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Who's the greatest leader in the world? Chicago Cubs's Theo Epstein
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For readers who don’t follow the Sox or the Cubs – which both recently claimed their first World Series wins in living memory under Mr. Epstein’s watch – Fortune’s decision will likely come as a surprise.
Responsible fatherhood: He’s been a key voice in the national conversation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
While the certificate represents the end of a 17-year drug addiction marked by countless court appearances and several stints behind bars, it is also emblematic of the type of progress and improvement that he works to bring out in others who live in Baltimore. Jones is founder and president of the Center for Urban Families (CFUF), established in 1999 with the objective of empowering low-income families through programs designed to help wage earners contribute to their families and to help men fulfill their roles as fathers. There are dozens of outstanding warrants, high rates of reentry among those released from correctional facilities, and a tally of more than $26 million in collective child-support arrears, he notes.
Delay on GOP health care vote: Bill 'too conservative' and 'not conservative enough'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
House Speaker Paul Ryan thought he had found the “sweet spot” in the Republican health care plan – a bill that would appeal to both GOP conservatives and moderates. Despite intense coordination with the White House and the president’s personal involvement on the GOP bill to repeal and replace Obamacare, the speaker was forced to delay the bill for lack of Republican votes. If Speaker Ryan is unable to forge a compromise that will bring him to victory, it will be a huge blow to the Republican agenda, to his speakership, and to President Trump.
Help North Koreans ‘live in the truth’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
North Korea tested its first nuclear device in 2006 and may soon test a missile capable of reaching an American city with such a weapon. The US and its allies remain frustrated that their main option, a tightening of economic sanctions, has not curbed the North’s nuclear threat. The regime may be worried that the North Korean people, despite living under tight censorship, are learning that the world is standing up for their human rights.
15 under 15: Rising stars in cybersecurity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Everything in their lives is captured in silicon chips and chronicled on Facebook. Turns out, CyFi had unearthed a new class of previously undisclosed security weaknesses, otherwise known as zero days, spanning across all mobile devices.
From caricature to man of character: How time and art change image of Bush
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Last July, when former President George W. Bush began to smile and sway to “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” holding hands with both his wife and former first lady Michelle Obama during the closing moments of a memorial service for five Dallas police officers, many of his long-time detractors could only look and mock. On traditional and social media, Mr. Bush, making a rare public appearance at the time, was once again the president of the malaprop, seemingly lacking in seriousness and curiosity, the smirking architect of a disastrous and unnecessary war.
20 Must
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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23 Summer Hairstyles We're Completely In Love With
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Here's Why Chrissy Metz Doesn't Want Her 'This Is Us' Character's Weight Loss to Be So Easy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"I kind of don't want her to figure it out right away."
This 1 Number Could Reveal Whether You'll Gain Excessive Weight During Pregnancy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Spoiler alert: It has to do with your youth.
Every Little Girl Is Going to Want to Wear These 'Girl Power' Tees From Children's Place
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
And they're very affordable.
5 Health Risks of Breast Implants
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Getting breast implants doesn't come without health risks. From infections to more serious conditions, watch the video to learn about the complications that can result from breast augmentation.
