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'He Didn't Pinch It, He Grabbed It.' Another Woman Has Accused Roy Moore of Groping Her
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Six women have now accused him of sexual misconduct
Treacher Collins syndrome: What you need to know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Answers to some of the more common questions about the disorder.
Interstellar visitor shaped like giant fire extinguisher
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A newly discovered object from another star system that's passing through ours is shaped like a giant pink fire extinguisher.
Unsettled by pro
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
UN negotiations on how to implement the climate-rescue Paris Agreement wrap up in Bonn Friday, after two weeks of talks unnerved by an American defence of fossil fuels. President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the hard-fought global pact cast a long shadow over talks marked by revived divisions between rich and developing countries. Key disagreements revolve around how to share out responsibilities for drawing down greenhouse gas emissions, and the money required to do so.
Democrats edge toward running on universal health care
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Democrats have a problem: Despite the historic unpopularity of the White House’s current occupant, their own favorability ratings are not much higher. The most recent proposal put forth in Congress is the State Public Option Act, which would allow citizens to buy into Medicaid, the decades-old program that provides health care for Americans with low incomes and disabilities. The plan would give states the option of offering Medicaid to all residents regardless of income.
'Cone Weed' gets Christmas makeover in North Carolina town
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HUNTERSVILLE, N.C. (AP) — At first, it was an orange traffic cone with a weed growing out of it. Now, the roadside attraction dubbed "Cone Weed" is something of a Christmas miracle to locals.
Man gets his dying wish: To be buried with cheesesteaks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PLAINS, Pa. (AP) — A Pennsylvania man who always joked that he wanted to take something to eat when he died has gotten his wish.
Raqqa Needs Rebuilding. Who Will Foot the Bill?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Authorities in the Syrian city face a staggering task as it tries to restore life to a ruined city
Scientists trace origin of misbehaving electrons to creepy whistles in space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Space is weird. It's full of weird rocks, weird balls of gas, weird stars, and weird things that we can't even properly categorize. It's also full of weird sounds, and if you spent a moment to sample NASA's Halloween playlist of spooky space noises you know exactly what I'm talking about. Some of the noise we hear in space has simple explanations, while others are a lot more mysterious, and NASA thinks it's finally figured out where one of the most mysterious "whistles" is coming from. NASA calls them the "whistler mode chorus," and they sound like something straight out of a 1980s arcade game. They're definitely odd, and while they're pretty fun to listen to, researchers using NASA data now know what role they play in a particularly strange phenomenon taking place in Earth's atmosphere. The new study, which was published in Geophysical Review Letters, was conducted by scientists at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. It focuses on the behavior of high-energy electrons which have a habit of being launched into the Earth's upper atmosphere. Researchers have known about this behavior for some time, but were puzzled by the cause. The strange, bird-like chirps, as it turns out, are responsible. https://soundcloud.com/nasa/whistler-waves2 Thanks to a bit of luck with the position of two NASA satellites, the scientists were able to determine that the electrons were escaping into the atmosphere thanks to a plasma wave. The waves are the result of the mishmash of electric and magnetic fields twisting around the Earth, and they happen to be very good at making electrons fly. What you hear in the high-pitched whistles is the waves themselves, and when a wave manages to accelerate many electrons at once it fires them off into the atmosphere in what scientists call a "microburst." Using one satellite to observe the waves swooping in and another to spot the high-energy particles taking flight, the researchers were able to show that they were indeed linked.
Roy Moore's Democratic Challenger Surges Ahead in New Poll — Thanks to Women
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Doug Jones leads Moore by 8 points
'We Would Have Had a Horrific Bloodbath.' How Quick
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The shooter repeatedly tried to break into the Rancho Tehama Elementary School
Here's How To Get Free 2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Wondering where else you can snag good deals and free two-day shipping on Black Friday other than Amazon?
Tesla Unveils World's Fastest Production Car In Surprise Announcement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tesla on Thursday night unveiled its electric semi truck, but the massive new vehicle was overshadowed by what it was hauling inside.
Billionaire Norwegian given $30,400 drunken driving fine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — A 22-year-old Norwegian student has been handed a 250,000-kroner ($30,400) fine for drunken driving — but can still count herself lucky.
