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We need stronger candidates, not stronger parties
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It’ll be a long time before we see another presidential field populated solely by career politicians. But that’s not something we should necessarily fear.
Midwest farmers fear tariff war, while their steelworker neighbors cheer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump’s trade policies may be helping some steel companies — and steelworkers — but China is threatening to retaliate with tariffs on American agricultural exports. Farmers in this Illinois town are worried about losing their market.
Homeowner finds naked intruder in her tub, eating Cheetos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MONROE, La. (AP) — Police in Louisiana say a woman came home to discover a naked stranger in her tub, eating her Cheetos while taking a bath.
It's (another) boy! Michigan family with 13 sons gets No. 14
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROCKFORD, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan couple with 13 sons has welcomed a 14th into the family.
Meanwhile in ... Gambia, voters will vote using glass marbles for the last time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Gambia, voters will head to the polls this spring to elect local officials as expected, but it will be the last time they will vote using glass marbles. For the past 60 years, each Gambian has cast a vote by dropping a glass marble into a barrel painted in party colors. The system works well, discourages fraud, and allows illiterate voters to participate, Gambian officials have said in the past.
'Cross the Bushes Off Your Worry List.' George H.W. Bush Honors Barbara Bush, 'The Enforcer'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'I always knew Barbara was the most beloved woman in the world'
NASA's Tess spacecraft embarks on quest to find new planets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Tess spacecraft embarks on quest to find planets around neighboring stars that might support life
Three Former U.S. Soldiers Have Been Convicted for the Contract Killing of a Filipino Woman
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 12-day trial offered a window into the clandestine world of private mercenaries
Astronauts Are Reading Storybooks to Kids from Outer Space and Here's How to Get in the Orbit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Story time is fun and all, but with so many distractions these days, it can be hard to get kids to focus on a book instead of an iPad blaring Daniel Tiger. A new project from the nonprofit Global Space...
Prince Harry Knows Meghan Markle Is the Real Draw and This Is Proof
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They're already pros at compromising
'Kept Us Laughing Until the End.' Read the Bush Family's Statements Following the Death of Barbara Bush
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Barbara Bush died Tuesday at the age of 92
RZA weighs in on the Wu
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
RZA, the spiritual leader of the Wu-Tang Clan, got a kick out of seeing two of his rap colleagues meet former FBI Director James Comey on Tuesday.
California tortoise with cracked shell gets $4,000 repair
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SAN DIEGO (AP) — A wayward tortoise that cracked its shell after falling off a 10-foot wall in California is recovering after vets used screws, zip ties and denture material to repair it.
SpaceX postpones launch of NASA's planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX postponed the launch of NASA's new planet-hunting mission Monday in order to verify the Falcon 9 rocket's navigation systems, the California-based company said. The next opportunity to blast off the $337 million satellite -- which aims to advance the search for extraterrestrial life by scanning the skies for nearby, Earth-like planets -- will be Wednesday. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, is "in excellent health and remains ready for launch," SpaceX said on Twitter.
California has worst US air pollution: report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
California has the most polluted cities in the United States, a report issued on Wednesday said, as President Donald Trump's administration seeks to force the state to weaken its vehicle emissions standards. The study published by the American Lung Association -- which covers the period from 2014 to 2016, the year before Trump took office -- said Los Angeles remained the city with the worst ozone pollution, and ranked fourth in terms of year-round particle contamination.
Scientists may have just solved the plastic crisis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Could single-use plastics soon be recycled?
The Latest: SpaceX rocket booster lands on floating platform
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's newest planet-hunting spacecraft rockets away; SpaceX booster lands on floating platform
Flag at President Trump's Mar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was later lowered, the White House said
Unfiltered: ‘We are human beings’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In the middle of an empty Manhattan church on a Wednesday afternoon sits Rev. Juan Carlos Ruíz, adjusting his priest collar. Outside, people cross the street to and from Central Park. Although it is April, they are still dressed in winter coats.
Mars’s Two Tiny Moons Were Formed After an Asteroid Hit the Planet, New Theory Suggests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mars has two tiny moons, Phobos and Deimos, whose names mean “fear” and “terror” in ancient Greek. Maybe “mystery” would have been the better term to choose, since the origins of the two satellites has stumped scientists for decades.
