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Police: Man grew pot because he thought it'd be legal soon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ST. ALBANS, Vt. (AP) — Vermont police have arrested a man who acknowledged growing marijuana to prepare for possible statewide legalization of the drug.
Research suggests comfort eating is triggered by nurture, not nature
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You may be all too familiar with the scenario: you’ve had a particularly grueling day at work, or you’re in the throes of a devastating breakup, and you reach for your favorite food for comfort. Scientists call this tendency “emotional overeating”, reacting to negative emotions such as stress or sadness, with the desire to eat highly palatable food. To find out more, we recently conducted two studies of emotional overeating in children from the UK and Norway.
‘Better you than me,’ President Trump jokes with NASA astronauts about urine in space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Monday, April 24, President Trump, Ivanka Trump and NASA astronaut Kate Rubins spoke to Cmdr. Peggy Whitson and flight engineer Jack Fischer of NASA on the International Space Station. The conversation took a lighthearted turn when Whitson told the president about experiments onboard aimed at getting drinking water out of urine.
What Trump has done for, and to, the environment in his first 100 days
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump’s actions during his first 100 days have not won over environmentalists. Donald Trump’s election victory, after a campaign characterized by railing against environmental regulations and dismissing the work of climate scientists, sent shivers through the environmental and scientific communities. During his first 100 days in office, the brash and unpredictable president has been following through on his campaign promises to bolster the oil, coal and natural gas industries and reverse the eco-friendly policies of his predecessor, former President Barack Obama.
Donald Trump’s Russian riddle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Russian cyberattacks during the election, ties between Trump advisers and the Kremlin, investigations: What do they all add up to? Here’s what we know.
From inauguration to 100th day: President Trump’s rocky ride in pictures
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Just 100 days into his term, Donald Trump’s young presidency has already provided its share of memorable moments, from his speech to a joint meeting of Congress to his decision to rain cruise missiles on a Syrian base in response to a chemical attack that killed civilians, including children. He has hosted a virtual parade of world leaders, seen his Supreme Court pick confirmed, and held some rallies that recall the mood of his boisterous, unorthodox campaign, all while trying to lay the groundwork for still-elusive legislative achievements.
'Marvel vs Capcom: Infinite' gets release date, story mode
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fox Gamer: Capcom announces the release date and collector's edition for the next installment of the fan-favorite fighting franchise
With Secret Airship, Sergey Brin Also Wants to Fly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Google co-founder is said to be working on an enormous dirigible in a Silicon Valley hangar.
What we do in the next 5 years will determine the fate of the melting Arctic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Global warming has pushed the Arctic into a new state unprecedented in human history, with thinning and retreating sea ice, skyrocketing air and sea temperatures, melting permafrost, and glaciers that are shedding ice at increasing rates.  All of these impacts and more may seem remote at first — after all, few of us live in Nunavut — but if you're a coastal resident anywhere in the world, from New York City to Dhaka, Bangladesh, what happens in the Arctic will affect you during the next several decades and beyond, primarily through sea level rise.  SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming The economic effects of all Arctic warming impacts may be enough to dent the gross domestic product of some countries, with cost estimates ranging from $7 trillion to $90 trillion by the end of this century. These are the conclusions of a new, comprehensive assessment of the Arctic climate by a division of the Arctic Council — a cooperative, governing body that helps oversee development in the Far North.  Sea ice (TOP) meets land as seen from NASA's Operation IceBridge research aircraft above Greenland.Image: Mario Tama/Getty ImagesThe scientific report, released on Tuesday, is known as Snow, Water, Ice, and Permafrost in the Arctic, or SWIPA. About 90 scientists helped produce the report, while more than two-dozen experts peer-reviewed the results.  The document contains two key findings that anyone concerned about the future of not just the Arctic, but the entire globe, should take note of.  The first is that the Arctic Ocean could be free of summer sea ice starting as early as the late 2030s, which is earlier than other estimates have shown. The second is that rapid Arctic warming is driving greater melting of land ice in the region, which led scientists to conclude that consensus projections of global sea level rise made in 2013 are too conservative. Compared to the previous SWIPA report, which was produced in 2011, the new assessment paints a far more dire picture of an Arctic climate in overdrive.  