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A year after the March, women are sprinting forward
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Ginny Dameron didn’t know what to expect from the Women’s March in Austin, Tex., last January. Odelia Younge also felt conflicted over whether to join the March in San Francisco — at first. For Emily Porter, the decision was easier.
With forgiveness, a need for economic justice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In the 1990s South Africa preached reconciliation and forgiveness in its successful and largely peaceful transition out of apartheid. Today, Liberia, long torn by civil wars, has peacefully elected a new president, George Weah, who’ll take office Jan. 22. South Africa never fell into a civil war, though many worried that could happen.
Battle over legal marijuana: a monumental moment for states’ rights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
West Hollywood is painted with rainbow flags. Known as “The Creative City,” this counterculture hub is set in rolling hills, thrumming with thrift stores, vegetarian restaurants, and, since Jan. 1, four dispensaries selling recreational cannabis. As people waiting in a line outside West Hollywood’s MedMen brush off a rainstorm, Iain McDonald, an actor and Lyft driver from Australia, says he’s puzzled by what he sees as a “war on California.” “When they say state vs. federal – as an outsider – that doesn’t feel right,” he says.
How to secure your privacy in the new age of technology
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kurt 'The Cyber Guy' Knutsson offers tips on how to manage your settings on your Amazon home devices.
Michigan Meteor: Why Did it Explode, and How Likely Is It to Happen Again?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Residents of southeast Michigan got either a thrill or a scare Tuesday when a rare meteor appeared to explode in the night sky. “I went to turn and I noticed a ball of flame coming at an angle,” a local man told The Detroit News. Events like these occur dozens of times each year, including a handful over Michigan within the last decade or so, according to Michigan Live.
Congress Likely Racing Toward a Government Shutdown
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The measure faces iffy prospects in the Senate
Allowed 1 Shower a Year and Fed Just Once a Day: New Allegations of Abuse in House of Horrors Case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The couple faces more than three dozen charges
Need a Job? Why Artificial Intelligence Will Help Human Workers, Not Hurt Them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In 2013, James “Jimi” Crawford founded a company called Orbital Insight, barely noticed at the time amid the Silicon Valley froth. Crawford had worked at NASA for 15 years and wrote software for Mars rovers. Crawford saw an opportunity to collect and analyze what he anticipated would be a deluge of images from a surfeit of new satellites that would circle the Earth, taking readings and pictures.
The 20 Funniest Tweets From Women This Week
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The ladies of Twitter never fail to brighten our days with their brilliant ― but succinct ― wisdom.
Stormy Daniels says Trump is 'terrified of sharks'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
While late-night talk show hosts are focused on the salacious details of Donald Trump's alleged affair with porn star Stormy Daniels, a peculiar anecdote from one of their purported encounters has caught the attention of the internet.
The 'Sisterhood of the Van,' one year after the Women's March
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Jocelyn Duke treats her memory of that day as a talisman, taking it out when the actual moment feels distant, turning it this way and that in her mind.
Cops: Maine man punches self in face to avoid sobriety test
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BELFAST, Maine (AP) — Police in Maine have accused a man of punching himself in the face three times to avoid a sobriety test.
Ice packs: Cigarette smugglers find frozen route to Lithuania
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Tobacco smugglers are using river iceflows and GPS technology to transport their goods into Lithuania, where an estimated one in every six cigarettes smoked in 2016 was illegally imported. The Baltic country's border guard said on Friday it had found thousands of packets of cigarettes attached beneath blocks of ice on the river Neris, which runs into Lithuania from Belarus, since the ice began flowing two weeks ago. The iceblocks carried GPS trackers to aid retrieval.
A year into 'America First,' the world eyes US – and Trump – with less trust
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"From this day forward, it’s going to be only America First," he declared. Recommended: What do you know about Donald Trump? The president has not launched the trade war with China that he had threatened, for example.
U.S. tests nuclear power system to sustain astronauts on Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Initial tests in Nevada on a compact nuclear power system designed to sustain a long-duration NASA human mission on the inhospitable surface of Mars have been successful and a full-power run is scheduled for March, officials said on Thursday. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and U.S. Department of Energy officials, at a Las Vegas news conference, detailed the development of the nuclear fission system under NASA's Kilopower project. Months-long testing began in November at the energy department's Nevada National Security Site, with an eye toward providing energy for future astronaut and robotic missions in space and on the surface of Mars, the moon or other solar system destinations.