Who Is Kimba Wood? Meet the Federal Judge Overseeing the Michael Cohen Case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The mounting legal case against President Donald Trump's personal attorney Michael Cohen has brought another name into the news: Kimba Wood.
Google Just Launched a Smartphone Game to Teach Adults How to Code
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thousands of people have already used the app, called Grasshopper
Acting NASA administrator’s parting words: Accept risk wisely, with ‘eyes wide open’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
  COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — NASA should rethink its approach to the risks of spaceflight as it prepares for a new wave of exploration, the space agency’s outgoing chief says. “Protecting against risk and being safe are not the same thing,” Acting NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot told a standing-room crowd here today at the 34th Space Symposium. “Risk is just simply a calculation of likelihood and consequence.” Lightfoot said he’s worried that excessive risk aversion could hobble NASA as it prepares to build an outpost in lunar orbit and blaze a trail to Mars. “Would we have ever launched Apollo in… Read More
Will Trump Make a Bad Deal With North Korea?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As the Trump Administration moves closer to possible talks with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, fears are mounting from allies.
Huge asteroid the size of a football pitch skims past Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It passed us closer than the moon
Brain science institute at Brown receives $100M gift
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brown University's brain science institute has been given $100 million to advance the understanding of the brain and what causes Lou Gehrig's Disease, Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. The Ivy League university in Providence, Rhode Island, announced the donation from alumnus Robert Carney and his wife, Nancy, on Wednesday. Institute Director Diane Lipscombe said she hopes the funding can be used to help figure out why neurons die in neurodegenerative disorders.
The power is out again in Puerto Rico, 7 months after Hurricane Maria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Seven months after Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico is still dealing with the fallout as it experienced an island-wide blackout on Wednesday. SEE ALSO: The mayor of Puerto Rico's capital can't believe this tiny firm's $300 million contract This latest power outage follows a series of outages in the months since Maria. Just last week, half of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority's (PREPA) customers lost power when a tree fell across a major power line. And in November 2017, San Juan and several other cities lost power at least twice due to a failure.  The entire electrical system in Puerto Rico collapses AGAIN! Back to September 20th. @DavidBegnaud @leylasantiago @maddow @stephencolbertr — Carmen Yulín Cruz (@CarmenYulinCruz) April 18, 2018 Per CNN, PREPA is focusing primary efforts on getting power back to hospital and water services as well as banks and the city of San Juan. The outage was reportedly caused when an excavator hit a main transmission line while clearing vegetation. PREPA is hoping to have power restored in the next 24 to 36 hours One spotlight event will go on as scheduled, though. The Cleveland Indians and Minnesota Twins are in San Juan for a two-game series and Wednesday's night game will go forward as planned thanks to generators to power the lights at Hiram Bithorn Stadium.  All emergency systems at Hiram Bithorn Stadium have been tested just now and are fully functional. The game will GO ON. Nothing will stop us pic.twitter.com/u4jpCkjc1Q — Carmen Yulín Cruz (@CarmenYulinCruz) April 18, 2018 The island's infrastructure and power grid were already fragile before Maria struck in late September 2017, lashing the island with sustained winds of up to 140 miles per hour, throwing the entire island into the dark and straining resources.  Controversy has followed recovery efforts in Puerto Rico, including President Trump's disastrous response to the storm and the much-debated contract initially given to Whitefish Energy to repair the power infrastructure. And the exact death toll from the storm is still unknown; while the official number stands at 65, this number is likely far too low, with some estimates pegging it at closer to 1,000.
420's long, strange trip to pot holiday began in California
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SAN RAFAEL, Calif. (AP) — Friday is April 20, or 4/20. That's the numerical code for marijuana's high holiday, a homage to pot's enduring appeal and universal slang for smoking.
Why Bob Corker is bucking GOP tribalism, in a Tennessee tradition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Here’s the rub: Mr. Bredesen is a Democrat. Corker, in fact, was so concerned that the very conservative Congresswoman Blackburn would lose his seat that a few months ago, he floated the idea of running for reelection after all.
Even at Starbucks? A conversation grows about hidden racial bias
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Videos of two black men leaving a Starbucks in handcuffs last week has confronted many Americans with one of the nation’s most troubling and divisive questions: How deep does racism still run? Half a century after lunch counter sit-ins that cemented the civil rights movement, the similarities between the images then and those from a downtown Philadelphia Starbucks were jarring: police officers escorting two stone-faced black individuals from a storefront after they had insisted on equal treatment. In this case, two black men were waiting for a friend, but not making a purchase, in one of the most overtly progressive corporations in the nation.
