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GOP senator: Health care vote now ‘in jeopardy’ due to McConnell’s ‘breach of trust’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Ron Johnson says the Republican health care bill is in “jeopardy” due to comments Mitch McConnell made to moderate senators behind closed doors.
California judge who pocketed 2 cardholders agrees to resign
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A Northern California judge who agreed to resign after swiping two art deco-style business cardholders from a judges' dinner in San Francisco said Monday that he remains deeply remorseful.
Afghan girls robotics team competes after visa obstacles
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — Their team shirts didn't say "Afghanistan" and their name badges were handwritten, not typed, suggesting the last-minute nature of their entry into the United States. But the Afghan girls competing Monday in an international robotics competition in Washington were clearly excited to be representing their nation.
Resurrecting Ancient Wines That Can Survive Climate Change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Spanish region of Catalonia is proud of its traditions. The official language, Catalan, has thrived for centuries, despite the establishment of Spanish as the rest of the country’s official language in the 1700s. Castells, or adults and children climbing on each other’s shoulders to form human towers, continues to be a popular activity at festivals. And in Vilafranca del Penedès, an hour outside of Barcelona, the local winery Bodegas Torres is researching and rediscovering wine varieties long thought to be extinct.
Space Corps Military Branch Approved by House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The House passed the National Defense Authorization Act with the Space Corps in it, but the current Senate bill does not include a new military branch.
It Takes Guts: The Yucky Way Sea Spiders Get Oxygen to Their Legs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This appears to be the case for sea spiders, according to a new study. The creatures pass oxygen to their extremities via their gut fluids, rather than the substance they have in lieu of blood called hemolymph. While it’s strange that sea spiders — whose bodies are dominated by long, spindly legs punctuated by a tiny head and trunk — take oxygen into their bodies through pores in their outer layer, "their guts are just bizarre," said the study’s lead author Art Woods, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Montana.
These polar field guides' Antarctica winter wedding was a freezing first
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A British couple went all-in with a winter wedding theme.  SEE ALSO: One of the largest icebergs ever recorded just broke free of Antarctica Polar field guides Julie Baum and Tom Sylvester married over the weekend in an intimate ceremony at the British Antarctic Survey's Rothera Research Station. It's the first official wedding to take place in the British Antarctic Territory. The historic moment occurred in 15-degree weather at a specially decorated chapel at the research station. Looks cozy. Congratulations to Julie and Tom - who work for the Cambridge-based @BAS_News @itvanglia pic.twitter.com/tfRmGXlL5J — Neil Barbour (@nellybabs) July 17, 2017 The British Antarctic Survey said Baum made her wedding dress partially out of an old orange tent. The couple, who had been dating for more than a decade, braved the freezing temps for some unique wedding photos. (Literal cold feet are so much better than figurative ones.) So excited to share pics from #wedding of Julie & Tom in #Antarctica, the first in the British Antarctic Territoryhttps://t.co/ejjS8s3m0Q pic.twitter.com/frNNm6DJw6 — Antarctic Survey (@BAS_News) July 17, 2017 Marriage law in the territory was reformed in 2016, making it easier for marriages taking place there to be recognized in the UK. Baum and Sylvester had been selected to join the British Antarctic Survey to lead deep-field science expeditions in 2016 and colleagues joked they should get married at the station. After a three-year engagement, they went for it.  The ceremony was followed by a party featuring iced wedding cakes prepared by the station chef, and the newlyweds then rode off in a Sno-Cat vehicle. Talk about a destination wedding. WATCH: An iceberg the size of Delaware broke off Antarctica
Trump unveils ‘Made in America’ week
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The week will begin Monday with a “Made in America product showcase” featuring crafts and other items created in each of the 50 states.
Team Trump’s evolving story on Don Jr.’s Russia meeting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The White House’s story has repeatedly changed when discussing Donald Trump Jr.’s meeting last summer with a Kremlin-linked lawyer promising dirt on Hillary Clinton’s campaign. In an off-camera briefing later that day, press secretary Sean Spicer said that nothing came out of the meeting except a discussion on Russian adoption policy. “You know I’m not going to get into the specifics of this, but I will say it’s quite often for people who are given information during the heat of campaign to ask what that is,” said Spicer.
Trump wishes McCain speedy recovery: ‘We need his vote’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Monday wished Sen. John McCain a healthy recovery from surgery — but then immediately pivoted to stressing his old foe’s value in pushing the Republican health care bill through the Senate.
On ‘Made in America Week,’ White House fields questions about what’s not: Trump products
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Shirts are among the products made abroad by the Trump Organization. WASHINGTON — Monday was the start of “Made in America Week” at the White House, a celebration of U.S. industry and products. Along with a showcase of goods made in each of the 50 states, the event came with questions about the wide selection of products President Trump’s family businesses source from overseas factories.
