during the warmest year on record for the Earth as a whole. The Arctic has been warming at about twice the rate of the rest of the world.  Arctic temperature spikes seen on a chart showing Arctic average temperatures in 2017 compared to previous years. Arrows point to 2 of the spikes. Image: zack labe/mashable As sea ice melts it exposes darker ocean waters beneath it to incoming solar radiation, causing the water temperatures to rise. These milder ocean waters then melt more ice while increasing air temperatures as well, which in turn goes on to melt more ice and snow, exposing more darker surfaces, and so on.  This phenomenon is known as Arctic amplification, and it is having repercussions both throughout the Arctic and beyond.  Not quite Las Vegas The new adage among Arctic specialists is a twist on the Las Vegas slogan: "What happens in Arctic does not stay in the Arctic."  #Arctic sea ice maximum and #Antarctic minimum both at record low this year. https://t.co/RnAmDjJUqk pic.twitter.com/4P5QzYDF3S — NSIDC News (@NSIDC) March 22, 2017 Research has shown that Arctic sea ice loss may be changing weather patterns across large portions of North America, Europe and Asia. A study published on March 15 found that sea ice loss is linked to worsening "airpocalypse" events in China, where smog smothers major cities for days, sickening millions.  The absence of fall sea ice cover just north of Russia favors more fall snowfall in parts of Siberia, which influences the placement of high and low pressure areas in ways that contributes to air stagnation across eastern China, the study found. Until recently, the steepest losses of Arctic sea ice were seen in the summer and fall. But scientists say that winter trends indicate that the sweeping changes taking place in the Arctic are rattling winters there too. "It is certainly unusual to have 3 winters in a row with very warm Arctic temperatures and record low sea ice conditions," Julienne Stroeve, a senior research scientist at the NSIDC, said via email. "While the winter ice cover has been changing more slowly, these last 3 winters suggest perhaps that the autumn/winter is also starting to respond more." Temperature trends since 1950, showing the fastest warming in the Arctic. Image: berkeley earth The record low winter peak in Arctic sea ice does not mean the upcoming summer melt season will set a record as well. For example, 2016 set a similar record during March but fell short of a record low in September due to weather conditions that favored the retention of sea ice cover in parts of the Arctic.  "The 2017 melt season is starting off in a deep hole," Serreze said. "Will we hence see a new record low ice extent this September? Possibly, but a lot depends on the weather patterns this coming summer,  which we can't predict." Arctic sea ice is declining in all months of the year, with the steepest drop in the summer and fall. Projections show that by the middle of the century the Arctic Ocean could be seasonally ice-free, opening it up to more shipping activity, transits of military vessels as well as fishing and oil and gas drilling activities. Record low seasonal peak sea ice volume has been set in 2017. Image: piomas/university of washington "I think having three consecutive years of low wintertime max records is noteworthy. Additionally, observing long-term sea ice losses in all months is an important factor in a warming Arctic," said Zack Labe, a graduate student at the University of California at Irvine. Walt Meier, a NASA research scientist, explained the situation more bluntly.  "We’re ending the winter growth season with the sea ice in the worst shape we’ve seen it in our satellite record," he said in an email. "... I’d say the Arctic sea ice is more fragile than it's ever been at this time of year. If we get any kind of extreme summer weather conditions conducive to ice loss, we may well be looking at a record low this summer." Record low in Antarctica, too Meanwhile, in the Antarctic, sea ice also set a record low. On March 3, Antarctic sea ice extent hit just 815,000 square miles, the NSIDC found, which was the lowest in the satellite era.  Unlike in the Arctic, though, where sea ice loss is attributable to a mix of human-caused global warming and natural variability, the influences on Antarctic sea ice are more poorly understood.  The geography of these two regions are, in fact, polar opposites, with the Far North situated as an ocean surrounded by land, whereas Antarctica is a continent ringed by sea ice cover at its edges.  "The record lows are not surprising, given Antarctic sea ice extent’s high variability," the NSIDC said in a press release. "Just a few years back, extent in the region set record highs." In both the Arctic and Antarctic, sea ice melt does not raise sea levels because the ice is already floating. However, the loss of sea ice cover has sped up warming in the Arctic, which has accelerated the melting of glaciers in Greenland and other areas. WATCH: NASA timelapse shows just how quickly our Arctic sea ice is disappearing
GOP Health Insurance Plan Hits Older People Hardest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Helen Bell, a 59-year-old former hospital worker, suffers from several chronic conditions that often land her in the hospital and require frequent doctor visits and expensive medications. But hea...
How Clean Is Your Makeup Sponge?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
You might love your fancy sponge, but what are you REALLY smearing on your face? Users on one Reddit board got curious and cut their beauty sponges open. If they aren’t cleaned properly, foundation seeps into the centers of the sponges.
Man Gets Huge Tapeworm from Sushi?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
One avid fan of sushi and sashimi got an unexpected bonus with his meal – a 60-foot-long tapeworm!
Is Your Messy Toddler Naughty or Awesome?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The latest trend has parents sharing hilarious pics of their little ones making huge messes. These parents are kidding about the shame – but is it actually good for toddlers to be messy?
Nude Sleeping
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Is sleeping in the buff better for you “down there”? One study has concluded that it is.
Ditch the Mommy Guilt with Humor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
“Parenting can be difficult, right?” asks ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork. “You’re going to make some mistakes, but it’s important to have a sense of humor!” That’s why two moms, Alicia Ybarbo and Mary Ann Zoellner, collect tales of parents' not-so-shining moments.
