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Anthill 11: waste not, want not
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This episode explores how one person's waste can be another's treasure. We talk to scientists trying to eke something useful out of big piles of rubbish and discuss making the economy more circular.
Vacheron Constantin’s Latest Super
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With its latest astronomical super-complication, Vacheron Constantin reaches for the stars and then some.
When reporters accidentally wrote science fiction: A true story about Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Communication can be a tricky business, whether it’s your profession or you’re just exchanging words and ideas with your fellow humans. A true story about science fiction that was accidentally reported as fact a century ago is proof positive. A little glitch and a lot of imagination misled science writers for decades. The error may…
This Tiny Drone Can Pollinate Flowers Like a Bee
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Japanese researcher’s adhesive gel picks up and drops pollen grains on contact.
California fuel standards to get critical review
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
RIVERSIDE, Calif. (AP) — A state review has found California is on track to meet its tougher car-emission standards and urges regulators to draft more ambitious environmental targets for the future.
Save the bees: EU plans blanket ban on destructive pesticides
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The European Commission (EC) is reportedly mulling over new legislation that would ban a majority of insecticides used in fields across the continent. The phenomenon is known as colony collapse disorder, with most scientists in agreement that it is caused by the effects of plant-protecting chemicals, in addition to habitat loss and natural diseases. The most damaging pesticides in question are called neonicotinoids and according to leaked drafts of the plans, acquired by the Guardian, the EC is considering a blanket ban.
If you lose your sense of smell, it could mean you’re going to die
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers say that measuring older people’s sense of smell could be an important indicator of overall health well-being. Dr Jonas Olofsson, of the University of Stockholm in Sweden, said: ‘Our results were not explained by dementia, which was previously linked to smell loss.
Hunt For Sterile Neutrinos Draws Another Blank
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers associated with the NEOS collaboration in South Korea announced Tuesday that they had failed to find any trace of the hypothetical particles.
A round
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — They took an eight-hour flight just to look out the airplane's window, but it was an extraordinary view.
Threat to Birth Control Access Should Transcend Politics (Op
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump's new administration has introduced a dizzying array of dramatic policy changes, leaving many people struggling to comprehend the impact. Such a repeal would jeopardize access to free, highly effective birth control. Republican, Democrat, woman or man: Everyone is put at risk from a wrongly politicized issue that has no place in reproductive health.
Engineers develop solar powered 'skin' which could transform lives
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Engineers have developed an innovative way of using the sun to power a "synthetic skin" used on prosthetic limbs.
Think GOP Health Insurance Overhaul Is Stalled? Some Changes Already Are Underway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Even though House Speaker Paul Ryan was forced Thursday to delay the vote on legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, major changes to health insurance already are afoot. “The T...
Why worms and fish are good models for epilepsy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Simpler animal models can give researchers a much clearer picture of human diseases.
Giant, hyper
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It takes just about 27 days for the Moon we all know and love to make its way around the Earth, but it's going to take far longer for a giant model of the Moon to do the same. Museum of the Moon is an art exhibit that provides visitors with an up-close-and-personal look at our planet's only natural satellite, and it's currently traveling between festivals and universities so that everyone can experience its awesomeness. https://vimeo.com/186381069 Created by artist Luke Jerram, Museum of the Moon is described as "a fusion of lunar imagery, moonlight and surround sound composition." In practical terms, it's a huge model of the Moon measuring 30 feet in diameter, with every square inch of its sphere covered in ultra high-resolution NASA imagery of the lunar landscape. At 1:500,000 scale, each centimeter of the manmade Moon represents just over three miles of the real lunar surface. https://vimeo.com/173586070 The idea behind the project is to showcase how the Moon has impacted civilization since the dawn of mankind. To that end, the touring artwork will collect new bits of Moon lore from each place it visits, bringing new stories, beliefs, and traditions to every new location. The mini Moon has already visited France, the UK, Belgium, and the Netherlands, and will hop between festivals in Europe for much of the remainder of 2017.
