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President Trump Says He'll Pull the Plug on the North Korea Summit if He Feels it Won't be 'Fruitful'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Donald Trump said he'll pull out of a historic meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un if he feels it’s “not going to be fruitful”
A Militant Linked to the 9/11 Attacks Has Been Captured by U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mohammad Haydar Zammar, a Syrian-born German national, was captured by U.S.-backed forces
Bus leaves Cleveland for New York, ends up in Toledo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CLEVELAND (AP) — Greyhound says it is investigating how a bus meant to take passengers from Cleveland to New York ended up in Toledo.
Origin of diamonds found in meteorite have been traced to a long
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mankind has managed to learn a lot about our Solar System and the planets that reside in it simply by gazing into the night sky, but finding evidence of planets that no longer exist is obviously a much more difficult challenge. A team of scientists now believes they've done just that thanks to the shattered remains of a rock that fell to Earth back in 2008. The Almahata Sitta meteorite broke up in Earth's atmosphere and drifted down to the sands of Sudan's Nubian Desert, and the precious gems found inside of its rocky chunks may reveal the existence of a planet that not longer exists. The strength of diamonds gives them the unique ability to act like a record of the past, and the diamonds found in the remains of this particular meteorite appear to have come from a still-forming "protoplanet." The researchers know this because of the materials found in the meteorite, which could only have formed in a massive rocky body. The only two possible explanations are a colossal asteroid or a young planet. After analyzing the meteorites and diamonds hidden within them, the researchers determined that they could only have formed under incredible pressure, and perhaps even within a young planet as large as Mars. Their work was published this week in Nature Communications. "We discovered chromite, phosphate, and (Fe,Ni)-sulfide inclusions embedded in diamond," the researchers write. "The composition and morphology of the inclusions can only be explained if the formation pressure was higher than 20 GPa. Such pressures suggest that the ureilite parent body was a Mercury- to Mars-sized planetary embryo." The scientists believe that whatever planet it may have come from is completely gone, which would have happened very early in the Solar System's life. They believe that large Mars-size worlds were common in the early days of our system, and that many of them collided with each other and broke down into smaller bodies that were then absorbed by other planets. The chunk of space rock that dropped in the desert in 2008 is considered the first evidence of the existence of these early planets which no longer exist.
Queen Elizabeth Publicly Supports Prince Charles for the First Time to Succeed Her as Leader of the Commonwealth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Saying Charles would "carry on the important work" of leading the Commonwealth
The Deadly Southwest Engine Explosion Is a Dangerous Warning Sign for Thousands of Planes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This has happened once before
Columbine Students Won't be Participating in the National 4/20 Walkout. They’re Doing This Instead
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The walkout is meant to pay tribute to the shooting at their school
Trump's divisive pick to run NASA wins narrow confirmation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Senate narrowly confirmed President Donald Trump's choice of a tea party congressman to run NASA
Horses throw toads to win quirky British pub championship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Two points are awarded for throwing a toad in the hole, with one point awarded for landing it on the lead table. The Black Horse came out victorious at Wednesday's championship at a hall in the team's home town of Lewes in southern England.
Cow may be biggest mammal if humans keep up extinctions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - The spread of humans around the world from Africa thousands of years ago wiped out big mammals in a shrinking trend that could make the cow the biggest mammal on Earth in a few centuries' time, a scientific study said on Thursday. The spread of hominims - early humans and relatives such as Neanderthals - from Africa coincided with the extinction of mammals such as the mammoths, sabre-toothed tiger and glyptodon, an armadillo-like creature the size of a car. "There is a very clear pattern of size-biased extinction that follows the migration of hominims out of Africa," lead author Felisa Smith of the University of New Mexico told Reuters of the study published in the journal Science.
Space telescope launches on quest for planets that could support life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A NASA satellite has embarked on a quest for planets where life might exist. Propelled by a Falcon 9 rocket supplied by private firm SpaceX, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) hurtled off of a launchpad in Cape Canaveral, Florida and into its search for so-called “exoplanets”, or worlds capable of potentially supporting life. TESS will watch for flickers of starlight emitted when planets pass in front of stars they orbit as scientists hope to catalogue thousands of new planets.
'Dog Yoga' Helps People and Their Pets Unwind Together
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Yoga classes meant to be taken with your dog are becoming a practice available in cities around the world.
