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1 in 3 Americans Don’t Know That a Gender Wage Gap Exists, Survey Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
‘To close the pay gap, we need to close the awareness gap’
Beached whale dies despite rescue efforts at Argentina resort
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A whale that ran aground on a beach in Mar del Plata, Argentina's biggest seaside resort, has died despite rescue efforts to get it back into the sea. The eight-meter whale, which weighed around six tonnes (6,000 kilos or 13,200 pounds), ran aground on Saturday, prompting both locals and experts to try and save it in this coastal city some 400 kilometers (250 miles) south of Buenos Aires.
Why Tuesday Could Define Trump's Presidency
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Historians judge presidents by crises. Donald Trump faces two: a chemical attack in Syria and an investigation into his personal lawyer.
5 Most Deadly Chemical Weapons on Planet Earth (VX, Sarin, Mustard Gas and More)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Chlorine is a readily available industrial chemical with many peaceful uses, including as bleach in paper and cloth, to make pesticides, rubber, and solvents and to kill bacteria in drinking water and swimming pools. Chlorine did not figure in Assad’s initial stockpile declaration in October and was not removed with the rest of Syria’s chemical weapons last month. Despite its dual-use nature, chlorine’s use as a chemical weapon is still banned under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC).
Zuckerberg says Facebook staffers have been interviewed by Mueller's team
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told lawmakers on Capitol Hill on Tuesday that staffers at the social media giant have been interviewed by members of special counsel Robert Mueller's office.
Zuckerberg hedges on how Facebook tracks you
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Some questions about Facebook are too tricky for its chief executive to answer. 
Singing road strikes wrong chord with Dutch villagers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Created by strategically laid "rumble strips" as a way of livening up journeys across the flat landscape, the novelty has worn thin for locals who say the constant droning melody is driving them mad. If hit at the correct speed - the 60 kph (40 mph) limit - the road will sing out the anthem of the Friesland region - a northern part of the Netherlands that has a distinct language and culture. The Friesland authority has agreed to remove the rumble strips later this week, local newspaper Leeuwarder Courant reported.
In Brazil, support for anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Lorena Faria travelled more than 100 miles by bus last week to hunker down with thousands of protesters outside the metalworkers union headquarters in São Bernardo do Campo, Brazil, in support of former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva.
Behind shock of Cohen raid, signs of a meticulous process
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In many ways, the sudden seizure by federal law enforcement of piles of documents from Michael Cohen, a stalwart of Mr. Trump’s business for years, seems an extraordinary event, an inflection point for the legal problems gradually creeping up on current and former Trump campaign and administration officials. The question is, in what way, for whom, the raid is evidence that problems will be getting worse. Given the stakes, and the people involved, it is almost certain that the Justice Department and FBI are trying to avoid missteps, proceeding slowing and double-checking along the way.
Anyone want to buy a dinosaur? Two on sale in Paris
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The skeletons of an allosaurus and a diplodocus are up for auction in Paris this week, marketed as hip interior design objects -- for those with big enough living rooms. "The fossil market is no longer just for scientists," said Iacopo Briano of Binoche et Giquello, the auction house that is putting the two dinosaurs under the hammer on Wednesday. "Dinosaurs have become cool, trendy -- real objects of decoration, like paintings," the Italian expert told AFP, citing Hollywood actors Leonardo DiCaprio and Nicolas Cage as fans of such outsize prehistoric ornaments.
Mark Zuckerberg meets with lawmakers on Capitol Hill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Facebook CEO takes responsibility for social network's scandals; Peter Doocy reports from Washington.
A Competitive Eater Suffered a Rare 'Thunderclap' Headache Brought on by the World's Hottest Chili Pepper
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He ate a "Carolina Reaper" — the world's most intense chili — at a hot-pepper-eating contest
Advertisers keep up pressure on Laura Ingraham
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Laura Ingraham returned to Fox News this week, but the bad news for her continued. The exodus of advertisers from Ingraham's show resumed following her weeklong hiatus, meant to stem the loss of sponsors unwilling to associate their brands with her program.
