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Plastic waste now polluting Arctic Ocean, scientists find 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Plastic waste in the ocean is now so widespread it is polluting remote ice floes in the Arctic, scientists have discovered. A team from Exeter University discovered blocks of polystyrene in areas hundreds of miles from land which until recently were covered by ice all year round. Large plastic pieces break down into ‘microplastics’ which are consumed by wildlife and are then passed up the food chain. The expedition was able to go further into the Central Arctic Ocean than any other yacht in history, because of recent reductions in summer ice cover in the Arctic, which is thought to be the result of climate change. Scientists fear the blocks are breaking up into microplastics  Credit: CONOR MCDONNELL @CONORMCDPHOTO Marine biologist Tim Gordon of Exeter University said: “Finding pieces of rubbish like this is a worrying sign that melting ice may be allowing high levels of pollution to drift into these areas. “This is potentially very dangerous for the Arctic’s wildlife. “The Arctic Ocean’s wildlife used to be protected by a layer of sea ice all year round. Now that is melting away, this environment will be exposed to commercial fishing, shipping and industry for the first time in history. “We need to seriously consider how best to protect the Arctic’s animals from these new threats. By doing so, we will give them a fighting chance of adapting and responding to their rapidly-changing habitat.” The Arctic Mission team also used nets with holes smaller than a millimetre to sieve for microplastics in the water. They will now analyse the samples in the laboratory to evaluate current levels of pollution in the Arctic and its likely impacts on wildlife. Estimates suggest there are over 5 trillion pieces of plastic floating in the world’s oceans, and there are estimates it will soon outweigh fish. Scientists are now checking the area of microplastics Scientists fear there is now enough plastic to form a permanent layer in the fossil record. Dr Ceri Lewis, scientific adviser to the expedition based at the University of Exeter, said: “Many rivers lead into the Arctic Ocean that are often a source of plastic pollution, but plastic pollution has been literally trapped into the ice. “Now the ice is melting we believe microplastics are being released into the Arctic.  The Arctic is thought to be a hot spot of microplastics accumulation due to the number of rivers that empty into the Arctic basin, yet we have very little data to support this idea in the more northerly parts of the Arctic Ocean. “This is really important data to collect as the Arctic supports many key fisheries which might be impacted but the presence of microplastics.” The team are is investigating the impact of man-made noise pollution on Arctic marine life and mammals, which can be particularly sensitive to sound. The Arctic Mission team used underwater loudspeakers and microphones to understand how sound travels through the polar seas, and how this might be impacted by ice loss. Professor Steve Simpson, an expert in bioacoustics and noise pollution at Exeter said: "It is critical that we establish baseline natural recordings in this newly exposed oceanic environment. “These recordings will allow us to understand how human activities are changing the soundscape of the summer Arctic, and assess the success of future noise management in this unique acoustic world.”
Treatment restores signs of awareness in brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — French researchers say they restored some signs of consciousness in a brain-injured man who hadn't shown any awareness in 15 years.
Physics Explains How Maryland Fan Epically Crushed a Beer on Her Head
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She puts shotgun champions to shame.
Looking back at the 'Hitler diaries' in an age of fake news
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Last week there was a memorial service for Russell Watson, a much-admired writer and editor at Newsweek magazine, where he and I both worked for sizable chunks of our lives. Hoping to capitalize on the publicity about the sensational find without actually committing either cash or its editorial imprimatur, the editors decided to run a cover story on the “controversy” over the diaries, based mainly on what other people were saying about them.
Roger Stone: Manafort’s mood 'amazingly good' despite coming indictment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Yahoo News interviews Roger Stone about Paul Manafort's looming indictment.
Baby left on side of Oklahoma freeway in car seat with cash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A 1-month-old baby found on the side of an Oklahoma interstate in a car seat stuffed with $5,500 in cash and a birth certificate was in state custody Monday as authorities continued to investigate why the boy was abandoned.