Uber launches new safety features for customers and drivers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Changes to the ridesharing app include 911 function and a share feature that allows friends to track your trip.
Stormy Daniels Reveals Sketch of the Man She Says Threatened Her Over Trump Affair
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"His face is burned in my memory"
From Lyrids to Perseids: Meteor showers to watch out for in 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Every year our skies are lit up by returning meteor showers, from Lyrids to Quadrantids, Orionids to Geminids. If the weather conditions are in our favour and the moon isn't too bright, there's a chance you'll be able to see the shooting stars in action. Here is our guide to the must-see meteor showers of 2018 – including the spectacular Lyrids shower which will peak on the morning of April 22 – as well as where and how to see them. What exactly is a meteor shower? A meteor shower occurs when Earth passes through the debris stream occupying the orbit of a comet - or, in simpler terms, when a number of meteors flash across the sky from roughly the same point. Meteors are sometimes called shooting stars, although they actually have nothing to do with stars. If you're lucky you could see up to 100 meteors or 'shooting stars' every hour on December 13/14. Credit: PETE LAWRENCE Perspective makes meteor showers appear to emanate from a single point in the sky known as the shower radiant. A typical meteor results from a particle the size of a grain of sand vaporising in Earth’s atmosphere when it enters at 134,000mph. Something larger than a grape will produce a fireball and this is often accompanied by a persistent afterglow known as a meteor train. This is a column of ionised gas slowly fading from view as it loses energy. Meteor, meteorid or meteroite? Let's get this straight. A meteor is a meteoroid – or a particle broken off an asteroid or comet orbiting the Sun – that burns up as it enters the Earth's atmosphere creating the effect of a "shooting star". Meteoroids that reach the Earth's surface without disintegrating are called meteorites. Meteors are mostly pieces of comet dust and ice no larger than a grain of rice. Meteorites are principally rocks broken off asteroids in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and can weigh as much as 60 tonnes. They can be "stony", made up of minerals rich in silicon and oxygen, "iron", consisting mainly of iron and nickel, or "stony-iron", a combination of the two. The Geminids meteor shower in Vladivostok, Russia in December 2017 Credit: Yuri Smityuk Scientists think about 1,000 tons to more than 10,000 tons of material from meteors falls on Earth each day, but it's mostly dust-like grains, according to Nasa, and they pose no threat to Earth. There are only two incidents recorded where people reported being injured by a meteorite, including one in 1954 when a woman was bruised by a meteorite weighing eight pounds after it fell through her roof.  When is the next meteor shower? The Lyrid meteor shower takes places annually between April 16 and April 25. In 2018, it will peak on the morning of April 22, with the greatest number of meteors falling during the few hours before dawn. With no moon, stargazers might be able to see between 10 and 20 Lyrid meteors per hour at the shower's peak.  Lyrid meteors are typically as bright as the stars in the Big Dipper, but some are much more intense, even brighter than Venus, the brightest object in the night sky after the moon. Called "Lyrid fireballs", these cast shadows for a split second and leave behind smokey debris trails that linger for minutes. Tim Peake space pictures What causes the Lyrid meteor shower? The ionised gas in the meteors' trail burns up as it enters the Earth's atmosphere, creates the glow which can be seen streaking across the night sky.  The shower occurs as the Earth passes through the dust left over from Comet Thatcher (C/186 G1), which makes a full orbit of the sun once every 415 years (which is why there are no photographs of it). Flakes of comet dust, most no bigger than grains of sand, strike Earth's atmosphere traveling 49 km/s (110,000 mph) and disintegrate as streaks of light. Comet Thatcher last visited the inner solar system in 1861 - before the widespread use of photography  - and isn’t expected to return until the year 2276. How did the Lyrids get its name? The shower radiates out from the direction of the star Vega, the brightest light in the constellation Lyra the Harp, from which it takes its name. Vega is a brilliant blue-white star about three times wider than our Sun and 25 light years away. The Lyrids radiating from the vicinity of the blue star Lyra Credit: earthsky.org You might remember Vega being mentioned in Carl Sagan's movie Contact - it was the source of alien radio transmissions to Earth. When were the Lyrids first observed and recorded? The earliest sightings of the Lyrid meteor shower go back 2,700 years and are among the oldest of known meteor showers. In the year 687 BC the ancient Chinese observed the meteors and recorded them in the ancient Zuo Zhan chronicles saying:  "On the 4th month in the summer in the year of xīn-mǎo (of year 7 of King Zhuang of Lu), at night, (the sky is so bright that some) fixed stars become invisible (because of the meteor shower); at midnight, stars fell like rain. That era of Chinese history corresponds with what is now called the Spring and Autumn Period (about 771 to 476 BC).  