A creative solution to the US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In an April 10 speech, President Xi Jinping suggested China will continue on its government-driven path to be a technological superpower by 2025 despite US actions. The final compromises to end this “trade war” may depend on how much each country changes its view of itself as able to invent and create new markets. For the US, a report by the National Science Foundation in January warned that the country’s global share of science and technology activities is declining.
The Creators of Westworld Actually Want to Give Away Spoilers for Season 2. Here's Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They admit the move could be a 'potentially highly controversial' decision
How we found a giant ichthyosaur almost as big as a blue whale
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A jaw bone found on a beach in Somerset could be from the largest ichthyosaur of its kind ever discovered.
Laura Ingraham Returns to Fox News, Accusing Liberals of Bullying Conservatives 'Into Silence'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After she lost advertisers when she mocked a high school shooting survivor
Nuclear scientists at CERN discover color of antimatter, hope to learn much more
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For the first time in history, researchers at CERN have been able to examine the spectral structure of an antimatter antihydrogen atom in full glorious color. Here's why that matters.
Three words Sen. Kennedy wants to hear from Mark Zuckerberg
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Republican senator from Louisiana previews the Facebook CEO's appearance on Capitol Hill.
China’s Xi Jinping Offers Trade Concessions, but They May Not Be Enough to Satisfy Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Xi pledged to lower auto import tariffs and ease foreign investment, just as trade tensions rise with the U.S.
Apple facilities now use 100 percent clean energy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Apple is patting itself on the back for hitting its goal of 100 percent clean energy. All of the tech company's facilities around the world are powered by renewable energy, Apple announced Monday. That's stores, offices, and data centers powered from solar, wind, hydrogen, and other clean energy sources. While impressive that facilities in 43 countries are powered with clean energy, its many suppliers are still working at it. Apple has convinced nine more suppliers "to power all of their Apple production with 100 percent clean energy, bringing the total number of supplier commitments to 23." Pegatron with iPhone factories in Shanghai and Kunshan, China, and Finisar, the U.S. company that builds parts to power Face ID and Animoji are among the nine pledge makers.   SEE ALSO: Google bought more renewable energy than it needed last year Reaching 100 percent renewables has been a years-long mission. Back in 2015, Apple was close at 93 percent. Major energy projects have pushed the company toward clean operations. Twenty-five projects, including wind, solar, and biogas projects generate 626 megawatts of clean energy. More projects are in the works in 11 countries, bringing in 1.4 gigawatts of clean energy, Apple said.  In China, wind and solar projects bring in 485 megawatts of energy across six provinces. At Apple headquarters in Cupertino, California, a 17-megawatt solar panel installation on the roof and biogas fuel cells bring in clean energy.  Apple said since 2011 all of its energy projects cut back greenhouse gas emissions by 54 percent. That was a reduction of 2 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent.  All this clean energy sounds very "green," but it doesn't change Apple's stance on replacing and repairing its electronic products. Apple continues to promote (frequent) new purchases of iPhones, MacBooks, and other energy- and resource-depleting items. As a business that makes sense, but as an environmentally conscious company it's destructive. That 100 percent clean energy milestone gets a bit sullied with Apple's repair policies in mind. WATCH: This artist is building solar lanterns so kids can study and play after dark
Like flu season, the 'infectious' spread of bitcoin could be over, Barclays says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Barclays analysts came up with price model that likens bitcoin to an infectious disease and shows that like flu season, price spikes and cryptocurrency mania may be nearing an end.
'It would be suicide' to fire Mueller, GOP senator warns Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump renewed speculation about the fate of the Russia investigation after the FBI raided the office of his personal attorney on Monday, saying, in response to a question about firing special counsel Robert S. Mueller, "We'll see."