Koalas don't like water but they're being 'driven to drink' by climate change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Koalas have what some would consider the dream life: Eating and sleeping all day. When they're awake they eat leaves, which is their complete source of nourishment. But fun fact: Koalas don't drink water. At least, they didn't used to, except in extreme cases. But thanks to climate change, our marsupial friends are being driven to drink more water than ever before. Their leaves are simply drying up. SEE ALSO: Being cheeky is infectious for these parrots That's a phenomenon that's led researchers at the University of Sydney in Australia to conduct a long-term study on the impact of water on koala populations, and its potential benefits. It's even seen them set up special "drinking stations" just for koalas. "Increasing hot and dry conditions will mean more droughts and heat waves affecting the koalas’ habitat," Dr Valentina Mella, a postdoctoral researcher, said in a statement. "It is believed that koalas are particularly vulnerable to climate change because they rely exclusively on trees — not only to sleep on but also for eating, which together comprise of the bulk of their activities." Koalas have been very thirsty especially in Gunnedah — the self-proclaimed "koala capital of the world" — where their population was reduced by 25 per cent during a heat wave in 2009.  In the study, the Gunnedah koalas were observed via hidden surveillance cameras drinking from the artificial stations day and night, consuming around 10 minutes worth at a time, even during the winter months. Image: university of sydney Semi-retired local farmer Robert Frend designed the water stations to aid researchers. They're nicknamed the "Blinky Drinker," in a nod to the cartoon koala, Blinky Bill. "I'd always believed that koalas get all their moisture from the leaves," Frend told Reuters.  "I mean, they have been living here since the 1970's without any water supplementation. There might have been the odd dam around about but to see them in this area where there just isn't any water was certainly a shock and an eye-opener." Koalas are listed as vulnerable around the country due to declining populations from loss of habitat, disease, dog attacks and vehicle collisions.  The study could help to challenge the belief that koalas don't need water — results are already showing they can benefit from water supplementation. The researchers say a previous study showed koalas will often reject leaves with less than 55 to 65 percent water content. "This is a perfect example of how the understanding of animal behaviour can be applied to solve pressing problems," Mella said. "We hope to use our findings to create a practical plan to manage Australia's rural lands for this iconic species." WATCH: Robotic glove lets people with limited hand mobility perform daily tasks
US Navy reviving ramjet missile technology using cheaper model rocket parts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The US Navy has decided to revisit decades-old ramjet engine technology and has succeeded in building a working rocket engine out of affordable model rocket parts. Engineers at the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) in China Lake, California, were challenged to build, design and fly a ramjet missile engine in just six months – what seemed to be an impossible demand, considering that it can take up to two decades to build a new fighter jet. The theory surrounding ramjet engines was first developed in France, Hungary, the Soviet Union and Germany in the early 1900s.
Our lungs play a previously unknown role in making blood
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The lungs are not just for respiration and could also play a crucial, and previously unrecognised role in blood production. The scientists who made this discovery have also identified a new pool of blood stem cells capable of restoring blood production when stem cells in the bone marrow are depleted. Platelets are cells that circulate in our blood and bind together at the site of an injury to stop us from bleeding.
How the Huns influenced Romans at the frontiers of the Empire 1,500 years ago
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In historical sources, mentions of the Huns often evoke scenes of terror and violence.
1 Habit That Can Completely Change Your Workday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A little mindfulness benefits your coworkers, too.
Salvage of South Korea's Sewol ferry: the facts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
South Korea's sunken Sewol ferry emerged from the waters on Thursday, nearly three years after it sank with the loss of more than 300 lives in one of the country's worst maritime disasters. Unfavourable conditions also played a role in a series of delays in the salvage operations, with an original deadline of July 2016 pushed back until now.
The ethics of research: how to end the exploitation of vulnerable communities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new code of conduct for researchers has been developed by the San peoples of southern Africa.
Excavations reveal 'Tomb of Christ' in Jerusalem is at risk of collapse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists say that there is a "very real risk" of collapse of the site thought to be the tomb of Jesus Christ at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem. "When it fails, the failure will not be a slow process, but catastrophic," Antonia Moropoulou of National Technical University of Athens, chief scientific supervisor of the excavations told National Geographic. The site has been undergoing restoration that started in 2016, first exposing the tomb in October.
Let there be light: German scientists test 'artificial sun'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists in Germany flipped the switch Thursday on what's being described as "the world's largest artificial sun," a device they hope will help shed light on new ways of making climate-friendly fuels
Intel chair Nunes admits mishandling Trump wiretap claim
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House intelligence committee chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., apologized to members of the panel today for his public claims about intelligence community surveillance of President Trump’s transition team amid charges from Democrats that his unilateral announcement on the White House lawn had “betrayed” the panel’s bipartisan investigation of Russian cyberattacks on the 2016 election. “At this point, the committee’s independence is on life support,” Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., told Yahoo News after a closed-door meeting of the committee Thursday. “Not since Sept. 11 has this committee been charged with such an important responsibility,” Swalwell added, referring to the panel’s Russia probe.
