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New Zealand test rocket makes it to space but not to orbit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
California-based company Rocket Lab says it has launched a test rocket into space from its New Zealand launch pad, although the rocket didn't reach orbit as hoped
Montana governor slams alleged Gianforte body
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Montana Gov. Steve Bullock called congressional candidate Greg Gianforte’s alleged assault of a reporter “a real wake-up call” in an exclusive interview with Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric, as voters in his state head to the polls today.
Trump caught on camera – awkward moments at NATO summit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Photographers capture awkward moments of Donald Trump at his first NATO summit.
Wisconsin woman jumps on hood of her SUV to prevent theft
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A Wisconsin woman pumping gas near downtown Milwaukee stopped a thief from stealing her SUV by jumping on its hood and clinging to the windshield wipers as the man tried to drive away in her vehicle.
How Trump and Europe rebonded
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
During his first official trip to Europe this week, President Trump was politely asked to back the defining glue of the Continent and the transatlantic partnership. Both the European Union and NATO – the core of what is called “the West” – have enough issues without the uncertainties of Mr. Trump’s “America First” theme of the past year. Both the EU and NATO are too often defined by what they are against, such as Russian aggression, trade protectionism, terrorism, and anti-democratic forces.
Dairy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Want to fuel up like an athlete? Watch this video to learn how to make these easy and delicious dairy-free energy balls.
Trump's budget screws over climate research, but don't freak out yet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Shots fired.  President Donald Trump may be 6,000 miles away from Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, but that didn't stop him from launching an all-out assault on climate science and related energy research. The weapon of choice? His fiscal year 2018 budget proposal. The cuts are staggering in scope, and the consequences are already starting as federal employees and contractors — spooked by the figures out this week — begin job searching in earnest.  SEE ALSO: Trump might pick a non-scientist to be USDA's 'chief scientist' Every single agency that touches climate change research, from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to the Department of Energy, NASA, and especially the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), would see sharp reductions and eliminations of climate research programs. NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice in Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesWhile the proposal is just the start of negotiations with Congress over a final, enacted budget, it represents the clearest statement yet of Trump's priorities for governing the country.  And those priorities do not put climate change — ranked by other major industrialized and developing countries as one of the top threats facing the world today — high on the list.  According to Mick Mulvaney, the head of the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the administration targeted climate funding for sharp reductions, but he rejected the charge that it's anti-science. “I think the National Science Foundation last year used your taxpayer money to fund a climate change musical. Do you think that’s a waste of your money?” he said, citing a well-worn example from 2014 of wasteful research spending often pointed to by Republican lawmakers who deny the link between human-caused greenhouse gas emissions and climate change.  “What I think you saw happen during the previous administration is the pendulum went too far to one side, where we were spending too much of your money on climate change, and not very efficiently,” Mulvaney said at a budget briefing on Tuesday morning.   “We don’t get rid of it here. Do we target it? Sure," he said. "Do a lot of the EPA reductions aimed at reducing the focus on climate science? Yes." "Does it meant that we are anti-science? Absolutely not." Losing our eyes and ears The budget cuts Trump is proposing would leave climate scientists without critical data and would shrivel up the job market for researchers at a time when climate change expertise is more needed than ever.  One budget cut at NASA would hit an instrument meant to improve scientists' ability to monitor the amount of solar radiation entering and exiting the atmosphere, which is a foundational measurement needed for keeping tabs on and projecting climate change.  Tens of thousands of protestors gathered on April 22, 2017  to protest the Trump administration's anti-science moves.Image: LO SCALZO/EPA/REX/ShutterstockAnother would eliminate a mission known as CLARREO-PF, which is a satellite instrument aimed at increasing our understanding of how clouds and particles known as aerosols affect the climate.  This would address one of the biggest uncertainties in climate science, but hey, Trump and his cabinet members do like citing uncertainty as a reason not to act on global warming, so...  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ NASA's overall Earth Science Mission, which helps provide research and observations of our planet, would be cut by nearly 9 percent, including the elimination of five Earth observation missions and an education program aimed at supporting the next generation of space science researchers. At the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the office responsible for helping restore and protect our coasts in a time of sea level rise would be completely eliminated. The agency's climate research programs, considered to be among the best in the world, would also take a funding cut on the order of 30 percent. The NOAA budget also contains some bizarre cuts that the meteorology community will likely strongly object to, including getting rid of the array of Pacific Ocean buoys that enable forecasters to detect El Niño events, as well as a network of specially-designed ocean instruments to detect destructive tsunamis in the Pacific Ocean before they hit land.  