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President Trump Calls Omarosa 'That Dog' As He Denies Using the N
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The attack will complicate his efforts to deny using racist language
Red Tide Is Killing Marine Life and Scaring Away Tourists in Florida. Here's What to Know About It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency
Canada's westernmost province declares wildfires emergency
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
British Columbia declared a province-wide state of emergency Wednesday as Canada's military joined firefighters in trying to douse 556 wildfires burning across the craggy region. The province's public safety minister, Mike Farnworth, said the measure -- which allows for officials to take "every action necessary" to protect the public -- would be in effect for 14 days. "Public safety is always our first priority and, as wildfire activity is expected to increase, this is a progressive step in our wildfire response to make sure British Columbia has access to any and all resources necessary," Farnworth said in a statement.
Scientists from Latin America to diffuse advances in neurosciences
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico, Aug. 15 (Notimex).- With the participation of scientists from Brazil, Uruguay, Chile, Argentina and Mexico, the symposium "The challenge of neurosciences in Latin America" ​​will be held, with the purpose of disseminating the advances that  the research has had in this area. The event is organized by the Center for Research and Advanced Studies (Cinvestav, for its acronym in Spanish) and the Latin American Regional Committee of the International Brain Research Organization (IBRO-LARC). In a statement, the Cinvestav reported that this meeting aims to "analyze the understanding gap between society and governments with neuroscientists, as well as the relevance of their research mainly in countries with emerging economies." The meeting will be held next Friday, August 17, and the general public can attend with previous registration on the website https://desafioneurocienciaslatinoamerica.eventbrite.com.ar Luisa Rocha Arrieta, researcher at the Department of Pharmacobiology of the center, explained that this meeting will expose the need to project their research to solve health problems, as well as to discuss the distance between the neurosciences, governments and supports designated to science. The event is divided into two sessions, the first of them will address the importance of basic science in solving health problems. They will present cutting-edge topics such as the use of stem cells for the repair of the nervous system, or the effective use of new drugs for diseases such as Parkinson, among others. The second session will focus on the importance of science policy and neurosciences in Latin America. "What we consider to be a point in common throughout Latin America, is the need to educate politicians and the population in general, since we believe that as the relevance of doing studies in neurosciences becomes known and disseminated, it will be understood why a drug study can save or improve the quality of a patient´s life,” said the Cinvestav specialist through a statement from the institution. She explained that at a Latin American level, Uruguay may be one of the most advanced countries in this area "for example, they have studies on how to apply marihuana derivatives in different disorders, the government's support is reflected in the quality of their research. NTX/MSG/BBF
Program aims to help young scientists conduct experiments in space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Many children grow up wanting to be astronauts — but without encouragement or
Scientists Predict 'Anomalously Warm' Climate Until 2022
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Forget about cooling down -- according to a new scientific forecast, the
Trump revokes security clearance of former CIA director who has criticized the White House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
White House press secretary Sarah Sanders began her briefing on Wednesday by reading a statement from President Trump announcing his decision to revoke the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan, a prominent critic of the current administration. The statement went on to list other current and former officials whose clearances would be under review.
Wisconsin flipped for Trump. Minnesota nearly did. What do their primaries predict for the midterms?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Everything you need to know this week about Election 2018
Unfiltered: ‘We ruin the lives of a******s, psychos, pervs, and trolls’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In Carrie Goldberg’s career as a victims’ rights lawyer, she goes after four different kinds of offenders: “A******s, psychos, pervs and trolls.” An accomplished attorney who has most recently won a $950,000 sexual assault case involving a teen girl in Brooklyn and is currently representing one of the plaintiffs in the Harvey Weinstein case, Goldberg and her firm specialize in sexual assault and sexual privacy violations, including revenge porn, sextortion and other forms of online abuse. Defined as the distribution of sexually explicit images of a person without that person’s consent, revenge porn is a form of abuse that affects approximately 1 in 8 adults — most of them women. Sextortion takes it one step further: “[It’s] when somebody is being blackmailed, and usually their intimate images or videos are used as leverage to get somebody to do more things,” said Goldberg.
In Brazil's poorest state, flood of Venezuelans tests limits of compassion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It’s an increasingly common sight in Roraima, Brazil’s poorest and smallest state, which is situated in the Amazon and shares a border with Venezuela. As humanitarian, economic, and political crises have intensified across their country, tens of thousands of Venezuelans have crossed into Brazil seeking medical attention, food, and opportunity. “Things in Venezuela have changed,” says Jesús Quispe, a former member of Venezuela’s armed forces, as he lines up for the bare-bones breakfast.