It also offers hope that action can be taken now to slow down and eventually stabilize Arctic warming after about the year 2050. But time is running out. Even with rapid action to curb global warming pollutants like carbon dioxide and methane, the Arctic most of us grew up with — featuring thick sea ice making the region virtually impenetrable year-round — is gone, and is not likely to return anytime in the next century.  Sea ice thickness trends, showing the thinning trend in recent years.Image: zack labe"... The Arctic of today is different in many respects from the Arctic of the past century, or even the Arctic of 20 years ago," the report states. "Many of the changes underway are due to a simple fact: Ice, snow, and frozen ground — the components of the Arctic cryosphere — are sensitive to heat."  Based on computer model projections, the report states that average fall and winter temperatures in the Arctic will increase up to 5 degrees Celsius, or 9 degrees Fahrenheit, above late 20th century values by the middle of the century, even if relatively stringent greenhouse gas emissions cuts are made.  Such temperature thresholds are already being reached in some months, with January 2016 recording a temperature anomaly of 9 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981-2010 average for the region, with even higher anomalies seen during October through February of the same year.  This past winter was the warmest on record for the Arctic, and for the third straight year, Arctic sea ice peaked at a record low level during the winter. This has left sea ice in a precariously thin and sparse state as the upcoming melt season nears.  The report contains valuable findings on what would happen to Arctic climate change if the world were to come close to meeting the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement. That treaty, which went into force in November 2016, aims to keep global warming to well under 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels through the year 2100.  It's unclear whether the agreement's goals are still feasible, considering that the U.S. — the world's second-largest emitter — is considering pulling out of it altogether, and other nations have yet to offer plans to cut their emissions in line with the temperature target.  A "drunken forest" in Fairbanks Alaska where trees are collapsing into the ground due to permafrost melt.Image: Warming Images/REX/ShutterstockMeeting the Paris targets would help slow the pace and reduce the severity of Arctic warming, but it "would not stabilize the loss of Arctic glaciers, ice sheets, and ice caps," the report states.  "The recent SWIPA assessment tells that the changes in the Arctic are bound to continue at the current rate until mid-century," said Morten Skovgaard Olsen, who chaired the new report, in an email.  "But it also tells that immediate and ambitious green-house gas reductions will slow the speed of changes beyond mid-century and even stabilize change beyond mid century, preventing major further impacts associated with the Arctic melt .” Any carbon pollution cuts made now will have the most significant influence on what the Arctic will look like after about 2050, the report's authors said at a press conference Tuesday in Virginia.  “The changes are cumulative, and so what we do in the next 5 years is really important on slowing down the changes that will happen in the next 30 or 40 years," said James Overland, a climate scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  "The emphasis on action and immediacy is one of the main findings” from the report, he said.  NASA project scientist Nathan Kurtz surveys an iceberg locked in sea ice near Pituffik, Greenland.Image: mario tama/Getty ImagesForeign ministers from the eight Arctic nations will meet in Fairbanks, Alaska on May 11 to discuss these findings and other issues pertaining to the region. Some discussion on the Paris agreement may take place, particularly along the sidelines of the talks. According to the SWIPA report, meltwater from Arctic glaciers has contributed 35 percent of current sea level rise, with the greatest contribution coming from Greenland.  The planet's largest island lost an average of 375 gigatons of ice per year. This is equivalent to losing a block of ice measuring 4.6 miles on all sides, from 2011 to 2014 alone. It amounts to twice the melt rate from 2003 to 2008. In addition, thawing permafrost is harming infrastructure from Alaska to Siberia, with landslides and mysterious craters swallowing parts of the Russian Arctic.  In Alaska, the report found that wildfires in taiga forests are worse now than at any time in the past 10,000 years, due to hotter, drier summers and earlier spring snowmelt. WATCH: Stunning drone footage captures rare video of blue whales feeding
Horny male seeks mate: Kenya's last northern white rhino joins Tinder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By Katharine Houreld NAIROBI (Reuters) - Like many guys using the Tinder dating app, Sudan loves the outdoors and travels widely. The catch: he's the world's last male white northern rhino and desperately needs to mate. 6 ft tall and 5,000 pounds if it matters." Conservationists are hoping that Sudan's Tinder profile will help them raise enough money for $9-million fertility treatment as all attempts at getting him to mate naturally have failed.