Jaw bone on British beach belonged to huge ancient reptile
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A 205-million-year-old jaw bone belonging to an ancient porpoise-like reptile known as an ichthyosaur was likely one of the largest ever known on Earth, researchers in Britain said Monday. The bone fragments of the long-extinct fish predator were spotted on the beach at Lilstock, Somerset in May 2016, and together they measure about three feet long (96 centimeters), said the report in the journal PLOS One. After comparing them to another set of bones in Canada scientists believe they came from an ichthyosaur that was close to 26 meters long, almost the size of a blue whale.
Bots May Be Behind Two
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Twitter is overrun by bots, but that's not necessarily a bad thing, a new study says
Mark Zuckerberg begins two days of testimony on Capitol Hill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What message should the Facebook CEO send the public? Attorney Alex Swoyer weighs in on 'Fox & Friends First.'
New way of defining Alzheimer's aims to find disease sooner
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Government and other scientists are proposing a new way to define Alzheimer's disease — basing it on biological signs, such as brain changes, rather than memory loss and other symptoms of dementia that ...
Consumer Groups Say YouTube Violates Children's Online Privacy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Advocates and consumer watchdogs have asked the FTC to investigate
A new broom: SLeone president declares national cleanup day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sierra Leone's new President Julius Maada Bio has announced that the first Saturday of each month will be "national cleaning day," as part of a campaign to improve hygiene and the work rate of civil servants. The measures were announced by the president's office late Monday, two days after a rally in which Bio, a former general who was briefly in power in the 1990s, said he would be a stickler for "discipline". Bio added that all civil servants and government ministers were expected to be at work from 8:30 am until 4:45 pm, and he and the vice president would carry out snap checks.
Nikki Haley Condemns Chemical Attack in Syria: 'Only a Monster Does This'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'The monster who is responsible for these attacks has no conscience'
Trump rages on Twitter after FBI raids his lawyer's office
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump continued to fume about the FBI raid on the office and hotel of his lawyer, Michael Cohen, after federal agents reportedly seized information related to Cohen’s hush-money payment to porn star Stormy Daniels on the eve of the 2016 presidential election.
Watch: NASA Wrecks Crash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A crash-test dummy’s life is full of ups and downs. The space agency’s Langley Research Center in Virginia has given shed some light on the experiences of these abused figures, including footage of the devastating crashes they endure in the name of science. Researchers “have to use crash test dummies to evaluate the likelihood of injury when they’re either coming back to the ocean or they’re going to be coming back to land,” Martin Annett, a structural impact dynamics engineer, said in the NASA video.
The Office of President Trump's Lawyer Michael Cohen Was Raided by the FBI
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cohen has been under increasing scrutiny amid the special counsel probe
Japanese confirmed as world's oldest living man aged 112
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Masazo Nonaka from Japan was recognised Tuesday as the world's oldest man at the ripe old age of 112, as his family revealed his secret: sweets and hot baths. Nonaka, who was born on July 25, 1905 -- just months before Albert Einstein published his theory of special relativity -- received a certificate from Guinness World Records at home on Japan's northern island of Hokkaido. "He needs a wheelchair to move but he is in good condition," said Yuko Nonaka, his granddaughter.
Revenge of the Faceblockers: Social media abstainers aren't worried about their data
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Americans who never joined Facebook aren’t worried about their data being misused — because they never provided it.
Who Were the Original Mercury Seven? NASA's First Astronauts Included John Glenn, Alan Shepard
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's been 59 years since seven men were presented to the world as NASA's first-ever astronaut class. The men, called the Original Seven, became overnight sensations in the United States. 
Facebook data notifications start after breach fallout
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Facebook looks to reassure their 2.2 billion users with the rollout of new 'alert' update to the app, providing users with a notification when a third party accesses their data; Jonathan Hunt reports.
