World News
IN SHORT
Thursday, April 27, 2017

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
Tucker Carlson and Caitlyn Jenner debate Trump and transgender rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The conservative Fox News host made his debut in the slot formerly occupied by Bill O'Reilly with a discussion about the president's approach to LGBT issues.
Bloomberg dismisses Trump’s ‘disingenuous’ promise to revive coal industry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Billionaire media mogul Michael Bloomberg said that President Donald Trump knows full well he will not be able to save the United States’ declining coal mining industry.
World's last male rhino getting help from Tinder dating app
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — The world's last male northern white rhino has joined the Tinder dating app as wildlife experts make a last-chance breeding effort to keep his species alive.
Stork delivery? Woman gives birth to baby at Nebraska zoo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A woman whose baby was due mid-May went into labor early and gave birth at a Nebraska zoo. Drea Hubbard was born Sunday at the Henry Doorly Zoo & Aquarium, weighing 5 pounds, 5 ounces. Her mother, 24-year-old ...
Humans threaten crucial 'fossil' groundwater: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Human activity risks contaminating pristine water locked underground for millennia and long thought impervious to pollution, said a study Tuesday that warned of a looming threat to the crucial resource. This suggests that deep wells, believed to bring only unsullied, ancient water to the surface, are "vulnerable to contaminants derived from modern-day land uses," study co-author Scott Jasechko, of the University of Calgary, told AFP. Groundwater is rain or melted ice which filters through Earth's rocky layers to gather in aquifers underground -- a process that can take thousands, even millions, of years.
Royal Society: We must take action on AI machine learning to safeguard our futures
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Royal Society is calling for governments, academia and industry to work together urgently to ensure that machine learning develops into a technology able to benefit the UK as a whole, as an antidote to fear mongering about the future dangers of artificial intelligence. The UK's science academy has spent a year and a half working on the report, entitled "Machine Learning: the power and promise of computers that learn by example", in order to find out how the UK general public views machine learning.
Converting coal would help China's smog at climate's expense
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BEIJING (AP) — China's conversion of coal into natural gas could prevent tens of thousands of premature deaths each year. But there's a catch: As the country shifts its use of vast coal reserves to send less smog-inducing chemicals into the air, the move threatens to undermine efforts to rein in greenhouse gas emissions, researchers said Tuesday.
Technology Is Killing Iceland’s Language
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Technology doesn’t speak Icelandic, so it’s in danger of being lost to history.
Astronaut breaks US space record, gets call from Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Astronaut Peggy Whitson broke the U.S. record Monday for most time in space and talked up Mars during a congratulatory call from President Donald Trump.
UNEP chief confident US will not ditch Paris climate deal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The UN's environment chief is confident that the United States will not pull out of the Paris climate deal and expects a decision from Washington next month. Erik Solheim told AFP in an interview on Monday that even if the United States withdraws, China and the European Union will step in and take the lead to implement the global agreement on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
Voices from overseas: People from around the world consider Trump's first 100 days
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It was the most stunning political victory of the 21st century, one that brought shocked concern in many parts of the world and cheers in others. One uncontroversial certainty was that it would cause reverberations around the globe. Donald Trump campaigned on an “America First” platform, but has found himself as president drawn into thorny geopolitical complexities aplenty in the first 100 days of his administration.
Ivanka Trump booed at W20 summit after calling father a ‘champion’ for women
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The first daughter was scoffed at by the audience when she described President Trump’s “advocacy” for families.
Torrents of juice flood Russian town after factory accident
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MOSCOW (AP) — A flash flood of fruit juice from a beverage plant in southern Russia has flowed into a town's streets and into the River Don.
Stuck cow pulled from muddy ditch by Florida deputies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WAHNETA, Fla. (AP) — Sometimes a law enforcement officer's duty involves rescuing a cat from a tree. In one Florida county, it also can involve rescuing a cow.
Deputy wrangles feisty alligator in central Georgia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MACON, Ga. (AP) — An alligator has been apprehended at a park in central Georgia after a sheriff's deputy wrestled the creature.
Trump foreign policy at 100 days: The downside of unpredictability
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Not quite 100 tumultuous days into his term, President Trump’s foreign policy remains a work in progress — a frequently shifting, unpredictable approach to world affairs that has unsettled rivals, but also sometimes unnerves even close allies who wonder if anyone can speak with authority for the Twitter-reliant commander in chief. “It’s early, but you can understand why some people would be unnerved,” Haass told Yahoo News by telephone.