What price loyalty? How cast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
What's the difference between Omarosa Manigault Newman and Corey Lewandowski? Loyalty to the boss – Donald Trump – who hired and fired you.
President Trump Dares New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to Run Against Him in 2020
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump dared New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to challenge him in 2020, warning, "Anybody that runs against Trump suffers"
Turkey Escalates Feud With U.S. By Increasing Tariffs on American Imports
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The products include rice, cars, alcohol and coal
China’s Top Buddhist Monk Has Resigned Amid Sexual Harassment Allegations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Shi Xuecheng was under investigation for alleged sexual harassment of six female monks
Charles Darwin's theory of evolution owes more to his garden than the Galápagos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Was Darwin inspired by the tropical wildlife of his travels to discover natural selection? Actually, pigeons, worms and barnacles were far more prominent in his thinking.
The world’s first practical quantum computer has cash and a timeline
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The dream of building a practical quantum computer could be closer than ever, thanks to a $15 million grant from the National Science Foundation to seven universities around the United States.
Stonehenge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Are flying saucers really using it as a runway?
The Viral New 'Matilda Challenge' Has People Mastering Objects With Their Mind Powers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Unleash your inner psychic abilities
Flood toll in India's tourist hotspot Kerala jumps to 67
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The flood toll in India's southern tourist hotspot of Kerala jumped to 67 after another 25 deaths were reported Wednesday, with more than 50,000 people seeking shelter in relief camps, a state official told AFP. The situation is bad in many parts of the state and the number (of deaths) will likely increase," a senior official from the Kerala State Disaster Management Authority told AFP. Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan's office announced on Twitter that Kochi International Airport -- the main gateway to the region -- would be closed until Saturday "due to heavy rains and resultant flooding".
Survivor of newly found WWII shipwreck: 'So many' to rescue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Daryl Weathers remembers trying to pull men from the sea off Alaska's Aleutian Islands after a U.S. Navy destroyer hit a mine left by the Japanese following the only World War II battle fought on North American soil.
After firefighting rips up the land, crews move in to fix it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LAKEPORT, Calif. (AP) — Jack Hattendorf steers his road grader back and forth across a dirt path cutting through blackened earth.
Dozens of Troops Killed by Taliban Attacks on Checkpoints in Afghanistan, Officials Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The assault followed a massive insurgent attack last week
One city’s crime fighting quandary: where exactly to invest?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Lonnie McClain was playing video games inside his house on Chicago’s West Side one afternoon this May, when two white police officers came up on his porch. Chicago has been in the national spotlight in recent years for its high-profile police shootings of black residents, including Laquan, as well as its struggles with gun violence.
Monitor grapples with gender balance in sourcing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Journalism is built on sources. Reporters count on experts and ordinary citizens to bring nuance and humanity to news events. The sources that reporters select shape the tone and direction of a story.
Onetime Teen Mom Who Became a Celebrated Teacher Wins Democratic House Primary
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jahana Hayes could be the first black woman to win a CT congressional seat
Half of Republicans Believe the Media Is the Enemy of the People: Poll
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
65% of those polled said they believe the news media is "an important part of democracy"
Groups calls for Facebook to be broken up
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A group calling itself Freedom from Facebook slammed the social media giant in a complaint to the Federal Trade Commission. It slams Facebook's privacy policies and suggests remedies to combat what they call Facebook’s ‘monopoly.’
Just Who Is Andy Chan, the Leader of Hong Kong's Independence Movement?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The head of the Hong Kong National Party has infuriated Beijing with his calls for independence, but is curiously short on specifics
Genoa bridge collapse: maintaining these structures is a constant battle against traffic and decay
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bridge engineering does not end when construction finishes and traffic starts to flow.
At Least 30 Killed in Taliban Fire Attack in Afghanistan, Officials Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The attack comes amid days-long insurgent violence
Firefighting mars the earth. California crews are fixing it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LAKEPORT, Calif. (AP) — Jack Hattendorf steers his road grader back and forth across a dirt path cutting through blackened earth.
Can Manafort's team make a killer close?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It has been difficult to discern the defense’s theory of Paul Manafort’s case, but a member of the special counsel’s team has a concise assessment of the defense’s approach, at least when it comes to cross-examination. “We like clarity,” he observed. “They like confusion.”