Race for Mexico's 'cocaine of the sea' pushes 2 species toward extinction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The dried fish parts don't look like much to the novice eye, but the totoaba swim bladders discreetly displayed in this shop in Guangzhou, China sell for up to $20,000. Half a world away, off the coast of Mexico, poachers battling each other for this "cocaine of the sea" are using drug cartel-like tactics to get it -- pushing two species toward extinction and leaving ordinary fishermen fighting to survive. The lucrative black market for totoaba swim bladders -- prized in Chinese traditional medicine for their purported healing and beautifying properties -- have turned the Gulf of California into a battleground, criss-crossed by armed poachers, Mexican navy vessels and environmental activists patrolling with pirate flags.
Sen. Thune previews Zuckerberg's congressional testimony
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Republican senator from South Dakota met face-to-face with the Facebook CEO ahead of his appearance before the Senate Commerce Committee.
John Bolton Takes the Lead as National Security Adviser as Tensions Mount Abroad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A possible strike on Syria and a high-risk North Korea summit are already on his agenda
This week's earthquake cluster is the new normal in Oklahoma. Here's why.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A cluster of earthquakes hit Oklahoma over the past few days, unsettling thousands of the state's residents. As of 11 a.m. ET Monday the U.S. Geological Survey says that 2,274 people reported feeling a 4.3 magnitude quake Sunday night. There have been at least 16 noticeable earthquakes (above 2.5 in magnitude) observed by the Geologic Survey since Friday, April 6. While nerve-rattling, the quakes are normal for the area — at least since 2009. That's when the problematic quakes began, Jeremy Boak, Director of the Oklahoma Geological Survey, said in an interview.  SEE ALSO: Hey, how about we helicopter grizzly bears into this remote National Park? "It's not out of the ordinary," said Boak. "In the frame of what’s been going on, it’s normal." Oklahoma's dramatic rise in quakes has been stoked by oil and gas extraction activity in the region.  There have been 8 earthquakes with magnitudes ranging from 2.5 to 4.6 between Perry and Covington in northern Oklahoma in the past 24 hours. The latest, having a preliminary magnitude of 4.6, occurred at 7:16 CDT this morning. #okquake https://t.co/JwfpIrHgSb pic.twitter.com/UbqUwya6jX — USGS in Oklahoma (@USGS_Oklahoma) April 7, 2018 This quake activity — associated with the "fracking revolution" that has also propelled historically high U.S. oil exports — comes in two forms. The first is fracking itself, an oil extraction process more formally known as "hydraulic fracking." Broadly, this means injecting millions of gallons of water, sand, and a small percentage of chemicals into a deeply-drilled hole. This breaks apart rocks to release oil deposits, sometimes creating earthquakes. But most Oklahoma quakes aren't caused by fracking itself, but by a secondary process called "wastewater injection." After water is used to fracture apart rocks thousands of feet below, it comes back up as "wastewater," and is usually injected back into the ground nearby (the mixture has to go somewhere). Water is extremely heavy, so, this can put pressure on deep-lying faults. And if enough pressure is applied to these cracks in the Earth's crust, they'll rupture and move, causing sizeable quakes.  While a U.S. Geologic Survey spokesperson said it's too early to officially confirm the cause of the northwestern Oklahoma earthquake burst, Boak said it's almost certainly due to wastewater injection. That's the common cause of quakes in this part of northwestern Oklahoma, and generally, has been the prevailing story for years. Earthquakes of 3.0 magnitude or higher measured in Oklahoma as of July 2017.Image: U.S. Geologic survey But, overall, earthquakes have been on the decline in Oklahoma since the especially rattling years of 2014, 2015, and 2016.  The year 2015 saw nearly 900 quakes of 3.0 or higher in Oklahoma (around 2.5 or above is noticeable to most people). For perspective, before 2009, Oklahoma usually recorded one or two quakes of 3.0 magnitude or higher each year. By 2015, earthquake activity peaked for a time at around 4 and a half quakes each day, Boak previously said.  