The burger of the future comes from crickets, not cows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Agriculture has come a long way in the past century. We produce more food than ever before -- but our current model is unsustainable, and as the world’s population rapidly approaches the 8 billion mark, modern food production methods will need a radical transformation if they're going to keep up. But luckily, there’s a range […]
Michael Bloomberg called 'bullsh*t' on this energy technology
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Michael Bloomberg, an outspoken environmentalist and former New York City mayor, had some harsh words for carbon capture and storage, the unproven technology that proponents say will turn fossil fuels into "clean" energy sources. "Carbon capture is total bullshit" and "a figment of the imagination," Bloomberg said on Monday, addressing a crowd at the Bloomberg New Energy Finance summit in New York. SEE ALSO: The Kentucky coal mining museum switches to solar power Carbon capture involves taking the emissions from coal and natural gas-burning power plants and industrial facilities, then burying the carbon deep underground or repurposing it for fertilizers and chemicals. The idea is that by trapping emissions before they enter the atmosphere, we can limit their contribution to human-caused climate change. Climate experts say it will be next to impossible to eliminate the world's emissions without carbon capture systems. The International Energy Agency has called the technology "essential," given that countries are likely to keep burning coal, oil, and natural gas for decades to come. Michael Bloomberg, billionaire, former NYC mayor, prominent environmentalist and major coal critic.Image: joe raedle/Getty ImagesBut to Bloomberg and other critics, that's precisely the problem. By investing billions of dollars into carbon capture, countries can effectively delay the inevitable — the end of fossil fuels — and postpone investments in genuinely cleaner energy, such as wind and solar power. So far, only a handful of carbon capture projects even exist around the world, and many of them have faced steep cost overruns and delays. The Kemper Project in Mississippi — billed as America's "flagship" carbon capture project — is more than $4 billion over budget and still not operational. Yet President Donald Trump and many coal industry leaders talk about carbon capture as if it's already solved the nation's energy challenges. If we have "clean coal," why invest in alternatives? Bloomberg has also used aggressive language to express disdain for the coal industry. "I don't have much sympathy for industries whose products leave behind a trail of diseased and dead bodies," he wrote in his new book, Climate of Hope, which he co-authored with former Sierra Club executive director Carl Pope. "But for everyone's sake, we should aim to put them out of business," Bloomberg said. Scott Pruitt, head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, speaks with coal miners in Pennsylvania.Image: ustin Merriman/Getty ImagesThe billionaire media mogul has donated some $80 million to the Sierra Club to help the environmental group shut down coal-fired power plants as part of its Beyond Coal campaign. More than 250 U.S. coal plants have shut down or committed to retire since the campaign began in 2011. Many of those closures came as natural gas prices plummeted, prompting utilities to ditch coal, and as federal clean air and water rules made it too costly to upgrade aging coal plants. Of the nation's more than 500 coal plants, only 273 now remain open, and Bloomberg's philanthropy arm and the Sierra Club are working to shutter those, too. The former mayor also recently announced a new coal-related donation. Bloomberg told the Associated Press that he plans to donate $3 million to organizations that help unemployed coal miners and their communities find new economic opportunities. Bloomberg Philanthropies highlighted the struggles of miners in a new film, From the Ashes, to be featured at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York this week. Coal miners "have paid a terrible price," he told the AP. WATCH: Documentary 'From the Ashes' shows U.S. coal communities in a new light
Court removes obstacle to releasing wolves in New Mexico
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DENVER (AP) — A federal court on Tuesday removed an obstacle to the U.S. government's plan to release more endangered wolves in New Mexico over the state's objections, but it was not clear whether additional animals would be reintroduced under the Trump administration.