Sea creatures in Mariana Trench (the deepest place on Earth) have plastic in their stomachs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sea creatures living in the deepest part of the ocean have been found with man-made fibres in their stomachs for the first time, showing that no part of the world’s seas are now untouched by human rubbish. Scientists from Newcastle University discovered that every single crustacean surveyed at the bottom of the Mariana Trench, a six mile deep schism in the Pacific Ocean, had debris in its body. The team used the same deep-diving technology which was recently used to film the remarkable footage of the trench for the BBC’s new natural history series Blue Planet II. Fragments found in the stomachs and muscles of sea creatures included synthetic fibres including Rayon, Lyocell and Ramie as well as textiles such as Nylon, polyethylene and polyvinyl. The same lander which sampled the crustaceans were used to film remarkable footage for Blue Planet II Credit: BBC Dr Alan Jamieson, who led the research, said: “The results were both immediate and startling. “This study has shown that manmade microfibres are culminating and accumulating in an ecosystem inhabited by species we poorly understand, cannot observe experimentally and have failed to obtain baseline data for prior to contamination. “There were instances where the fibres could actually be seen in the stomach contents as they were being removed. “It is highly likely there are no marine ecosystems left that are not impacted by anthropogenic debris.” Mariana trench - locator map The team tested crustaceans found in the ultra-deep trenches that span the entire Pacific Ocean - the Mariana, Japan, Izu-Bonin, Peru-Chile, New Hebrides and Kermadec trenches. The sampled depths range from four to more than six miles including the deepest point, Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench, at 6.7 miles (10,890m) using free-falling deep-sea landers. After examining 90 individual they and found ingestion of plastic and fibres ranged from 50 per cent in the New Hebrides Trench to 100 per cent at the bottom of the Mariana Trench. A man-made fibre which was found in the stomach of an amphipod in the Mariana Trench Credit: BBC Deep-sea organisms are dependent on food raining down from the surface and because food is scarce they are not picky about what they eat. And once the plastics are on the sea-bed there is nowhere for them to go, so they continue to accumulate. Sir David Attenborough, who narrates BBC Blue Planet II, said plastic in the ocean was now a major threat to the world’s oceans. “Everybody should be concerned about it,” he told The Telegraph. “It’s a terrible paradox that when it was invented in the 1920s or earlier scientists went to huge trouble to make sure it was indestructible. And now we are dumping hundreds of tons into the oceans every day. “It doesn’t mean it doesn’t fragment and that is one of the problems, it fragments into tiny little sphere which absorb poisons selectively, so these highly poisonous globules are then eaten by fish.” Mariana trench - depth An estimated 300 million tonnes of plastic now litters the oceans, with more than 5 trillion plastic pieces weighing over 250,000 tons currently floating on the surface. Although the majority of marine litter can be observed floating on the surface, the degradation and fragmentation of plastics will ultimately result in sinking to the underlying deep-sea habitats, where opportunities for dispersal become ever more limited. It is estimated that without a major intervention the weight of plastic in the ocean will be greater than the weight of fish by 2050. Amphipods taken from Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench Credit: Newcastle University  Craig Bennett Friends of the Earth chief executive officer said: “This is further shocking evidence that toxic plastic is accumulating in even our most precious and remote environments. “Urgent measures are needed to defuse this plastic pollution time bomb. “Government’s around the world must come up with a plan to rapidly phase-out fossil fuel-based plastics for good. “There should be no place for plastics that aren’t biodegradable and made from natural materials.”
15 Black Men Arrested By a Corrupt Cop Are Cleared of All Convictions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The police officer tried to extort each of the men for money
Eating Organic Is Not As Good for the Environment As You Think
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Organic food is trendy and expensive, but would a complete switch to organic food offer a magic solution to sustainable food production?
Roy Moore: Mitch McConnell Should Step Down, Not Me
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Moore refuses to quite despite calls from GOP leaders
The FCC Just Made It Easier for One Company to Own Multiple TV Stations Where You Live
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It weakens rules meant to support independent local media
4 Republican Senators in Private Talks That Could Kill Current Tax Reform Bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In private conversations, many have relayed their concerns over the deficit
Scientists just sent a message to a possible alien civilization, and it could have disastrous consequences
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Humans, generally speaking, are incredibly interested in the potential existence of intelligent alien life. The idea that an alien civilization exists somewhere in the cosmos has always fascinated us, but we'v yet to find any evidence that our dreams are more than fantasy. Now, scientists have taken a big step towards contacting extraterrestrials, sending a message to a nearby star system that may well host an advanced civilization, but not everyone thinks that was such a good idea. A group of scientists hungry for evidence of aliens took it upon themselves to send a message to the system called GJ273, which resides approximately 12.4 light-years away from Earth. That's a pretty sizable distance, but the signal will eventually get there, and if ET is listening they'll most certainly know it's not an accident. The message, which reportedly included samples of music, language, and math, also included a request that anyone who gets it should attempt to respond. If the scientists strike gold, a message would likely be headed back our direction by around 2042, and astronomers will be listening closely for any sign of it. However, many scientists have voiced their displeasure at the idea that mankind might proactively contact an alien civilization, especially one that has mastered spaceflight. Without having any idea of whether or not our needle-in-a-haystack signal is retrieved by a peaceful alien race or a hostile one, many fear that we could be setting the stage for the ultimate destruction of mankind and perhaps Earth as we know it. One of the more vocal opponents of the effort is world-famous physicist Stephen Hawking, who has suggested that yelling into the void may bring dire results. Likening the arrival of an alien race to Earth to that of Europeans arriving in America, Hawking warns that a more advanced species could do whatever they wanted to our planet with little regard for mankind's fate. The signals, which were sent in mid-Otober, should arrive at their destination many years from now, and if we indeed to hear back, it will be a momentous occasion. Let's just hope we don't annoy them if they're having a bad day.