But this year, Boak expects around 200 noticeable quakes to occur in Oklahoma. This recent cluster of quakes, then, is "part of the continuing pattern which in general is declining," he said. There are two major reasons for the decline, said Boak. One is the falling price of oil. This means that oil and gas extraction isn't quite as lucrative as it once was a few years ago (it's a famously boom and bust industry). Accordingly, there's a bit less fracking activity. Oklahoma resident Lisa Griggs believes cracks in her home have been caused by Oklahoma's manmade earthquakes.Image: The Washington Post/Getty ImagesThe second reason is mandatory state requirements that oil and gas companies find ways to reduce quaking. The rattled citizens of Oklahoma made quite clear to the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, which regulates the gas industry, that the quakes must stop — or at least be limited. "We needed to shut this down and it actually appears to have worked," said Boak. Oil and gas companies accomplish this reduction in a variety of ways, which includes stopping wastewater injections when seismic activity begins. As for Boak, he has still yet to feel one of Oklahoma's big quakes — even though he studies them. He's too far south of most the activity, in the quieter confines of Norman, Oklahoma.  "I’ve never had the privilege of feeling one of the Oklahoma earthquakes," he said.  WATCH: Scientists found a weird galaxy without dark matter
NASA’s Juno snapped another photo of Jupiter that looks like a watercolor painting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Out of all the different pieces of NASA hardware floating around our Solar System, the Juno spacecraft probably has the best gig in terms of pure eye candy. The orbiter regularly snaps almost-too-good-to-be-real photos of the gas giant and its swirling cloud tops and sends them back to eager scientists and skywatchers back on Earth, and its latest batch of high-flying photos is just as good as we've come to expect from the reliable probe. NASA, which regularly shows off some of Juno's best work, took the time to highlight a particularly cool-looking photo of Jupiter's iconic cloud patterns that was snapped back on April 1st. As with many images of the planet that we've seen in the past, the photo almost looks like an antique watercolor painting, and it's hard not to lose yourself in the surreal sight. "See intricate cloud patterns in the northern hemisphere of Jupiter in this new view taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft," NASA says of the image. "The color-enhanced image was taken on April 1 at 2:32 a.m. PST (5:32 a.m. EST), as Juno performed its twelfth close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 7,659 miles (12,326 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a northern latitude of 50.2 degrees." NASA makes it incredibly easy for the general public to see what the Juno spacecraft is observing via its JunoCam web portal. Here, raw images are uploaded without any additional processing, and citizen scientists have the opportunity to enhance them by emphasizing the colors and contrast. This particular photo was processed by Kevin M. Gill. You can view the photo at its full resolution here. The Juno spacecraft is currently nearing the conclusions of its original mission timeline, having over six years and eight months of its planned seven-year mission. However, as with many of NASA's spacecraft, the probe is likely to get a new lease on life with extended mission goals that will allow it to deliver awesome photos like this one for a while longer.
Wildlife Traffickers Are Illegally Selling Animal Parts on Facebook, Advocates Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Advocates say Facebook has failed to stop illicit traders
Mark Zuckerberg's Testimony on Cambridge Analytica Could Backfire on Congress
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Top aides in Congress worry that lawmakers could drive themselves into serious peril as they take on Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg.
Activists and Medics Say a Gas Attack Near the Syrian Capital Has Killed at Least 40 People
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Syria denies ever using chemical weapons during the seven-year civil war
10 teams advance in international carbon dioxide competition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — A $20 million international competition to make profitable products from a gas that otherwise would contribute to global warming has entered its final stretch.
Tech tyranny: Is tech more addictive than opioids?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dr. David Hill, chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Communications and Media, says smartphone addiction could be a greater crisis for society than opioids. #Tucker
Florida Gov. Rick Scott Announces Senate Campaign
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's expected to be a closely-watched, expensive election
Diamond & Silk: Facebook says we are 'unsafe'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Social media stars speak out on 'Fox & Friends' about their dealings with Facebook.
Our fossil finger discovery points to earlier human migration in Arabia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
How we found the oldest human fossil ever discovered outside Africa and the Levant.