The Trump standard: The 45th president’s norm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump has set new norms and broken old ones: tweetstorms, attacks on Obama, awkwardness with allies, mixing government and business, and more.
The contrarians: They didn’t vote for Trump, but they would now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
David Kord Murray, the owner of a small business-finance company in California, admits he likes to be different — “to take the contrary position.” Yet even he is surprised to have reached his latest conclusion — that while he strongly supported Hillary Clinton during the campaign, and voted for her without reservation, he now wishes he had cast that vote for Donald Trump.
Trump’s ‘big, beautiful wall’ collides with Congress
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump backed off his demand that Congress pay for a wall spanning the entire U.S.-Mexico border in a crucial spending bill that must pass by Friday night to keep the government funded.
Bill Maher Wants Everyone to Stop Talking About Colonizing Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We hear a lot about putting America first. Let's put Earth first."
Astronaut Peggy Whitson holds records for longest time in space by an American
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Whitson is the first woman to command at NASA, take eight space walks and orbit nearly 250 miles above the Earth.
Even penguins marched (well, waddled) for science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What's better than clever protest signs? Protest penguins. On Saturday, as thousands of people joined the March for Science worldwide, a group of penguins waddled in solidarity at the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California. The aquarium shared the "March of the Penguins for Science" via Facebook Live. The post had nearly 1.7 million views by mid-afternoon on Sunday. The March for Science movement was born in response to President Donald Trump's "clear anti-science actions," organizers said in January.  The Trump administration has vowed to slash funding and staffing for federal scientific agencies. Top officials have repeatedly expressed hostility and skepticism toward robust, peer-reviewed, widely accepted research — including the scientific consensus on human-driven climate change. SEE ALSO: The science march is about 'hope' for a fact-based future But the fear that science and reason are under attack isn't confined to the United States.  On April 22 — Earth Day — scientists and their supporters showed up at more than 500 events around the world, from the North Pole all the way down to the real land of the penguins: Antarctica. Das war der #marchforscience in Ny-Ålesund #ArktisFotos: Rodolphe Merceron/AWIPEV pic.twitter.com/5frqKER212 — AWI Medien (@AWI_de) April 22, 2017 A team of German researchers with the Alfred Wegener Institute braved below-freezing temperatures to carry pro-science signs and bang drums across the icy Antarctic landscape. In one photo, they held a sign with a quote from Marie Curie, the Nobel Prize-winning chemist. It read, "Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more so that we may fear less." WATCH: Penguin gets custom wetsuit to keep her warm
Scientists discover a new kind of light in the sky and call it ‘Steve’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The phenomenon was spotted by the University of Calgary’s Eric Donovan, who noticed it in photographs that had been posted on a Facebook page. The Facebook group had described it as a proton arc, but Professor Donovan knew proton auroras aren’t visible.
The EPA won't be shutting down its open data website after all
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists and data experts are closely tracking the websites of federal agencies, noting changes to pages dealing with climate change and energy since President Donald Trump took office.  On Monday, they noticed an alarming message posted to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) open data website, indicating it would shut down on Friday, April 28. SEE ALSO: The science march is about 'hope' for a fact-based future Friday is the day the current federal stopgap funding bill expires. The EPA apparently worried that Congress wouldn't pass a new continuing resolution to fund the government, and preemptively planned to end the Open Data service, according to the contractor managing the site, 3 Round Stones in Arlington, Virginia. However, open data advocates may have found that shining a spotlight and harnessing social media can be powerful tools for protecting our national digital resources. Well, let's get to scraping, my friends. pic.twitter.com/8svzlBYSuZ — Steven Rich (@dataeditor) April 24, 2017 The EPA disputes accounts that it ever intended to take down the website. Open Data was made publicly available in 2016 to enable people to easily search decades' worth of federal environmental data. The site hosts information on more than four million EPA-regulated facilities, including coal-fired power plants, steel mills, dry cleaners, and manufacturing sites. Reporters who visited the Open Data website on Monday encountered a pop-up notification advising them that the site would be shut down on Friday. Later attempts to visit the site resulted in "service unavailable" and "proxy error" screens. Bernadette Hyland, a data scientist and CEO of 3 Round Stones, alerted the public to the changes on Sunday via Twitter and in a Medium post, which has since been updated to include a statement from the EPA. .