In addition, the NOAA budget would slow the National Weather Service's implementation of more accurate computer models, increasing the gap between U.S. capabilities and those in Europe and elsewhere, which have surpassed this country. In addition, the U.S. Geological Survey, would be cut by more than 10 percent. Even before these cuts, the agency has been having trouble maintaining its network of river gauges that the National Weather Service relies on for triggering flood warnings. So just as heavy rains are becoming more common in a warming climate, the number of functioning gauges is declining.  The Energy Department's Office of Science, which funds research in physical sciences and cutting edge computer modeling, would also see a funding decrease of 17 percent.  None of these decreases are small, and all would reverberate across labs scattered across the country and throughout universities that depend on government grants for research funding. Picking the losers as winners The cuts could also fundamentally change the energy landscape, eliminating the government program that helped launch innovative renewable energy companies such as Tesla.   Under former president Barack Obama, the Energy Department turned into a massive venture capital firm dedicated to funding potentially transformational energy technologies. Now Trump is proposing to eliminate that program, known as the Advanced Research Projects Agency: Energy, or ARPA-E. If the current administration has its way, the office would see its budget plunge from $290 million in Fiscal Year 2017 to just $20 million as it is put to rest completely, along with hopes that the next Tesla will crop up in the U.S., and not, say, in China or another economic competitor. But the shift in priorities doesn't end there.  The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy would be cut by 70 percent compared to Fiscal Year 2017 levels, a staggering decrease that sets the government up against market trends as solar, wind and battery technologies comprise more and more newly-built electric facilities.  Last one: select S&T agencies and programs, requested changes from omnibus levels. #sciencebudget pic.twitter.com/6HoswXd42R — Matt Hourihan (@MattHourihan) May 23, 2017 Don't worry though, fossil fuels like coal and oil would fare just fine under the budget request. And nuclear power, which has stagnated due to regulatory hurdles and lower natural gas, wind, and solar prices, would get a boost in funds. Here comes the brain drain Major science groups that are normally inclined to avoid partisan combat have already come out and slammed the budget as misguided at best.  Rush Holt, a physicist and former congressman who is the director of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), said the budget would have a near-term impact on public health and overall science and technology capabilities in America.  "What we see is not just a reduction in government programs, what we see is a failure to invest in America," Holt said on a conference call with reporters. "We’re not just talking about the long-term future either. The harm to public health and to other areas would start to be felt really very soon." @AAAS_GR R&D by character, as a share of GDP. Research funding would hit a 40-year low in 2018. #Science @AAAS_GR pic.twitter.com/btVEj3RxMQ — Matt Hourihan (@MattHourihan) May 23, 2017 According to one AAAS analyst, the only science and technology-related government agency to see a funding increase under Trump's budget is the secretive Defense Advance Research Projects Agency, better known as DARPA.  The funding cuts, if they get through Congress as proposed, which is doubtful, would also discourage those seeking to go into science and engineering careers from doing so, as it would eliminate thousands of post-doctoral and career positions.  One contractor who works with the federal government on environmental issues, but asked not to be identified since he is not authorized to speak to the press, told Mashable that he and "many others" he knows have already begun "changing their career plans" as they brace for job cuts. "The ramifications of these cuts – which are below the FY17 omnibus levels – will have significant impacts on the health and welfare of the nation," Chris McEntee, the executive director and CEO of the American Geophysical Union, which is the world's largest organization of Earth scientists, said in a statement. Joanne Carney, director of government relations at AAAS, said the budget cuts will hurt the U.S. by impeding our ability to anticipate the ramifications of climate change.  "...This is about dealing with reality at all levels of government," she said.  "So defunding the very programs that seek to allow us to better understand the Earth and our changing environment isn’t helping the U.S. to address climate-related changes. It’s not allowing us to make informed decisions on how to adapt or to mitigate, and it has long-term consequences." There is some good news It is virtually certain that Congress will restore some of the funding for climate science. Many members of Congress of both parties were declaring the budget request dead on arrival on Tuesday.  However, even a fraction of the proposed cuts would still hit the science community hard and potentially erode America's leadership position in global climate research. Maria Gallucci contributed reporting for this story. WATCH: It's official, 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record
Brain scans show how fathers are more attentive to daughters than sons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dads not only act differently in their daily interactions with the children, but scans of their brains also revealed different patterns of activity depending on whether they have a boy or a girl. In recent years, a number of studies has shown that fathers treat girls and boys differently – suggesting in some cases that their behaviours could reinforce gender stereotypes in their children. For instance, studies often rely on parents' self-reports of their interactions with their children.
