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How the Gun Control Act of 1968 Changed America’s Approach to Firearms—And What People Get Wrong About That History
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A historian explains how the U.S. was able to enact a federal gun control law in 1968, and why such a law would be hard to pass today.
Why an enduring U.S. oil spill can't be stopped
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When the Taylor Energy oil drilling platform toppled over in September 2004, its 500-foot-tall metal legs twisted and bent as the looming structure sank to the seafloor. Hurricane Ivan's pummeling waves had unsettled the muddy ground, which spelled doom for the 20-year-old rig. It lay in a mangled, chaotic heap. And then, it started leaking oil. Over 14 years later, oil continues seeping to the surface in the Gulf of Mexico. And as geoscientist Oscar Pineda-Garcia, an expert in satellite-based sensing of oil spills events, concluded last month in a 91-page federal court-ordered report, there's been a chronic release of "at least" 300 to 700 barrels of oil each day (12,600 to 29,400 gallons). This vastly eclipses previous government estimates of between 1 to 55 barrels per day. The leaking oil could "easily" continue leaking for decades, Sean Anderson an environmental scientist at California State University Channel Islands who conducts oil spill research, said in an interview. This raises questions about whether anything can be done to clean up the oil, or stymie the stubborn leak. "There’s a perpetual petroleum ooze," said Anderson. "People [in the Gulf] have come to see that as being normal." An oil sheen in 2015 drifting from the site of the former Taylor Energy oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, off the Louisiana coast.Image: Gerald Herbert/AP/REX/ShutterstockAfter 14 years of leaking, the Taylor Energy mishap is threatening to become one of the country's worst-ever oil spills — rivaling 2010's Deepwater Horizon disaster, the largest in U.S. history. "It's one thing to say you're leaking one or three barrels a day. But at 700 barrels a day you’re getting into some interesting numbers," Stan Meiburg, the former Acting Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, said in an interview.  "If — and that's a big if — the rates have been occurring at that rate for 14 years, you get a big number," added Meiburg, who is now the director of Graduate Studies in Sustainability at Wake Forest University. SEE ALSO: This scientist keeps winning money from people who bet against climate change There is, of course, potential that Pineda-Garcia's final estimates are higher than reality, but he noted that the surface oil he and his team measured did not account for oil trapped under the water, so the rate of leaking is likely "higher than these calculations," the report concluded.  Sopping up the oil There's no expectation that the leaking will stop on its own, so the Gulf should expect Taylor Energy oil to continue collecting on the ocean's surface. This carries little-understood health implications for residents living near cleanups; it's deadly to wildlife; and the oil can taint beaches. But cleaning up a daily, perpetual spill is daunting.  "Your options are really not that great," said Meiburg. "You can try and burn it off," he noted, use long booms to fence in the spill, or employ chemicals to disperse the oil. But dumping chemicals into the water carries new environmental burdens.  "It raises the question if the cure is better than the disease," Meiburg said.  Any blown well in deep waters is a great burden to clean up — and in some cases even find. "One of the most difficult challenges with an ultra-deep (+150 m deep) water blowout is that it is difficult to contain," Jonathan Whiting, a civil engineer at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, said over email.  "The escaping oil doesn’t float straight up to the surface, but gets moved around by changing underwater currents," said Whiting. "The oil could eventually surface miles from the source, and some oil will never reach the surface at all. Emergency responders can’t clean up an oil spill that they don’t know where to find." A boat's wake passing through a Taylor Energy oil sheen in 2015.Image: Gerald Herbert/AP/REX/ShutterstockThe one thing oil has going for it is that it's a natural, organic substance, and there are microbes in the ocean that consume weathered, spread-out petroleum.  But with a relentless, high-volume leak, these natural recovery processes can't always occur. "With a continuous spill constantly leaking, different seasonal currents could bring the oil to many different beaches in the vicinity," noted Whiting.  