GOP Sen. Roberts: I ‘deeply regret’ quip about insurance coverage for mammograms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan., speaks at Secretary of Agriculture nominee Sonny Perdue’s confirmation hearing. Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., expressed remorse Thursday for making a sarcastic comment implying that coverage for mammograms shouldn’t be a requirement for the GOP’s insurance plan. Mammograms are essential to women’s health & I never intended to indicate otherwise,” he tweeted.
Trump supporter: My husband is being deported Friday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As a popular Indiana restaurant owner faces deportation under President Trump’s immigration directives, his family becomes the latest in a series of Trump supporters to find campaign promises affecting their lives. According to a report from Indiana Public Radio, Roberto Beristain’s family said he’s expected to be deported on Friday and has already been moved from the detention facility in Wisconsin where they had been visiting him. Beristain is the owner of Eddie’s Steak Shed in Granger, Ind., which he purchased from his sister-in-law earlier this month after eight years of working at the restaurant.
Spicer scolds wary GOP over ‘free votes’ to repeal Obamacare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Shortly before Republican leaders postponed a vote on repealing and replacing Obamacare, the White House on Thursday scolded Republicans who took “free votes” to roll back the law while Barack Obama was in office but balk at supporting President Trump’s health care plan. “You’ve taken a bunch of these free votes when it didn’t matter because you didn’t have a Republican president. “Well, this is a live ball now, and this is for real, and we’re going to do what we pledged to the American people and keep our word,” Spicer told reporters at his daily briefing.
Democrat Joe Manchin cautions against Gorsuch filibuster: ‘What goes around comes around’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., said Thursday that he would not join a Democratic filibuster of President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, arguing that the integrity of the Senate needs to be preserved. Manchin, a conservative Democrat and key vote, told Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric that Senate decorum needs to be preserved and that it started to fall apart in 2013 when then-Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid instituted the so-called nuclear option.
Rick Perry questions win of first openly gay student president at Texas A&M
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Earlier this month, Texas A&M student Bobby Brooks was elected student body president, making him the first openly gay student to hold the position. At a school that has historically been one of the most LGBT-unfriendly schools in the nation, Mr. Brooks’s election gave some a reason to celebrate. One of Brooks's rivals, Robert McIntosh, had the lead when the votes were first counted.
In Exxon climate change probe, how will the ‘lost emails’ be recovered?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A New York state judge has ordered ExxonMobil to work with state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman to recover lost emails, part of an ongoing climate change probe of the company. According to the attorney general, the account was actually an email alias for Rex Tillerson, then the chief executive of the corporation (Mr. Tillerson's middle name is Wayne). Currently, Tillerson is the US secretary of State, a fact which has raised the stakes of the investigation considerably.
London attack: how Europe has overcome terror campaigns before
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The attack outside the Houses of Parliament, which left four people dead and dozens injured, was the latest in a string of low-tech, high-profile terrorist incidents in Europe. Good police and intelligence work can head off such incidents and save lives, as Europe’s recent history has shown. The graver threat – that terrorist attacks undermine Western societies by spurring anti-Muslim hatred and divisions – is harder, though not impossible, to confront.
UN urges Sri Lanka to investigate civil war atrocities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Speaking to the UN Human Rights Council, Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, reported on the situation in Sri Lanka still dealing with the aftermath of a 26-year civil war that ended in 2009.
Martin McGuinness leaves behind a complicated legacy, uncertain future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Martin McGuinness, a former Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) leader and politician, will be laid to rest on Thursday in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Among them were many dignitaries, including former US President Bill Clinton. Recommended: Forget Irish cliches: How much do you really know about Ireland?
