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From 'special seed' to 2,170
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HALF MOON BAY, Calif. (AP) — "One special seed" and months of care by an Oregon commercial pilot produced a massive pumpkin that tipped the scales at a global weigh-in Monday in Northern California, the fourth time his gargantuan plants were awarded top honors.
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
50 Last
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
Meghan McCain Says Her Father's Values Did Not Die With Him as She Returns to The View
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Meghan McCain returned to 'The View' for the first time since the death of her father, John McCain.
Genetic glitch increases men's risk of impotence, study says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've located the first well-documented genetic glitch that increases a man's risk of impotence, a step that might someday lead to new treatments.
President Trump Has Thoughts About Taylor Swift Criticizing a Candidate He Supports
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump’s back and forth with fellow celebrities is anything but over. Following Taylor Swift’s Instagram endorsement of Democratic Tennessee candidates, the President himself weighed in.
Julia Trying Cameo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Julia Trying Cameo
The Latest: Nordhaus predicts US will accept climate science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the Nobel prize in economics (all times local):
20 People Were Killed in a Limo Crash. Locals Say They've Wanted the Intersection Fixed 'For Years'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Residents say the location was a known hazard
Hubble Space Telescope sidelined by serious pointing failure
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The Hubble Space Telescope has been sidelined by a serious pointing problem.
Man allegedly posts video of how to remove an ankle monitor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri man is charged with a felony after he allegedly filmed himself removing an ankle monitor and then posted the video on Facebook.
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
65 Amazing Couples Costumes You Need This Halloween
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
How George W. Bush's Daughter Barbara Paid Tribute to Barbara Bush at Her Wedding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The former first daughter wore a sweet 'something borrowed'
China Tells the U.S. to Stop Criticizing Beijing's Policies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China’s foreign minister has told visiting U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo that the United States should stop what he called groundless attacks on his country’s policies.
The Surprising Role of Circus Performers in the Fight for Women's Suffrage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Barnum & Bailey's Circus Women's Equal Rights Society was founded in 1912
Despite Controversial Tweetstorm, 5 Reasons You Should Still Invest in Elon Musk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Can Musk’s recent SpaceX and Tesla wins save his stocks?
Tribal Map of America Shows Whose Land You're Actually Living On
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A history worth examining on Indigenous People's Day.
French prosecutor demands hefty fine for cruise ship pollution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
French prosecutors called for a 100,000-euro fine against a US cruise ship captain and the vessel's owners for having deliberately flouted European air pollution limits. The company "...wanted to save money at the expense of everyone's lungs, in the context of major air pollution, caused partly by cruise ships," prosecutor Franck Lagier told the court in Marseille. The ship's captain, Evans Hoyt, knew perfectly well that the fuel he had filled up with in Barcelona was illegal, said the prosecutor.
Massive bruisers go head to head in the last Fat Bear Week semifinal match
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Welcome to Fat Bear Week at Mashable! Each fall, Katmai National Park holds a competition as Alaska’s brown bears finish fattening up for their long winter hibernation. This year, Mashable is getting in on the salmon-munching action. Check back with us all week as we follow the fat bear face-offs each day, and remember to get your votes in for each round. Happy fishing! The Fat Bear Week finals showdown is nearly set: Profoundly plump Bear 409 (also known as Beadnose) awaits the winner of Monday's semifinal showdown.  The match pits two of the largest and most dominant Brooks River bears against one another: Bear 32 "Chunk" and Bear 747.  Voting opened at 10 a.m. ET on the Katmai Facebook page and the winner will be announced at 10 p.m. ET. You can vote simply by clicking on the image of bear you wish to vote for, and then "Liking" that image. To help you make an informed vote, view the bears' dramatic summer to fall transitions below: Bear 32Image: nps Bear 32Image: nps Bear 747Image: nps Bear 747Image: nps Each bear that regularly visits the Brooks River in Katmai National Park is given a number by park biologists. The massive Bear 747 just happened to "grow into" his given number. Both bears are large enough to demand the best fishing spots along Alaska's Brooks River, where thousands of daily viewers watched bears snatch fish from the frigid stream on the explore.org webcams this summer.  SEE ALSO: Bear hibernation is a superpower, but it comes with a cost Last year, Bear 32, nicknamed "Chunk" years ago by park rangers, proved to be the most dominant bear of the river, capitalizing upon an enfeebled Bear 856 (who had previously commanded the river's bear hierarchy since 2011).  Image: DUSTIN DRANKOSKI/BOB AL-GREENE/MASHABLEBut this year, a rejuvenated Bear 856 returned to form and has stood unopposed for the best fishing spots — even from the likes of Bear 747 and Chunk. Unlike Bear 856, however, Bear 747 focused most of his attention this summer on eating copious amounts of salmon. Some dominant males — like Bear 856 — will sacrifice valuable fishing time to seek and mate with females.  This might be a good strategy for passing along one's genes and propagating offspring, but it puts a bear like 856 — who was taken out earlier in the week by Chunk — at a clear disadvantage in the Fat Bear Week contest.  Bear 747's girth serves as ample evidence.  WATCH: A paralyzed man walks, with assistance, thanks to a new therapy that reactivates the spinal cord
American Duo Win Nobel Prize in Economics for Work on Growth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Yale University professor William D. Nordhaus and NYU professor Paul M. Romer have been jointly awarded the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2018. Both Nordhaus and Romer's work focused on the creation of long-term sustained and sustainable economic growth and broadened the scope of the field. Born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Nordhaus began studying the interaction between nature and the economy in the '70s, and he was the first person to create a quantitative model that focuses on how the climate and economy affect each other.
