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EMILY'S List President: Trump Has Empowered American Women — By Accident
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stephanie Schriock, president of EMILY's List, shares how she thinks President Trump has affected women during his first year in office.
Scientists Explain Why the Black Death Wasn't Actually Caused by Rats
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Human ectoparasites may be the culprits behind medieval plague.
Allied Leaders at Casablanca: The Story Behind a Famous WWII Photo Shoot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The conference took place 75 years ago
The Trump Administration Is Appealing a Ruling That Blocked Its Plan to End DACA Protections
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A judge temporarily blocked the decision to end protections for young immigrants
'Hanging On to Life.' 4 Police Officers Shot Responding to Domestic Disturbance Call
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The suspect was also wounded
Chinese solar boom sparks global renewables boon: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Chinese boom in solar panel installation last year helped drive global investment in renewable clean energy technology to record levels, a new study showed Tuesday. After a dip in 2016, overall global investment in the sector rose 3.0 percent to a total $333.5 billion, offsetting falls in Japan, Germany and Britain, according to the Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) study. "The 2017 total is all the more remarkable when you consider that capital costs for the leading technology -– solar -– continue to fall sharply," said BNEF chief executive Jon Moore.
New discovery of water on Mars could help future missions to the planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists found eight sites with evidence of ice beneath the martian surface. These discoveries were made based on recent images sent back by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Thai court drops royal insult charges against academic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BANGKOK (AP) — A Thai military court on Wednesday dropped royal insult charges against an 84-year old historian who questioned whether a Thai king had actually defeated a Burmese adversary in combat on elephant-back over 500 years ago.
Meteor?: Bright light, loud noise rattle Michigan residents
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
DETROIT (AP) — The National Weather Service says the bright light and what sounded like thunder in the sky across the Detroit metropolitan area may have been a meteor.
Early Vikings Revealed Through Two Rare Artifacts Inscribed With Ancient Runic Texts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Two rare artifacts inscribed with ancient letters, or runes, could be the key to a mysterious era of Viking history when they suddenly abandoned their old alphabet and transitioned to a new one. Archaeologists discovered a comb and a small plate while excavating an ancient Viking marketplace in Ribe, the oldest town in Denmark today and a powerful hub during the early Viking Age, according to ScienceNordic. Runes are sets of symbols comprising an alphabet in which each character represents a specific sound.
Donald Trump Is in Good Physical and Mental Health, White House Doctor Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump's doctor has recommend that he lose some weight, but said the president is in excellent physical and mental health.
Mormon Church Appoints 93
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He's the second-oldest man to assume leadership of the church
Palestinian Leaders are Calling on President Mahmoud Abbas to Withdraw Recognition of Israel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Palestine Liberation Organization’s Central Council declared it should no longer be bound by the 1993 Oslo peace accords
EU parliament calls for ban on electric pulse fishing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The European Parliament called Tuesday for a ban on electric pulse fishing in the European Union, defying Brussels which wants the experimental practice in the North Sea done on a larger scale. The parliament, the EU's only directly elected body, will now try to strike a compromise with the European Commission, the bloc's executive, and the European Council, which groups the 28 member states.
This "Rainbow" Dinosaur Found in China Was Probably a Magnet for Mating
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If it works for hummingbirds, it must have worked for dinosaurs, right?
Mom of 13 Siblings Found Malnourished and Shackled Was 'Perplexed' When Deputies Arrived
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
David Allen Turpin, 57, and Louise Anna Turpin, 49, could face charges including torture and child endangerment
Washington state town wary of slow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
UNION GAP, Wash. (AP) — A slow-moving landslide in a fertile farming region in Washington state has forced evacuations as officials prepare for what they say is inevitable — the collapse of a ridge that sits above a few dozen homes and a key highway.
Doctor gives Trump a clean bill of health, physical and mental
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump needs to lose 10-15 pounds but is generally in excellent health and has no problems “whatsoever” with his mental ability, his official military doctor said Tuesday. Dr. Ronny Jackson predicted that Trump would stay in good health throughout his time in office, even if it stretches to a second term.