Scorching weather helps uncover archeological sites around Britain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Britain's hottest summer in decades has revealed cropmarks across the country showing the sites of Iron Age settlements, Roman farms and even Neolithic monuments dating back thousands of years, archaeologists said on Wednesday. Archaeologists at the public body Historic England have been making the most of the hot weather to look for patterns revealing the ancient sites buried below, from Yorkshire in the north down to Cornwall in the southwest. "We've discovered hundreds of new sites this year spanning about 6,000 years of England's history," said Damian Grady, aerial reconnaissance manager at Historic England.
A cold
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In quiet ceremonies next week, the people in the Czech capital of Prague will commemorate the 50th anniversary of an event that still reverberates across much of Europe. On the night of Aug. 20, 1968, the tanks and troops of the Soviet empire rolled into the city to end what was called the Prague Spring. In the months before the Moscow-led invasion, the head of then-Czechoslovakia, Alexander Dubček, had reversed some basic elements of Soviet ideology by reducing state control of industry and embracing the dignity of individuals in choosing their own form of government.
Missouri Crash Survivor Calls for Ban on Duck Boats
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tia Coleman's husband and three children died in the tragedy
Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer Concedes GOP Primary to Secretary of State Kris Kobach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kobach will face Democrat Laura Kelly in the November general election
Great White Shark's Seal Hunt Makes for Dramatic Scene Off Cape Cod
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A great white shark’s predation of a seal was recorded off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, by the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy on August 2.This footage shows multiple angles of the attack, as well as a clip of the shark swimming underwater with a part of the seal in its mouth. Credit: Atlantic White Shark Conservancy via Storyful
Red Tide Is Killing Marine Life and Scaring Away Tourists in Florida. Here's What to Know About It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tourists and residents alike have been chased away from Florida’s famous beaches by an ominous-sounding ecological occurrence: red tide.
Alert level raised for tiny volcanic isle in southern Japan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TOKYO (AP) — Japan raised alert levels on a small southern volcanic island on Wednesday, urging its 105 residents to prepare for an evacuation amid growing risks of an eruption.
Germany confirms aid for animal feed after drought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Germany has confirmed it will relax some environmental conservation rules to help farmers overcome a sharp rise in animal feed prices after this summer's drought, the agriculture minister said on Wednesday. Agriculture Minister Julia Kloeckner also said she would await official crop figures before deciding on a response to calls for 1 billion euros ($1.13 billion) in crisis state aid requested by German farmers. Kloeckner, a senior member of Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservatives, added she would make a decision about state aid next week when the cabinet is expected to approve the annual harvest report on Aug 22.
Impeached West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Retires so Voters Can Choose Her Replacement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The House of Delegates voted to impeach all four justices
A dead baby orca and the intense grief of animals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For 17 days, the killer whale Tahlequah kept her decomposing calf afloat in ocean waters north of Seattle. Sometimes, the lifeless calf would sink, and Tahlequah would dive down and push it back up to the surface. But after 400 hours of this trying effort, Tahlequah apparently accepted fate on August 11, and let her deceased young fall to the depths of the Salish Sea. This grim event has been widely viewed as a show of intense grieving for the loss of a young calf, perpetuating an unsettling trend for these troubled animals. The endangered whale population here, facing a plummeting salmon supply, are in a bad place: A calf has not survived in three years. Although we can’t commune with animals, it seems there’s little doubt Tahlequah, also known as J35, was exhibiting grief, an emotion increasingly recognized in animals, from cattle to elephants.  SEE ALSO: Iceland gets away with killing dozens of huge, endangered whales. Here's why. “There seems like there’s a refusal to accept the death,” Preston Foerder, who researches animal cognition and behavior at the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, said of Tahlequah’s behavior. “If we were to see similar behavior in humans, we would call it grief,” Foerder said. This is little surprise to many researchers who spend time around killer whales. The mammals have been observed living socially complex lives, largely made possible by their advanced brains.  “It screams intelligence,” Lori Marino, a neuroscientist who has been studying the minds of cetaceans for over two decades, said in an interview. “They are impressive brains.” Killer whales have an “elaborate structure” in their brains, known as the paralimbic lobe, that bridges the emotional part of their minds to their decision making, said Marino. “You’re not surprised at the depth of what they feel,” said Marino, who is now the president of the Whale Sanctuary Project, which aims to build a marine home for captive whales. Yet, one doesn’t need an advanced mind to experience grief.  “We’re interested in studying what big-brained animals do, but when it comes to farmed animals, we don’t really want to know,” Barbara King, an emeritus professor of anthropology at the College of William and Mary, said in an interview. The larger environmental question reflected in the J35 story is that both the USA and Canada MUST redouble efforts to restore wild salmon (particularly Chinook) throughout Washington State and British Columbia for a food supply for the SRKW in this region. - Ken Balcomb pic.twitter.com/mqQy83KxSe — Whale Research (@CWROrcas) July 27, 2018 King has watched dairy cows, with their young taken from them, mourn their losses and attempt to seek out their young, in vain. “The mother clearly, clearly grieves,” said King, who authored the book How Animals Grieve. Javelinas — hairy hog-like animals in U.S. deserts — have been spotted sleeping next to the bodies of their dead.  A marmoset monkey in the Amazon was observed  attending to a mortally injured mate after the animal fell from a tree and cracked its skull on the ground, said King. And Japanese macaques carry around their infant dead as the bodies decompose. “They [monkeys] won’t give up on it [the infant] till it’s fallen apart,” said Foerder. But the endangered killer whales in these waters off of Vancouver Island, known collectively as the Southern Resident killer whale population (SRKW), may have an even more compounded pain. The whales have been in decline for decades, largely because the nutritious salmon the toothed-cetaceans rely on have been overfished. The Salish Sea, north of Seattle, Washington encompasses the waterways and straits around Vancouver Island.Image: nasa earth observatoryAnd these whales aren’t exactly spitting out offspring even in the best conditions.  It takes 10 years or longer for a female to become sexually mature, and then it takes 15 to 18 months for a female to give birth to a single calf, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “The loss of a single whale is huge in the life history of these animals,” Marc Bekoff, professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado, said in an interview. It appears other killer whales, aside from the grieving mother, may have acknowledged this reality as well.  According to The Center for Whale Research, the organization that has been monitoring these whales for decades, the killer whales performed a ritual-like gathering in a circle on July 24, after the calf died. There have also been unconfirmed reports, noted Bekoff and King, that other whales helped keep the dead calf afloat during the 17-day period. If so, this group grieving may serve a greater purpose. “Grieving brings surviving members of a group together,” said Bekoff. “It’s like a wake.” “It’s possible that the group grieving is a way for them to say, ‘Everything is okay – the group is still here,'” he said. Javilinas in southwest Texas.Image: Shutterstock / Dennis W DonohueIt’s also possible that Tahlequah’s behavior was influenced more by evolutionary pressures, than by grieving itself. “In terms of evolution, all behaviors should have some sort of purpose,” said Foerder, noting that Tahlequah could have been repeatedly pushing the calf up to breath, until it eventually became overwhelmingly apparent the calf was dead. “Is she grieving, or just continuing to keep it alive?” asked Foerder. “It’s hard to nail down.” Still, King said there's little doubt this was extreme grieving behavior, as Tahlequah’s behavior altered dramatically after her calf perished.  "I would never claim to know what an animal thinks or feels," said King. "The animals themselves are physically expressing this behavior." WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?
U.N. Spokesperson Says More Than 100 Civilians Killed In fighting Between Afghan forces and The Taliban
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.N. Spokesperson Says More Than 100 Civilians Killed In fighting Between Afghan forces and The Taliban
The Death Toll From Italy's Genoa Bridge Collapse Has Risen to 39
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Many in the city had said the 1967 bridge needed shoring up
ASPCA says more than 600 birds removed from home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals says more than 600 birds were removed from a house in central Ohio after reports of animal neglect and a complaint from the public about living conditions.
Sen. Bernie Sanders Wins Vermont Democratic Primary, but Is Expected to Turn It Down
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Under Vermont law he cannot appear on the November ballot as both a Democrat and an independent
Darwin's theory of evolution owes more to his garden than the Galápagos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Was Darwin inspired by the tropical wildlife of his travels to discover natural selection? Actually, pigeons, worms and barnacles were far more prominent in his thinking.
Facebook is ‘a surveillance system,’ sci
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The novelist reflects on the way that the social media platform spies on its customers.
How to be a philanthropist while you’re on the job
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
This column is part of an occasional series about how you, too, can make a difference. It is written by the head of our partner organization UniversalGiving, which helps people give and volunteer in more than 100 countries.
Omarosa's Tapes Show an Ongoing Problem With White House Security
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump has regularly fallen short of stringent national security rules typically followed in the White House.