Tradition associates this period with the Chinese teacher and philosopher Confucius, one of the first to espouse the principle: “Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself.”   American observers saw an outburst of nearly 100 Lyrid meteors per hour in 1982. Around 100 meteors per hour were seen in Greece in 1922 and from Japan in 1945. 2018 | Major meteor showers Major meteor showers to look out for in 2018 The Quadrantid meteor shower The Quadrantids was the first major meteor shower of 2018; it peaked at around 8pm on January 3 when between 10 and 60 meteors were shooting per hour.  It had a sharp peak, which means the best of the shower only lasted a few hours - although it remained active until January 12th. First spotted in 1825 by the Italian astronomer Antonio Brucalassi, astronomers suspect the shower originates from the comet C/1490 Y1, which was first observed 500 years ago by Japanese, Chinese and Korean astronomers. Why is it called Quadrantid? The Quadrantids appear to radiate from the extinct constellation Quadrans Muralis, which is now part of the Boötes constellation and not far from the Big Dipper. Because of the constellation's position in the sky, the shower is often impossible to see in the Southern Hemisphere - however there is a chance of spotting it up to 51 degrees south latitude. The best spots to see the display are in countries with high northern latitudes, like Norway, Sweden, Canada and Finland. The Perseid meteor shower The Perseids appear to originate from within the star constellation Perseus, hence the shower's name. The shower occurs when Earth passes through the debris stream occupying the orbit of the comet Swift-Tuttle. The wonderfully named comet is the largest object known to repeatedly pass Earth (it's 16 miles wide). It orbits the sun ever 133 years and each time it passes through the inner solar system it warms up, releasing fresh comet material into its orbital stream. The last time it was closest to the sun was in December 1992. It will be back again in July 2126.  Perseid meteor radiant When can I see the Perseid meteor shower? The window for the next Perseid meteor shower is from July 17 to August 24 2018. Stargazers stand a chance of seeing the shower at any point in this window, however the peak will occur around on August 13.  The best time to take a look at the sky will be from about 1am BST in the Northern Hemisphere until the onset of dawn twilight. Peak rates of 150-200 meteors per hour were recorded in 2016, but typical rates are about 80 meteors an hour streaking across the night sky, each leaving a trail.   To see it, look at a height approximately two-thirds up the sky in any direction. If you want a recommendation, east through south offers some great background constellations in the early hours during August. Look for the shower's "radiant" from the north-east corner of Perseus. The Orionid meteor shower The Orionid meteors appear every year, with showers producing around 20 meteors every hour. The shower is active throughout October until November 7, but the best time to see it will be on October 20 between midnight and dawn, when the sky is darkest and the shower will be at its brightest. Tom Kerss, an astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich said:"If you can brave the cold, make a plan to stay out and enjoy the thrill of seeing tiny flecks of Halley's Comet disintegrate at hypersonic speeds above your head." He advises finding a secluded spot and allowing the eyes to adjust to the darkness. Orionid meteors streak across the sky over Kula town of Manisa, Turkey on October 21, 2017 Credit:  Anadolu Agency Mr Kerss said: "There's no advantage to using binoculars or a telescope, your eyes are the best tool available for spotting meteors, so relax and gaze up at the sky, and eventually your patience will be rewarded. "Meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, though if you have to pick a direction, you might fare slightly better looking east." The meteoroids from Halley's Comet strike Earth's atmosphere at a speed of 148,000mph, (238,000kph) burning up in streaking flashes of light that can be seen with the naked eye. Orionid meteors are known for their speed and brilliance, so if you persevere there's a good chance you'll see several bright 'shooting stars' zipping across the sky. The Orionid Meteor Shower is one of two meteor showers created by debris from Halley's Comet - the other is the Eta Aquarids, which occurs in May. Unfortunately, Halley's Comet itself has not been visible from Earth since 1986. Why is it called Orionid? It's named Orionid because it appears to radiate from the constellation Orion. Orion is one of the brightest and best known constellations and contains two of the 10 brightest stars in the sky Rigel and Betelgeuse, as well as the famous Orion's Belt.  