Dr. Pimple Popper Faces off Against the "Blackhead Mask"
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Imagine having so many blackheads that it looks like you’re wearing a mask – that was the situation one man found himself in before Dermatologist Dr. Sandra Lee, aka “Dr. Pimple Popper,” went to work. Dr. Lee explains that the “masked man,” also nicknamed “Zorro” by his friends, had a career working with jet engines. The heat in his workplace basically “baked” skin oil into his pores, and then extensive sun damage led to solar comedones -- enlarged blackheads – around his eyes and temples.
Would You Do the Deed with Your Kids in the Room?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A post on a popular parenting site went viral when it posed an explosive question: Is it wrong to have sex in the same room with your children?
Can You Sue if Someone Gives You an STD?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Is your health status your own business, even if it endangers someone else? Legal expert Anahita Sedaghatfar says that legally, it’s not. “In most states, you have a legal obligation to inform a sex partner if you have an STD before you have sex with them.” This applies to all STDs, but most often legal cases are brought for incurable ones, like herpes and HIV.
Mom Shamed for Working Out!?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Mothers get shamed for everything: paying too much attention to their kids, neglecting their kids, how they dress their kids, and especially for “letting themselves go.” But surely no one would get shamed for getting a little healthy exercise while the kids are busy, right? Not so fast -- one mom has been shamed on social media for NOT letting herself go! Erin Oprea was minding her own business and jumping rope for a workout during her children’s soccer game when a nosy stranger took her picture and posted it on social media, accusing her of “trying to get attention.” What the cyberbully didn’t realize is that Erin is Carrie Underwood’s personal trainer, and Carrie herself came to Erin’s defense online.
Texas Dad Throws His Daughter a $6 Million Party
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
One girl’s Sweet 16 cost her dad a sweet $6 million!
Researchers watched the end of an online world, and it was surprisingly civil
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Using 275 million records and an MMORPG, a team of international researchers attempts to reveal how humans will behave as the end of days approach.
We may just have solved the great mystery of why drops splash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mathematicians make a splash with new theory that could lead to breakthroughs in 3D printing, climate science and forensics.
Sea otters have been using tools to get food for millions of years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sea otters may have been using tools to get at food for millions of years. This is way longer than bottlenose dolphins – their marine mammal tool-using counterparts, which have only mastered the ability in the last few centuries. The two best examples we have are sea otters and Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins.
Indonesia increases estimate for cruise ship reef damage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Indonesia said Wednesday a cruise ship on a voyage organised by a British company had damaged about 18,900 square metres of coral reef, increasing the estimate of the devastation caused when the vessel ran aground. The accident happened this month in Raja Ampat, eastern Indonesia, one of the most biodiverse marine habitats on Earth and a favourite with intrepid travellers and divers due to its palm-fringed islands, coral and fish. The 4,200-ton Caledonian Sky smashed into the reefs at low tide around Kri, one of hundreds of small islands in Raja Ampat, after taking tourists on a bird-watching expedition.
Rare frog discovery has researchers hopping for joy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. (AP) — A discovery involving a rare California frog has researchers hopping for joy.
Trump Signs NASA Bill, Ponders Sending Congress to Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Washington (AP) -- President Donald Trump signed legislation Tuesday adding human exploration of Mars to NASA's mission. Could sending Congress into space be next?
Sea ice hits new record low at both poles
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The sea ice cover in the Arctic and Antarctic hit new record lows for this time of year, marking the smallest polar ice caps in the 38-year satellite record, US government scientists said Wednesday. In March, the Arctic ice sheet should be at its biggest, but on March 7 the ice cover reached "a record low wintertime maximum extent," said a statement by the US space agency NASA. The disappearing sea ice comes as the planet has marked three years in a row of record-breaking heat, raising new concerns about the accelerating pace of global warming and the need to curb burning of fossil fuels which spew heat-trapping greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere.
6 Moves for Perfect Wedding Day Posture
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
These posture exercises will help you stand upright, sculpt your shoulders, and lengthen your core, so that you'll have better health as you age. Watch the video for the workout.
How to Make Healthier Southwestern Corn Chowder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
In this recipe, we lighten up the classic dish with ingredients that are lower in fat and calories than the original. Then, we toss in punchy spices to give it a southwestern flavor.
How to Make a Rhubarb Crumble
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
In this recipe, we combine rhubarb with naturally sweet, also in season berries to make a gluten-free, fiber-packed rhubarb crumble you won’t be able to resist.
GOP Repeal Plans Hit Older People Hardest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Helen Bell, 59, has several chronic health conditions that often land her in the hospital and require frequent doctor visits and expensive medications. But her health issues aren’t her biggest wo...
7 Richard Simmons Quotes We Love
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Richards Simmons took the fitness world by storm over three decades ago, with his inspiring story of weight loss and believing in himself. Watch the video to revisit all the times he reminded us to love yourself.
You’re not as secure online as you might think
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The problem with our grasp of cybersecurity isn’t so much that we remain dangerously illiterate — it’s that we think we know what we’re doing anyway. The Pew Research Center was a little more diplomatic than that though in characterizing the findings of a new survey of Americans’ understanding of online security. “Many Americans are unclear about some key cybersecurity topics, terms and concepts,” wrote Kenneth Olmstead and Aaron Smith in their introduction to “What the Public Knows About Cybersecurity.” But it’s that thinking that probably leads many internet users to make choices that they think make them more secure, but, in reality, leave them as exposed as ever.
Parrot Laughter Is Contagious, Scientists Find
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A parrot native to New Zealand has demonstrated contagious emotion, scientists said.