EU plans to place blanket ban on bee
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The European Commission (EC) is reportedly mulling over new legislation that would ban a majority of insecticides used in fields across the continent. The phenomenon is known as colony collapse disorder, with most scientists in agreement that it is caused by the effects of plant-protecting chemicals, in addition to habitat loss and natural diseases. The most damaging pesticides in question are called neonicotinoids and according to leaked drafts of the plans, acquired by the Guardian, the EC is considering a blanket ban.
Automated machine learning company DataRobot raises $54m
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DataRobot has raised $54 million in a Series C round, bringing its total investment to $111 million.
Fossil Named In Honor Of David Attenborough
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The famous naturalist and broadcaster has had a number of other fossils, animals, plants and even a boat, named after him previously.
Why DARPA Funded a Farm Tech Startup
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Why DARPA Funded a Farm Tech Startup
SCIENCE SAYS: Unavoidable typos in DNA help fuel cancer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — Cancer patients often wonder "why me?" Does their tumor run in the family? Did they try hard enough to avoid risks like smoking, too much sun or a bad diet?
How science is helping the police search for bodies in water
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
How does the police decide where to send dive teams to search for bodies? They ask scientists for advice.
Could Breast Implants Be Linked to Cancer?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Women with breast implants may be at a higher risk for a rare cancer, according to an FDA announcement. Dr. Ordon clarifies that this is not a correlation with breast cancer, but a blood cancer called anaplastic large cell lymphoma. When an implant is placed, a woman’s body forms a capsule of biofilm around it – this is where the cancers may occur.
Is March Madness Leading to a Vasectomy Boom?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
March is the peak period for college basketball excitement! But according to the Cleveland Clinic, it’s also a peak period for something else.
DIY Dermatology Trend Dangers!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Dermatologist Dr. Sonia Batra is here to discuss some DIY skin treatments that have gone viral. The Micro-Roller is supposed to plump lips by jabbing them with thousands of tiny needles as an alternative to fillers and collagen injections. “The little needles irritate the skin, and they also stimulate collagen,” explains Dr. Batra, who demonstrates the product on her own lips.
I Absorbed My Twin Before Birth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
“I have a condition called chimerism,” explains Taylor. The rare condition occurs when two fraternal fertilized eggs fuse in the womb – in a sense, Taylor absorbed her own twin sister. “I have two different immune systems, and I have two different bloodstreams.
I Lost My Eye to Save My Life!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
When she was just eight years old, Lindsay developed a lump on her eye. Lindsay was separated from her family for two months during treatment. The family hoped their ordeal was over, but 18 months later the cancer returned.
Why does water splash? We may just have solved this longstanding physics mystery
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Recently, I have contributed to this field by working on a new theory explaining what happens to the critical thin layer of air between a drop of water and a surface to cause a splash. The most obvious question is why, and when, do drops splash? Nowadays, cameras can take over a million frames per second and resolve the fine details of a splash.
