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The Race To Build A Reusable Rocket
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By as early as 2030, ArianeGroup could be doing something that SpaceX has done since 2015.
War in Space: Congress May Add a New Military Branch Amid China, Russia Satellite Threats
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here's another sign we're living in the future: For the first time in 70 years, the U.S. may add a new military branch—for space. The House Armed Services Committee voted last week to approve a proposal in the National Defense Authorization Act that would create the Space Corps, a military arm under the Air Force aimed at overseeing operations in space. The concept of the Space Corps dates back to 2001, when then-Defense Secretary nominee Donald Rumsfeld called for more collaboration between agencies and the establishment of an undersecretary position focusing on space, intelligence and information.
Japan e
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Japanese e-commerce giant Rakuten has banned the sales of ivory products on its site, the company said Friday in a move hailed by conservation activists as a boost to international efforts to stem smuggling. Rakuten had been accused for years of providing the world's largest online marketplace for ivory, which could fuel smuggling through poor law enforcement. The bulk of legal ivory in Japan has to come from registered stockpiles or have been purchased before the ban came into force.
Alaska mom, baby meet ex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
An Alaska mother is cherishing cellphone photos she snapped of her wide-eyed 6-month-old baby in the arms of former President Barack Obama.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Borneo's orangutans in 'alarming' decline: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The orangutan population on the island of Borneo has shrunk by a quarter in the last decade, researchers said Friday, urging a rethink of strategies to protect the critically-endangered great ape. An international team of researchers used a combination of helicopter and ground surveys, interviews with local communities, and modelling techniques to draw a picture of change over the past ten years. Some suggested that Bornean orangutan numbers were in fact increasing.
A Barrage Of Biotech Updates Expected At ISTH Meeting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Biotech stocks are highly volatile investments, which look toward catalytic events such as FDA decisions, clinical trial results and data presentation at various conferences. Benzinga has compiled a list ...
Tesla to build giant battery in Australia amid energy crisis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SYDNEY (AP) — Tesla announced on Friday it will build the world's largest lithium-ion battery in southern Australia, part of a bid to solve an energy crisis that has led to ongoing blackouts across the region.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Another fitness
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
This week, according to the Information, Jawbone shut down.
Philippine police arrest rare sea turtle poachers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Philippine police said Friday they had seized 70 dead hawksbill marine turtles, a critically endangered species illegally trafficked for its prized shell, and arrested two suspects. Hawksbills face an extremely high risk of extinction according to Swiss-based International Union for Conservation of Nature as their shell is used for making jewellery and hair ornaments. Two local men were arrested Thursday while transporting the dead hawksbills by boat off the coast of Dumaran town on Palawan island, police chief Arnel Bagona told AFP.
Arkansas to ban dicamba weed killer after drift complaints
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Arkansas will temporarily ban the use and sale of the weed killer dicamba after a rise in complaints that the agricultural chemical is drifting into neighboring fields and damaging crops, the state's agriculture department said on Friday. The emergency 120-day ban of dicamba, produced by Monsanto Co, Germany's BASF and others, will go into effect as soon as paperwork is filed with the Arkansas Secretary of State, said agriculture department spokeswoman Adriane Barnes.
Gov. Jerry Brown outmaneuvers Donald Trump by announcing a summit of his own, on climate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
California Governor Jerry Brown is not about to take a back seat to President Donald Trump when it comes to summit meetings, or for that matter, anything else.  On Thursday, as world leaders gathered in Germany for a high-stakes G-20 Summit meeting, during which climate change policies will be a major source of tension, Brown announced he will be holding a Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco in 2018. Since President Trump declared that the U.S. intends to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, Brown has been using his status as the governor of the most populous state — and world's sixth-largest economy — to negotiate directly with foreign governments, including China and Canada, on climate policies.  SEE ALSO: California's governor, not Trump, meets with China over climate change "It's up to you and it's up to me and tens of millions of other people to get it together to roll back the forces of carbonization and join together to combat the existential threat of climate change," Brown said in a video message to a festival in Hamburg, the site of the G-20 meeting.   "President Trump is trying to get out of the Paris Agreement, but he doesn't speak for the rest of America. We in California and in states all across America believe it's time to act, it's time to join together and that's why at this Climate Action Summit we're going to get it done," Brown said. Since Trump's Paris Agreement announcement on June 1, dozens of mayors and 13 governors have bucked the White House and said they intend to meet the agreement's goals anyway.  California is part of the Under 2 Coalition, which is an international consortium of cities, states, and countries committed to keeping global warming to below 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, below preindustrial levels through 2100.  Coalition members aim to, among other actions, reduce their greenhouse gas emissions to 80 to 95 percent below 1990 levels. The 2018 climate summit in California will be timed to precede a round of U.N. climate negotiations, and according to the governor's office, it will mark the first time a U.S. state has hosted an international climate change conference with the direct goal of supporting the Paris Agreement.  California aims to generate half of its electricity from renewable sources by 2030, and has put in place the strictest greenhouse gas emissions reduction plans in the country. WATCH: Coconut oil might be worse for you than you previously thought
Someone supposedly won a dinner with President Trump last month, but we don’t know who
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Did you win a trip to Washington last month to meet President Trump at the Trump Victory Dinner at Trump International Hotel? Someone did, or was supposed to, according to a post on the official website of Donald J. Trump for President.