Orion's Belt is made up of three bright stars quite close together almost in a straight line, and is about 1,500 light years from us on Earth.  Orion has been known since ancient times and is also referred to as Hunter thanks to Greek mythology. He is often seen in star maps facing Taurus, the bull. The Geminid meteor shower The Geminids are an annual meteor shower caused by the 3200 Phaethon asteroid. Its orbit brings it very close to the sun, causing its surface material to crumble and break off. The Earth passes through this space debris every December, which burns up as hits our atmosphere. These are the meteors visible in our sky. The Geminids were first observed relatively recently, in 1862, compared with the Perseids (36AD) and the Leonids (902AD). The meteor shower appears to come from a point in the constellation Gemini, hence its name. The Geminids meteor shower over Egersheld Cape on Russky Island in the Sea of Japan in December 2017 Credit:  Yuri Smityuk When can it be seen? The next Geminid meteor shower can be seen from around December 4th to 17th, with peak activity from about 10pm on December 13th and into the early hours of the 14th.  Sightings are possible around the world, but there's good news for Britons: the shower favours observers in the Northern Hemisphere over those in the Southern. If you're lucky you could see up to 100 meteors or 'shooting stars' every hour. You can spot the meteors anywhere, but they will appear to come from the Gemini constellation. During December, it begins the evening in the east and moves across the sky to the west during the night. Find Orion's Belt - three bright stars positioned in a row - and then look above it and a little to the left. They will appear as streaks of light, and will sometimes arrive in bursts of two or three. They vary in colour, depending on their composition. An average of 120 meteors an hour - or two a minute - can be expected, or more during the 2am peak. Stars in the Milky Way over Kielder Forest Credit: Owen Humphreys The best stargazing spots in the UK A dark night is best for a meteor shower, after midnight and before dawn.  Head somewhere away from the bright lights - into more rural areas if you can - and be prepared to wait a good hour if you want the best chance of seeing a shower. Look for a wide, open viewing area - perhaps a national park or large field on the side of a road - and make sure you concentrate your gaze towards the east. Meteor showers are unpredictable though, so prepare for the fact you might not see much. Choose a dark location away from stray lights and give yourself at least 20 minutes in total darkness to properly dark adapt.  Britain has some wonderful stargazing locations, including three "Dark Sky Reserves" (Snowdonia, Brecon Beacons and Exmoor national parks) and Europe's largest "Dark Sky Park" (Northumberland National Park and the adjoining Kielder Water and Forest Park). best stargazing locations Galloway Forest Park: Galloway is a couple of hours from Glasgow and an hour from Carlisle. The park's most popular spot for stargazing is Loch Trool. Exmoor and around: Exmoor was granted International Dark-Sky Reserve status by the International Dark-Sky Association in 2011. Light pollution is managed to make the area more appealing to amateur astronomers. Romney Marsh: Night once provided cover for smugglers known as Owlers, but today Romney Marsh offers celestial bounty, arching over a landscape adorned with the spires of ancient churches. Kielder: Kielder Forest is officially the darkest place in England – 250 square miles of wooded beauty where Northumberland brushes against Scotland. It has its own fabulous, modern, wood-clad observatory on the slopes of Black Fell above Kielder Water. North York Moors: As well as stunning night skies, the North York Moors boast historic market towns such as Helmsley and Pickering, plus appealing coastal spots, including Scarborough and Whitby.
New York City Just Removed a Statue of Surgeon J. Marion Sims From Central Park. Here's Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Calls for the statue's removal peaked in 2017
State hits Memphis for removing Confederate monuments
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Months after Memphis circumvented state law to take down two monuments, the Tennessee legislature voted to remove funding that would’ve gone to commemorating the city’s bicentennial.
Fresno State professor under fire for celebrating death of Barbara Bush
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Fresno State University is distancing itself from an Arab-American professor who celebrated the death of former first lady Barbara Bush as it reviews the matter, school officials said Wednesday.