Dinosaur tail to be auctioned for Mexico quake reconstruction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By Diego Oré MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - A fossilized dinosaur tail discovered in Morocco will be auctioned on Tuesday night in Mexico to raise funds for the reconstruction of thousands of schools damaged by two earthquakes that struck the Latin American nation in September. The 4-metre-(13-foot)-long, 180-kg (396-pound) tail will be offered at a reserve price of 1.8 million Mexican pesos ($95,805), according to organizer Morton's Auction House. Anything raised above the reserve price will be donated to the BBVA Bancomer Foundation to help finance the reconstruction of some 5,000 damaged schools.
A new form for the CS Perspective in the Daily
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Starting on Monday, Jan. 22, you’ll begin to see how this thinking is now being applied to the Christian Science Perspective. The audio version of the Perspective will now include the full version of the article (not just the short read), and it will be read by the actual author, whenever possible.
Video Shows Firefighter Catching Child Tossed From Burning Building
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“We were catching babies like a football"
Suffering from writer's block? A simple cup of tea gets the creative juices going, scientists say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A simple cup of tea sparks an instant burst of brainpower and creativity, according to a new study - within minutes of drinking a brew. Volunteers in the study almost immediately scored better results in creative and cognition tests than those who had drunk a glass of water, researchers found. The findings suggest it could be the antidote to everything, from writer's block to artists looking for inspiration during brainstorming sessions. Although tea contains caffeine and theanine, both associated with increased attentiveness and alertness, these do not usually take effect instantly. Instead, researchers believe tea works to enhance and create a 'positive' mood which in turn sparks the brain's cognitive regions into life. In tests for the specialist journal Food Quality and Preference, Yan Huang of Peking University's School of Psychological and Cognitive Sciences conducted two tests on up to 50 students, with an average age of 23. Perfect cup of tea As the students gave their name, age and other details to researchers, half were given a cup of black tea to drink and the other half a glass of water, before immediately going into one of two different tests. The first test saw them asked to make an "attractive and creative" design out of building blocks and in the second they were asked to come up with a "cool" name for a new noodle restaurant. Their results were judged by other, non-participating, students for creativity and design and marked on a scale by the researchers. In the block building test, the tea drinkers scored 6.54 points against 6.03 points for the water drinkers. In the name test, the tea drinkers scored 4.11 against 3.78. The results show that tea helped both divergent thinking - the process of coming up with a number of new ideas around a central theme and what most people would consider to define creativity. The report said: "This work contributes to understanding the function of tea on creativity and offers a new way to investigate the relationship between food and beverage consumption and the improvement of human cognition." They added: "Two biological ingredients, caffeine and theanine, have beneficial effects on attention, which is an indispensable part of cognitive function. "But the amount of tea ingredients our participants absorbed was relatively small. Also, theanine facilitates long-term sustained attentional processing rather than short-term moment-to-moment attentional processing." Instead, tea is a 'mood enhancer' and this may have been why it worked so well in the short term, it added.
Hawaii's missile alert gaffe: why good human
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Poorly designed critical warning systems need a radical overhaul to prevent a repeat of Hawaii's errant 'ballistic missile threat' alert.
The Real Meaning of the Separation of Church and State
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It is too important a concept to be misused
‘This Is a Highly Respectable Family.’ Grandmother Defends Couple Accused in California 'House of Horrors'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“They were very protective of the kids,” David Allen Turpin's mother said
Feathered Dinosaur Shimmered Like a Rainbow, Fossil Reveals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three years ago, a farmer in the Hebei province of China uncovered a mysterious fossil and brought it to the the Paleontological Museum of Liaoning. Now, after studying the find, scientists have announced that the fossil is of a new, duck-sized dinosaur—and when it lived it had an incredible feather display that shined like a living rainbow. An international team of scientists studying the dinosaur, called Caihong juji, made the discovery by carefully analyzing tiny melanosomes, the part of the cells that contain pigment, in the fossil, which turned up dramatic evidence of the dinosaur’s flamboyant plumage.
Accused Killer Claims Missing UPenn Student Was Trying to Hit on Him
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Blaze Bernstein was stabbed more than 20 times
Report: Porn star said she had yearlong affair with Trump in 2006
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Stormy Daniels, the adult film actress who was reportedly paid $130,000 by Trump’s lawyer to stay silent, told Slate in 2016 that she carried on an almost yearlong sexual relationship with Trump a decade earlier.
DHS secretary defends Trump amid immigration firestorm: 'We'd like to have people with skills'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Kirstjen Nielsen got into heated exchanges over the president’s comments about Haiti and African countries while testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
Trump's meeting with Kazakhstan president raises questions about human rights and business ties
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump proclaimed Tuesday “Religious Freedom Day,” but he spent the afternoon meeting with an authoritarian who has been accused of conducting a brutal campaign of repression against religious minorities and political opponents in his country.
