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This Super Cute Father's Day Google Doodle Will Make You Nostalgic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You can submit your own sketch for a Father's Day Google Doodle
Stephen Hawking's Voice Was Beamed Into Black Hole
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In memorial to the renowned astrophysicist, a song featuring Hawking's voice got beamed into a black hole.
Turned away by 2 countries, rescued refugees end their odyssey in Spain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
More than 600 refugees who set out from Libya to reach Europe were turned away by Italy, in a sudden change of heart about accepting refugees, and denied entry to Malta. At last, Spain agreed to take them — but the politics of immigration in the European Union are only growing more complicated and fraught.
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
The Future Has Arrived: Vacation Aboard the International Space Station Launch in 2020
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With the launch of missions aboard the ISS and a Philippe Starck–designed floating hotel, Axiom Space is making your sci-fi dreams a reality.
NASA’s most experienced astronaut, Peggy Whitson, hangs up her space helmet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, who holds the U.S. record for most cumulative time in space, is retiring after 22 years in the astronaut corps and three tours of duty on the International Space Station. Whitson, 58, became the station’s first female commander in 2007, the first woman to head the Astronaut Office in 2009, and the oldest woman to fly in space in 2016. She also holds the record for most spacewalks by a woman (10). Her total in-space time of 665 days —  gained during space station stays in 2002, 2008 and 2016-2017 — puts her on top of… Read More
1 Dead, 22 Injured After Shooting at New Jersey Art Festival
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Seventeen of the 20 people injured were treated for gunshot wounds
Bumblebee blues: Pacific Northwest pollinator in trouble
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Hundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northeast seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species.
17 Dead After Brawl Sparks Stampede at Graduation Party in Venezuela
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"All I know is my son is dead"
Dogs Might Have the Secret to Losing Weight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Like humans, some dogs are more prone to obesity than humans. A new study on dog behavior may help us better understand how human personalities affect obesity. Scientists in Budapest, Hungary asked volunteers to bring in their pet dogs, which the scientists would separate into groups based on whether they were average weight or obese.
Trump defends North Korea summit, trashes media: 'We got so much for peace in the world'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sunday morning, President Trump repeatedly defended the North Korea summit and accused the press of not giving him the credit he deserves for trying to bring more stability to the Korean peninsula.
Rescue ship Aquarius docks in Valencia after weeklong odyssey at sea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A ship carrying some of the approximately 630 migrants who were recently rescued off Libya and then denied entry by Italy and Malta has reached a Spanish port. Yahoo News has photos of the ship’s arrival.
Rudy Giuliani wants Mueller's 'almost illegal and unethical probe' to be investigated
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rudy Giuliani called for an investigation into Robert Mueller’s probe into Russian interference with the 2016 U.S. elections and potential links between Donald Trump’s campaign and Moscow.
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
This Futuristic Startup Raised $40 Million to Fling Heavy Objects Into Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Without using propellants like kerosene and liquid oxygen.
Virgin Galactic Gets Closer to Offering Space Tours
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sir Richard Branson disrupted the air-travel industry with Virgin America. Now he's setting his sights even higher.
Space Is Truly the Final Frontier (For the Next Great War)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The weaponization of space is inevitable, but there’s still time to make it as peaceful as possible. Chow is formerly a senior physical scientist for twenty-five years at the RAND Corporation and described the inevitability of space weaponization in his article “Space Arms Control: A Hybrid Approach." He argues that this will be the result of spacecraft that can remove debris and service existing satellites.
Ultimate outdoor Father's Day gifts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Adam Housley showcases the ultimate outdoor gifts for Dads this Father's Day including the Trek Super Commuter+ 8S Electric Bike, Ukeg 128 Stainless Steel Growler, Canon M50 DSLR Camera and The Otto Grill.
The U.K. Wanted to Ban Taking Photos Up Women's Skirts. One Lawmaker Shut It Down
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An attempt to make upskirting a criminal offense in the United Kingdom has been blocked by a Conservative party lawmaker.