What does third Trump travel ban mean for Supreme Court case?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A few days ago, Oct. 10 had been circled on calendars around the country – the day the Trump administration would make its first appearance before the US Supreme Court, to argue for the full enforcement of President Trump’s controversial “travel ban” executive order. Monday afternoon, in a one-paragraph order, the justices kicked that can down the road. One of the longest, most contentious, and confusing subplots of Donald Trump’s presidency is now going to have to play a little – or perhaps a lot – longer.
Living On The Moon May Happen By 2030, Scientists Claim
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By 2040, the population may reach 100.
'They Tell Me a Demon Lives Inside Me'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A young man tormented in Chechnya for being gay discovered Europe offers no safe haven.
How Deaths from Opioids Have Impacted US Life Expectancy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Life expectancy in the United States ticked upward between 2000 and 2015, but that rise was blunted by increasing rates of opioid-related deaths, a new report finds. Overall, life expectancy at birth increased by 2 years between 2000 and 2015, the report found. The life expectancy for a person born in the U.S. in 2000 is 76.8 years, compared with 78.8 years for a person born in the U.S. in 2015.
Blame starts to fly over Mexico quake collapses
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Allegations of negligent construction and oversight began to fly Monday after deadly building collapses during Mexico's earthquake, as hope faded of finding more survivors of a disaster that killed more than 300 people. Mexico City's mayor, the education minister, and the top official for the district all traded blame after reports that the Enrique Rebsamen primary school operated using false documents. "If confirmed, it would be very serious," Education Minister Aurelio Nuno told TV network Televisa, saying he had ordered an investigation.
Will Barcelona secede from Spain? Catalan independence is up for a vote — and Russia is stirring the pot.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
At issue is a wave of Catalan nationalism culminating in a referendum on secession, scheduled for Oct. 1.
White House: If NFL protests are about police brutality, players 'should protest the officers on the field'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
White House press secretary Sarah Sanders suggested Monday that if NFL players who kneel during the national anthem at games are doing so because of police brutality, they should protest the officers instead of the song.
Health care bill protesters descend on Senate hearing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The typically hushed corridors of the Russell Senate Building echoed with noise Monday as protesters, upset by the Senate Republicans’ health care bill, descended on lawmakers’ offices to let their displeasure be known ― part of several such demonstrations around the U.S. Capitol.
No more flying with reindeer: Unique Alaska planes to retire
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Claire Richardson remembers taking off in an airplane uniquely configured for Alaska when a horrible smell seeped into the passenger area.
As waters recede, Bangladesh takes stock – and plans for more flood
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In late August, while hurricane Harvey was battering Texas and Louisiana, heavy rain led to devastating floods and landslides across the region. The dangerously high flood waters forced Sufia and her husband to abandon their home, a bare-bones hut of corrugated-steel walls held up by wooden beams and concrete pillars in the countryside of Tangail District, about 50 miles north of the capital, Dhaka.
Defiant, Kurds vote in northern Iraq, seeking path to independence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In Erbil, capital of northern Iraq’s semi-autonomous Kurdish region, the longstanding dream of statehood has been sold as a done deal. Streets have been lined with billboards in favor of Kurdish independence, and hawkers old and young have been making a killing selling the sun-emblazoned tricolor flag of Kurdistan. In the run-up to the vote, major powers, including the United States, issued dire warnings that the vote will undermine the war against the so-called Islamic State (ISIS) and further destabilize Iraq.
In Alabama, an early test of anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“We cannot be bought,” declares B.B. Sellers, as he and his wife leave a sweltering outdoor rally for Roy Moore, the firebrand former judge who has been leading in a tight Republican run-off for US Senate. The GOP establishment has flooded the state with millions of dollars in advertising in advance of Tuesday’s primary election, trying to boost the chances of incumbent GOP Sen. Luther Strange, who was appointed earlier this year after former Sen. Jeff Sessions stepped down to become US attorney general.
Why elections in Europe spring a surprise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Last spring, Europe watched with surprise as a new centrist party in France, En Marche!, defeated the two traditional parties. The election win was a signal that the French want more independence and individuality in their political identity. Now it may be Germany’s turn.
Intel’s New Chip Design Takes Pointers From Your Brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Silicon neurons might make cars and robots smarter and more independent.