Mammals Have Been Shrinking for Thousands of Years and It's All Humans' Fault
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Humans can be challenging neighbors: We build cities, we turn forests into fields and we enjoy eating a host of other species. It finds a stark correlation between the arrival of humans or our lost relatives like Neanderthals on a new continent and the subsequent extinction of larger mammals that leaves behind smaller survivors. In short, mammals on average have been shrinking for more than 100,000 years, and it's all humans' fault.
E. Coli Outbreak Blamed on Contaminated Lettuce Spreads to 16 States, CDC Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A total of 53 people have been affected
Singapore Researchers Develop Ikea Furniture
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A team of researchers from Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have developed a pair of robotic arms capable of tackling one of the hardest tasks known to man. Assembling Ikea furniture.This video shows the two robotic arms get to grips with an Ikea Stefan chair as part of a study published on April 18 in the journal Science Robotics. The robots were able to autonomously construct the chair in 20 minutes using the pressure sensors, 3D cameras and the industrial gripper arms.“Dexterous manipulation is…[a] marker of human intelligence. Yet, demonstrationsof autonomous manipulation have been so far restricted to elementary tasks,” said the research team led by professor Quang-Cuong Pham in a statement released by NUT. “A main reason is that complex manipulation tasks in human environments require mastering multiple skills—from visual and tactile localization to motion planning, force control, and bimanual coordination—and managing their complex interactions.”The research team said the study opened the possibility for robots to work autonomously in new fields in manufacturing or logistics where traditional robotic assembly lines are not viable. Credit: Nanyang Technological University Singapore via Storyful
Plastic straws, cotton buds, and drinks stirrers could be banned in the UK
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The UK government has announced plans to ban the sale of plastic straws, drink stirrers, and plastic-stemmed cotton buds in an effort to cut down on single-use plastics waste.  SEE ALSO: These people are giving up plastic for Lent and it's all because of 'Blue Planet II' In an official statement, the government said it "is prepared to ban the sale of these items in England" but added that it will work with industry to "develop alternatives" and ensure there is "sufficient time to adapt." "Single-use plastic items such as straws, stirrers and plastic-stemmed cotton buds have a significant impact on our environment, both on land and in our seas and rivers when they are either littered or discarded incorrectly after use," read the statement. Recent research by the Marine Conservation Society (MCS) estimates that the UK uses around 8.5 billion straws a year, and studies have shown that about 8.8 metric tonnes of plastic waste ends up in our oceans each year. Per the MCS, plastic straws are among the top 10 items found in its beach cleanups.  Environment Secretary Michael Gove said the proposed ban comes as part of a concerted effort to "help protect our marine life." "Single-use plastics are a scourge on our seas and lethal to our precious environment and wildlife so it is vital we act now," says Gove. The proposed ban has been welcomed by environmental organisations, but some feel the ban needs to be part of a considerably larger effort to cut down on plastic usage. Louise Edge, senior oceans campaigner at Greenpeace UK, welcomed the ban but said it's important that the government goes beyond this ban and tackles other non-recyclable plastics.  "The government has made a strong move on banning some of the most unnecessary single-use plastics," Edge said in a statement emailed to Mashable. "Reducing the amount of plastic we're using and discarding is vital for curbing ocean plastic pollution and this could be the start of the elimination of unnecessary throwaway plastic." "Other non-recyclable 'problem plastic' should also be banned at the earliest opportunity," added Edge.   The MCS echoed Greenpeace UK's sentiments that more is needed when it comes to tackling marine pollution.  "It is great news," Sandy Luk, MCS's CEO, said in a statement. "But it needs to be part of a whole raft of long-term measures to tackle this huge problem, like levies on other avoidable single use plastic items, a bottle deposit return scheme and fundamental change to the whole way that we produce, use and consume plastics." The proposal will be "subject to consultation," which will be kicked off by the government's Environment Secretary later on this year.  WATCH: Mexico City's highway pillars are vertical gardens that help fight air pollution
Excavator to Blame for Puerto Rico's Island
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was the second major outage in less than a week affecting over 1.4 million customers
The Great Barrier Reef may never recover from the devastating 2016 heat wave
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Australia's Great Barrier Reef will never be the same following the devastating marine heat wave that hit it between 2015 and 2016, according to a new study published Wednesday.  The new research found that the northern third of the reef — which as a whole, is the largest living structure on the planet — experienced a "catastrophic die-off" of fast-growing coral species, like staghorn and tabular corals.  