Everest rescuers retrieve bodies of two Indian climbers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rescuers have retrieved the bodies of two Indian climbers who died on Mount Everest last year but whose remains could not be moved due to bad weather, an official said Thursday. A team of Nepali climbers retrieved the bodies of Goutam Ghosh and Paresh Nath from the balcony, an area just below the summit of the 8,848-metre (29,029-foot) mountain. Ghosh's remains were only located this year by other climbers on the mountain.
Obama in Berlin: ‘We can’t hide behind a wall’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former President Barack Obama and German Chancellor Angela Merkel attend a discussion at the German Protestant Kirchentag in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin on May 25. Former President Barack Obama seemed to take a subtle swipe at his successor Thursday, telling a Berlin audience that the world cannot “hide behind a wall” — an apparent reference to President Trump’s signature campaign promise to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. Obama was in Germany for Kirchentag, a conference affiliated with the Protestant church that he attended at the invitation of German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
Who is Greg Gianforte, the Montana House candidate who allegedly attacked a reporter?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The GOP candidate in Montana’s special congressional election is facing a new challenge: a misdemeanor assault charge issued Wednesday night.
‘Answer the question’: Bernie Sanders clashes with Trump budget chief during hearing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Fireworks erupted Thursday when President Trump’s budget chief sparred with a Senate panel over the administration's proposed 2018 budget, most notably trading barbs with Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., over potential cuts to entitlement programs.
Sens. Kaine, Flake seek vote to authorize war on Islamic State
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sens. Jeff Flake and Tim Kaine unveiled legislation that would formally give an AUMF to pursue the battle against the Islamic State, also known as ISIS.
Paul Ryan says Gianforte should apologize, not withdraw, after altercation with reporter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Speaker Paul Ryan said Thursday that GOP candidate Greg Gianforte should apologize for an apparently violent interaction with a reporter, but Ryan also said he would accept the Montanan into the House if he won his special election later in the day. “First, let me just say physical altercations — there’s never a call for physical altercations,” Ryan said when asked whether Gianforte should withdraw from the race. “There is no time where a physical altercation should occur or just between human beings, so that is wrong and it should not have happened.
GOP senators urge Trump to make ‘clean exit’ from Paris Agreement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A group high-profile Republican senators, including Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, are calling on President Trump to make a “clean break” from the Paris Agreement on climate change.
‘Knuckles turning white’: Macron is a match for the Trump power handshake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Of President Trump’s many idiosyncrasies, one that stands out is his aggressive style of shaking hands, which he has bestowed upon various world leaders since taking office. Trump and the newly elected Macron met in Brussels before a NATO summit and held the customary photo op, complete with an intense handshake.
Trial set for Amish community members over horse droppings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
RUSSELLVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Members of an Amish community in Kentucky may take their cases to court after being cited for violating an ordinance requiring horses to wear bags to catch their droppings.
Teraphysics to Present at the 7th Annual LD Micro Invitational
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Beyond Fiber Optics: Teraphysics Set to Enable the Future of 5G With Wireless High-Speed Data Delivery Technology LOS ANGELES, CA / ACCESSWIRE / May 24, 201 7 / Teraphysics, developer of ultrahigh-speed ...