‘Fire or Suspend!’ President Trump Encourages NFL Fans to Boycott Games
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He also criticized the NFL's ratings
50 Years Ago This Week: 'Individuals Marry, Not Races'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Also in this issue: Hurricanes and hunting
We're building a 1,300km
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) could help unravel the mysteries of antimatter and complete scientists' next model of the universe.
Nearly 50,000 Evacuated as Fears of Volcanic Eruption Grow in Bali
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mount Agung volcano's alert status was raised to the highest level on Friday
See How Human Activity Is Changing Animal Migration Patterns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new book maps how animals navigate a world heavily altered by urban development and climate change.
Mass Graves Containing Bodies of 28 Hindu Women and Boys Found in Myanmar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Myanmar's army blames the deaths on Rohingya insurgents
RXi Pharmaceuticals’ sd
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASDAQ:RXII RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (NASDAQ:RXII) is a unique player in the RNAi space due to the inherent self-delivery mechanism that efficiently distributes its interference RNA to the cell. ...
People with blue eyes all have one thing in common
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It turns out that everyone in the world with the striking feature can be traced back to one single person.
Sphinx, Baboon and Cat Statues Found in Ancient Egyptian Burial
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After years of being washed, perfumed and fed in ancient Egypt, the statue of a revered Egyptian deity was given a proper burial with other "dead" statues more than 2,000 years ago, a new study finds. Ancient Egyptians buried the statue of the deity Ptah — the god of craftsmen and sculptors — with other revered statues, including those of a sphinx, baboon, cat, Osiris and Mut, in a pit next to Ptah's temple. The statue of Ptah had likely sat in the temple for years, but it and the other sacred objects were respectfully buried after they accumulated damage and were declared useless by the ancient Egyptians, the researchers said.
'The Worst Thing I've Ever Seen.' Time Is Running Out In the Search for Survivors of Mexico Quake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rescue operations remained active in at least three sites in Mexico City, but no one has been found alive since Wednesday
As Puerto Rico reels from hurricane, Trump focuses on football
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Puerto Rico’s governor, its mayors, and its representative to Congress have all called attention to the island territory’s desperate situation, but the president hasn’t mentioned Puerto Rico on Twitter since the middle of last week. He has largely focused on NFL players instead.
German police arrest wanted man after he tries to vote drunk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BERLIN (AP) — A drunk German man who insisted on voting in Sunday's election despite lacking the necessary documents has landed in jail — after police discovered he was wanted for arrest.
New Alaska highway stripes are crooked, paint staining cars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
KETCHIKAN, Alaska (AP) — New yellow painted highway lines in the Alaska's Panhandle city of Ketchikan are crooked and the paint that's been used by state transportation officials has stained cars, officials said.
Time for the world to step up on Rohingya issue, Aung San Suu Kyi’s astounding hypocrisy, Irma’s destruction in Britain’s Caribbean islands, The
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It is high time the world made an all-out effort to stop the ongoing pogrom against Myanmar’s minority Rohingya...,” writes Mohammad Amjad Hossain. “The pogrom resembles those crimes perpetrated against Jews.... The military junta of Myanmar torches Rohingya villages, stops aid to Rohingya camps, and restricts Rohingyas’ movement.... [The United Nations] secretary-general ... must send peace-keeping forces to Rakhine State.... The Security Council should consider imposing economic sanctions on Myanmar’s government as well.... Further bloodshed must be stopped and this manmade crisis resolved. “The hypocrisy of Myanmar’s de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is astounding,” states an editorial.
Gene Therapy: A Big Week for Many Names
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s been a big week for the gene therapy universe. Of course, there’s the latest Barron’s cover story, which details the emerging medical revolution and highlights three stocks -- AveXis (AVXS), Regenxbio (RGNX), and Spark Therapeutics (ONCE) -- that have big stakes in what is widely considered one of the most exciting areas in the biotechnology arena. Last week, Ultragenyx Pharmaceutical (RARE) offered to buy Dimension Therapeutics (DMTX) for at $5.50 per share in cash.