Company removes beeping alarm clock in wall vent since 2004
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROSS, Pa. (AP) — A heating contractor has removed a beeping alarm clock that's been inside a Pennsylvania family's wall vent for nearly 14 years.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Watching freedom of the press erode, Venezuela's journalists get innovative
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“President Nicolás Maduro continues with his plan to rewrite the constitution without consulting Venezuelans,” a woman says, her head hovering behind a square cardboard cutout made to look like a television screen. Bus TV is a live newscast on public buses that started here in Caracas, but has already spread to cities including Mérida, Valencia, and Barinas. Amid prolonged protests over Venezuela’s economic and political crises, and increasing authoritarianism, it targets listeners who may not have access to the internet or media beyond public television stations, which are under increasing pressure from the government.
30 Fall Nail Designs You're Going to Fall In Love With
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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The Moment I Realized Being Skinny Isn't Everything — And How That Helped Me Become a Runway Model
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It taught me that my sense of self came not from how I looked, but from how I felt.
Avoid an E. Coli Infection From Flour
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A report published in the latest issue of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report offers a good reminder for everyone that food poisoning do...
Pogue's Basics: Navigate the Start menu tiles using keyboard
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
As you probably know, the Start menu in Windows 10 has two sides. If you start typing, you’ll discover that you can navigate the left side from the keyboard. Too bad you can’t navigate the right side if you’re a keyboard nut!
The Strangely Literal Meaning Behind “Dog Days Of Summer”
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The "dog days of summer" actually refers to an astronomical event. From early-July to mid-August, the star Sirius (which is represented by a dog in ancient Greek and Roman mythology) appears to rise and set with the sun. Among the ancient Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians, it was believed that the combined energies of Sirius and the sun made summer's peak as hazy and hot as it tends to be.
New fabric from Atacama promises to keep you cool and dry during your workouts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Named for the driest desert on the planet, Atacama promises to deliver technical fabrics that not only wick moisture away from the body, but also never become saturated, are highly breathable, and channel sweat from the body.
Elon Musk: The world's population is accelerating toward collapse and nobody cares
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Tesla CEO tweeted Thursday about the perils of overpopulation, responding to an article in the New Scientist.
Someone won a dinner with President Trump last month, but we don’t know who
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Did you win a trip to Washington last month to meet President Trump at the Trump Victory Dinner at Trump International Hotel? Someone did, or was supposed to, according to a post on the official website of Donald J. Trump for President.
U.S. side says Trump pressed Putin on election meddling, now wants to ‘move forward’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump on Friday repeatedly “pressed” Russian President Vladimir Putin on Moscow’s alleged interference in the 2016 election, only to be rebuffed, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said.
Boston transit ads seek to kick manspreading to the curb
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOSTON (AP) — The Boston-area transit system is hoping to kick manspreading to the curb.
Local company removes alarm clock in wall vent since 2004
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROSS, Pa. (AP) — A heating contractor has removed a beeping alarm clock that's been inside a Pennsylvania family's wall vent for nearly 14 years.
A man of many talents: Vermont governor wins stock car race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BARRE, Vt. (AP) — Vermont's stock-car-racing governor is back in victory lane.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Turning down the temperature on town halls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
There’s nothing quite as personal as health care to arouse the passions of voters. In the summer of 2009, angry tea party protesters swarmed town halls of Democrats working on health-care legislation. Now the tables are turned – to the point where some Republicans are simply not holding these meetings with the public, or finding a way to screen questions or restrict access.
How a Forensics Lab in Oregon Solves Crimes Against Animals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The United States Fish and Wildlife Service Forensics Laboratory is the only lab in the world devoted entirely to investigating crimes against animals. Founded in 1988 by former crime scene investigator Ken Goddard, the lab could be mistaken for something out of a television show—except for the freezers full of animal corpses and flesh-eating beetles. Located in Ashland, Oregon, this state-of-the-art facility boasts a pathology department, an on-site forensic ornithologist and a genetics team to investigate illegal animal killings, smuggling and other crimes. With such a coveted team of experts and scientists, this unique lab is helping the entire world crack down on serious crimes against animals.
