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Succession Is a Bleak But Satisfying Portrait of Modern Wealth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's a tale as old as time—or at least, as old as King Lear
Crew heads to International Space Station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronauts from the U.S., Russia and the European Space Agency are headed to the International Space Station #tictocnews (Source: Bloomberg)
Six Things We Learned About the Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Trump will meet North Korea's Kim Jong Un for a summit in Singapore. Here's what TIME's Beijing correspondent thinks we can expect
Mars Curiosity rover detects ingredients for life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
History's greatest off-road vehicle finds organic molecules, seasonal methane.
Controversial Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The series of confidential memos were compiled by Christopher Steele, a former British intelligence officer. Although a few news reports about the former spy’s work appeared prior to the November 2016 election, no news organization was able to verify the most alarming allegations – including that Mr. Trump and his associates were colluding with the Russians to undermine the Clinton campaign.
Read the 191 Arguments President Trump Has Made Against the Mueller Investigation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump has made at least 192 separate arguments about the Russia investigation.
Only LeBron James Would Throw an Alley
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
And in the first quarter too
Actually, Those Aren't Beyoncé's Twins in That 'OTR II' Tour Picture
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alert the Beyhive
One of the Closest Stars Looks Friendly for Life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alpha Centauri A may be even less deadly than the sun - if there are any planets there.
'There's People Shot Everywhere!' Las Vegas Police Release Audio of 911 Calls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They released 518 audio calls and a birds-eye video from atop the Mandalay Bay resort
'Didn't You Guys Burn Down the White House?' President Trump Fumbles in Phone Call With Justin Trudeau
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump reportedly made an erroneous historical reference during a call on trade
The Personal Style Behind Kate Spade's Designs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Spade the person—like the bags, shoes and accessories she designed—deserves a special place in the legacy of fashion
Nanaimo, B.C. Baby Has Surgery After Putting Spiny Caterpillar In Her Mouth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A B.C. mom is warning other parents after her baby daughter put a caterpillar in her mouth and ended up requiring an hour-long operation. In a Facebook post, Krystal Dawn Pavan says she was in her backyard in Nanaimo, B.C. with eight-month-old Kenzie Pyne and as well as her three-year-old son when the baby started wailing last Thursday. "She had her mouth open and she had these black pieces inside it," Pavan told CBC News.
Guatemala's Fuego Volcano Explodes Again, Prompting Evacuations as Death Toll Rises to 75
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The eruption had already claimed 75 lives, according to authorities
Lava transforms a Hawaiian bay into a blackened peninsula
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The shallow, tropical waters of the Big Island's Kapoho Bay are no longer: Satellite images show a bay overtaken by lava, transformed into a black mass of land jetting into the sea. Lava meeting the ocean is, of course, the way Hawaiian islands grow. Unfortunately, the rumbling flow of lava from the Kilauea volcano engulfed more than 130 homes in the neighborhoods of Vacationland and Kapoho Beach Lots — including the home of the Hawaii County Mayor — before oozing to the beach. SEE ALSO: Why Guatemala's volcano erupted in deadly avalanches, but Hawaii's hasn't As of June 6, the island's Civil Defense agency said lava is still actively pouring into the ocean, where it produces dangerous clouds of acidic steam, filled with natural glass particles.   Image: DigitalGlobeThe lava is coming from one of more than 20 fissures, or long cracks in the ground, that have opened up atop Hawaii's actively growing Kilauea volcano over the last month. As of June 5, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports molten rock shooting from the ground and fountaining between 150 and 180 feet into the air before slowly flowing downhill, toward the ocean. Lava flows on June 3, 2018.Image: DigitalGlobe Lava flows on June 5, 2018.Image: DigitalGlobe This volcanic activity is happening on the southwestern portion of the Big Island, so it's not a threat to most of Hawaii. But it's locally devastating, and volcanologists have no expectation of it ending anytime soon.  Based upon past eruptions, volcanologists suspected this one could last a month or months, and it seems they're right. Also, Kilauea is now tapping intensely hot molten rock from deep underground. This means the lava is coming from a new source than the stuff that spewed from the ground in early May.  Lava from fissure 8 headed down toward Kahoho Bay. Orange, fountaining lava can be seen in the distance.Image: UsgsThis eruption will continue to pour lava over the island, and much of it will find its way into the ocean, perhaps filling more iconic Hawaiian bays.  WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?
