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Three Dead, Hundreds Injured by Earthquake in Western Japan's Osaka
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One victim was a 9-year-old girl who was knocked down by a concrete wall
James Hansen wishes he wasn't so right about global warming
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — James Hansen wishes he was wrong. He wasn't.
Donald Trump To Establish ‘Space Force’ And Twitter Users Can’t Deal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Making America great again wasn't good enough for Donald Trump. Now he's
Crying for 'Mami' and 'Papá' at a Border Patrol detention center
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
 ProPublica has a recording of 10 children ages 4 to 10 who had been separated from their parents and brought to an unnamed facility within the previous 24 hours. An article describes the children crying “‘Mami’ and ‘Papá’ over and over again, as if those are the only words they know."
On election issues, US Supreme Court sticks to the shallows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Elections – how they’re set up, how they’re carried out – have been an important theme in the current Supreme Court term. Justices considered cases on everything from appropriate voting booth attire to methods of drawing election district lines. The gerrymander issue, dealing with partisan manipulation in the drawing of districts, was notable in this regard.
Family separation: Evangelicals add their voices to opposition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Julie Frady planned to make a poster to protest the Trump administration’s new “zero tolerance” immigration policy last week, she wanted to find the perfect Bible verse to stand against it, she says, one nobody else would expect. Since she joined about 60 protesters who marched in front of the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services office in Delano, Kan., Thursday, more and more people across the United States, and from across its often-polarized political spectrum, have begun to express deep moral reservations at the logistical realities of the practice.
Is Gene Editing Dangerous? 4 Things You Should Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Investing in gene editing could be risky. But how risky?
What Happens if AI Doesn’t Live Up to the Hype?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Artificial intelligence is having a moment in London. Last week, to coincide with London Tech Week, an annual showcase of the city’s digital prowess, London hosted CogX, a 6,000-person-strong event that bills itself as the “Festival of All Things AI,” and the AI Summit London, which lays claim to the mantle of “the world’s largest AI event for business.” The events have non-stop panels, parties, and big-name sponsors like SoftBank, Accenture, IBM and Google. Underpinning much of the buzz over artificial intelligence in London and elsewhere is the implicit premise that AI is the transformative technology of the moment, or maybe of the decade, or even of the century or, well, just about ever.
Angela Merkel Is Fighting for Her Political Life. Here's What to Know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A standoff over Germany’s liberal migration policies threatens to collapse the fragile coalition that Merkel presides over.
Retired astronaut says NASA and SpaceX 'will never go to Mars'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A retired astronaut predicts that rockets developed by SpaceX, NASA, and Blue Origin won’t succeed in landing human beings on Mars — not because the technology won’t work, but because the safety risks are too great.
ETF of the Week: ARK Genomic Revolution Multi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ETF Trends publisher Tom Lydon discussed the ARK Genomic Revolution Multi-Sector Fund (ARKG) on this week’s “ETF of the Week” podcast with Chuck Jaffe on the MoneyLife Show. Drug stocks are also getting ...
Senate candidate's first campaign ad depicts Trump administration as literal dumpster fire
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Richard Painter, a former White House ethics attorney under President George W. Bush who is running for the U.S. Senate in Minnesota as a Democrat, is taking his pointed criticism of President Trump straight to voters.
Rubio campaign manager: The GOP no longer has an 'ideological compass'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Terry Sullivan, in an interview for “The Long Game,” a Yahoo News podcast, leveled his critique at both Republicans and Democrats, but said as a Republican he was more authorized to speak about that party’s drift.
Tests confirm mystery animal shot in Montana was a wolf
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The mystery is over: Wildlife officials have confirmed that an unusual-looking animal shot in central Montana was a gray wolf.
Amid growing tensions with Russia, a push for meaningful dialogue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“They haven’t improved,” says the former Russian energy minister and businessman, whose foundation underwrites Russian participation in a longstanding effort to boost bilateral relations through unofficial, “Track II” diplomacy. In fact, US-Russian relations have only sunk into deeper distress since September, the last time the two citizens’ delegations of the Dartmouth Conference met: more sanctions, more diplomatic expulsions, more military clashes in Syria, and a growing sense that the entire US-Russian arms-control regime is at risk. “I invest my time, energy, money,” says Dr. Shafranik, co-chair of the Dartmouth dialogues.