Radiohead Just Got a New Species of Venezuelan Ants Named After Them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In South America, there are ants capable of farming their own food that are known in the scientific community as Sericomyrmex, or "silky ants." Researchers from the Smithsonian recently discovered three new species of these fungus-eating insects, which differ from other Sericomyrmex because the female ants are covered in what Phys.org describes as a "white, crystal-like layer" with an as-of-yet unknown function. …
A psychologist explains why changing your life isn’t as hard as you think
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When Sheryl Sandberg’s husband died unexpectedly two years ago, she was devastated. In her new book Option B, coauthored with organizational psychologist Adam Grant, Sandberg recounts her process of discovering resilience in the face of loss and upheaval. The story of Sandberg—Facebook’s chief operating officer, a mother of two, and the author of Lean In—might…
World's last male northern white rhino gets help from Tinder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — The world's last male northern white rhino has joined the Tinder dating app as wildlife experts make a last-chance breeding effort to keep his species alive.
Did the Stone Method Work for These Two Women?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
At the New Year, Ali and Juliana wanted to get back into shape and feel better about their health and fitness. Ali told The Doctors, “I’m willing to put in the hard work, but I just need somebody to tell me what to do.” They agreed to do celebrity trainer Lacey Stone’s “Eight Weeks to Change” program -- which is part The Stone Method --  addressing three areas: mental, physical, and food. Lacey, who is the trainer on "Revenge Body with Khloe Kardashian," coaches the women through five-day-a-week workouts.
Do You Know How to Escape from a Car Trunk?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A 25-year-old Avondale, Alabama, woman escaped from an abductor who locked her in the trunk of her own car – and it was all caught on camera!
Maria Shriver’s Fight Against Alzheimer’s
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Journalist and author Maria Shriver joins The Doctors to talk about the Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement, which she founded. “My dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2003, and there was very little known about the disease then. Maria notes that Alzheimer’s is increasingly a women’s disease.
My Baby Might Never Walk Without Surgery
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Angelique desperately wanted a child – but her dream pregnancy was marred by scary news. Angelique’s pediatrician said Sophie had dwarfism, but something about the diagnosis didn’t seem to fit. Angelique took her baby to a specialist who identified Sophie’s condition as Congenital Femoral Deficiency, a rare birth defect in which a baby’s femurs fail to develop normally.
'Breakthrough' bending wave technology turns your smartphone's display into one big loudspeaker
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Never mind getting rid of the headphone jack – what if your next mobile phone came without a speaker? It seems like an unthinkable proposition, however according to one company this could be the future of smartphone audio. UK-based tech firm Redux has developed a new type of surface audio technology which it claims removes the need for the frequently underwhelming micro speakers found in smartphones by instead channelling sound through the display.
Scientists name new species of fungus
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new species of ant discovered in the Venezuelan Amazon has been named after Radiohead, Phys.org reports. Ana Ješovnik and Ted R. Schultz from the Smithsonian Institution’s Ant Lab recently discovered three new ant species from the genus Sericomyrmex, and named one species Sericomyrmex radioheadi.
US should stay in Paris climate accord: energy secretary
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The United States should stay in the Paris climate accord but renegotiate it, Energy Secretary Rick Perry said Tuesday, alleging that some European countries were not doing enough to curb emissions. A decision is expected by President Donald Trump next month on whether or not to stay in the landmark 2015 Paris Agreement limiting global carbon emissions, signed by 194 countries. "I'm not going to say I'm going to go tell the president of the United States, 'Let's just walk away from the Paris accord'," Perry said during the Bloomberg New Energy Finance conference in New York.
Priebus: Syria strike reflects ‘Trump Doctrine’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Reince Priebus says that Trump's decision to attack a Syrian military base and to set aside trade disputes with China reflect an emerging “Trump Doctrine.”