The Opportunity rover has survived Martian hell for 15 years. Here's how.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A dust storm the size of North America has smothered NASA's Opportunity rover for the past week, shrouding much of the red planet in darkness and depriving the robot's solar panels of light.  Opportunity's battery power has dropped so low that it's now in a sleep mode and unable to send information back to Earth. "It's gotten so bad she's not talking to us," Bill Nelson, chief of the Opportunity mission's engineering team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, said in an interview.  SEE ALSO: The Opportunity rover is caught in a huge dust storm on Mars, but NASA remains hopeful "It’s a bit scary — we like to hear from our rover." On June 8, NASA announced that "perpetual night" had settled over Opportunity, which has been exploring Martian terrain since 2004. NASA, like its 400-pound rover, must wait it out, wondering if the battery will power up when the storm passes. An artist's conception of the Opportunity rover on Mars.Image: nasa"If they go completely dead, you're usually in trouble," said Nelson. But Opportunity's engineers, many of whom have spent over a decade shepherding the machine through its life on Mars, recognize it's a tough, expertly-built robot, that is apparently hard to kill. After all, it was only expected to live for 90 days. Now, it's lived for more than 5,100. "I’m fairly optimistic at this point," said Nelson. "I’m hopeful that we may be able to recover." Conquering the red dust NASA scientists may have grossly underestimated Opportunity's lifespan, but it's not because they thought the extreme cold would kill it, or that the six-wheeled rover would drive into a steep ditch.  The Curiosity rover, on another part of the planet, captured these two images of the dust storm.Image: nasaRather, they expected typical Martian dust to layer upon the solar panels, eventually starving Opportunity of light and power.   "We thought the dust would obscure the arrays enough that the rover would die," said Nelson. But, the rate of dust turned out to be significantly less, said Nelson. And, critically, the Martian wind has helped out quite a bit.  "We’ve been lucky that winds or dust devils have come and blown off the arrays," said Nelson. "The wind blows off the bulk of the dust." And, Opportunity has unwittingly evaded sprawling, red tempests. "We’ve been fairly fortunate in missing the regional and global dust storms," said Nelson. Opportunity vs Spirit Opportunity's sister rover, Spirit, stopped functioning in 2010. The robot was nearly identical to Opportunity. But why did it die, at least 8 years sooner?  A shade simulation of dust blocking out the Martian sun. Opportunity has been experiencing the far right conditions.Image: nasa"There's some luck involved in these things," said Nelson. And sometimes, the luck is bad.  In 2010, Spirit got caught in a less-than-ideal place on the red planet. Winter was coming, and the rover became embedded at an angle that wasn't receiving much sun.  In short, the arrays weren't generating much energy. NASA engineers, including Nelson, were incrementally backing the rover out, to an angle where the sun would power the rover. "But we simply ran out of time," said Nelson. Eventually, there just wasn't enough energy to drive Spirit's motors.  "She simply froze to death." A super robust machine NASA put an incredible amount of effort into building Opportunity — and Spirit, too. "We’ve had more than 2,000 people at a time working on the design of these rovers," said Nelson. "That's a lot of brainpower." "We have done everything humanly possible to make Opportunity as robust and perfect as possible," he added. "And that’s why they lasted so long." Opportunity takes a picture of its shadow in 2014.Image: nasaSpecifically, Nelson cited the machine's motors, which turn a number of different things, like its wheels and the mast camera that's lofted high above the rover.  "The motors are stressed the most," said Nelson. "If we couldn’t rove, it wouldn’t be much of a project anymore." The mast camera has made over 103 million revolutions. And the motors that turn the wheels are nearing the 100 million milestone, with one of the front wheel motors having revolved some 93 million times.  Nearly everywhere on Mars is rough and rocky. But the rover, and its many motors, hasn't had to traverse too much excessively challenging terrain, like a bunch of large rocks. "We built these rovers to protect against all sorts of risks — but most risks never came to pass," said Nelson. The first near-death experience, 15 years ago Opportunity may have now lived well over 5,000 Martian days — called "sols" — on the frigid desert planet, but it's lucky it didn't crash into the surface during landing, becoming a crumpled mass of wires and metal.  