@splcenter Breaking news on @EPA #pollution #opendata going offline https://t.co/I0JtspAfr6 #EndangeredData #environmentalJustice @altUSEPA — Bernadette Hyland (@BernHyland) April 24, 2017 The EPA told 3 Round Stones, "If Congress does not pass a budget, we will be facing a government shutdown and won't be able to give technical direction to continue any work," Hyland wrote in the Medium post, which received over 8,600 page views in 24 hours. A related tweet earned 137,000 impressions. Social media backlash swiftly followed, and reporters flocked to the site to figure out what, if anything, was happening to the troves of federal environmental information hosted there. By Monday afternoon, visitors to Open Data received a different pop-up notification, which clarifies that data on the site will still be available come Friday. Image: screenshot/opendata.epa.gov"The website isn't going anywhere, and this episode has little to nothing to do with contingency plans in case of a shutdown," J.P. Freire, a spokesman for the EPA, said in an email. He accused the site's contractor of sending "inappropriate and unauthorized communications on EPA's behalf." Another EPA spokesman, John Konkus, said "rumors about the website, opendata.epa.gov, are just that — rumors." Hyland, who stands by her original account, said the last 24 hours have been particularly encouraging. Not only did people speak out in defense of data science — but the federal government also responded. It's the best example of "social media working in a positive way to have a positive outcome that I've ever personally experienced," she said in an interview.  She added that last Saturday's March for Science events likely helped inspire some of the public support for Open Data. "I think we benefitted in a way from that momentum," Hyland said. "The need for open access is at the forefront of everybody's awareness." WATCH: The first zero emissions ship looks pretty badass
Larry Bird delivers Pacers' 2021 All
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — Indiana wants the NBA All-Star Game and sent Larry Bird to get it — in an Indy car.
Toy given to police officer as safety talisman gets to Ohio
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CINCINNATI (AP) — Police in Ohio have received a stuffed toy given by a child to a Pennsylvania police officer to help keep him safe.
Dr. Travis’ Secret Cheap and Healthy Guacamole Ingredient
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Ob/Gyn Dr. Nita Landry is no fan of healthy food – but will she be won over by ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork’s super-nutritious guacamole?
Is There a Solution for Woman's Urinary Incontinence?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains mature subject matter. Viewer discretion is advised.
Woman with Excessive Facial Hair Returns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Diamond, who had a beard due to hormonal imbalances caused by polycystic ovary syndrome, returns to show off her new look! Diamond was distressed by her facial hair – ashamed to go out, and depressed by her appearance. Now she’s received laser hair removal treatments and her shaving days are over!
PBA Is no Laughing Matter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
PseudoBulbar Affect (PBA) is a little-known disorder, but it affects about two million people in the U.S. Those affected are subject to sudden episodes of uncontrollable laughing or crying unrelated to their actual feelings. Dyanna suffered a stroke five years ago. UCLA Professor of Psychiatry and Aging Dr. Gary Small joins The Doctors to explain PBA.
Dr. Dow's Brother's Recovery from Multiple Strokes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Psychotherapist Dr. Mike Dow has helped countless guests to The Doctors deal with difficult and painful events. Now he reveals his own family’s struggle with his brother David’s strokes. “He was a really happy kid, he was a really smart kid,” says Dr. Dow.
Could Brain Stimulation Fight Obesity?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
People with obesity could benefit from magnetic or electric stimulation of the brain that helps them to eat less, a new review of studies finds. In the review, researchers looked at the latest work on two noninvasive brain-stimulation techniques, and found that for people with obesity, both electrical and magnetic pulses yielded promising, though very preliminary, results. The main target of the brain stimulation is usually a region called the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which is linked to dietary self-control, the review said.
In video call to space station, President Donald Trump calls for speeding up trips to Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Humans on Mars by 2024? President Donald Trump set that time frame today, almost certainly in jest, during a congratulatory video call to the International Space Station and its record-setting commander, NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson. The purpose of the orbital linkup from the Oval Office was to recognize Whitson’s new status as the U.S. record-holder for most cumulative time in space – “534 days and counting,” Trump noted. But the topic soon turned to Mars, and how soon humans would be journeying to the Red Planet. When Trump asked Whitson what the time frame was, Whitson noted that the bill he… Read More
Emulating The Unthinkable: FDA's Tech Bet With 'Organ
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Who might have thought that one day the function of an entire organ can be packed into a miniature chip? The human intelligence is transcending past all understanding. And the telling proof for the same ...
The “March for Science” Worked. Here’s Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The “March for Science” Worked. Here’s Why
President Trump speaks with record
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Monday, Arpil 24, 2017, President Trump speaks to record breaking astronaut Commander Peggy Whitson of NASA currently in space on the International Space Station.