Cash for a cleanup? It's unclear, however, how much funding there will be for regular cleanups.  After putting aside hundreds of millions of dollars for environmental recovery, Taylor Energy has sued the United States to get $423 million back.  In its lawsuit, the oil company argues, incredibly, that “no evidence exists of a present and ongoing leak from any of the wells at the MC20 site [the oil platform site]." Taylor Energy wants to dissolve its $423 million trust that guaranteed payment for the costs of plugging the leaking wells, and other environmental remediation. The company — now defunct and sold — has already spent a whopping $435 million on containing the leaks — including hauling the heavy platform to the surface. Because the U.S. is now mired in a lawsuit, the Bureau of Ocean Energy and Management, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) all declined to comment on this story. However, NOAA did note that it is undertaking a "Natural Resource Damage Assessment" process to determine if public natural resources have been harmed by the leaking oil.   If a U.S. federal court determines that Taylor is still on the hook for the enduring oil leak, there are effective and realizable "near future" cleanup solutions, said Seshadri Ramkumar, a professor in the Department of Environmental Toxicology at Texas Tech University. He suggests the use of cotton — pure, largely unprocessed cotton.  "The science is there — the resources are there," Ramkumar said in an interview, emphasizing that it's a realizable solution — though one that will require money.  "One gram of cotton can absorb 30 time its weight in liquid crude oil," Ramkumar found. The pure cotton can be integrated into a mat or a long boom, he said. It eliminates the need to dump chemical dispersants into the sea, and natural cotton doesn't sink.  For now, Taylor Energy contractors have experimented with putting domes over areas where they've identified leaking oil, which allows them to then collect the oil. "This is a very new technique with mixed results," noted Whiting. Plugging the leaks Mopping up the oil, of course, wouldn't be necessary if the wellheads were sealed, hundreds of feet under sea. Capping these wells, however, is profoundly complicated, especially in the case of the Taylor Energy collapse. Taylor Energy had drilled 28 separate wells into the seafloor, like punching holes into the ground. Some of them have been found and contained, but over half haven't been located.  In 2010, during the dramatic Deepwater Horizon spill, the Deepwater blasted 134 million gallons of oil into the ocean. But 87 days later, British Petroleum (the company responsible) capped the leak. The Taylor Energy collapse, however, comes with other, unique challenges.  "This particular well is a really different situation from the Deepwater Horizon, and in some ways much more complex," noted Meiburg. Plugging Deepwater Horizon — though it was no simple feat — required capping just one well. Engineers were able to drill into the metal pipe and pump sealant into the leaking hole.   That's not the case with the Taylor leak. A year after the Deepwater Horizon spill,  public beaches along the Louisiana coast remained closed.Image: Bevil Knapp/EPA/REX/ShutterstockWhat's more, according to The Washington Post, the federal government prohibited Taylor Energy from boring through the mess of collapsed metal and deep sea mud — as that might penetrate a pipe and make matters significantly worse. Anderson, however, believes it's the industry's power and influence in the Gulf — not engineering limitations — that's allowed the oil to continue flowing. "To be fair to them, it [plugging the leak] is a challenge," said Anderson. "It is a pain to get to, but it's completely within our realm of doing." Oil and gas companies aren't all inherently nefarious, noted Anderson. But the Gulf is filled with oil industry — and leaks. It's simply an ubiquitous economically dominant industry.  "Nobody wants to criticize the [Gulf] oil and gas industry — you can’t say anything bad about oil and gas," said Anderson. "There's oil right and left, everywhere."  In California waters, these spills get cleaned up. In 2015, during the Refugio spill, experienced crews from Louisiana came to California help clean up the viscous pollution. But these Gulf workers weren't too impressed with California's spill, which caked beaches in black oil. It was tiny, compared to Gulf standards. "Those crews would laugh at our cleanup efforts," said Anderson.  So off Louisiana shores, the oil still flows into the sea — sometimes for 14 years with no clear end in sight. "Louisiana made a deal with the devil," said Anderson. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?      