Islamist and feminist: A new generation stakes its claim
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Alaa Khaled finds nothing unusual about being both a devout Muslim and a women’s activist, insisting she is an activist because she is a Muslim. “As a Muslim it is incumbent on me to fight for social justice for my country, my citizens, and my gender,” Ms. Khaled says while protesting austerity measures and taxes in Jordan in recent demonstrations that brought down the prime minister. “Fighting against injustice and inequality, fighting for human rights and women’s rights – these are not just my political causes,” Khaled says.
The high court’s hint on partisan gerrymandering
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In a unanimous ruling on Monday, the Supreme Court hinted at how it may someday decide on partisan gerrymandering, or the drawing of electoral districts by state legislators to keep one party in power. Individual voters, the justices concluded, must first show whether they were harmed by the boundaries of their particular voting district. For the courts, the effect of gerrymandering on political or social groups is not a matter of justice.
The Latest: Trump signing directive to clean up space junk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump is signing a new space policy directive at the White House that aims to reduce satellite clutter in space. Trump said Monday that the United States' space program had been bogged down by politics and rising costs. It also sets up new guidelines for satellite design and operation, to avoid collisions and spacecraft breakups.
The World Health Organization Now Considers 'Gaming Disorder' a Unique Mental Health Condition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some critics warned that the move may risk stigmatizing young video gamers
Rudy Giuliani Says President Trump Could Use Pardon Power After Russia Probe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pardons may be granted if the president believes anyone was treated "unfairly"
When is the summer solstice? Everything you need to know about the longest day of the year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On some days it feels like summer has definitely arrived: the deckchairs are out in parks, holidays are booked, there's mention of firing up the barbecue and – in true British fashion – we've no idea what to wear to our air-conditioned offices. But technically speaking astronomical summer doesn't actually begin for a few days, when Britain will enjoy the longest day of 2018. Read on below to find everything you need to know about summer, the solstice, traditions, the significance of Stonehenge – and how to celebrate it. When is the longest day of the year? In the northern hemisphere, summer solstice, or longest day of the year, takes place between June 20 and 22 each year.  This year it falls on Thursday, June 21, when the UK will enjoy 16 hours and 38 minutes of daylight. The sun will rise at 4.43am and set at 9.31pm, according to weather.com.  The solstice officially marks the beginning of astronomical summer which ends when the autumn equinox falls on September 23. Day and night will be at almost equal length on this day, as the sun crosses the celestial equator and moves southward into the northern hemisphere. What happens during the summer solstice? There are two solstices each year - one in the winter and one in the summer. The summer solstice occurs when the when the tilt of Earth's axis is most inclined towards the sun and is directly above the Tropic of Cancer. Traditionally, the summer solstice period fell between the planting and harvesting of crops, leaving people who worked the land time to relax. This is why June became the traditional month for weddings. It might seem like a day to celebrate, but it actually signals the moment the sun's path stops moving northward in the sky, and the start of days becoming steadily shorter as the slow march towards winter begins.  Summer solstice 2017, in pictures However, we won't notice the days becoming shorter for a while. The shortest day of the year isn't until Thursday, December 21, known as the winter solstice; it lasts for 7 hours 49 minutes and 41 seconds in Britain, which is 8 hours, 49 minutes shorter than the June solstice. At the winter solstice, the Earth's axis is tilted furthest away from the sun directly over the Tropic of Capricorn bringing only a few hours of daylight. In the southern hemisphere the dates of the two solstices are reversed. The winter solstice occurs on the same day in June and the summer solstice the same day in December. The term 'solstice' derives from the Latin word 'solstitium', meaning 'sun standing still'. Some prefer the more teutonic term 'sunturn' to describe the event. Astrologers say the sun seems to 'stand still' at the point on the horizon where it appears to rise and set, before moving off in the reverse direction. Equinox and solstice explainer graphic Summer solstice traditions: why is Stonehenge so significant? Stonehenge in Avebury, Wiltshire is the most popular place for Pagans to celebrate the longest day because it famously aligns to the solstices. The rising sun only reaches the middle of the stones one day of the year when it shines on the central altar. Built in three phases between 3,000 B.C. and 1,600 B.C Stonehenge's exact purpose still remains a mystery. The stones were brought from very long distances – the bluestones from the Preseli Hills more than 150 miles away, and the sarsens probably from the Marlborough Downs, 19 miles to the north. The day marks the ancient middle of summer It has significance for pagans who have always believed that midsummer day holds a special power.  