Even the eyelashes freeze: Russia sees minus 88.6 degrees F
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MOSCOW (AP) — Even thermometers can't keep up with the plunging temperatures in Russia's remote Yakutia region, which hit minus 67 degrees Celsius (minus 88.6 degrees Fahrenheit) in some areas Tuesday.
On policy, Trump favors one side of red
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump’s major policy moves over the course of his first year in office have had a common denominator: They either overtly favor his base of support – the roughly one-third of voters who solidly back him – or they appear to penalize those states that vote Democratic. The most striking example is tax reform, which struck a blow against blue-state Americans who tend to pay high state and local taxes, or SALT. Other recent policy moves also appear to have an anti-blue tilt.
Will Europe speak up for cooperation?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A year ago Chinese President Xi Jinping offered his vision of the world, one in which China plays the lead role in trade and other world affairs. This year President Trump will speak Jan. 26 at this annual forum of world leaders, sharing his views on international cooperation, informed by his oft-stated “America First” philosophy. Will Mr. Trump define the place of the United States in the world narrowly, emphasizing that the US will act only if and when its national interests are clear and the benefits immediate?
2018: The year the European Union stands and delivers?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At this time last year, the Dutch, French, and Germans were heading toward elections whose stakes were no less than the endurance of the European Union. The postwar project did more than survive the far-right rebellion of 2017: The victory in May of French President Emmanuel Macron over the Euroskeptic Marine Le Pen gave the bloc a decisive boost. Recommended: How much do you know about the EU?
Dunkin' Without the 'Donuts': New Store Tries Out New Name
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Dunkin' Donuts store opening is dropping 'Donuts' from its name
You Lie More When Speaking a Second Language
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s not a matter of proficiency: Karin is equally fluent in German and English, but her emotional experiences are bound more strongly to her mother tongue, simply because she experienced more fundamental, defining emotions as a child. This article was originally published on The Conversation.
This Country Is Making It Illegal to Boil Live Lobsters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some researchers now think lobsters can feel pain
Wreck of Dutch Warship Found Buried Beneath Coral
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Divers in the blue waters around the Yucatán Peninsula have discovered three historic treasures: a sunken lighthouse and the remains of an 18th-century Dutch warship and a 19th-century British steamer, according to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH). The battered wrecks were found near the coastal town of Sisal, Mexico, a modern beach destination that was once a bustling port in the 18th and 19th centuries. The shipwrecks were laden with artifacts, including cannons, cutlery and porcelain, said archaeologist Helena Barba Meinecke, head of the INAH's underwater archaeology of the Yucatán Peninsula.
Ancient Egyptian Mummies from 4,000 Years Ago Shared a Mommy, DNA from Teeth Reveals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Two millennia-old Egyptian mummies long believed to be brothers are actually half siblings, according to a new paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. The researchers argue the two men shared a mother but had different fathers, which may in turn suggest that the civilization valued a mother's influence more than scholars had realized.
A Nose for Loot? Dogs Training to Sniff Out Stolen Artifacts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A team of scientists will train dogs to see if the animals can sniff out looted artifacts from the Middle East that are being smuggled into the United States. Now, scientists are hoping the canines can also be trained to sniff out artifacts from Syria and Iraq, war-torn countries that have experienced widespread looting of archaeological sites. "Terrorists, organized crime and common criminals are destroying archaeological sites on an industrial scale to cash in on illegal profits … that is why we need to find out if we can train dogs to help," said Michael Danti, a consulting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, in a statement announcing the creation of the K-9 Artifact Finders research program.
World's largest sea turtle could come off 'endangered' list
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Federal ocean managers say it might be time to move the East Coast population of the world's largest turtle from the United States' list of endangered animals.
Burn, Baby, Burn: Australian Birds Steal Fire to Smoke Out Prey
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Grassland fires that are deadly and devastating events for many kinds of wildlife are a boon to certain types of birds known as fire foragers. But in Australia, some fire-foraging birds are also fire starters. Three species of raptors — predatory birds with sharp beaks and talons, and keen eyesight — are widely known not only for lurking on the fringes of fires but also for snatching up smoldering grasses or branches and using them to kindle fresh flames, to smoke out mammal and insect prey.