Ridiculously Tiny Baby Octopus Riding Ocean Trash Is So, So Smol
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A baby octopus the size of a pea was hitchhiking on a piece of plastic floating in the Pacific Ocean when Hawaiian researchers spotted it and scooped up the smol, smol cephalopod. Photos shared on Facebook by Hawaii's Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park show the wee baby rescued from the trash and huddled in a plastic tub, its spotted arms curled daintily under its bulging eyes and mantle. Park researchers were monitoring coral reefs in August when they spotted the charismatic eight-armed stowaway on a piece of floating plastic debris, park representatives wrote on Facebook.
Both parties go all in on Nevada's bellwether Senate race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Nevada’s Dean Heller, the only Republican senator running this year in a state won by Hillary Clinton, is edging up in the polls against Democrat Jacky Rosen. It’s a make-or-break election for both parties.
In DeSantis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Republican Ron DeSantis and Democrat Andrew Gillum clashed in Wednesday's final debate.
Senate candidate Corey Stewart doesn't waste any sympathy on CNN over bombing attempt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Corey Stewart, the Republican candidate for Senate in Virginia, made it clear where he places the blame for suspected mail bombs sent this week: on the intended victims.
Why neglected governors’ races are more important than you think
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Actor Ronald Reagan answers questions at a news conference in Los Angeles, Ca., on Jan. 4, 1965, after announcing that he will campaign for the Republican nomination for governor of California, left and Arkansas governor Bill Clinton, talks with reporters while on the campaign trail in Manchester, N.H., on Jan. 8, 1992. WASHINGTON—If you want to live in the White House, first try the governor’s mansion. Ronald Reagan’s stint in Sacramento launched his national political career.
Investigators treating packages as 'live devices,' not hoax
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
WASHINGTON (AP) — Investigators probing crude pipe bombs sent to prominent critics of President Donald Trump are trying to determine whether the devices were intended to detonate or simply to sow fear, law enforcement officials told The Associated Press Thursday.
Goodwill workers find original 1774 US 'rebel' newspaper
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BELLMAWR, N.J. (AP) — A quick eye by Goodwill workers in New Jersey has turned up an original 1774 Philadelphia newspaper with the iconic "Unite or Die" snake design on the masthead.
Political violence and its antidote
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Democracy, writes British scholar David Runciman in a new book about the topic, is simply “civil war without the fighting.” But, he adds, when something is not working in a democracy – such as when there is an uptick in political violence – the people usually change it. Lately, a few democracies have witnessed a rise in political violence. In South Africa, an increase in feuding within the ruling African National Congress has led to about 90 politicians killed since 2016.
Control of House may hinge on ‘Panera moms’ in the suburbs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The last time voters here sent a Democrat to Congress, Richard Nixon was president, and the sprawling retail center that is disappearing in Ms. Mattson’s rear-view mirror didn’t even exist. Mattson turns into a modest neighborhood where she will canvass for Abigail Spanberger, a former CIA operative who is seeking office for the first time.
China’s unveiling an up
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Seven years ago, China was shut out of using the International Space Station by the US over national security concerns, driving China to aspire to a space station of its own. Now the country is getting ready to show the world what it has built for the first time. China’s Manned Space Agency announced it…
Supermassive black holes: we've spotted signs of mergers that may finally help us prove they exist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Merging supermassive black holes would emit gravitational waves, allowing scientists to detect them.
Vote Like It Matters. Because Then It Will
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nancy Gibbs wants people to "vote because it is the one absolutely necessary step toward any better place," in the 2018 midterm elections.
Public Rage Won’t Solve Any of Our Problems
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Rage is a dangerous emotion, not simply because it can be destructive but because it can be so easily satisfied with cheap targets."