Charles Manson Has Reportedly Been Hospitalized
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He was also reportedly hospitalized in January
Sen Al. Franken Accused of Kissing and Groping Woman Without Her Consent
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Franken apologized for the incident
House Passes Sweeping $1.5 Trillion GOP Tax Overhaul Bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It moves President Trump and the GOP closer to a legislative victory
Pakistan indifferent as smog kills more people than militancy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The toxic smog that has covered parts of Pakistan for weeks has exposed official torpor over rampant pollution that has killed thousands more people than have died in years of militancy. In Lahore, where the situation was most critical, the level of PM2.5 -- microscopic particles that lodge deep in the lungs -- had dropped to 159 Wednesday from more than 1,000 during the pollution spike, according to PakistanAirQuality, a citizen-driven monitoring initiative. Pakistan is already ranked third in the world -- behind China and India -- for the number of deaths caused by pollution, with 125,000 people killed annually, according to one measure by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, a research institute founded by the Gates Foundation.
Police Knew 'Madman' Had Guns Before Deadly Shooting Rampage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Police defended their decision not to arrest the man for previously violating a court order prohibiting him from having guns
All The Best Black Friday Deals, In One Exhaustive List
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We know how overwhelming Black Friday and Cyber Monday can be.
Australians Have Voted Overwhelmingly in Favor of Same
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
About 62% of registered voters who responded want to legalize same-sex marriage
Twitter Revoked the Verification of White Supremacists Like Richard Spencer and Jason Kessler
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Under new guidelines, verification can be removed for "promoting hate"
Cambodia's Top Court Has Dismantled the Opposition Party, Sounding a 'Death Knell' for Democracy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The vote has effectively turned Cambodia into a one-party state, rights groups say
AP Exclusive: US scientists try 1st gene editing in the body
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person's DNA to cure a disease.
President Trump Was in Asia for 12 Days. Here's What He Missed at Home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When President Trump returned from a week and a half in Asia, he arrived back to a series of domestic issues.
'Ghost Guns.' California Shooting Rampage Highlights Problem of Homemade Weapons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Northern California shooter found an easy way around a court order prohibiting him from having guns: He built his own at home
Trump Thinks the Roy Moore Allegations Are 'Very Troubling.' But He's Not Pushing Him to Quit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The people of Alabama should make the decision"
Correction: MOMA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — In a story Nov. 12 about the theft of photographs from a museum in New York, The Associated Press erroneously reported where the theft took place. It was at MoMA PS1 in Queens, not the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan.
A Vote in Cambodia's Supreme Court Could Effectively Dismantle Democracy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Prime Minister has asked the courts to dissolve the opposition party
Watch Live: President Trump Makes First Public Statement Since Returning from Asia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The President returned from Asia on Tuesday. He tweeted on Monday that he will be making a "major statement," but did not release any details about the timing or the content
Fox Firepower: Making munitions safe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fox Firepower: Allison Barrie discusses new technology being used to create 'insensitive munitions' that will only detonate when they reach the intended target.
Mitch McConnell Wants an Investigation of Groping Allegations Against Al Franken
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Leeann Tweeden said Franken kissed and groped her without her consent more than a decade ago.
President Trump Stays Silent as Allegations Mount Against Roy Moore
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump, who has also withstood allegations of sexual assault, was uncharacteristically silent when questioned about the scandal
Scientists Have Sent Messages to Advanced Alien Civilizations—And Are Hoping for a Reply in 25 Years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Updated | A small group of scientists has unilaterally decided to send messages to any advanced alien civilization living in a star system 12.4 light years away (over 70 trillion miles). The decision to actively send messages to aliens is controversial. There are two main avenues of thinking—the first, known as SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is that we should actively look for alien life by listening out for signals, the second that we should be sending out messages so any advanced lifeform out there would be able to find us.
The women who have accused Roy Moore
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Roy Moore, the Republican Senate candidate from Alabama, has seen his campaign derailed in the past week as nine women have accused him of behavior ranging from uncomfortable and unwanted overtures to sexual assault.