Kensho's Space index
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here's how Kensho's Space index fared in 2017.
Massive oil spill spreads in East China Sea, could be world's largest in decades
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What could be the largest oil spill since 1989's Exxon Valdez is unfolding in the East China Sea after a deadly and fiery collision between two vessels caused a tanker to sink. All 32 crew members are thought to have died aboard the Iranian vessel "Sanchi," which was carrying about 1 million barrels of condensate.  According to Bloomberg News, the ship was transporting hydrocarbon liquid that's a key ingredient for making petrochemicals, including jet fuel. It was headed to the port of Daesan, South Korea when it struck the transport ship "CF Crystal" off China's eastern coast.  SEE ALSO: This chatbot wants to cut through the noise on climate science The tanker and its associated oil slick had been on fire for days after the collision. While the fire likely killed all aboard the ship, it was seen by environmental experts as a way to minimize the broader impacts of the spill, since the flames burned off the lightweight condensate on the ocean surface.   However, the fire is now out, and the ship has sunk, raising the possibility that the harmful cargo is going directly into the sea.  The cargo is different than the crude oil spilled by the Exxon Valdez in 1989, but if all the condensate were to leak into the ocean, it would rank as the biggest spill in decades.  Much remains unknown about the fate of the cargo, and therefore similar can be said about what the environmental impacts will be. Reports in recent days are not encouraging, since there is word of a rapidly spreading oil slick on the surface of the ocean. Citing Chinese authorities, Bloomberg reported that the spill expanded from 3.9 square miles to 52 square miles between Sunday and Monday local time.   An oil spill in the heavily trafficked East China Sea could have significant environmental repercussions. Humpback whales travel through that area, and heavily fished species such as mackerel and bluefin also spend time in that area.  “It is virtually certain that much of the condensate went into the sea in solution, and that toxic underwater hydrocarbon plume will injure marine life exposed to it,” Richard Steiner, an oil spill specialist based in Alaska, told Bloomberg. “Even the burned fraction will leave a toxic residue on the water.” Ma Jun, a Chinese environmentalist, was quoted by CNN as saying the spill took place in one of the most productive fishing areas in the country, known as the Zhoushan fishing ground.  A handout photo made available by the Transport Ministry of China shows smoke rising from the fire on the Panama-registered tanker 'Sanchi' on Jan. 14, 2018.Image: TRANSPORT MINISTRY OF CHINA HANDOUT/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock"We still need to keep an eye on how these contaminants might be carried by the ocean flow to have the impact on the fishing ground," Jun told CNN.  According to Greenpeace International, it's not clear how large this environmental disaster will be, since the amount of condensate that leaked into the water is unknown.  "A major concern is that, now that the tanker has sunk, any condensate which did not yet burn off could continue to leak underwater, disperse and break down quite quickly, significantly complicating clean up operations," the environmental advocacy organization stated in a Jan. 15 fact sheet.  WATCH: 2017 is about to be one of the hottest years of all time
Massachusetts police arrest man for stealing manhole covers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WEBSTER, Mass. (AP) — Massachusetts police say they have arrested a man who stole seven manhole covers and put traffic cones in their place.
Jordan’s need to diversify options, freedom will save Kenya, not being ostriches, National Payments Platform could change banking, demolition of a w
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“In recent weeks, there has been much commentary in Jordan on the importance of taking a new approach to Jordan’s bilateral relations,” writes Amer Al Sabaileh. “Strategically, it is imperative that Jordan continues to diversify its options, but this must be done with a clear plan and idea rather than clichés and propaganda.
As US tightens stance on migrants and refugees, is Mexico prepared to take more?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It took more than a year, thousands of miles of travel, and a medical exam by a pair of volunteer midwives in the back of a car for C., a Honduran migrant in Mexico, to learn the real value of her temporary humanitarian visa. C.’s visa includes medical care, permission to work legally in Mexico, and the security of having “papers” to show when police stop her on the street. Recommended: How much do you know about Mexico?
Mar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Health inspectors found 15 violations in the club's two main kitchens
'We Are Crushed.' Celebrities React to Death of Cranberries Singer Dolores O’Riordan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Cranberries lead singer died suddenly at the age of 46
4 South Carolina Police Officers Shot Responding to Domestic Disturbance Call
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The suspect was also wounded