Why has Jackson, Miss., been labeled 'the fattest city' in the US?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
According to personal finance website WalletHub, Jackson, Miss., is the fattest city in America. WalletHub released its ranking of the 2017 Fattest Cities in America list on Wednesday. The list was based on analysis of the 100 most populous cities in the United States with regard to various weight-related factors to create the rankings.
Former Russian lawmaker and Moscow critic gunned down in Ukraine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A former member of the Russian Duma who had moved to Ukraine was shot and killed in Kiev on Thursday, sparking allegations that the murder was politically motivated. Denis Voronenkov was shot dead outside the upscale Premier Palace hotel in the Ukrainian capital. Ukraine is currently investigating the incident.
Why Healthy Food Doesn't Have to Cost More
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
When shopping for groceries and trying to decide between two items—say, brands of granola bars—how do you determine which is healthier? A lot of us automatically assume that the more expensive pr...
Apple just bought the app it once crowned 'most innovative' and made it free for everyone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
If you can't beat it, buy it. That's what Apple did on Wednesday when it acquired an app...
India says no to most of Apple's demands
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Apple is not getting any special treatment from the Indian government.  Despite the company’s imminent plans to begin manufacturing iPhones in the country, the Indian government remains committed to not folding to the Cupertino giant’s demands.  SEE ALSO: Apple had its best year ever in world's fastest growing smartphone market When asked if the government has accepted the iPhone maker’s demands, commerce and industry minister Nirmala Sitharaman told Rajya Sabha (Council of States) that the ministry has said "no" to "most" of them. Apple has put up an "unprecedented" list of demands before the government. "Apple India has sought concessions, including duty exemptions on manufacturing and repair units, components, capital equipment including parts and consumables for smartphone manufacturing and service/repair for a period of 15 years," Sitharaman added. Apple sees big potential in India. The company’s CEO paid his maiden visit to the nation last year and expressed desires to bolster the company’s business in the country. Even though India remains one of the few places that has shown strong iPhone sales, there is no easy way for Apple to continue the momentum. For one, more than 50 percent of iPhones sold in the nation last year were iPhone 5s models. The four-year-old iPhone sells for under $300 in the country. Analysts say the company needs to lower the prices of the iPhone, which are higher in India due to domestic import laws. Apple's solution of sorts was to try to convince the Indian government to permit sales of refurbished iPhones — a proposal India was quick to discard.  Now Apple’s biggest bet at making iPhones affordable (and possibly to get India to say yes to refurbished iPhones) is if it could start manufacturing locally.  The Indian government offers various benefits to overseas companies to setup manufacturing plants in India as such efforts help in creation of new jobs and foster the development of cities and states.  Mashable was first to report about Apple’s plans to manufacture iPhone SE in India starting as early as April. It appears Apple will have to make do with the same usual incentives that other international brands get. WATCH: You can now take selfies... with your feet?
Twitter says it shuttered 377,000 accounts that promote terrorism in six months
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
In its latest transparency report, Twitter said it shuttered a total of 376,890 accounts "for violations related to promotion of terrorism," bringing the 17-month total up to the end of 2016 to 636,248.
Amazon is continuing to define what consumers expect
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
More recent Amazon initiatives such as Prime Now and Flex Delivery aim to deliver orders to your doorstep in two hours or less. When Amazon (AMZN) began offering free two-day shipping to Prime members, that fast shipping time became the new expectation for many customers who were previously accustomed to waiting much longer for their packages. Now, the Seattle-based e-commerce giant is setting the bar even higher  with initiatives such as Prime Now and Amazon Flex, which ship goods to you in two hours and in some cases promise one-hour delivery.
Nintendo explains Switch Joy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Nintendo has issued an official statement regarding the cause of the left Joy-Con connectivity issues plaguing the Switch, vowing that there's no inherent design issue, but a "manufacturing variation."
Morgan Freeman’s ‘Through the Wormhole’ Announces Series Finale
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
All good things must come to an end, even thought-provoking science lessons from Morgan Freeman. The final four episodes of Through The Wormhole with Morgan Freeman will begin airing April 25 on Science Channel.