Britain's most mysterious stone circles Midsummer's eve was believed to be a time when the veil between this world and the next is at its thinnest, and when fairies were though to be at their most powerful. Over the centuries, the June solstice has inspired many festivals and midsummer celebrations involving bonfires, picnics, singing, watching the sun rise and Maypole dancing. Many towns and villages across Britain still mark the day.  One ritual was the lighting of fires, heralding the start of shorter days, although this doesn't really happen anymore. The idea was that flames would keep the dark away.  Where can I celebrate the summer solstice? Stonehenge always welcomes an influx of garland-wearing hippies, druids and curious tourists who head to the mysterious stone circles and wait for the sun to appear.  Crowds of around 20,000 greet the moment dawn breaks with a mixture of cheers and silent meditation, and the strawberry moon added extra excitement this year.  The solstice car park will open on Wednesday at 7pm ahead of the sunset at 9:26pm. Revellers will watch the sunrise at 4:52am the following day. Moonrise over Stonehenge in Wiltshire  Credit: Alamy It's slightly quieter at the Avebury stone circle, Britain's second greatest prehistoric site, about 20 miles from Stonehenge. In Penzance, the Golowan Festival celebrates the summer solstice from June 23 to 28. If you're in London, watching the sunrise from Parliament Hill will give you great views of the capital.
President Trump's Family Separation Policy Is Dividing Republicans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
High profile Republicans like Laura Bush and Susan Collins are speaking out
Trump: 'The United States will not be a migrant camp'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Monday again tried to shift blame for his administration’s controversial policy of separating immigrant families at the border to Democrats.
‘It’s disgraceful’: Some Trump supporters condemn family separations at border
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Several of President Trump’s supporters have been speaking out against the administration’s policy of separating children from their parents when they cross the U.S. border illegally.
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
This Retired Astronaut Says SpaceX and NASA Rockets ‘Will Never Go to Mars’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He compared the prospect to trying to cross an ocean in a canoe.
Meghan Markle Cried When Her Father Told Her He Would Miss Her Wedding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thomas Markle also said he disagreed with Prince Harry about Donald Trump
The inside story of how AI got good enough to dominate Silicon Valley
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alex Krizhevsky didn’t get into the AI business to change the course of history. Krizhevsky, born in Ukraine but raised in Canada, was just looking to delay getting a coding job when he reached out to Geoff Hinton about doing a computer-science PhD program in AI at the University of Toronto. The fateful moment was…
Cages, Fences and Foil Sheets. What it's Like Inside a Facility Where the Border Patrol Is Holding Families
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The U.S. Border Patrol allowed reporters to briefly visit the facility where it holds families arrested at the southern U.S. border
Trump's NASA Moon Shot May Start With Robots Before Astronauts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump’s administration wants to send robotic explorers to the moon as early as next year and do another human lunar landing within 10 years, according to a NASA spokeswoman. The push could result in the first Americans stepping foot on the moon’s surface 55 years after doing so for the first time, NASA spokeswoman Megan Powers said. Meanwhile, Trump plans to sign a directive Monday to better track and monitor space debris as commercial and civil space traffic increases.
Cigarettes Have to Be Labeled 'Deadly' Now. Here's Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A recent court order requires tobacco companies to detail cigarettes' deadly health effects and the addictiveness of smoking
Baby born on Paris suburban train gets free rides until 25
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
The Paris public transport company RATP says a baby boy born in a suburban train will get free rides in the French capital until he is 25. Live-tweeting the event Monday, the RATP said the baby was born in a train in the center of Paris, disrupting traffic on the RER A line. News of the "unannounced birth" was displayed on Paris train traffic screens.