Obamacare subsidies remain sticking point in spending bill negotiations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Speaker Paul Ryan speaks about the American Health Care Act, the Republican replacement to Obamacare, in March. WASHINGTON—With a Friday deadline for a government shutdown looming, Democrats and Republicans in Congress are stalled on the issue of continued funding for Obamacare. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., have said any short-term spending bill must include language guaranteeing Congress will pay for the Affordable Care Act’s cost-sharing subsidies, which lower health-care costs for 7 million people.
Even If You've Had Shingles, Get the Zostavax Vaccine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Nearly one in three American adults will experience an outbreak of herpes zoster, also called shingles, at some point in their lives.  Most will get the viral illness—which brings a blistery rash...
‘Cooper’s Treasure’ Star on Why He’s Televising His Secret ‘Treasure Map From Space’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“Cooper’s Treasure” is currently being discovered by viewers, and there’s good reason to board the sea-bottom series. The Discovery show follows the underwater expeditions of Darrell Miklos, who just might have the most valuable and unique treasure map in the world — or rather, from out of this world. Here’s the backstory: Miklos’ friend Gordon Cooper was one of NASA’s first seven astronauts in the 1950s.
Can Collisions Between Protons Create Quark
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists associated with the ALICE collaboration at CERN's Large Hadron Collider have observed possible signatures of this hot and dense plasma even in collisions between protons.
Very hungry caterpillars could be the answer to the Earth's massive plastic bag problem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Spanish biologist and amateur beekeeper may have discovered a way to deal with some of the trillion plastic bags humans use and toss annually — and the answer lies in the humble caterpillar. Or, more specifically, the Galleria mellonella, or wax moth. SEE ALSO: Roads made from recycled plastic are paving the way to a greener tomorrow Federica Bertocchini, from Spain's Institute of Biomedicine & Biotechnology of Cantabria, was actually working away at her side hustle—beekeeping—when she made the discovery that could make a huge dent in Earth's plastic problem. Finding a bunch of wax moths in her hives, where they were busy munching on the wax that her bees need to make honeycomb, she dumped the pesky critters in a plastic bag. On her return, she discovered they'd eaten their way out of the bag. Teaming up with biochemists Paolo Bombelli and Christopher Howe, she aimed to find out if—and how—the creatures were truly digesting the plastic. Their results were published in Current Biology Monday, and could have important ramifications in the fight against environmental waste. Essentially, the team discovered "the fast bio-degradation of polyethylene (PE) by larvae of the wax moth Galleria mellonella, producing ethylene glycol." When a film of PE was left with wax worms, holes started appearing within 40 minutes. As the graphic below shows, a high street grocery bag was riddled with holes after just 12 hours in the presence of some 100 worms. Overall, 92mg of plastic disappeared—far more than the previous record for bacteria, 0.13mg. The team also smeared the unsavory-sounding "worm homogenate" onto PE films, which showed the special enzymes produced by the worms helped break down the plastic. Life always finds a way. And be it to eat & digest polyethylene #plastic bags, like these wax moth caterpillars https://t.co/DH4bYokIlt pic.twitter.com/kaMceb38aS — Current Biology (@CurrentBiology) April 24, 2017 "What allows the wax worm to degrade a chemical bond not generally susceptible to bio-degradation?" the study asks. "The answer may lie in the ecology of the wax worm itself. They feed on beeswax, and their natural niche is the honeycomb; the moth lays its eggs inside the beehive, where the worms grow to their pupa stage, eating beeswax. Beeswax is composed of a highly diverse mixture of lipid compounds, including alkanes, alkenes, fatty acids and esters." In other words, these worms are built to devour compounds similar to those found in plastic bags. But forget notions of huge armies of worms unleashed into your discarded grocery bags.  "The idea would be to not use the worms," Bertocchini says. “Maybe we can find the molecule and produce it at high-scale rather than using a million worms in a plastic bag.” However, not everyone is impressed with the discovery. Marine biologist Tracy Mincer from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute told National Geographic he believed reducing plastic production and increasing recycling was more important than finding ways to break it down after the event.  “Polyethylene is a high-quality resin that can be up-cycled in many ways and can fetch up to $500 per tonne,” he told the publication. “In my opinion, although this is an amazing natural history story and wonderful academic exercise, it is not a solution for disposing of polyethylene as this is throwing away money.” Another researcher from Michigan State University also voiced concern. Ramani Narayan told The Atlantic the evidence that waxworm paste produces ethylene glycol is "tenuous at best." The fight against our plastic infestation continues. WATCH: Scientists have created edible water orbs that can help replace plastic bottles
7 things that make mosquitoes bite you more
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mosquitoes choose their prey — you, perhaps — based on a bunch of factors. But there's...