How Exercise Can Benefit Your Brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Aerobic exercise, resistance training (such as weight lifting), and tai chi can all boost brain function in people older than 50, concludes a review published today in the British Journal of Spor...
4 Things You Must Know About the Future of Space Travel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Or Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin rocket company, which aspires to launch six lucky tourists into space via a capsule, and that's testing its New Shepard rocket ahead of plans for commercial suborbital journeys in 2018. For those more inclined to board a spaceship, Richard Branson's Virgin Galactic aims to send tourists -- including world-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking -- aboard the SpaceShipTwo (a six-passenger aircraft) into space this year. If you're not interested in gliding into deep or suborbital space -- or you lack the funds to support a $250,000 journey aboard the Virgin Galactic -- you can enjoy epic space events from Earth this year, including watching the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21, stargazing in prized national parks or even checking out the northern lights.
Advocates Urge Administration to Heed Science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists, students and research advocates rallied on a soggy Earth Day in Washington, D.C. on Saturday, conveying a message about scientific freedom without political interference. (April 22)
Facebook Stories could end up driving younger users away instead of attracting them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Simply copying Snapchat might not be enough to keep the biggest social network relevant.
Kids Under 12 Shouldn't Take Codeine Drugs, FDA Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Children younger than 12 should not take codeine, a drug found in some cough and pain medicines, according to new rules from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that further restrict the use of this drug in kids. Parents should read the ingredient labels on pain and cough medicines to make sure that they don't contain codeine or another medication called tramadol before giving the medication to children, the agency said. The FDA said today (April 20) that it is making changes to its requirements for the labels of codeine-containing drugs because of reports that some children experience life-threatening breathing problems, and even die, after taking medicines that contain codeine.
The biggest known database of sarcasm is here. Great
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In spoken English, the difference between a genuine “Can’t wait” and a sarcastic “Can’t wait” is obvious. Online and in written form, not so much. Sarcasm is one of the hardest language concepts for a machine to detect, but to improve natural-language processing (which could, for example, greatly advance the abilities of chatbots) we’re going…
Kitty Hawk unveils, begins testing of 'flying car' prototype
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trace Gallagher reports from Los Angeles
Supporting Science is as American as the Constitution and the Founding Fathers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientific progress and American democracy are inextricably bound for their mutual survival.
France probes Peugeot over emissions cheating
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
France on Monday opened a judicial enquiry into allegations carmaking giant PSA cheated on diesel pollution tests in the latest twist in a huge emissions scandal which hit the industry in 2015. A judicial source told AFP the Paris prosecutor on April 7 opened an investigation into claims that PSA might have rigged controls which could "render its merchandise dangerous for human or animal health". Fraud investigators have levelled similar allegations at PSA's French rival Renault, part government-owned and accused of cheating on pollution tests for diesel and petrol engines for over 25 years with the knowledge of top management.
Kasich: Trump a ‘mixed bag’ at this point
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Ohio Gov. John Kasich said Monday he thinks it’s too early to fully assess President Trump’s performance, even as the 100-day mark of his time in office approaches.
Larry Bird delivers Pacers' 2021 All
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Indiana wants the NBA All-Star Game and sent Larry Bird to get it — in an Indy car. Bird drove four blocks down Fifth Avenue in his specially themed car to deliver the Pacers' bid to host the 2021 game ...
Witnesses to execution test a 'somber civic duty'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Dale Baich has watched 13 people die in the Arizona death chamber. One in particular has stayed with him: convicted murderer Joe Woods, who took nearly two hours to die. In some respects, Mr. Baich, a capital defense attorney, had no option but to be there for a client.
For Turkey's Erdoğan, new powers present fresh challenges
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Dressed all in black and with a string of prayer beads wrapped around his wrist, the bearded election monitor in Istanbul's conservative Fatih district predicted that a “yes” result to expand presidential powers would heal Turkey’s deep divisions, and usher in an era of utopian calm. “Turkey will be a more understanding, tolerant, and sympathetic country,” said Ülker Abdullah, an Istanbul security guard appointed by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) to watch a polling station for the landmark referendum April 16. “If the result is ‘yes’ … people will live with each other with more respect, with more diversity,” said Mr. Abdullah, of his expectations of investing Turkey’s charismatic but divisive leader with sweeping new powers.
Israeli president’s advice on Holocaust remembrance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
If his talk can inspire Israel and its neighbors to live in peace someday, perhaps it will be remembered as long as the Holocaust will be. The third way accepts the need for Jewish solidarity and the goal of preventing genocide but adopts the Jewish value of respecting all men and women, regardless of their religion or race.