These reefs have now shifted to a new state, with a different balance of coral species than were present prior to the marine heat wave. Scientists have tied that marine heat wave itself, and the increasing prevalence and severity of them, to human-caused global warming. SEE ALSO: Bad news! Extreme ocean heat waves are a thing, and they're getting worse The study, published in the journal Nature, shows that many coral species that comprise the Great Barrier Reef succumbed to ocean temperatures that were well above average. However, those corals died in water temperatures that scientists previously thought would still sustain the organisms, not kill them. This raises the possibility that corals are more sensitive to ocean warming than previously thought, adding even more evidence that if global warming were to exceed about 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, above pre-industrial levels, many coral reef ecosystems would cease to exist as we know them today.  These findings about the collapse of coral ecosystems could inform future decisions of whether to list unique ecosystems such as the Great Barrier Reef as "threatened" World Heritage Sites, something the Australian government has opposed for fear that it would hurt tourism.  The research team used satellites to map the pattern of heat exposure across the 3,863 coral reefs that make up the overall Great Barrier Reef.  According to the study, 30 percent of corals on the Great Barrier Reef died within just a nine-month period in 2016, as water temperatures exceeded a particular heat threshold.  Most of these losses occurred in the northern 434-mile section of the reef, which lost more than two-thirds of their corals, calling into question their ability to function as unique ecosystems. The different colour morphs of Acropora millepora, each exhibiting a bleaching response during the mass coral bleaching event.Image: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/Gergely Torda"Our study shows that the transition of the GBR to a new system is already underway, due to global warming," said Terry Hughes, director of the ARC Center of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies in Australia, in an email. "It’s here and now, and it’s happening faster than we expected." Reefs that were exposed to the warmest waters of this marine heat wave, which was tied to both a strong El Niño event in the tropical Pacific Ocean and human-caused global warming, suffered "an unprecedented ecological collapse," the study found, with species composition changing drastically, reducing the diversity of species present after the assault from the warmer than average seas. "Our study shows that coral reefs are already shifting radically in response to unprecedented heatwaves," Hughes said in a statement. He said focusing on protecting the more heat-tolerant coral species is key to ensuring the survival of the Great Barrier Reef.  Some scientists have even suggested using "assisted migration," or importing more heat tolerant species, to foster more resilient coral communities in places that suffer from coral bleaching-related mortality.  “Bleaching is not like a steamroller that just kills everything… there are winners and losers both between and within species,” said Mikhail Matz, who studies how corals adapt to climate change at the genetic level and was not involved in the new study.  Matz says the corals that remain after a major marine heat wave such as the one in 2015-16 might be genetically adapted to be more heat tolerant.  "We expect that if genetics works as we think it works then the next generation will be more heat tolerant, because this is natural selection going on," he said.  Although they don't look like it, corals are actually living animals, and they receive vital nutrients from symbiotic algae that live within them, providing them with their vibrant colors. When exposed to stress from high temperatures, corals can expel the algae, which causes the coral to expose its skeleton. These bleached coral are more susceptible to continued high ocean temperatures as well as damage from pollution and other threats.  While bleached coral can recover, a prolonged period of high temperatures can kill corals outright.  This is what happened during the longest global coral bleaching event on record, which lasted from 2014 to 2017, but was particularly pronounced in the northern third of the Great Barrier Reef during much of 2015 and 2016.  There are ‘winners’ and ‘losers’ among corals as they respond to the accumulating impacts of climate change.Image: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/Mia HoogenboomStudy co-author Mark Eakin, who directs a coral bleaching prediction program at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), said part of the reason for the high rates of mortality in the northern Great Barrier Reef is that these areas had not been previously exposed to many bleaching events, and the less heat tolerant species succumbed almost immediately.  "You’re losing some of those more sensitive species," he said in an interview. "But what that also means is you’re losing a lot of diversity.” The study paints a grim prognosis for the parts of the Great Barrier Reef hit hardest by the heat wave. The reef will likely lose some of the marine diversity that makes it such a valuable ecosystem. However, that doesn't mean that all of the heat-sensitive coral will completely disappear.  Instead, picture a future in which heat resistant coral species dominate such reefs, playing host to a smaller number and variety of fish and other aquatic species. Such heat-tolerant corals may grow more slowly, since the more abundant, fast-growing species are less tolerant to heat stress.  The study concludes that the transition "has already begun on the northern, most-pristine region of the Great Barrier Reef, changing it forever as the intensity of global warming continues to escalate."  “The good news is that you’ll still have reefs, but they definitely won’t be as good of reefs as we have now,” Eakin said. WATCH: Biggest die-off of corals ever recorded on Great Barrier Reef
NASA Finally Gets a New Leader
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After an unprecedented wait, the nation’s space agency has a Trump-picked, Senate-approved, permanent leader at last. Lawmakers voted 50–49 on Thursday to approve the nomination of Jim Bridenstine, a Republican congressman from Oklahoma, for NASA administrator, following months of debate over his qualifications and growing uncertainty over leadership at the agency.