Suspect Shot Victims Multiple Times in Kroger Grocery Store Rampage, Police Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A gunman fatally shot a man in the back of the head inside a Kroger and then killed a woman in the grocery store's parking lot before exchanging gunfire with a bystander, police said. Officers then captured the suspect as he tried to flee.
This optical illusion ‘reveals how your brain really works’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What do you see when you watch this?
Why TIME Devoted an Issue to Guns in America
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When JR and I discussed his creating a cover for TIME we immediately landed on guns. It was just a few months after the shooting in Parkland
Tigers dwindling: just six sub
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Six different sub-species of tigers exist today, scientists confirmed Thursday, amid hopes the findings will boost efforts to save the fewer than 4,000 free-range big cats that remain in the world. The six include the Bengal tiger, Amur tiger, South China tiger, Sumatran tiger, Indochinese tiger and Malayan tiger, said the report in the journal Current Biology. Three other tiger subspecies have already gone extinct: the Caspian, Javan and Bali tigers.
The Latest on Brexit, As the Clock Runs Down
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Negotiations over Britain’s complex disentanglement from the European Union are nearing a final outcome.
Russia launches first Soyuz rocket since failed space launch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russia on Thursday successfully launched a Soyuz rocket for the first time since the failure of a similar rocket aborted a manned take-off to the International Space Station (ISS) on October 11. "This is the first launch of a rocket from the Soyuz family since the October 11 accident," Russia's space agency chief Dmitry Rogozin wrote on Twitter. It was the third launch of a Soyuz rocket from Russia's northern Plesetsk launch pad this year, the military said.
Andrew Gillum and Ron Desantis Florida Governor Debate Gets Heated
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Andrew Gillum and Ron Desantis Florida Governor Debate Gets Heated
Archaeologists uncover oldest weapons ever found in North America, and they might rewrite history
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For many years the consensus among archaeologists was that humans began settling in North America around 13,000 years ago. This timeline was based on artifacts found that dated back between 12,700 and 13,000 years, including weapons. Now, a new discovery in Texas could throw that theory right out the door. Researchers from Texas A&M, Baylor University, and the University of Texas have uncovered what they believe to be spear points that were used by human hunters as far back as 15,500 years ago. The discovery pre-dates the accepted timeline for the settlement of North America by a significant margin, and scientists may be forced to rethink when and where the first groups of humans pushed into what is now the United States. “There is no doubt these weapons were used for hunting game in the area at that time,” Michael Waters of Texas A&M, lead author of the paper published in Science Advances, said in a statement. “The discovery is significant because almost all pre-Clovis sites have stone tools, but spear points have yet to be found. These points were found under a layer with Clovis and Folsom projectile points. Clovis is dated to 13,000 to 12,700 years ago and Folsom after that. The dream has always been to find diagnostic artifacts – such as projectile points – that can be recognized as older than Clovis and this is what we have at the Friedkin site.” It's thought that hunting was what drove groups of ancient peoples into new areas, and at the time the spear points may have been used in hunting efforts against large game like mammoths. However, it wasn't as though settlers of the age had maps or even a vague understanding of how the continent was shaped. They would have had little knowledge of what lied over the horizon as they traveled north, and wouldn't have relocated unless it was necessary. With that in mind, it's easy to see why determining when human settlers arrived is such a difficult task. Smaller groups may have come and gone over time, and progress would have been slow. Whether this new discovery represents a large-scale movement into North America far earlier than was previously known, or if it's nothing more than a bizarre outlier, remains to be seen.
America Is Polarized. It’s Why We Have to Start Listening to Each Other
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Margaret Hoover wants people to start listening to each other, now that America is more polarized than ever among those politically engaged.