Wild monkey spotted in central Florida neighborhood
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
APOPKA, Fla. (AP) — Wildlife officials are warning central Florida residents to stay away from wild monkeys after one was spotted in the area.
New York bowler rolls perfect 300 game in just 86.9 seconds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CORTLAND, N.Y. (AP) — A New York bowler has rolled a perfect 300 game in less than 90 seconds.
World's last male northern white rhino gets help from Tinder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
The world's last male northern white rhino has joined the Tinder dating app as wildlife experts make a last-chance breeding effort to keep his species alive. "I don't mean to be too forward, but the ...
Hezbollah's defiant signal to Israel, Lebanon, and the UN
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The stated objective of the Hezbollah-coordinated press tour of southern Lebanon was to see new Israeli defensive installations on the border – indications, according to the powerful Shiite Lebanese militia, of Israeli fears of Hezbollah’s growing military might. The unprecedented spectacle appeared to be a deliberate and calculated breach of a UN Security Council resolution that bans non-state forces from bearing arms in southern Lebanon, and it illustrated the unmatched sway Hezbollah wields, and the impunity it enjoys throughout the country. Recommended: Hezbollah 101: Who is the militant group, and what does it want?
Mysterious shapes and patterns discovered in Arctic and Antarctic sea floor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thousands of kilometres of the Arctic and Antarctic sea floors have been charted in an ambitious and highly detailed atlas of the polar seabed. Several strange shapes gouged out of the sea floor reveal some of the more dramatic periods of the poles' past. What we do know about the seabed here on Earth is perhaps at its scantiest in the remote polar regions.
Donald Trump congratulates record
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After spending more than a year and a half living in space throughout her career, astronaut and International Space Station commander Peggy Whitson has received a congratulatory call from President Donald Trump to commemorate her record breaking time in orbit. During the chat they also happened to discuss drinking urine. “It’s really not as bad as it sounds,” Ms Whitson told Mr Trump about the recycling program on the International Space Station that converts astronaut urine into drinkable water.
Edible insects give Mexicans a taste of history – and maybe the future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
There are crispy brown grasshoppers cooked into that bread. Eating bugs “is confused with being something exotic,” not just by foreigners, but by many city-dwelling Mexicans as well, says Isaac Sandoval, co-owner of the Época de Oro Chocolateria, who is serving up critter-covered chocolates. “This is tradition and is a huge part of Mexico’s story,” Mr. Sandoval says.
Republicans control all of Washington. Why aren't they winning more?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Republicans have a majority in both the House and Senate, and there’s a Republican in the White House. Like many US chief executives before him, President Trump is discovering that partisan dominance isn’t a magic button. There are numerous impediments to a party working its will in national governance, even if it has a congressional majority and holds the executive branch.
Trump’s possible logic on North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As North Korea moves to own more nuclear weapons and missiles, will Japan and South Korea seek nuclear weapons rather than rely on the United States – as the preferred cop on the beat – with its deterrence threat of nuclear retaliation? This has helped curb the proliferation of nuclear weapons, helping to keep the world safe from a devastating type of warfare. It is in this moral context that the world must watch what President Trump, along with China, is doing about North Korea’s nuclear ambitions.
Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Reversed?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Nearly 20 million Americans have diabetes, and another 86 million are at risk for developing it. Jane Ann says that a new program has done just that for her. Jane Ann was diagnosed with diabetes 15 years ago, when she weighed almost 300 pounds.