California judge who swiped 2 cardholders agrees to resign
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A Northern California judge is losing his job after swiping two art deco-style business card holders from a judges' dinner in San Francisco.
At a snail's pace. Larry lands world snail racing title
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LONDON (Reuters) - "Ready, steady, slow," was the cry as 'Team Uslime Bolt' and their rivals got underway at the World Snail Racing championships in the English village of Congham. More than 150 snails took part in Saturday's championships, held on a damp cloth on a table top in a field, vying to become the latest winner of an event which dates back to the 1960s. Larry, owned by Tara Beasley, was this year's winner, completing the 33 cm course in two minutes and 20 seconds on Saturday.
Illinois school dorm director teaches dog to bark in whisper
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GREENVILLE, Ill. (AP) — A resident director who lives in a dorm at a college in southern Illinois has taught his dog to bark in a whisper.
Will Trump restrain steel imports? Why many in GOP wouldn’t mind if he did
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The US and China have just wrapped up 100 days of trade talks, heading into a bilateral economic summit this week in Washington. A month later, the administration will begin renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with partners Canada and Mexico. The administration has rattled its sword repeatedly since taking office.
'Married at First Sight' Star Jamie Otis Live Streams Heartbreaking Tribute to Late Son
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The reality star lost her unborn son at 17 weeks.
This tiny Japanese space agency drone is giving us a glimpse of life in space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you've ever wondered about what it's like to be inside the International Space Station through the lens of, say, a drone, look no further.  The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has released images and video from its JEM Internal Ball Camera, known as "Int-Ball," — a camera drone that can record images and video while moving in space — and the new footage gives us earth-dwellers a sneak peek of the happenings on the space laboratory. SEE ALSO: Astronauts to go on 'contingency' spacewalk to fix Space Station The device itself is a tiny little ball (that looks like a Star Wars character, tbh) that can move autonomously in space, and take photos and video under remote control by the JAXA Tsukaba Space Center. Image: Japan Aerospace Exploration AgencyAccording to the JAXA, the Int-Ball was initially delivered to "Kibo," the Japanese Experiment Module on the International Space Station, on June 4, 2017, aboard SpaceX's uncrewed Dragon capsule. With the device and it's recording capabilities, JAXA is giving people a fascinating look at the inner-workings of the International Space Station. The device uses existing drone technology, but its interior and exterior parts were manufactured through 3D printing. The goal of Int-Ball is to reduce the time the crew spends on photography — which currently amounts for 10% of the crew's working time — to zero. Int-Ball also allows ground workers to check footage in real time, and gives them the ability to see things from the on-board crew's point-of-view. It "will contribute to maximized results of 'Kibo' utilization experiments," according to JAXA, so the device is both cute and helpful. You can learn more about Int-Ball and see the footage that it has delivered here. WATCH: Scientists are creating drones that fly in sync with each other
Astronomers Detect 'Peculiar Signals' From Direction Of Red Dwarf Star Ross 128
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have discovered mystery signals coming from a star 11 light years away. The “very peculiar” pulses appear to be unique to the red dwarf, scientists say, with observations of similar nearby stars showing no similar behavior.
How the Internet Deciphered a Fake Alien Message
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One evening last year, when his newborn daughter was small enough to hold with one arm, René Heller reached for a book to occupy his mind while he rocked her to sleep. Heller, an astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institutes in Göttingen, Germany, picked up Is Anyone Out There? The Scientific Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence.
Outdoor smart security camera and light
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Smart & Safe Tech: Kuna is a security camera built inside a porch light that is designed to protect against unwanted intruders. You can interact with visitors at your front door via your smartphone from anywhere
There Might Be a Cure for Baldness By the Time You Go Completely Bald
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Apologies to the already-bald, though.
California climate law touted as global model faces key test
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California lawmakers are nearing a high-stakes decision that will decide the fate of a climate initiative that Gov. Jerry Brown holds up as a model to be replicated around the world to confront rising global temperatures.
NASA communications satellite damaged 3 weeks before launch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's newest communications satellite has been damaged, just three weeks before its planned August launch
Hwasong
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korea's latest missile test has brought simmering tensions between the notoriously reclusive country and the United States to a head. Are North Korean rockets capable of reaching American shores? Schilling, whose experience includes developing rockets for the U.S. Air Force, said the latest North Korean missile is the first with sufficient range and payload capacity to deliver a single nuclear warhead into United States territory.