Climate action urgent, says world's only 'water ambassador'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Countries must work urgently to solve water issues caused by climate change, a Dutch official billed as the world's only "water ambassador" said Monday, backing a dire warning from the UN. Henk Ovink said nations should be planning now to anticipate future problems, from flooding or sea level rises at one end of the scale to drought and conflict over water resources at the other. "We need a radical change," said Ovink, the special representative on water affairs for the Netherlands, who says his post is the only one of its kind in the world.
Bill and Hillary Clinton launch U.S. tour and tickets aren't cheap
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The former first couple will embark on a 13-city speaking tour after the midterm elections.
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
Limpets under threat due to rise in antidepressant use, scientists warn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Limpets are being killed due to the rise in antidepressant use which means they struggle to cling onto rocks, scientists have warned. A new study argues that aquatic creatures in and around the UK are now “bathing in a soup” of the drugs after prescription rates doubled in the last ten years. Experts have called for doctors to consider the effect on the environment before offering medication such as Prozac, saying its presence in the ecosystem can affect everything from a creatures’ growth and shape to its movement and feeding habits. They also point to research indicating that antidepressants in waste water have caused shrimps to swim towards light, making them more likely to be eaten by predators. Similarly, the chemicals have been linked to aquatic species no longer being able to stick to surfaces such as rocks. It is thought that approximately six million people - around 10 per cent of the population - now take antidepressants regularly. Published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, the new study calls for an overhaul of the UK’s waste water system to bring chemical levels to within legal levels, as well as encouraging patients to return unused medication to pharmacies rather than flushing down the lavatory. Professor Alex Ford, of Portsmouth University’s Institute of Marine Biology, said: “Antidepressant and anti-anxiety medications are found everywhere, in sewage, surface water, ground water, drinking water, soil, and accumulating in wildlife tissues. “They are found in sea water and rivers and their potential ability to disrupt the normal biological systems of aquatic organisms is extensive. “This isn’t about a one-off pollutant entering their habitat; wildlife are bathed in drugs for their entire lifecycle. He added: “Laboratory studies are reporting changes such as how some creatures reproduce, grow, the rate at which it matures, metabolism, immunity, feeding habits, the way it moves, its colour and its behaviour.” Scientists believe that aquatic organisms can be affected by as little as one nanogramme of the drugs per litre, the equivalent of a few drops of water in an Olympic-size swimming pool. It is thought that, just as antidepressants affect hormones such as serotonin in the human brain, they affect serotonin in invertebrate creatures. Research has also indicated that the drugs affect the species’ ability to reproduce. “Toxicity levels of pharmaceuticals in the environment do not necessarily relate to high concentrations, but to their constant low-level discharge, persistence in ecosystems and highly active biological functions,” said Professor Ford in a linked editorial. “In this way, pharmaceuticals that are found in relatively low concentrations could be extremely potent and very persistent, and able to significantly affect non-target organisms.” The researchers suggest that the increase in antidepressant use is partly due to the difficulty in securing psychological counselling in the UK. They argue that prescribing the drugs should be reduced in favour of counselling as far as is safe for patients. The majority of antidepressants enters the environment having been excreted into the sewage system, with even the most modern plants unable to adequately extract traces from the water.
World War I's Most Legendary American Soldier Didn't Want to Fight. Here's What Changed the Pacifist's Mind
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Oct. 8, 1918, Alvin York single-handedly killed 25 and captured 132 of the enemy, forcing the German Army to retreat from their position
Trouble for Hubble: gyro fails on space telescope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Hubble space telescope, which has been in orbit since 1990, is currently out of action because of a gyroscope failure, the US space agency said Monday. "Mission experts are taking steps to return Hubble to great science," the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) said in a tweet. It said Hubble went into "safe mode" on Friday because of the failure of another of the six gyroscopes used to orient the telescope.