Opportunity's dust-covered solar panels in 2014.Image: nasaThe rover launched to Mars in 2003, and that same year a huge dust storm hit the world, covering one-fourth of the planet. The dusty atmosphere could have been bad news for Opportunity's landing. As the rover descended through the Martian sky, it needed to deploy its its parachutes at just the right time. However, because of the dust storm, the atmosphere retained more heat, enlarging it and making it unclear exactly when the chutes should deploy. If the parachutes opened too early, the spacecraft could be moving much to fast, shredding the parachute. "There was a lot of concern that things might not go right and we might destroy the parachute," said Nelson. Opportunity looks back and takes a picture of its tracks in 2010.Image: nasaWorse yet, NASA wouldn't receive the rover's distant signals — or perhaps any signal at all — until after the landing because of the time it takes for a signal to travel between Mars and Earth. "The mission was either made or destroyed before we heard the first word of it hitting the atmosphere," said Nelson. "That was scary. The sense of tension was palpable. People were on pins and needles." Yet Opportunity survived, and in the 15 years since, it has continued surviving. And now, it's part of NASA's family. "The rover isn’t just some hunk of metal on a distant planet," said Nelson.  "It’s like a family member. We don’t talk about it — we talk about her." WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
Is There a Postcredits Scene in Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Warning: Spoilers for Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom ahead! The second installment of the Jurassic World trilogy has finally arrived, and it's wild.
'Worst Devastation I've Seen.' Angelina Jolie Visits Mosul a Year After Liberation From ISIS
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The trauma and the loss that they've suffered is unparalleled"
Hey, kids: Put a rocket in space and win a million dollars in Base 11 Space Challenge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
News Brief: Students from colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada are being recruited for the Base 11 Space Challenge, a $1 million competition to encourage the development of a liquid-fueled, single-stage rocket powerful enough to reach 100 kilometers (62 miles) in altitude. That height marks the internationally accepted boundary of space. Deadline for winning the $1 million grand prize is Dec. 30, 2021, and there’ll be smaller incentive prizes awarded along the way. The program aims to boost participation by women and minorities in aerospace. For details and instructions on how to enter, check out the Space Challenge… Read More
Mount Everest, the high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Decades of commercial mountaineering have turned Mount Everest into the world's highest rubbish dump as an increasing number of big-spending climbers pay little attention to the ugly footprint they leave behind. "It is disgusting, an eyesore," Pemba Dorje Sherpa, who has summited Everest 18 times, told AFP. As the number of climbers on the mountain has soared -- at least 600 people have scaled the world's highest peak so far this year alone -- the problem has worsened.
Stephen Hawking's ashes buried at Westminster Abbey
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stephen Hawking, a giant of science and celebrated British physicist who died in March, was honored Friday before more than 1,000 people at London’s Westminster Abbey, where his ashes were buried. Hawking, who died at 76 after a lifelong battle against terminal motor neuron disease, was a groundbreaking physicist and mathematician. Studying at Oxford and Cambridge University, he was diagnosed with the debilitating illness at age 21.
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
Melons Are Being Recalled Over Salmonella Fears in More Than 20 States
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Salmonella symptoms include fever, diarrhea and abdominal cramps
Hawking's voice beamed into space during London burial
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A message from late British astrophysics giant Stephen Hawking was beamed towards the nearest black hole on Friday as his remains were laid to rest in London's Westminster Abbey. With celebrities and science enthusiasts from around the world in attendance, the ashes of the theoretical physicist were interred by the graves of fellow science greats Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin. A specially-written musical piece by Greek composer Vangelis featuring Hawking's famous synthesised voice was beamed into space by radio waves from a European Space Agency satellite dish in Spain.
Our Brains Have Evolved to Want High
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When we are faced with foods both high in fat and carbohydrates, like many processed foods are, the part of the brain in charge of processing reward is kicked into a higher gear when compared with foods high in one or the other, according to a team of researchers in the U.S., Germany, Switzerland, and Canada. When humans were hunter-gatherers, we mainly ate plants and animal meat and rarely encountered foods high in fat and carbohydrates, the authors of the study noted.