L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti follows in Obama's footsteps — to Iowa
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti tests the political waters in visit to Iowa.
What's in a name? Why a Castro
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recommended: How much do you know about Cuba? Cuba’s National Assembly, a group of more than 600 handpicked politicians who run unopposed, nominated the island’s next president this week. Vice President Miguel Díaz-Canel, the only candidate put forth, will be Cuba’s first leader in nearly 60 years who wasn’t part of the revolution that overthrew US-backed dictator Fulgencio Batista and installed a Communist government on the island.
#MeToo's next challenge: domestic gun violence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
During the decade she lived with her boyfriend, Sara Elmer was surrounded by guns. “I was in survival mode every day,” says Ms. Elmer. Indeed, in the United States, close to half the number of women killed in violent homicides each year are fatally shot by their intimate partners, according to federal crime statistics.
Review: Nintendo's Labo Kits for the Switch Will Make You Feel Like a Kid Again
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And they're good for actual kids, too
A start
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BenevolentAI said the latest round of funding will help it scale drug development and its AI platform.
Barbara Bush, the No
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A tribute to the no-nonsense First Lady who ran the family that ran the country
Elon Musk's seven top tips to boost business, including walking out of bad meetings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tesla boss Elon Musk says excessive meetings are "blight on business" - and also urges workers to bypass managers to get the job done.
Ted Cruz shrugs off past feud and lauds Trump in Time essay
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Ted Cruz wrote an essay for Time magazine’s annual “100 Most Influential People in the World” issue, praising President Trump, who the Texas senator once described as a "bully," "narcissist" and "serial philanderer."
The new mercy for corrupt firms that fess up
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Just before its annual meeting this week, the World Bank announced that an African railroad company would be barred for two years from any new loans from the bank because of a corrupt act. This is the latest example of a legal trend in many countries, from Argentina to Singapore, as well as at the World Bank. Another assumption is that such a deal, called a deferred prosecution agreement (DPA), will provide incentives for companies to self-report misconduct.
Kremlin cyberpower? How fight over messaging app is showing its limits.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Kremlin forces appear to be badly losing their latest war, but it isn't in Syria or Ukraine. It's in cyberspace, where Russia's communications watchdog Roskomnadzor this week began trying to block the popular messaging app Telegram because its encoded services are allegedly “terrorist friendly.” Since the app has consistently refused to hand over its encryption keys to law enforcement, it has been a target of official ire for at least three years. Meanwhile millions of Russians – including Kremlin officials and State Duma deputies – continue to use the service despite the ban, according to business news agency RBK.
DARPA Launch Challenge offers $10M top prize for rapid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Almost 15 years after a $10 million competition gave a boost to private-sector spaceflight, the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is kicking off another launch contest with a $10 million grand prize. The DARPA Launch Challenge — officially unveiled here today at the 34th Space Symposium — won’t send people to the edge of space, as the Ansari X Prize did in 2004. But it will introduce some new twists for the launch industry. Contest rules call for teams to be given the full details about where and when they’ll launch, what kind of payload they’ll launch,… Read More
First look: Super smart LRASM missiles that can obliterate enemies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stronger, faster and technologically smarter, here’s a look at Long range anti surface missiles. These “super” missiles can be fired from the air or sea and is poised to deliver far more damage.
Amazon Has More Than 100 Million Prime Subscribers, Reveals Jeff Bezos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Amazon shipped five billion items with Prime worldwide in 2017
A Puppet Dinosaur Has Caused Three Members of the Air National Guard to Lose Their Posts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's unclear why the oath of re-enlistment was undertaken with a dinosaur puppet
The Great Barrier Reef Has Been Forever Changed By Global Warming, Scientists Warn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bleak new study describes the profound damage that climate change has
Join us for a live video taping of Skullduggery
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Join Yahoo News’ Editor-in-Chief, Daniel Klaidman, and Chief Investigative Correspondent, Michael Isikoff, for a special live video taping of Skullduggery.