Huge Prehistoric Crocodile Chewed Through Bone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An enormous prehistoric crocodile had teeth similar to the T. Rex so it could chew through bones.
Robots are pouring drinks in Las Vegas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The technology allows the robots to make limitless combinations of cocktails
UNESCO keeps Great Barrier Reef off 'in danger' list
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
UNESCO said Thursday its World Heritage Committee (WHC) had decided not to place Australia's Great Barrier Reef on its list of sites "in danger" despite concern over coral bleaching. A WHC spokeswoman said the Committee, which is meeting in Poland, had made the decision late Wednesday and expressed "deep concern" over two straight years of mass coral bleaching, which aerial surveys found had affected some two-thirds of the World Heritage-listed site. The bleaching is the result of warming sea temperatures linked to climate change.
If you were hoping for signs of life on Mars, science has some bad news
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mars as we know it today is an extremely hostile planet when it comes to life, but there's always been the possibility that life in some form existed there eons ago. Scientists haven't found evidence of that — at least not yet — and now new research suggests a possible reason why: Mars is perfectly suited to prevent early life from thriving. It's terrible news for anyone who dreamed of one day hearing about martians, but there may be a silver lining. The research, carried out by scientists from the University of Edinburgh's School of Physics and Astronomy, reveals that certain minerals present on the surface of Mars are deadly to bacteria. The compounds, called perchlorates, were tested in a simulated martian environment here on Earth, and when introduced to a very basic bacteria, the life ceased almost immediately. This discovery paints Mars a very unfriendly place for life to take root, but there are still some questions left to be answered. For starters, the specific bacteria may simply have been particularly vulnerable to the minerals, and additional testing will need to be carried out to confirm whether or not other basic life forms could coexist in an environment rich with them. Additionally, the fact that the surface of the planet was hostile to life doesn't eliminate the possibility that subterranean life may have thrived on Mars, including the possibility of marine life. The research is still ongoing, and the search for life outside of our planet will never cease, but it's not a particularly good sign for anyone hoping Mars held the key to extraterrestrial life.
Total Solar Eclipse 2017: Astronomer Explains Everything You Need to Know about August Event
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The first total solar eclipse to pass from the West Coast to the East Coast in almost a century will see parts of the U.S. plunged into darkness over the course of the day on August 21. What is a total solar eclipse?
The very much threatened Great Barrier Reef is not 'in danger,' UNESCO says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Australia's Great Barrier Reef is under serious threat as warming waters kill off large swaths of corals. But it's not "in danger" — at least not according to UNESCO. The United Nations cultural body this week voted to leave the 133,000-square-mile World Heritage Site off its list of endangered sites, which is the last stage before a site is delisted altogether. Perplexingly, the same body last month warned the Great Barrier Reef will be dead by the end of this century unless countries sharply reduce greenhouse gas emissions. So, why the disconnect? SEE ALSO: This adorable baby turtle blob is bringing hope to Southeast Asia Because the decision has less to do with the reef's imperiled condition and more to do with avoiding political embarrassment for Australia's government and lasting damage to Australia's tourism industry. Nemo, found.Image: evergreen/unescoThe coral reef system represents around A$56 billion — or $42.4 billion in U.S. dollars — in economic, social, and brand value to the Australian economy, Deloitte Access Economics said in a recent report. The reef's status as a World Heritage Site is part of what makes it so iconic, recognizable, and inspiring to tourists around the world. Australian officials breathed a sigh of relief after the World Heritage Committee voted on late Wednesday in Krakow, Poland.  "The announcement overnight was a big win for Australia and a big win for the [Malcolm] Turnbull government," Australia's Energy Minister Josh Frydenberg told Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Image: UNESCOHe said the vote was "a strong endorsement" of the government's Reef 2050 plan to improve water quality, reduce land clearing, and increase the reef's resilience to climate change by mid-century. But coral reef experts and environmental groups said they were frustrated by the outcome. Putting the Great Barrier Reef on the endangered list would create pressure on the Australian government to reduce planet-warming emissions and to take more aggressive steps to combat marine pollution, starfish invasions, and other local threats, critics said. "An endangerment listing, as tragic as that would be, would be a more realistic representation of the state of reef and would at least force the federal government to act on climate change," Alix Foster Vander Elst, Greenpeace Australia Pacific campaigner, told Reuters . Damaged corals of Australia's Great Barrier Reef.Image: ED ROBERTS/ARC CENTRE CORAL REEF STUDIES HANDOUT/EPA/REX/ShutterstockEven with its 2050 plan, Australia's management of the expansive natural wonder is facing increasing criticism as sweeping sections of the reef turn bleach-white. In 2015 and 2016, the Great Barrier Reef suffered its largest die-off ever recorded due to unusually warm waters, with 35 percent of corals on the northern and central reef declared dead, the ARC Center of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies said in late May.  