Pompeii dig finds intact skeletons of two women and three children huddled together
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archeologists are piecing together the dramatic last moments of two women and three children whose skeletons have been discovered at Pompeii. Caught up in the terrifying eruption of Mt Vesuvius nearly 2,000 years ago, they sought shelter in the inner room of a villa, wedging a piece of furniture – either a bed or a divan - against the door. But their attempts at self-preservation were sadly in vain and all five died as the building was engulfed in volcanic ash and collapsed. The skeletons were discovered in the same villa where archeologists last week found a charcoal inscription that suggested that the eruption of Vesuvius happened in October AD 79, not August of that year, as previously thought. The women and children would have barricaded themselves inside the house because by then there was no chance of fleeing Pompeii – the ash had been falling for 18 hours, homes were covered in debris and streets were blocked with ash and pumice, said Massimo Osanna, the director of Pompeii. “The place where they took shelter must have seemed safe,” Prof Osanna said. The skeletons are believed to belong to two women and three children Credit: Ciro Fusco/Ansa Instead, their lives were soon after snuffed out by the devastating impact of the volcano’s eruption. “They were crushed by the roof when it collapsed, or burned by the pyroclastic cloud, or perhaps a combination of both those things,” he said. Not far from the skeletons, archeologists made another intriguing discovery – a 17th century coin, suggesting that the villa was partially explored by tomb-raiders decades before official excavations began in 1748. The effect of tunneling and digging by early tomb raiders was “devastating”, Prof Osanna said. “The objective was to find any objects of value, without paying any regard at all for human remains, which they disturbed.” Pompeii is undergoing a new phase of excavations, the most intensive since the 1950s, with extraordinary finds coming to light almost every month. A new phase of excavations at Pompeii has unearthed some stunning frescoes and mosaics Credit: Ciro Fusco/Ansa The EU-funded project has unearthed villas decorated with frescoes and mosaics depicting Roman gods and goddesses and animals such as crocodiles, snakes, deer and peacocks. Despite more than 250 years of intermittent excavations, a third of Pompeii still remains to be explored. The discovery of the charcoal inscription last week suggested that Mt Vesuvius did not erupt on August 24, AD 79, but two months later. The inscription was found along with other bits of writing, much of it ribald. “On the walls of the atrium and corridor of the villa there is a notable quantity of graffiti, which is still being studied, with phrases that are in some cases of an obscene character," archeologists said in a statement.
Suspicious packages sent to Biden and De Niro; Trump blames media for stirring 'anger'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Suspicious packages addressed to former Vice President Joe Biden and actor Robert DeNiro were recovered by law enforcement officials on Thursday amid a nationwide manhunt for a possible serial bomber.
Both parties go all in on Nevada’s bellwether Senate race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Nevada’s Dean Heller, the only Republican senator running this year in a state won by Hillary Clinton, is edging up in the polls against Democrat Jacky Rosen. It’s a make-or-break election for both parties.
NASA spacecraft on mission to ‘touch the sun’ looks back to take shot of Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was taken 27 million miles from Earth
How Europe Turned Compassion Into a Crime
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Swiss pastor is one of many Europeans who has been charged for helping asylum-seekers
Police Dogs Are Being Fitted With Body Cameras So They Can Scout for Their Handlers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Police dogs have always helped their human counterparts through their eyes and nose, and now some of the dogs are getting their own backup — cameras that transmit live video.
No Injuries as Vintage Plane Crashes on Southern California Freeway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A pilot escaped injury after his vintage single-engine plane crashed and burst into flames on a Southern California freeway Tuesday, authorities said.
President Trump Says Media Should Halt 'Endless Hostility': The Latest on Pipe Bombs Sent to Clintons, Obamas and More
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We condemn the attempted violent attacks recently made against President Obama, President Clinton Secretary Clinton and other public figures," Sarah Sanders said.
Endangered fin whale washes up on Belgian beach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An 18-metre (60-foot) fin whale washed up overnight on a Belgian beach after dying offshore, in what the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences called a rare event. The male whale, which weighed 35 tonnes, was first spotted at sea on Wednesday before its body drifted to the Coq beach near Bruges, the first time such an event has occurred in 21 years, local media said. Fin whales are a protected species and are the world's second biggest mammals after blue whales.