Postponing health care vote creates new uncertainty — and opportunities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Yahoo News‘ continuing coverage of the Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare comes in the latest Health Care Declassified. We’ll combine our own reporting with the best insights from around the Internet to give you the latest on the future of health care in America. This was the week the revised Republican health care bill was supposed to come up for a vote on the Senate floor in a dramatic showdown, a plan that was still uncertain as late as Saturday. But that changed quickly Saturday night with the news that Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., had emergency surgery to remove a blood clot, forcing him to rest at home in Arizona — and, because the Republicans have no votes to spare, pushing back a vote on the bill for at least a week and perhaps longer. Rand Paul, R-Ky., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, have said they will oppose a procedural motion to begin debate on the proposal, meaning McConnell can afford no more defectors if he wants to move forward with repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act.
GOP Sen. Heller receives threatening note over health care
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Dean Heller received a note at his Las Vegas office that reportedly threatened the senator if he voted to take away the note writer’s health care.
Meet a new breed of prosecutor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The new district attorney of Nueces County here in southern Texas strolls around the local courthouse in cowboy boots and a crisp brown suit with a colorful tie and matching pocket square, flashing a smile as wide as the grille of the Ford F-350 pickup he drives. On the surface, at least, he seems like your stereotypical Texas lawman – the one you see in movies wearing a Stetson and spurs, delivering justice and colloquial quips through a lip filled with chewing tobacco. Eventually, he may talk about the raft of progressive changes that he’s beginning to implement in Nueces County, such as helping young offenders go to trade school instead of to prison.
Why 'son et lumiere' shows light up French summer nights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Forget fireworks, we had son et lumiere. While the French are old hands at the artform, I had the feeling we were experiencing the show “Chroma” the way spectators did in 1952, when Paul Robert-Houdin officially introduced them to a brand new genre. The architect and curator, fittingly also the grandson of a famous French magician, projected special lights, set to accompanied sound, onto the facade of the Chateau de Chambord, a Renaissance castle in the Loire Valley, playing with spectators’ sense of place and emotion.
Creating a virtuous circle with North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With tensions rising over North Korea’s nuclear and missile capabilities, the new president of South Korea, Moon Jae-in, has decided to break what he calls “the vicious circle of military escalation.” On July 17, his government offered to hold talks with North Korea. The two sides have not held talks since 2015, or just before North Korea began rapid advances in the firing range of its missiles. Any gradual engagement with North Korea now, Mr. Moon hopes, might lead to a virtuous circle of trust and goodwill that allows the two Korean nations to negotiate the difficult issues of nuclear disarmament and mutual recognition.
Two centuries later, researchers say the French revolution was an act of radical privatization
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you think big government is holding back economic growth today, it’s got nothing on the feudal system of France’s ancien regime. Historians record overlapping levels of nobles and Catholic church officials collecting taxes on everything from passing flocks of birds to the manufacture of doors and windows within city walls, not to mention the…
Chinese Scientists Just Set the Record for the Farthest Quantum Teleportation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Chinese scientists have just shattered a record in teleportation. More specifically, the scientists beamed the quantum state of a photon (information about how it is polarized) into orbit. Not only did the team set a record for quantum teleportation distance, they also showed that one can build a practical system for long-distance quantum communications.
Ross 128: Mystery Radio Signals Detected from Red Dwarf Star Just 11 Light Years Away
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The “very peculiar” pulses appear to be unique to the red dwarf, scientists say, with observations of similar nearby stars showing no similar behavior. Researchers at the Arecibo Observatory, Puerto Rico, were observing a group of red dwarf stars in a bid to identify planets and other objects orbiting them. In April and May, the team recorded information coming from Gliese 436,  Ross 128,  Wolf 359,  HD 95735,  BD +202465,  V* RY Sex, and  K2-18.
Apollo Astronauts Reflect on US Moon Missions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Apollo astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Harrison “Jack” Schmitt, Michael Collins and Walt Cunningham reflected on the U.S. missions to the moon during a gala at the Kennedy Space Center for Aldrin’s space education foundation. (July 17)
How Bayer Is Creating Value through Innovation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In 2016, Bayer owned ~51,000 valid patent applications and patents relating to ~5,000 protected inventions worldwide.
This Is Why Investors Will Need to Learn a New Acronym: CRISPR
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats are becoming a key technology in the coming genetic engineering revolution.
7,500 Pounds of 'Eels' Cover Oregon Road with Slime (Here's Why)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A truck carrying a bunch of slime eels recently crashed on the highway in Oregon, releasing a mind-boggling amount of slime and forcing the highway to close. The slithery creatures fell off a truck on Highway 101 in Oregon yesterday (July 13), causing a five-car crash, coating nearby cars in a Ghostbusters'-worthy amount of slime, and sending the spooked creatures slithering across the road, Oregon Live reported. The slime eels, or Pacific hagfish, had been collected from the Newport Bayfront on Oregon's coast and were in containers on a truck that overturned, said Cari Boyd, a lieutenant for the Newport Area Command of the Oregon State Police.