Nobel Prize for Economics Goes to 2 U.S. Professors for Their Insights on Tech Innovation and Climate Change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nobel Prize for Economics Goes to 2 U.S. Professors for Their Insights on Tech Innovation and Climate Change
Could More Female Scientists in Public Office Save America?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Shaughnessy Naughton is fighting for a more informed Congress.
Elon Musk's SpaceX lands Falcon 9 rocket on West Coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket landed back at its launch site in California after ferrying an Argentinian satellite into space. SpaceX has landed re-used rockets in Florida, but had been unlucky on the West Coast so far.
US 'green growth' duo win Nobel Economics Prize
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
US economists William Nordhaus and Paul Romer on Monday shared the 2018 Nobel Economics Prize for constructing "green growth" models that show how innovation and climate policies can be integrated with economic growth. Working independently, they have addressed "some of our time's most basic and pressing questions about how we create long-term sustained and sustainable growth," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said in a statement. The academy said their models, both developed in the 1990s, have "significantly broadened the scope of economic analysis".
Trump predicts Democrats will vote for Republicans because of Kavanaugh stance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump says Democratic voters will support Republicans because of Democrats' talk of impeaching Justice Brett Kavanaugh.
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
Australians Are Furious Over Plans to Project an Advertisement on the Sydney Opera House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Critics say the UNESCO World Heritage site should be protected from commercialization
Susan Rice Considering a 2020 Challenge to Senator Collins in Maine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Susan Rice was President Barack Obama's national security adviser
Scientists Just Laid Out Paths to Solve Climate Change. We Aren’t on Track to Do Any of Them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The planet could see a global temperature rise of over 1.5°C as early as 2030
Wife of Missing Interpol President Says He Sent a Photo of a Knife Before Disappearing in China
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The wife of Interpol’s president made an impassioned plea Sunday for help in bringing her missing husband to safety, saying she thinks he sent an image of a knife before he disappeared in China as a way to warn her he was in danger.
Brazil's Far
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A far-right former army captain who expresses nostalgia for Brazil’s military dictatorship took a strong lead in its presidential election Sunday, rallying voters to his promises to rid Latin America’s largest nation of rampant corruption and crime.
Limousine crash leaves 20 dead in New York
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A limousine carrying four sisters, other relatives and friends to a birthday celebration blew through a stop sign and slammed into a parked SUV outside a store in upstate New York, killing all 18 people in the limo and two pedestrians, officials and victims’ relatives said Sunday. Relatives said the limousine was carrying the sisters and their friends to a 30th birthday celebration for the youngest.
Walk on the wild side: Dutch jogger runs into lion cub
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — A jogger's run through the Dutch countryside turned into a walk on the wild side when he discovered a lion cub in a field.
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
Bulgarian Television Journalist Viktoria Marinova Was Raped and Killed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She recently reported on an investigation into alleged fraud related to EU funds
Republicans Held a Locker Room Kegger for Kavanaugh's Confirmation on Last Night's 'Saturday Night Live'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Everyone's pumped, from white men over 60, to white men over 70."
President Trump Says He Hopes to See Kim Jong Un After Pompeo Reports Progress in Pyongyang
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The trip was the latest turn in a diplomatic saga between Un and Trump
Thai official suspended after being caught with bearcat carcasses, weapons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Thai official has been charged by police after being caught with bearcat carcasses and hunting weapons in a national park, police said Monday, the latest case of poaching allegedly committed by powerful Thais. Senior district official Vacharachai Sameerak was part of a group of 12 found by National Park officials on Saturday night in Sai Yok Park, in Kanchanaburi province. "After checking their cars, there were four bearcats paws found, together with guns and ammunition," said police chief Thanee Sangaunjeen, adding that the group did not have authorisation to enter the park.
Journalists Protest After Hong Kong Denies Visa to a Financial Times Editor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Media associations in Hong Kong said they were “shocked and deeply concerned” after city immigration authorities denied a work visa to a prominent journalist in a decision that has stoked fears for the financial hub’s press freedoms.
China Accuses Detained Ex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Chinese authorities say they are investigating the former president of Interpol for bribery and other crimes
Missing Interpol President Resigns From the Agency While Under Investigation in China
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
His whereabouts have been a mystery since his wife reported him missing Friday
Trump's future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The White House acknowledges that the temperature is likely to rise 7 degrees by 2100, and is treating this as a reason to do nothing, on the grounds that the world is screwed no matter what, so why bother trying to save it?