What Donald Trump's Mental Health Exam Doesn't Tell Us
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He bragged that he "scored the highest"
Supreme Court Delays Order for North Carolina to Redraw Map in Gerrymander Case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A lower court had said Republicans would need to redraw the state's Congressional districts by next week
A Norwegian Airline Claims to Have Set a New Record for New York to London Flights
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Norwegian Airlines flight DY7014 beat the previous subsonic record by three minutes
Even Chris Hemsworth Can’t Give 12 Strong the Momentum It Needs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"12 Strong," based on Doug Stanton’s 2009 book "Horse Soldiers," never pulls off the momentum it needs to be a rousing film.
Phoenix Serial Killer Suspect Identified After DNA Allegedly Connects Him to 9 Killings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Seven men and two women were shot between Nov. 27 and Dec. 17
A Leader of Zimbabwe's Opposition Party Was Among Five Killed in a Helicopter Crash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Roy Bennett was known as "Pachedu," meaning "one of us" in the Shona language
Republicans Are Offering Children’s Health Insurance in a Short
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump favors making the children's health insurance program part of "a long term" deal
What makes immigration deals so hard
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Specifically, a deal that offers a reprieve for the 700,000 unauthorized immigrants brought to the country as children and temporarily protected under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? Republicans, who hold majorities in both the House and the Senate, are split over whether or not to provide so-called Dreamers some protections in exchange for reforms, like tighter border security measures, that their constituents have long called for.
Thames paddle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Floating on the murky waters of the River Thames in London, activist paddle-boarders are trying to rid the waterway of a plague of plastic waste and draw attention to the problem. As the sun rises on the Thames behind historic Kew Bridge in the west of the British capital, quacking ducks and gliding swans conjured a serene landscape. It is this kind of regularly sullied scene that inspired several members of paddle-board association Active360 to launch cleaning sessions of the river and canals that run through London.
Watch the World's First Ever Drone Surf Rescue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A drone deployed an emergency flotation device to save two struggling swimmers in Australia
India's Ballistic Missile Test Is a 'Direct Threat,' a Chinese State
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
India's Agni 5 missile test traveled for 19 minutes and 3,000 miles, putting China's eastern coastal cities in range
Enjoy technology without jeopardizing safety, security
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kurt the 'CyberGuy' provides insight.
President Trump Denies Changing His Mind About the Border Wall
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He's pushing back against his own chief of staff
‘Potentially hazardous’ asteroid wider than world’s tallest building is hurtling towards Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It could plunge Earth into a mini ice age
Russian police in unexpected encounter with crocodile
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — Russian police had an unexpected encounter while searching a house in St. Petersburg — a crocodile in the basement.
Amazon's New Headquarters Will Be in One of These 20 Cities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The e-commerce giant has settled on a list of finalists for what's being called HQ2
This Ex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Don Blankenship went to prison last year over the deadliest U.S. mine disaster in four decades
Former High School Classmate Charged With Murder of UPenn Student
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Blaze Bernstein was found buried in a park
Pope Francis Performs First Airborne Papal Wedding During Flight in Chile
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He married two flight attendants from Chile
'Mutant flu' could lead to more effective vaccine: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Experiments in lab animals have shown signs of success for a newly engineered flu virus that may lead one day to a more effective vaccine, researchers said Thursday. The World Health Organization considers the flu a major public health concern because it infects up to five million people with severe illness each year and causes up to 650,000 deaths. "Because the variations of seasonal influenza viruses can be unpredictable, current vaccines may not provide effective protection against them," said senior author Ren Sun, a professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).
North Korea Aligning With South Korea for the Winter Olympics Is Already Causing Controversy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North and South Korea will march under one flag for the 2018 Winter Olympics, but North Korea's participation is already causing controversy
Nintendo's Newest Products Are Switch Accessories You Can Build Yourself
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nintendo Labo is a new DIY accessory-building kit for the Switch
4 Simple Ways to Protect Your Child From the Flu
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This year’s flu season is especially bad, and kids are at risk
After a Bogus Missile Warning, Hawaii's Lawmakers Ask Whether State or Federal Officials Should Be Sending Alerts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hawaii is the only state in the nation with a pre-programmed alert that can be quickly sent to wireless devices
Hawaii’s False Alarm Exposes U.S. Civil Defense Gaps
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hawaii's false missile alarm brought home the perilous state of affairs between the U.S., its allies and North Korea amid rising tensions.