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
Poachers become protectors: How tigers bounced back in an Indian park
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Over two days inside Periyar Tiger Reserve, a national park in South India, Mr. Chacko and his colleagues demonstrate time and time again their knowledge of this forest and its inhabitants. Since they were teenagers, the men have shared the lush Cardamon Hills and shores of the Periyar River with bison, elephants, and tigers – originally, as poachers. Today, they work as tour guides and caretakers of the national park, thanks to an initiative by the local forest department.
Here's What to Know About Asia's Annual Dragon Boat Festival
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The annual celebration honors an ancient Chinese poet
Making Sense of How Our Brains Form Decisions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists are closer to understanding how the brain works by using a tiny, flexible, needle-like probe that can measure how different areas communicate with one another. Photo: Composite/Allen Institute for Brain Science
The internet fuels conspiracy theories – but not in the way you might imagine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Conspiracy theories have always existed but the internet fuels them in new ways.
Cambodian Prince Norodom Ranariddh Seriously Injured in Car Accident That Killed His Wife
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Prince Norodom Ranariddh has reportedly been medically evacuated to Thailand
A Gunman Has Been Killed After Wounding Two People at a Walmart in Washington
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bystander shot the gunman dead outside the store
Audi boss arrested in diesel probe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Audi chief executive Rupert Stadler was arrested Monday in connection with parent company Volkswagen's "dieselgate" emissions cheating scandal, with prosecutors saying they feared he might try to destroy evidence. The dramatic development comes a week after Munich prosecutors raided Stadler's home, accusing him of fraud and the falsification of documents that allowed diesel vehicles equipped with cheating software to be sold to European customers. Prosecutors in the Bavarian state said the arrest was justified because of the "risk of concealment of evidence".
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
This Retired Astronaut Says SpaceX and NASA Rockets 'Will Never Go to Mars'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This Retired Astronaut Says SpaceX and NASA Rockets 'Will Never Go to Mars'
Mexico Fans Set Off Earthquake Sensors With Raucous World Cup Celebration
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sensors recorded a small earthquake possibly caused by "mass jumping"
AP Was There: The age of climate change begins
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — On June 23, 1988, a top NASA scientist told Congress and the world that global warming had arrived. NASA scientist James Hansen predicted that 1988 would be the world's hottest year on record, thanks to the burning of fossil fuels that released heat-trapping gases.
Landslides, flash floods as monsoon batters southern Myanmar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Flooding in southern Myanmar has caused a landslide at a famed Buddhist pagoda, submerged homes and displaced hundreds of people as monsoon rains batter the country. Several parts of Myanmar's southern Mon state are facing flash floods due to heavy rains since the weekend with no relief in sight, according to a report in the state-run Global New Light of Myanmar on Monday. Rains triggered a landslide that damaged the hilltop Kyeik Than Lan​ pagoda, whose golden stupa towers over state capital Mawlamyine.
US property crisis looms as sea level rises, experts warn  
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Along sun-splashed shorelines in the US state of Florida, home prices are on the rise, developers are busy building new complexes, and listings just blocks from the beach describe homes that are "not in a flood zone," meaning no flood insurance is required. A reality check may come sooner than many may think, according to a report out Monday by the Union of Concerned Scientists, which finds as many as 64,000 coastal residences worth $26 billion in Florida are at risk of chronic flooding in the next 30 years, the life of a typical mortgage. Across the United States, 311,000 coastal homes with a collective market value of about $120 billion in today's dollars are at risk of chronic flooding by 2045, it said.
In many ways, Qatar has benefited from its neighbors’ blockade, Qatar’s Arab neighbors should embrace Al Jazeera, Iran’s #MeToo moment begins, T
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“When the blockade was imposed on Qatar on June 5, 2017, few expected it to last as long as it has,” writes Sultan Barakat. “One year on, what started as an expression of frustration with, and attempt to change, Qatar’s independent foreign policy, has, in fact, deepened the political divisions and, if anything, made it more difficult to envisage a return to Gulf unity.
President Trump Ally Roger Stone Reveals Undisclosed Meeting With a Russian National
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Russian figure allegedly tried to sell dirt on Hillary Clinton to Roger Stone
Five Dead After a Border Control Chase Ends With a Crash in South Texas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The vehicle went out of control at more than 100 mph and overturned