Harmful Cocktail: Alcohol Plus Energy Drinks May Raise Injury Risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In 10 of the studies, the people who consumed alcohol with energy drinks had a greater risk of getting injured, compared with those who consumed alcohol alone. For example, a 2015 study included in the review found that high school students who consumed alcohol with energy drinks were four times more likely to have a motor vehicle accident after drinking, compared with those who consumed alcohol by itself. Another study, conducted in 2014, found that teens who mixed alcohol with energy drinks were four times more likely to engage in fighting and five times more likely to sustain an alcohol-related injury, compared with those who consumed alcohol alone.
These new lenses give you superhuman sight, let you see colors with greater clarity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Metamers are colors which appear to be identical, but which actually possess different spectral compositions. A team of researchers have invented a pair of glasses that let us tell the difference.
Trump Signs Bill Authorizing NASA Funding, Mars Exploration
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just under $20 billion for NASA.
How your messy office space could be doing wonders for your productivity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bit of disorder and messiness can actually make some people more productive. If you live in a state of organised chaos like me, you might find it comforting to know a bit of messiness at work could actually mean you're more productive. According to Tim Harford, economist and author of "The Undercover Economist," disorder is actually linked with creativity and innovation.
Using GPS 'switches off' parts of your brain used to naturally navigate different routes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Italian explorer Christopher Columbus did not have satnav to guide him on his journey to discover India and his happy accident probably made him a joke in the explorer circles! But for those of us who use satellite technology to find the quickest route to a destination, the results are not always any better. A recent study, conducted at the University College London, has revealed that parts of our brain "switch off" when we make use of satnav systems. In the study, published in Nature Communications, 24 volunteers were made to undergo brain scans as they navigated a simulation of Soho in central London.
Infant's Rare 'Parasitic Twin' Successfully Removed with Surgery
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A 10-month-old girl who was born with a rare "parasitic twin" attached to her body has undergone a successful surgery to separate her from this underdeveloped twin. The infant, named Dominique, was born with the lower half of her twin's body — including legs and feet — protruding from her upper back and neck, according to information released from Advocate Children's Hospital in Park Ridge, Illinois, the facility where the surgery was performed. To receive the medical care she needed, she traveled from her home in Ivory Coast, a country in West Africa, to the United States.
Koshe Disaster: What Causes Garbage Landslides?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The tragedy isn't the first of its kind, according to a piece on the disaster in the American Geophysical Union's Landslide Blog, but it is the deadliest such incident in years. "Garbage landslides are particularly horrible events," Dave Petley, a blogger and geoscientist at the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom, wrote in a 2008 post about the phenomena. Petley wrote the 2008 blog post in response to a garbage slide in Guatemala City, in which the deadly conditions were much like those in Addis Ababa: mountains of garbage piled with little regard for stability, picked over by armies of scavengers who make a living by pulling recyclables from the waste.
Chuck Schumer says Democrats will filibuster Neil Gorsuch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Republicans have said they will change Senate rules to end the 60-vote floor for voting on Supreme Court nominees if Democrats block President Donald Trump’s nominee. “If this nominee cannot earn 60 votes—a bar met by each of President Obama’s nominees and President Bush’s nominees—the answer is not to change the rules, it’s to change the nominee,” Schumer said.
Time magazine presses Trump on his slew of evidence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump says he doesn’t necessarily need facts before making such evidence-free claims as, say, former President Barack Obama’s wiretapping the phones at Trump Tower, because they’ve later been proved right. “I’m a very instinctual person,” Trump told Time magazine’s Michael Scherer in a phone interview from the Oval Office on Wednesday. The president offered a list things he says he “predicted” would happen, including Brexit, Anthony Weiner’s sexting scandal, Bernie Sanders’ loss in the Democratic primary — even his false suggestion that a terror attack had occurred in Sweden the night before.