Researchers recreate 200
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hans Jonatan was born in St. Croix more than 200 years ago in 1784. His mother Emilia Regina was a house slave on the island, which means Jonatan was born into slavery.  He would later manage to free himself by escaping to Iceland, where he would marry a local woman and raise a family before dying in 1827 at the age of 43. There are no known photographs of Jonatan, but he gained notoriety when his life story was told in a book called The Man Who Stole Himself. But Jonatan once again finds himself the subject of much conversation this week. Despite having no access to any of the man's remains, researchers were able to recreate his DNA in a scientific breakthrough that could have tremendous implications. There are no known remains of Hans Jonatan, who died nearly 200 years ago. But a team of researchers were able to partially reconstruct Jonatan's genome using nothing but DNA from his descendants. In other words, scientists were able to reproduce a man's DNA without access to a sample, and without ever having observed any of the man's genetic material. A paper published in the journal Nature Genetics explains the researchers' feat. Using fragments of DNA taken from more than 180 of Jonatan's descendants, the scientists were able to recreate Jonatan's own DNA. This is the first time a procedure like this has been successful, and researchers believe it could have far-reaching implications. "A genome is a mosaic of chromosome fragments from ancestors who existed some arbitrary number of generations earlier. Here, we reconstruct the genome of Hans Jonatan (HJ), born in the Caribbean in 1784 to an enslaved African mother and European father," the researchers explained in their abstract. "HJ migrated to Iceland in 1802, married and had two children. We genotyped 182 of his 788 descendants using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips and whole-genome sequenced (WGS) 20 of them. Using these data, we reconstructed 38% of HJ’s maternal genome and inferred that his mother was from the region spanned by Benin, Nigeria and Cameroon." Now, it's important to note that while the procedure was undoubtedly a breakthrough, we shouldn't expect to see recreations of historical figures' DNA flooding labs around the world anytime soon. The team responsible for partially recreating Jonatan's DNA says that he was the perfect subject of such a procedure because he was the only person of African descent in Iceland at the time. Because of the country's homogeneity, scientists were able to distinguish known symbols of African DNA from Icelandic DNA in his descendants' samples. According to the researchers, no African ancestry apart from Jonatan existed in Iceland until around 1920. This made the task at hand much easier, since Jonatan was the only person in all of Iceland who was not of European descent.
Baidu's Robin Li is Helping China Win the 21st Century
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China has now set its sights on artificial intelligence, and Baidu founder Robin Li is up the the challenge.
Governors Ask Trump and Congress to Do More for Fight Against Opioids
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency in October
Chris Christie Didn't Break a Leg While Governor of New Jersey. Here's Why That's a Big Deal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Republican Chris Christie left the New Jersey governor's office with his popularity in tatters, but at least he didn't break a leg
Why Did Two
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It took just three weeks for two-thirds of all the world’s saiga to die. It took much longer to work out why. The saiga is an endearing antelope, whose bulbous nose gives it the comedic air of a Dr. Seuss character. It typically wanders over large tracts of Central Asian grassland, but every spring, tens of thousands of them gather in the same place to give birth. These calving aggregations should be joyous events, but the gathering in May 2015 became something far more sinister when 200,000 saiga just dropped dead. They did so without warning, over a matter of days, in gathering sites spread across 65,000 square miles—an area the size of Florida. Whatever killed them was thorough and merciless: Across a vast area, every last saiga perished.
Haitians Are No Longer Eligible for Temporary Work Visas in the U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Belize and Samoa were also dropped from the list
If You Get The Asian Glow, Alcohol Could Be Way Worse For Your Body
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you get the “Asian glow,” you may want to reconsider your next margarita.
Christie criticizes reports of his airline security handling
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — Chris Christie is disputing reports suggesting he tried to get special treatment that he enjoyed while he was governor.
You Can’t Use Google’s New Selfie Art App in These States
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The app has gone viral
How Fire and Fury Author Michael Wolff Got Into Donald Trump's White House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Michael Wolff’s pitch to the White House signaled a sympathetic view of the president