Scorching heat from this 'artificial sun' could help fight climate change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
German scientists have just switched on the world's largest "artificial sun," an instrument they say could be a game-changing technology in the fight against climate change. With 149 high-powered lamps, the Synlight system produces light about 10,000 times the intensity of natural sunlight on the Earth's surface. When concentrated on a single spot, the lamps can generate scorching temperatures of around 5,400 degrees Fahrenheit. The scientists say they eventually hope to harness that heat to produce hydrogen fuels, a carbon-free alternative for vehicles and airplanes. SEE ALSO: This giant offshore wind farm will be the largest in the U.S. A group of scientists and German officials unveiled the $3.8 million system this week at the German Aerospace Center's research facility in Jülich, a town in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. Within the facility, the Synlight experiment sits in a protective radiation chamber. Image: DLR institute of solar research "We need to expand existing technology in practical ways in order to achieve renewable energy targets, but the energy transition will falter without investments in innovative research," Johannes Remmel, the environment minister of North Rhine-Westphalia, said in a statement. Similar light-based technologies already exist in the U.S. desert. Sprawling solar power stations use mirrors to concentrate sunlight onto water. That heat in turn produces steams, which spins turbines and generates clean electricity. The Synlight team is studying whether their artificial sun could do something similar, but with hydrogen fuels. Hydrogen is sometimes called the "fuel of the future" because, unlike petroleum and natural gas, it doesn't produce carbon dioxide when burned. Hydrogen fuels are made by extracting the chemical from water vapor — a process that requires an enormous amount of energy to create. Image: Markus Hauschild/German aerospace center If companies get that energy from coal or natural gas power plants, then the hydrogen fuels aren't truly a zero-carbon alternative.  The artificial German sun won't immediately fix this conundrum, because Synlight itself requires a vast amount of electricity to operate. Just four hours of operation consumes as much electricity as a four-person household in a year, the Guardian noted. But the scientists said eventually they hope to harness natural sunlight to produce the hydrogen. "Renewable energies will be the mainstay of global power supply in the future," said Karsten Lemmer, an executive board member of the German Aerospace Center, said in the statement.  WATCH: This blooming solar system harvests energy from the sun like a flower
Expert: Bird flu outbreak nation's worst since 2015
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bird flu outbreak that has led officials to euthanize more than 200,000 animals in three Southern states already is the nation's worst since 2015 and new cases are still popping up, an expert said Wednesday. ...
Happier Feet: Antarctica Home to Millions More Penguins Than Thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Millions more Adélie penguins are waddling along the icy Antarctic continent than scientists previously thought. Researchers had estimated that about 2.3 million Adélie penguins called East Antarctica home. A team of scientists completed a comprehensive count of the penguin population using aerial and ground surveys, tagging data and automated cameras during several breeding seasons.
British teenager emails NASA to tell them their calculations are wrong
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A British teenager has emailed NASA scientists to tell that their calculations are wrong – and the space agency thanked him. A-Level student Miles Soloman found that radiation sensors on the International Space Station were recording ‘false data’ – and messaged a correction to NASA.
Don’t eat this spinach: Scientists grow heart tissue on Popeye’s favorite greens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What's the best platform for growing healthy heart tissues in a lab? According to a new bioengineering research project, it may be good old fashioned spinach leaves. Popeye would be proud.
Satellite launch shelved over strikes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After three days of delays caused by worker strikes in French Guiana, rocket firm Arianespace opted Thursday to postpone indefinitely the launch of satellites for South Korean and Brazilian clients. The launch will not be rescheduled "until the labour situation is resolved," Didier Faivre, director of Europe's Guiana Space Centre in Kourou, told local radio. The rocket is to deliver communications satellites for Brazil and South Korea into Earth orbit.
Student’s VR therapy tool combats social anxiety and speech disorders
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
24-year-old Product Design student Gareth Walkom has developed VR software designed to help individuals work through social anxieties and speech disorders by confronting a range of virtual scenarios.
Town of Reduction, population 60, up for sale in Pennsylvania
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By David DeKok HARRISBURG, Pa. (Reuters) - Got $1.5 million to spare? If so, tiny Reduction, a one-time company town built to house workers at a long-vanished garbage-processing plant in western Pennsylvania, could be yours for the asking. The plant, built by American Reduction Co on a wide bend of the Youghiogheny River, shut down in 1936 after processing waste from the city of Pittsburgh since the early 20th century.
5 Reasons Sex Is Painful
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Want to learn exactly how you can treat these pleasure-blockers? In this video, we teach you about five common reasons why sex can feel painful, and give simple solutions for each. Tune in if you’re suffering from any of these.
Pappardelle With Asparagus and Salmon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
By shaving butternut squash into thick ribbons, you can easily swap calorie-heavy Italian classics, like pappardelle, with a tasty low-carb alternative.
How to Protect Kids from Household Poisons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Of the two million-plus calls to U.S. poison control centers in 2015, almost half concerned kids aged six and under,  according to the latest data from the American Association of Poison Control ...
Wedding Body Workout: 5 Moves for Cinching Your Waist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
If you’re trying to get toned in time for the hotter weather and the wardrobe it requires, look no further. In this video, fitness expert Lauren Williams shares her five favorite moves for a cinched waist.