Scientists blamed human-caused global warming and a strong 2015 to 2016 El Niño for the hotter water temperatures, which can cause coral bleaching. In this phenomenon, corals expel their symbiotic algae and become more vulnerable to disease and death.  Sea surface temperature departures from average in March 2016.Image: Mitchell BlackAt the meeting in Poland, the World Heritage Committee did express "serious concern" about the health of the reef, which includes over 600 coral types and provides shelter and sustenance for thousands of marine species — everything from algae, worms, and snails to fish, turtles, and sharks. But the decision not to list the reef as "in danger" suggests the committee believes the Australian government is doing enough to keep the precious reef from disappearing. Given how rapidly oceans are warming, however, those efforts will likely fall far short, experts say. WATCH: This coral looks like a beating heart but it's actually in serious trouble
Trump: ‘Everyone’ at G
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump went on a Twitter burst Friday from Hamburg, Germany, where he is attending the G-20 summit. Among other things, Trump asserted that a hot topic among the world’s most powerful figures was the “disgraceful” response of Hillary Clinton's campaign manager to the phishing attack that led to thousands of campaign emails being leaked last year. Trump also appeared to conflate that attack with a separate hack that targeted the Democratic National Committee.
Smiles and small talk as Trump and Putin (finally) meet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin met Friday on the sidelines of a major economic summit in Germany, their first face-to-face encounter since U.S. intelligence formally accused Moscow of meddling in the 2016 election.
Nevada Sen. Heller is vulnerable, and first
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Nevada senator comes up for reelection next year, and a relative political newcomer is eager to challenge him.
Senate Republicans face protests and sit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
GOP senators have begun to waver on health care bill, and activists descended on local offices Thursday.
Arizona is asking: Where does Jeff Flake stand on health care?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As the GOP continues to struggle to pass some sort of Obamacare repeal bill, there is no Republican senator in a tougher bind than Jeff Flake — and there has been no clearer illustration of how tough that bind has become than what’s been happening back in his home state of Arizona during Congress’s July 4 recess. Ever since the House GOP unveiled its American Health Care Act earlier this year, Flake — one of only two swing-state Republican senators up for reelection in 2018 — has remained noncommittal, repeatedly declining to say whether he would vote for any of the various proposals on the table. On Wednesday, roughly 20 progressive activists, many with physical disabilities, flooded into Flake’s Phoenix office as part of a nationwide protest organized by the disability-rights group ADAPT.
‘Get a grip man’: Clinton campaign chair Podesta fires back at Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After the president claimed that “everyone” at the G-20 was talking about John Podesta, he sent a few pointed remarks back.
Wisconsin governor to Instagram haters: Have a cold one
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has a simple message for all his social media haters out there: Chill out and have a beer.
Gulf Arabs vs. Qatar: Why all the fuss over Al Jazeera?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Amid all the talk of Qatar’s alleged support for terrorism, at the core of the Gulf Arab countries’ ongoing blockade of the oil- and gas-rich emirate is one major source of contention: Al Jazeera. A central demand of the Gulf states lead by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates – relayed by mediator Kuwait and allegedly leaked by Qatar – is for the Gulf country to “close Al Jazeera network and its affiliates.” Other key demands: downgrading ties with Iran and closing a Turkish military base in Doha.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
5 years after the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider is just getting started
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's been five years since physicists at CERN reported (in the understated manner typical of scientists) that they had observed a particle "consistent with the long-sought Higgs boson."The discovery capped decades of theory and was an important triumph for the Large Hadron Collider, the means by which the elusive particle was found. But they...
MIT researchers used a $150 Microsoft Kinect to 3D scan a giant T. rex skull
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MIT's Camera Culture group has been able to successfully capture a high-resolution 3D scan of a Tyrannosaurus rex skull using about $150 worth of equipment and some free software.The skull, which belongs to the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, was discovered in 1990 and is the largest and most complete T. rex skull yet found....
Violent protests break out at G
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Protesters have turned violent in Hamburg, Germany, as the G-20 summit, featuring many of the world's most powerful heads of state, gets underway.