All hail Roy Moore at 'pro
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A “pro-family” rally in Birmingham, Ala., featured tributes to embattled Senate candidate Roy Moore by a parade of supporters — including one with a stalking conviction and one who has blamed Hurricane Sandy on gay marriage – but no comments from Moore himself on the latest accusations against him. After two hours of speeches, Moore gave a brief address before the host invited questions on “issues” from the assembled press. The first question was if Moore had ever touched young women without their consent and if he dated teenagers when he was in his 30s.
White House says decision to lift ban on elephant hunting trophies from Africa has not been 'finalized'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A U.S. ban on importing elephant hunting trophies from two countries in Africa is set to expire Friday, but White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said the move is not “final.”
Protecting the innocent from cyber warriors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In new warnings about cyberattacks by foreign entities, Britain and the United States have lately left the impression that innocent civilians, and not just governments, might become victims on a digital battlefield. On Nov. 15, for example, the US said North Korea is targeting banks, airlines, and telecom firms. The warnings are credible given evidence of Russian meddling in the 2016 US elections and North Korea’s 2014 hacking of Sony Pictures.
New refrain in Washington: Is this the Saudi Arabia we wanted?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
From the outset of his presidency, Donald Trump has signaled his intention to refashion Middle East policy in a big way – and to return Saudi Arabia, sidelined in President Obama’s regional vision, to a preeminent spot in US policy. Mr. Trump broke decades of presidential precedent by making Saudi Arabia the first foreign destination of his presidency.
Can Roy Moore Still Win?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore's recent sexual misconduct scandals have raised serious questions, but will he win anyway?
Strange genetic secret explains why Amish live 10 years longer than the rest of us
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Amish are known for their refusal to adopt modern technology
Sen. Ron Johnson Is the First Republican to Defect on Tax Bill – and a Sign of Trouble for the GOP
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Johnson complained the bills were more generous to publicly traded corporations
Trump administration says hunters can bring African elephant trophies into the U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Massive ivory tusks from legally hunted African elephants can once again be brought into the United States. Although the Obama administration banned the importation of African elephant trophies in 2014, on Wednesday the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service confirmed with ABC News that the ban had been lifted for Zimbabwe and Zambia, two nations with sizable elephant populations. The decision to allow these ivory hunting prizes into the U.S. stokes much controversy. Safari big-game hunters, who engage in legal hunting of these animals, feel they should be able to keep the spoils of their sport. But conservationists, such as The Elephant Project, view this as a "pay to slay" tactic that will encourage more poaching of an intelligent, vulnerable species.   Reprehensible behaviour by the Trump Admin. 100 elephants a day are already killed. This will lead to more poaching. https://t.co/rld67eM018 — The Elephant Project (@theelephantproj) November 16, 2017 SEE ALSO: Three Connecticut elephants were just given lawyers, and the case sways on free will African elephants — the planet's largest land mammals — are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, which is managed by the Fish and Wildlife Service. The animals have been listed with that status since 1978.  According to the Great Elephant Census, undertaken by a team of ecologists and biologists who spent years surveying the expansive African savannah in airplanes, the population of African elephants decreased by 30 percent in the 18 countries studied between 2009 and 2016, which include both Zambia and Zimbabwe.  African elephant populations have been particularly pressured by poaching for their ivory tusks, a demand that is only increasing. Since 2007, the ivory trade has doubled, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).  The Fish and Wildlife Service did not say what specific conditions had changed in Zimbabwe and Zambia to justify lifting the ban, but it did say more information about the decision would be posted in the Federal Register on Friday (the Federal Register is where the U.S. government officially publishes federal regulations). A Fish and Wildlife spokesperson, however, stated the agency's general belief that legal sport-hunting can benefit conservation goals: This latest decision, although limited to one species in two African nations, might signal the Trump administration's intent to increasingly use regulated sport hunting as an international wildlife conservation strategy. Last week, the Department of the Interior — which oversees the Fish and Wildlife Service — announced the creation of the International Wildlife Conservation Council. The council will specifically "focus on increased public awareness domestically regarding conservation, wildlife law enforcement, and economic benefits that result from U.S. citizens traveling abroad to hunt," according to the announcement. “Built on the backs of hunters and anglers, the American conservation model proves to be the example for all nations to follow for wildlife and habitat conservation,” Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said. Although the Endangered Species Act, one of the nation's most powerful conservation laws, has absolutely benefited once nearly extinct creatures like the Bald Eagle, 1,390 U.S. animals remain on the list as either threatened or endangered.  WATCH: Watch these elephants save one of their own from drowning