For still
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On the top of a steep hill in the West Bank city of Ramallah, the Palestinians’ de facto capital, the new Mahmoud Darwish Museum unfolds like the pages of an open book. In one wing of the milky colored stone building, poems written in the neat hand of the man celebrated as the Palestinian national poet are on display alongside items like his writing desk and the Palestinian Declaration of Independence, which he penned. Recommended: How much do you know about the Palestinians?
How an activist who helped transform postwar Germany views its newest challenges
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In American terms, you might best think of Gesine Schwan as a German Eleanor Roosevelt. To be sure, Professor Schwan was never a president’s first lady. During the great depression of the 1930s, Roosevelt famously lent her voice to workers who lost their jobs, to second-class women, and to African-Americans.
In Kim story, a likely ratings boost for diplomatic repairman designee Pompeo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For a year, Mr. Trump’s short-lived first secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, isolated himself on the State Department’s storied seventh floor to pursue a slash-and-burn department reorganization. With one Republican and a rising number of Democrats on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee already saying they will vote against confirmation, the former Kansas congressman looks unlikely to get an affirmative committee vote and faces an uncertain outcome in a full Senate vote later this month.
Moon shot for peace between the Koreas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In coming weeks, the world’s most heavily armed border, or the line between North and South Korea, could soon be the scene of the greatest peacemaking in 2018. On April 27, Kim Jong-un is expected to cross the 2.5-mile-wide demilitarized zone and become the first North Korean leader to set foot inside South Korea. Then, if all goes well at that historic meeting, President Trump could, either in May or June, fly to a yet-unknown country and become the first sitting president of the United States to meet a North Korean leader.
The Queen's Last Royal Corgi Died, But Please Try to Keep Calm and Carry On
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Queen Elizabeth's last corgi dog, Willow, has died – marking the end of an era for the British royal.
'We'll Always Be Grateful.' Barack and Michelle Obama Offer Condolences to Bush Family
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Barbara Bush reflected "the very best of the American spirit," they said
CIA Director Mike Pompeo Met with Kim Jong Un in North Korea, U.S. Officials Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Trump is preparing for a potential summit with Kim
George W. Bush: U.S. should be tough on Russia — 'not belligerent, but forceful'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Former President George W. Bush said on Monday that he has “always felt” the United States should be tough in countering Russian President Vladimir Putin’s aggression.
'No to sex on roundabouts', Norway tells high school graduates
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Norway's high school graduates should refrain from running naked across bridges and having sex on roundabouts lest they give drivers "too much of a surprise", the national transport regulator said on Wednesday. Norway's annual post-graduation period called "Russ" lasts weeks, involves partying and drinking heavily - and tends to challenge public morals every spring. In a statement titled "No to sex on roundabouts", Terje Moe Gustavsen, a former minister of transport who now runs the Public Roads Administration, said: "Everyone understands that being in and around roundabouts is a traffic hazard," .
Marx birthplace cashes in on 0 euro notes for anniversary
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
The German city of Trier is struggling to keep up with demand for 0-euro notes, bearing the face of its most famous son and communism's creator Karl Marx, and sold for 3 euros each as part of celebrations for his 200th birthday. Marx's best known and most influential works are the Communist Manifesto, co-written with Friedrich Engels and released in 1848, and his caustic analysis of capitalism "Das Kapital" two decades later. "The souvenir plays on Marx's criticism of capitalism and of course the 0-euro note fits perfectly with Marx as a motif," said Norbert Kaethler, managing director of Triers' tourism office.
How the world made macro strides in curbing microbeads
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When it comes to eliminating plastic waste, a great deal of progress is being made at the smallest of levels: microbeads. Used as exfoliators in such personal care products as face washes and shower gels, these tiny plastic spheres often end up in waterways and oceans, with the potential to pass toxins to fish and humans. Microbeads are so small they can’t be filtered out of the water system once washed down the drain.
Google employees petition Pentagon AI project
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Artificial intelligence project to use software to study drone video.
'Grit & Grace, Brains & Beauty.' Here's What Every Living President Said About Barbara Bush
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Many highlighted her public service and commitment to her family
James Comey Responds to President Trump's Tweet Storm Calling for Him to Be Jailed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"There's been so much of it that we're a little bit numb, and that's dangerous"