People Could Make Smallpox from Scratch in a Lab, Scientists Warn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have re-created a relative of the smallpox virus in a lab, from scratch. This virus, called the horsepox virus, is not harmful to humans, but the new findings suggest that it's possible for people to make the deadly smallpox virus in a lab. The researchers, from the University of Alberta in Canada, hope their effort could one day lead to a better smallpox vaccine.
Weed killer turns neighbor against neighbor in farm country
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A longtime Arkansas soybean farmer, Mike Wallace thought of his neighbors as a community and always was willing to lend a hand if they faced any hardships with their crops. "Mike would do anything ...
Elon Musk says we need to regulate AI before it becomes a danger to humanity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk’s thoughts on artificial intelligence are pretty well known at this point. At a gathering of US governors this weekend, he repeated these sentiments, but also stressed something he says is even more important: that governments need to start regulating AI now. “I have exposure to the very cutting edge AI, and I think people should be really concerned about it,” Musk told attendees at the National Governors Association summer meeting on Saturday.
A new NASA video shows Pluto in exquisite detail
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA has used data and photos from the New Horizon spacecraft to recreate the most detailed views of Pluto
See the New Trillion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This baby's a behemoth: At approximately 2,200 square miles (5,800 square kilometers), the iceberg represents about 10 percent of the Larsen C ice shelf, which it was a part of until it broke off this week. The 'berg is slightly bigger than Delaware in area and similarly proportioned: While the Blue Hen State is 96 miles (154 km) long, the Larsen C iceberg measures about 99 miles (159 km) from end to end, meaning it would take a little over an hour and a half to traverse it by car, assuming you had a car that could manage 60 mph (nearly 100 km/h) on uneven, floating sea ice. An instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite snapped one of the first images of this new iceberg on July 12, 2017, using thermal measurements to distinguish between ice and open water.
Gore: Trump ‘tears down America’s standing in the world’ by leaving Paris climate accord
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former Vice President Al Gore said Monday that the U.S. is “going through a challenging time” under the Trump administration, decrying President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement.
Hyenas spark admiration, not fear, in Ethiopia's Harar city
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By Tiksa Nagari HARAR, Ethiopia (Reuters) - Hyenas roam the streets of the ancient walled city of Harar in eastern Ethiopia every night, seeking scraps of meat to drag to the nearby caves. Abbas Yusuf, known as Hyena Man, learnt to feed the hyenas from his father, Yusuf Mume Salleh, who fed them for 45 years before passing the job to his son 13 years ago. "Hyenas have never attacked the people of Harar after my father started feeding them, unless you harm their babies," Abbas Yusuf told Reuters.
See this? Doctors find 27 contact lenses in woman's eye
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LONDON (AP) — Doctors intending to perform cataract surgery on a 67-year-old woman in Britain found something rather unexpected: 17 contact lenses mashed together in her right eye.
River roll call as 'swan upping' gets under way on Britain's Thames
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By Mark Hanrahan SHEPPERTON, England, (Reuters) - Six old-fashioned skiffs interrupted the sleepy pace of life on a stretch of the river Thames on Monday as teams embarked on the annual "upping" - a combined census and health visit for swans. "It's tradition - it's part of British history", David Barber, the swan marker on queen's crew told Reuters of the endeavour dating back to the 12th century, when swans were an important food source. The upping is in part about pomp and ceremony.
Donald Trump's $10 trillion climate mistake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
N/A
Japan’s space camera drone on the ISS is a floating ball of cuteness
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Japan’s space agency has for the first time released photos and videos taken on the International Space Station by its resident robot drone, which can be remote-controlled from Earth. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) says footage taken by the Internal Ball Camera (or Int-Ball) can be checked in real time by flight controllers and researchers on the ground and then fed back to the onboard crew. The Int-Ball was manufactured entirely by 3D printing, and it uses existing drone technology.
Siberia: Medieval Mummies From Mystery Arctic Civilization Discovered in Zelenyy Yar Necropolis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Two medieval mummies from a mystery Arctic civilization have been discovered at the edge of Siberia. The remains of an adult and baby were found in the Zelenyy Yar necropolis, an archaeological complex first discovered in 1997, and were covered in copper—with the adult having been plated from head to toe. Excavations at Zelenyy Yar ended last week, and over the course of this year’s expedition to the Arctic site, scientists found 10 graves.
Are Socialists Physically Weak?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A couple weeks ago, a study bubbled up through the muck of the The Red Pill subreddit: “Physically Weak Men More Likely to be Socialists (Unless They’re Poor),” the Redditor posted, next to a tag that says “Science” and, for good measure, a picture of an atom.