The Next Stage In Perovskite Solar Development
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Perovskite photovoltaic cells have long been promoted as a potential game changer in renewable technology, but until now, stability and toxicity issues slowed its adoption process
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
Machine Learning Can Solve Rubik's Cubes Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Are you just gonna like a robot show you up like that?
New Heavily
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers discovered the remains of a new species of dinosaur, which lived 85 million years ago in what is now Mexico’s Coahuila state. A team of paleontologists from the Desert Museum in Coahuila found the dinosaur—which has been named Acantholipan gonzalezi—in the arid Ocampo region, Reuters reported. The team has been analyzing the fossil for more than eight years and have now revealed that it represents a new genus, or group of species, of nodosauridae—a family of heavily armed dinosaurs, which roamed the Earth between the Late Jurassic period (roughly 163 to 145 million years ago) to the Late Cretaceous (around 100 to 66 million years ago).
What is 3D printing? Here’s everything you need to know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What is 3D printing? This fast, efficient object printing process has become a core part of multiple industries, and plenty of at-home hobbies. But what exactly is it, and how does it work? We're going to go over what 3D printing is, the different types of 3D printing, and the incredible ways that this printing […]
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
Airlines test Nextgen technology to reduce flight delays
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Airlines test Nextgen technology to cut down on flight delays nationwide.
Japan suspends sale of Canadian wheat after GMO wheat found in Alberta
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Japanese farm ministry said on Friday it has suspended its tender and sale of wheat from Canada after grain containing a genetically modified trait was discovered last summer in Canada's Alberta province. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) said on Thursday the wheat containing a genetically modified trait, developed by Monsanto Co (BAYGn.DE) to tolerate the Roundup weed-killer, was discovered in Alberta. "We are suspending the tender and sale of Canadian wheat until we confirm that the Canadian wheat that Japan buys contains no GMO," an official at the Japanese farm ministry said.
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
Patient Rule
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He's a good boy
NIH ends alcohol study, citing funding, credibility problems
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government is shutting down a study that was supposed to show if a single drink a day could prevent heart attacks, saying ethical problems with how the research was planned and funded undermine its credibility.
Google's new principles on AI need to be better at protecting human rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
AI has caused a "techlash" against Google. These principles are first step, but more needs to be done.
Investigators say DNA database can be goldmine for old cases
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A microscopic thread of DNA evidence in a public genealogy database led California authorities to declare this spring they had caught the Golden State Killer, the rapist and murderer who had eluded authorities for decades.
The Story Of Orra White Hitchcock And The Women Whose Modesty Hides Their Talent
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Mrs. Hitchcock has been steadily at work for thirty-six years, whenever
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
This Natalie Portman–Backed Documentary Will Make You Seriously Consider Going Vegetarian
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Narrated by Natalie Portman, the film dives into the best and worst of raising animals for food. Expect to rethink your lunch.
Scientists: This Cell Part Could Be Key to Stopping the Spread of Alzheimer’s Disease
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists believe that buildup of a brain protein called amyloid beta is the root of Alzheimer’s disease, but exactly how this disease spreads throughout the brain remains unclear. Now, new research believes it may have found the answer, suggesting that a cell previously thought to play a role in waste removal is actually the key to the spread of Alzheimer’s in the brain. The study, published online in Acta Neuropathologica, used brain samples from deceased patients with Alzheimer’s disease and control patients who died with a healthy brain.
Nearly 2,000 Children Have Been Separated From Their Families During Trump Border Crackdown
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump's policy, which results in family separation, sparked outrage this week
The most dangerous and misunderstood threat to humanity is the human mind
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The defining characteristic of humans is our capacity for complex thinking and advanced reasoning. These abilities have allowed us to develop innovations that transform our lives and our world. The impact of our intellect is so significant that the present era has been called the “Anthropocene,” in recognition of the extent to which this epoch…
Antarctica Is Thawing Faster, Tripling Its Effect on Rising Seas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Antarctica's annual ice loss has tripled since 2012, according to satellite data from @NASA and @esa https://bit.ly/2JMh9fF #tictocnews (Source: Bloomberg)