New Zealand launches into space race with 3D
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rocket Lab, a Silicon Valley-funded space launch company, launches the maiden flight of its battery-powered, 3-D printed rocket from New Zealand's remote Mahia Peninsula. No reporter narration.
In Europe, Trump feels the heat on climate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At every stop in Donald Trump's whirlwind of summit meetings in Europe, the issue of climate change -- and the US president's threat to ditch the 196-nation Paris Agreement -- is never far from the surface. "I am still trying to convince the doubters," German Chancellor Andrea Merkel said Tuesday at informal 30-nation climate talks in Berlin, where China's climate tzar, Xie Zhenhua, also urged the United States to stay the course. Newly minted French President Emmanuel Macron, on the eve of his May 7 victory, likewise vowed to "do everything possible" to keep the former reality TV star on board.
Artifacts From Ancient Americans Show Advanced Culture
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Artifacts recovered from an ancient American civilization show people who lived 15,000 years ago were more advanced than we’ve given them credit for.
Agency takes tectonics study to earthquake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alaska averages 40,000 earthquakes per year, with more large quakes than the other 49 states combined, and it's about to have its ground examined like never before
Montana papers retract their Gianforte endorsements after assault citation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Three major Montana newspapers have rescinded their endorsements of Greg Gianforte, the Republican candidate for the House of Representatives, after the was cited with assault.
Student's service dog gets own headshot in class yearbook
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
FREDERICKSBURG, Va. (AP) — A Virginia high school student who attends school with a service dog found himself side-by-side with his canine in the school's yearbook photos.
Florida woman finds python while doing laundry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
COCOA, Fla. (AP) — Another day, another python in Florida.
Tattooed 'Joker' accused of pointing gun at traffic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MIAMI (AP) — Police in Florida have managed to arrest the Joker without Batman's help following reports of a green-haired man with tattoos on his face pointing a gun at traffic.
Florida student accused of changing grade from F to B
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A 22-year-old student is accused of sneaking into a building and illegally logging into a Florida university's grading system to change his failing grade to a B.
New York City mayor still won't cheer for hometown Yankees
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — He has served a full-term as New York City mayor, but Bill de Blasio has never attended a New York Yankees game during his tenure. And he doesn't plan to break the streak now.
Nerd Nite meets NASA, sparking memories for an astronaut with deep Northwest roots
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The High Dive is known for drawing crowds into the local music scene, but this week, music wasn’t what drew nearly 200 people to the venue – it was NASA. Nerd Nite Seattle is a monthly gathering at the bar in the city’s Fremont neighborhood, featuring beer, tasty Mexican food, science talks and, of course, nerdy Seattleites. Tuesday night’s event drew in plenty of the regulars, plus an assortment of first-timers. One of the first-timers was NASA astronaut Anne McClain. She mingled with the crowd, and then got on stage to speak about her rigorous astronaut training, share hilarious stories about… Read More
Peru: Ancient pyramid excavation reveals extremely complex society 15,000 years ago
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The ancient civilisation that populated the coasts of Peru some 15,000 years ago was more advanced than archaeologists had previously imagined. Ancient artefacts suggest that these people had developed efficient techniques to extract resources from the sea early on. The site of Huaca Prieta in coastal Peru is home to the earliest pyramid in Latin America.
Here's what we'll lose with Trump's proposed NASA budget cuts, and why one expert is calling it out
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If congress agrees with Trump’s latest budget proposal, NASA will have about $561 million less to work with in 2018 than it did in 2017. With that said, significant programs will meet the chopping block because of it: NASA’s education program will completely shut down, along with at least four other missions related to studying asteroids or understanding Earth’s changing climate. NASA's acting administrator, Robert M. Lightfoot Jr., didn’t sound all that concerned.
Science Says: Whale of a mystery solved? How they got so big
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they have answered a whale of a mystery: How the ocean creatures got so huge so quickly.
On Trump and Russia, Mark Warner emerges as the accidental investigator
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Mark Warner finds himself as the ranking Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee, just in time for a high-stakes probe into the executive branch with eerie parallels to Watergate.
How do you move 40,000 bees? Carefully, with just 3 stings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
FREDERICKSBURG, Va. (AP) — With just three stings and no serious injuries, two beekeepers have safely removed an estimated 40,000 bees that bedeviled a Virginia townhouse community.