Humpback whales stop singing when ships are near: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Humpback whales are famous for their eerie, underwater songs. "As the authors note, however, ongoing studies are required to determine if indeed the response was temporary, as factors such as stress levels need to be considered and examined," she added.
Packages to De Niro, Biden seized, similar to pipe bombs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
WASHINGTON (AP) — Suspicious packages addressed to actor Robert De Niro and former Vice President Joe Biden were intercepted Thursday, and investigators said they were similar to crude pipe bombs sent to former President Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and CNN.
Suspicious packages sent to Biden and DeNiro; Trump blames media for stirring 'anger'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Suspicious packages addressed to former Vice President Joe Biden and actor Robert DeNiro were recovered by law enforcement officials on Thursday amid a nationwide manhunt for a possible serial bomber.
Blowtorch used to kill spiders may have started house fire
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Authorities say a man apparently set a California home on fire while using a blowtorch to kill spiders.
What a break! Man's fall leads to hospital lottery pool win
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
STRATFORD, N.J. (AP) — A New Jersey man walking to buy a lottery ticket for this week's massive Mega Millions jackpot fell and broke his hip, but the trip to the hospital turned into his lucky break.
UK police hunt shoplifter who looks like David Schwimmer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LONDON (AP) — British police are hunting a shoplifter who bears a striking resemblance to Ross Geller, the character played by David Schwimmer on the TV show "Friends."
Soap believed to be cocaine lands dealers, buyer behind bars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Police say the only clean part of an intended drug deal at a North Carolina airport was the fact that the drugs in question were actually soap bars.
Review: Google's New Pixel 3 Has One of the Best Cameras You Can Get Right Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you love smartphone photography, this could be the Android phone for you
These award winning photos capture incredible details of the sun and the Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The UK’s Royal Observatory Greenwich has chosen the winners of its 2018 Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition, which honors photography of the cosmos across multiple categories, such as “People and Space,” “Aurorae,” and “Galaxies.” Many of the winners showcase sweeping vistas with millions of stars, but some of the most stunning images focus on…
Transgender candidates push back on HHS gender identity proposal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
They do not hide their gender identities, nor do they deny the historical significance of their emergence onto the political stage, but most transgender candidates say they aim to focus on issues other than their sexuality. This week, however, that became harder than ever.
You can oppose Trump's nationalism. But don't sneer at it.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Donald Trump calls himself a “nationalist.” You needn’t be a racist to believe that national identity and borders matter.
Abigail Spanberger hopes to beat Rep. Dave Brat — and stand up for the CIA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Abigail Spanberger, a former CIA officer who is running for Congress in Virginia, is defending America’s intelligence agencies against attacks from President Trump.
Meanwhile in ... Berlin, three new rabbis have made history
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Berlin, three new rabbis have made history. The graduates of the Berlin Rabbinical Seminary have become the first rabbis ordained in the city since the Nazis began persecuting Jews in the 1930s. “The fact that Berlin – the place where deportations and extermination [were] planned and decided – is once again home to the largest Jewish community in Germany is ... an undeserved gift,” said German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, who marked the occasion at an event at a local synagogue.
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Are Honoring a Fijian War Hero. Here's What to Know About Him
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Talaiasi Labalaba helped his regiment survive a crucial Cold War proxy battle
China building boom uncovers buried dinosaurs, makes a star
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
YANJI, China (AP) — At the end of a street of newly built high-rises in the northern Chinese city of Yanji stands an exposed cliff face, where paleontologists scrape away 100 million-year-old rock in search of prehistoric bones.
Two Middle School Girls Arrested for Plotting to Kill Classmates and Drink Their Blood
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The girls were in possession of four knives, a pizza cutter and a knife sharpener
Stocks Take Yet Another Plunge in Dismal Month for the Market
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Major indexes pulled back sharply in early trading Tuesday