The Woman Who Carried Her Terminally Ill Baby to Term In Order to Donate Her Organs Gave Birth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
This story is so sad but so inspiring.
This Is Why We Say "Until Death Do Us Part" In Wedding Vows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The standard line is included in many traditional Catholic ceremonies, but what the heck does it really mean?
Serena Williams Officially Confirms Her Pregnancy With the Most Emotional Post
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Warning: Her words *will* make you cry.
Here's How Jennifer Lopez and Alex Rodriguez Started Dating
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
They met in the most surprisingly normal way.
Why I'm Sometimes Jealous of My Wife's Pregnancy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
She's experiencing something I will literally never get to experience.
Extremely Pregnant Ciara Proves She Can Still "Drop It Low" In New Baby Bump Pic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
And she does it in terrifyingly high platform shoes, too.
33 Ways to Battle Jealousy In Your Relationship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Tinder wants you to swipe right on this rhino to help save his species
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The world's most eligible bachelor is coming to Tinder — and he may not be who you expect. In a new campaign launched Tuesday, Tinder has partnered with the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in central Kenya to introduce users to Sudan, the last known male northern white rhino in existence. The platform hopes to save Sudan's species from extinction. SEE ALSO: 9 incredible ways we're using drones for social good As the last hope for all northern white rhinos, 42-year-old Sudan is one of the most protected animals on the planet, surrounded by armed guards at all times. He lives at the conservancy with the only two female northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu. But he's been unable to breed with Najin and Fatu due to a number of issues, including old age and a low sperm count.  Image: TinderThrough Sudan's Tinder profile — complete with an adorable profile photo — Tinder and the Ol Pejeta Conservancy hope to raise a hefty $9 million to fund in-vitro efforts in lieu of natural breeding to save the northern white rhino. "As a platform that makes millions of meaningful connections every day, raising awareness about Sudan the Rhino and the importance of finding his match seemed like something we could support in a really impactful way," a Tinder spokesperson told Mashable. "We've heard countless stories about Tinder babies, but this would be the first match to save a species." Any users who see ads on Tinder could potentially see Sudan the Rhino in their card stack. When users swipe right on Sudan, they'll receive a message that features a link to donate, which would help fund ongoing research focusing on "assisted reproductive technologies." Scientists are currently testing ways to use in-vitro fertilization on Najin and Fatu, as well as female southern white rhinos with Sudan's stored sperm, hoping to achieve white rhino pregnancies to support population growth.  Southern white rhinos aren't endangered, but they are a different subspecies from northern white rhinos. These offspring, then, wouldn't be 100 percent northern white rhino, but experts say that option is better than extinction. And there are currently 17,000 southern white rhinos in existence, meaning chances of success are much higher. White rhino populations around the globe have been severely threatened by poaching, with hundreds killed each year by illegal hunters. The animals are killed for their horns, which are traded illegally and used in traditional Asian medicines to treat a range of illnesses. They're particularly vulnerable to poaching because they're relatively unaggressive and travel in herds. Sudan at the Ol Pejeta Conservacy in central Kenya.Image: Glyn Edmunds / REX / ShutterstockIf successful, this would be the first time scientists carry out artificial reproduction in rhinos. They hope to establish a herd of 10 northern white rhinos after five years.  "Saving the northern white rhinos is critical if we are to, one day, reintroduce rhinos back into Central Africa," said Richard Vigne, CEO of the Ol Pejeta Conservancy. "They contain unique genetic traits that confer upon them the ability to survive in this part of Africa. Ultimately, the aim will be to reintroduce a viable population of northern white rhino back into the wild, which is where their true value will be realized." This isn't Tinder's first foray into supporting social good causes. Recently, the dating app let any user allocate $100 to a women-focused charity on International Women's Day. In 2014, the company partnered with Amnesty International to bring awareness to child and forced marriage around the globe through a series of in-app ads. WATCH: The last Sumatran rhino left the U.S. to save his species
Citizen scientists discover new type of aurora
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists still don't know what caused the mysterious phenomenon 'Steve'.