You can now convert your ordinary bike into an electric one
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Don’t have the cash to replace your regular bike with a fancy electric model? Well, you don’t have to. You can now replace your front wheel with an electric one. It’s called UrbanX and has already well surpassed its $50,000 Kickstarter goal, reaching more than $191,000. The wheel will give you a 30-mile range with a 20 mph top speed. It’s also much lighter than the average e-bike, which usually weighs 65 to 90 pounds. UrbanX adds only 15 pounds to your bike, which includes motor, battery, spokes, rim, and tire. ...
Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 review: The best Android tablet you can buy will cost you
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Samsung’s Galaxy Tab S3 is a direct shot at Apple’s iPad Pro. Apple’s (AAPL) original iPad was the standard-bearer for tablets. Straight-up tablets are falling out of style, as consumers increasingly turn toward productivity laptop-tablet hybrid devices like, well… the $599 iPad Pro.
Ancient Egypt: 6,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A carving showing a hunter armed with a bow, a dancing figure with arms in the air and an African ostrich has been discovered in Egypt, dating from the Stone Age. The carving was discovered during excavation of a large necropolis near Aswan in south-east Egypt. More than 80 mounds have been discovered in the necropolis, known as as Qubbet el-Hawa, or the hill of wind.
New Zealand's 2016 Kaikoura earthquake was one of the most complex ever recorded
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 7.8 magnitude earthquake that struck New Zealand last year was one of the most complex earthquakes ever recorded. Scientists discovered up to 12 faults ruptured at great distances apart – a finding that may mean current hazard models need to be completely rethought. It could also mean the risk of large earthquakes elsewhere are more likely.
Using a satnav switches off part of your brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Perhaps that explains why some users end up in rivers or driving through churches.
Thousands of US Kids Take Opioid Drugs Accidentally Each Year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thousands of U.S. children ingest opioid drugs each year on accident, a new study found. Results showed that, during this time, there were 188,000 total calls, or more than 11,000 calls per year, regarding children and teens who ingested opioid drugs. More than half of these cases involved young children who unintentionally ingested the drugs, the researchers said.
These Amazing Lamps Bring a Full Moon Into Your Bedroom Every Night
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These are stunning!
Engineers develop solar powered 'skin' which could transform lives
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Engineers have developed an innovative way of using the sun to power a "synthetic skin" used on prosthetic limbs.
White House ‘confident’ about health care vote despite delay
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The White House said a House floor vote on the GOP health care bill was postponed simply for scheduling reasons on Thursday and officials remain “confident” it will pass. Shortly after news of the delay broke, White House principal deputy press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters the vote was put off to avoid holding it in the wee hours of Friday morning. “We are going to start the debate tonight on the vote as planned,” Sanders said.
GOP critic of health care bill says Trump will win despite delay
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., the head of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, went out of his way to praise President Trump’s negotiating skills when announcing to reporters Thursday that there were still “30 to 40” House members whom the White House had failed to woo in time for the planned health care vote that evening. “We would not be where we are today even considering this if it were not for President Trump’s personal involvement,” Meadows said, minutes after House leaders announced they were scrapping their much-touted plan to vote Thursday on the repeal-and-replace measure.
President Trump’s big
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As President Trump was testing out a big rig’s horn on the White House South Lawn Thursday afternoon, the Republicans’ proposed Obamacare replacement bill was stalling out in the House.
Russia set to unveil the world's newest print encyclopedia – and its last?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Initiated by a decree of Vladimir Putin in 2003, the massive 36-volume Great Russian Encyclopedia (GRE) was intended – as encyclopedias tend to be – as a compendium of all fundamental knowledge, a benchmark of truth, and, more subtly, a repudiation of the ideologically-tinged world view of its famous predecessor, The Great Soviet Encyclopedia. Recommended: Sochi, Soviets, and czars: How much do you know about Russia? "Russia needed a new encyclopedia that reflects modern society and consciousness, so this one is not a continuation of its Soviet predecessor," Mr. Kravets says.