President Trump Can’t Declare War, Only Congress Can. So Why Won't It?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
While Trump launches bombs — and brags about a nuclear button — Congress dithers
U.S. Airline Regulators Will Boost Inspections After Fatal Southwest Jet Engine Explosion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pressure on the Federal Aviation Administration has mounted after an engine on a Southwest jet blew apart
How Smoking Pot May Hurt the Teenage Brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Young people who used marijuana tended to have lower scores on memory tests
Bill Gates backs $1bn plan to cover earth in video surveillance satellites
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A satellite company planning to launch a $1bn (£700m) network of satellites to provide "live and unfiltered" coverage of the Earth has been backed by former Microsoft chief executive Bill Gates and Japanese tech giant Softbank. The tech leaders are backing EarthNow, which plans to launch 500 satellites to cover Earth's atmosphere in video surveillance and provide live video feedback with only one second of delay. The Washington-based satellite company has the backing of aerospace giant Airbus as well as billionaire Gates and Softbank, the Japanese conglomerate that has invested billions in tech companies from Uber to chipmaker Arm. EarthNow founder Russel Hannigan said: "Our objective is simple; we want to connect you visually with Earth in real-time." Hannigan told the Wall Street Journal the price of the project could run to $1bn, although the companies did not disclose the value of the investment. Hannigan said the first funding would cover the planning stage of the project. Softbank has invested heavily in space and satellite companies under enigmatic chief executive Masayoshi Son. t has previously invested in satellite start-up OneWeb for $1bn, whose founder Greg Wyler added his backing to the start-up. Future space exploration Some of the applications will include services for government and commercial customers, as well as tracking illegal fishing, watching weather systems or tracking natural migrations. EarthNow said it would also enable live feed of the earth to be viewable from a smartphone or tablet. "We believe the ability to see and understand the Earth live and unfiltered will help all of us better appreciate and ultimately care for our one and only home," Hannigan said. EarthNow is just the latest start-up to benefit from a wave of funding in space technologies. In 2017, there were 67 equity fundings in space start-ups to the tune of $2.9bn. Most recently, US rocket company SpaceX is reportedly raising $500m from investors. Technology intelligence - newsletter promo - EOA
Everything You Need to Know About the April 20 National School Walkout
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's the second major school walkout planned in two months
‘I Don’t Get Confused.’ Nikki Haley Fires Back at White House After Russia Sanctions Comment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
White House economic adviser said Haley suffered "momentary confusion"when announcing new Russia sanctions
President Trump's Tariffs Are 'Distorting' Global Trade, E.U. Warns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The bloc wouldn't offer any concessions in order to be exempt from import duties
Shkreli's request to serve time at minimum security 'camp...
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The "Squawk Box" crew talks about some of the morning's top news stories, including an update on earnings, and NASA's successful launch of a satellite with a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.
Nikki Haley’s ‘I Don't Get Confused’ Comment Demonstrated Her Gift for the Clapback
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was one of many whip-smart comebacks throughout her career
‘It Was a Lot of Chaos.’ Retired Nurse Performed CPR on Woman Who Died After Southwest Flight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Peggy Phillips said she performed CPR on Jennifer Riordan until the plane landed
President Trump Says the U.S. and North Korea Are Talking at 'Extremely High Levels'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump said the two Koreas are negotiating an end to hostilities
SpaceX blasts off NASA's new planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA on Wednesday blasted off its newest planet-hunting spacecraft, TESS, a $337 million satellite that aims to scan 85 percent of the skies for cosmic bodies where life may exist. "Three, two, one and liftoff!" said NASA commentator Mike Curie as the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) soared into the cloudless, blue sky atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida at 6:51 pm (2251 GMT). The washing machine-sized spacecraft is built to search outside the solar system, scanning the nearest, brightest stars for signs of periodic dimming.
Inside Barbara Bush's Quiet Yet Forceful Influence on American Politics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She seemed to walk the line between the necessarily supporting nature of the role and the personal activism expected of a First Lady
Canadian Woman Who Instagrammed Her Cocaine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Melina Roberge and her accomplice posted photos of their cruise on social media
How plastic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New research has found a way to speed up enzymes that break down the PET plastic in bottles.