Anthony Weiner Is Being Sentenced for Sexting. He Faces Up To 27 Months in Prison
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Prosecutors say he broke the law by having illicit contact with a 15-year-old girl
'Zero Communication.' Puerto Ricans Are Hunting for Wi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The ability to communicate with the outside world is now a rare and precious resource on the island
French government declares war on pesticides
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
France is planning to cut back on use of all pesticides, the government said Monday, though it rowed back on an announcement of an outright ban on controversial chemical glyphosate. Government spokesman Christophe Castaner had said earlier Monday that France -- Europe's biggest food producer -- intended to phase out glyphosate completely by 2022 over fears that it may cause cancer.
Facebook's fakery problem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Turning over ads by Russian front groups
Jared Kushner Used His Private Email to Communicate With White House Colleagues
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kushner received or responded to fewer than 100 emails, his lawyer said
Milo Yiannopoulos Finally Spoke at Berkeley. But the Protesters Were Louder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Free Speech Week" ends with a whimper
President Trump Added Three New Countries to His Travel Ban. Here's What to Know About Them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Citizens from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Syria, Chad, North Korea and Venezuela are targeted
NASA Satellite Maps May Help Mexico Recover From Multiple Earthquakes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Another earthquake hit Mexico early Saturday morning. The 6.2 quake comes just  days after a devastating 7.1 magnitude earthquake shook central Mexico on Tuesday, claiming the lives of at least 295 people and destroying at least 3,000 buildings in the city’s capital. Authorities are continuing to search for trapped survivors, but due to the extensive damage and rubble, these efforts are often very difficult.
Neil deGrasse Tyson Picks Apart The Science Of Iconic ‘Game Of Thrones’ Scenes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson has some good news and bad news for the creative team behind “Game of Thrones.”
Photos: NFL players kneel during anthem as Trump fumes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Donald Trump insisted on Sunday that a wave of protests held by National Football League players during the US anthem before games had “nothing to do with race”.
Rangers: Woman armed with frying pan helped stop forest fire
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BEDDINGTON, Maine (AP) — Maine forest rangers say the quick actions of a woman armed with a frying pan helped stop a forest fire.
Bum rap? Sri Lankan arrested for trying to smuggle gold in rectum
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A Sri Lankan man who raised suspicion by the way he kept looking around in an airport departure lounge was found to be carrying nearly a kilogram (2.2 lb) of gold stashed in his rectum, a customs official said on Monday. The 45-year-old, headed for India, was arrested at Colombo airport on Sunday after customs officials noticed "suspicious movements", customs spokesman Sunil Jayarathne told Reuters. The suspect was carrying 904.77 grams of gold worth 4.5 million rupees ($29,577), but was freed after payment of 100,000 rupees, he said.
Time for the world to step up on Rohingya issue, Aung San Suu Kyi’s astounding hypocrisy, Irma’s destruction in Britain’s Caribbean islands, The
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It is high time the world made an all-out effort to stop the ongoing pogrom against Myanmar’s minority Rohingya...,” writes Mohammad Amjad Hossain. “The pogrom resembles those crimes perpetrated against Jews.... The military junta of Myanmar torches Rohingya villages, stops aid to Rohingya camps, and restricts Rohingyas’ movement.... [The United Nations] secretary-general ... must send peace-keeping forces to Rakhine State.... The Security Council should consider imposing economic sanctions on Myanmar’s government as well.... Further bloodshed must be stopped and this manmade crisis resolved. “The hypocrisy of Myanmar’s de facto leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is astounding,” states an editorial.
After 70 years, we’ve finally figured out how to build a better microwave
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You’ve probably never heard of Percy Spencer, but you’ve certainly used one of his most famous inventions—probably to make popcorn. The microwave was invented it in 1947 and soon became an American household staple. The devices sped up the heating and reheating process in the kitchen, and flew off store shelves and onto countertops by…
What Kind Of Personality Does Your Fish Have?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers put guppies in stressful situations and saw different reactions among individuals, suggesting complex and varying personalities.