The Winners and Losers in NASA's New Budget Proposal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As expected, Earth sciences and education will receive cuts in favor of solar system exploration and human spaceflight.
Snowy plover chick hatches on Oregon beach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A Western snowy plover chick that hatched on an Oregon beach this spring is the first of its species to emerge successfully in that area in more than 50 years and provides hope that a management plan for the federally threatened species is working, wildlife officials said Wednesday.
A Brief History of SETI@Home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The year was 1999, and the people were going online. AOL, Compuserve, mp3.com, and AltaVista loaded bit by bit after dial-up chirps, on screens across the world. Watching the internet extend its reach, a small group of scientists thought a more extensive digital leap was in order, one that encompassed the galaxy itself. And so it was that before the new millennium dawned, researchers at the University of California released a citizen-science program called SETI@Home.
Researchers Propose New Name for a Molten Planetary Object
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A "synestia" is a donut-shaped mass of molten rock that forms when two planets collide.
Obesity Cure? Scientists Discover Antibody That Reduces Body Fat in Mice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A treatment for obesity could be on the horizon as scientists have discovered an antibody that reduces body fat. In trials on mice, the antibody was found to increase bone mass and reduce adipose tissue (fat)—and while human studies are some way off, the findings could lead to new treatments for weight loss and osteoporosis. The antibody discovered targets follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) found in the pituitary gland.
3 Takeaways from the New CBO Score of the Republican Healthcare Plan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. A much-anticipated analysis of GOP plans to overhaul the Affordable Care Act (ACA) makes it clear that health insurance ...
Meat Mystery in Hong Kong as Apparent Beef Eating Soars: Chart
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you believe the numbers, Hong Kong is one of the most meat-crazed societies on earth. Beef consumption in 2016 came in at 53.2 kilograms per head -- roughly the equivalent of eating two Big Macs a day, ...
Learning to read in adulthoood transforms brain: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A study of women in India who learned to read in their 30s shows the human brain's incredible capacity to reorganize and transform itself, researchers said Wednesday. Researchers recruited women in India, a country with an illiteracy rate of around 39 percent, to see what they could learn about the areas of the brain devoted to reading. "This growth of knowledge is remarkable", said Falk Huettig from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, lead author of the study in the journal Science Advances.
Learning to Read Can Dramatically Change the Adult Brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Speaking multiple languages, accruing new skills or even just quitting a habit can forge new neural pathways. Literacy, it turns out, changes ancient regions of the brain that researchers never suspected played a role in reading. The finding expands not only our understanding of reading but also disorders that impair it, namely dyslexia.
Scientists balanced a dead flamingo on one leg to unlock the bird's standing secret
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New research reveals how flamingos can stand – and even sleep – on one leg for so long.
Science Says: What's known and not known about marijuana
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — A new marijuana study joins a limited record of scientific knowledge about the harms and benefits of pot.
To evangelicals, Trump is the whirlwind. And they’re fine with that.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
To Americans outside the evangelical tradition, Franklin Graham’s proclamation that there’s “no question” God supports Donald Trump’s presidency was a head-scratcher.
The Health Benefits of Laughing!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Is a good laugh just what the doctor ordered? Check out a funny blooper from Plastic Surgeon Dr. Andrew Ordon’s trip to Tahiti and giggle your way to good health.
Explore the Health Secrets of Tahiti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Take a tropical adventure – without leaving your couch! Join Plastic Surgeon Dr. Andrew Ordon on a journey to the islands of Tahiti for some rest and relaxation … and some wellness tips from this famously healthy Pacific paradise. Next Dr. Ordon visits the pineapple fields of Moorea. Tour guide Moana takes Dr. Ordon to sample pineapple juice and pineapple wine.
When Heat Can Be Hazardous to Your Health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Summer is a great time of year, but when temperatures rise your health could be at risk.
Running with the Wolves to Treat PTSD?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Almost 25 million suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder in the U.S. alone. One woman found a unique way to cope with her PTSD after a traumatic event – by following the call of the wild. After an ex-boyfriend raped Sarah, she developed agonizing PTSD.