At least 99 dead as Guatemala volcano threatens new eruptions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Explosions boomed from Guatemala's fearsome Fuego volcano Wednesday, unleashing fresh torrents of mud and ash down slopes, as the death toll from a previous eruption rose to at least 99. Fears of a new blowup of the 3,763-meter (12,346-foot) volcano have stalked rescue workers since Sunday's eruption buried entire villages on its southern flank. The National Forensic Sciences Agency said in a report Wednesday that morgues had received the remains of 99 people killed as a result of the eruption.
Unfiltered: ‘Raising wages [doesn’t] kill jobs. It's just a thing rich people say to poor people.’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
When Nick Hanauer was just 7, his father made sure he and his brother knew every aspect of the family business. Today, Hanauer is a self-made billionaire. Hanauer’s business acumen has allowed him to become one of the wealthiest Americans — the so-called 1 percent — but it has also made him an unlikely champion of the poor and a passionate advocate for the advancement of economic equality in the U.S.
Wandering caterpillars make for slippery road in Maine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BLUE HILL, Maine (AP) — Drivers: Better watch out for caterpillars in one Maine town.
How one woman in East Boston shares climate know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On a sunny day in early May, Magdalena Ayed leans over the fence above a pebbly beach in East Boston. It looks much better than it did just weeks before, says Ms. Ayed, when she and a group of volunteers cleaned the area of trash. “If we didn’t advocate for this [area], it would stay like this for 20, 30 years,” says Ayed, who is the founder and director of Harborkeepers, a local environmental nonprofit.
Briefing: Why violence has flared in Nicaragua
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For years, as neighbors like Honduras and Guatemala experienced political unrest and violence, Nicaragua was a bastion of calm. In April, President Daniel Ortega proposed a social security reform that would have increased employee payments but decreased benefits. More than 100 protesters have been killed, according to the most recent tally by the local human rights organization, the Nicaraguan Center for Human Rights.
Advice from the ants about grass
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In a June 7 statement, nearly 200 chief executives of major American firms put out a special plea through a group called the Business Roundtable. In essence, these titans of industry and finance gave their support to companies that are patient in growing their underlying value rather than continually panicked about producing quick results. “Public companies should be managed for long-term prosperity, not to meet the latest forecast,” the statement said.
The riddle of Hamas's new Gaza leader: extremist or pragmatist?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Yahya Sinwar, the Hebrew-speaking leader of Hamas in Gaza who spent 22 years in Israeli prison, is known more for stealth military action than speech-making. When Palestinians launched the still-running series of Friday protests along the Gaza-Israel fence this spring, Mr. Sinwar vowed to keep the protests going until the border itself was breached. The demonstrations, held to denounce Israel’s economic blockade of Gaza and symbolize Gazans’ yearning to return to ancestral homes in Israel, marked “a new phase in the Palestinian national struggle on the road to liberation,” he declared.
'I Crossed the Line.' Samantha Bee Apologizes for Controversial Remark About Ivanka Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I crossed the line, I regret it, and I do apologize for that."
Complete list of every full moon in 2018, including June's Strawberry Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Keep your eyes on the skies later this month for the seventh full moon of the year, dubbed the Strawberry Moon. The first blue moon of the year was a spectacular sight, dubbed the 'super blue blood moon'. Falling on January 31, it was the product of three different phenomena: it was a supermoon, a blue moon and a blood moon. While many said it was the first to be seen in 152 years, other contested the fact, leading to a division among scientists. Stargazers were also treated to two full moons in March: as well as the first full moon on the night of March 1, we saw another full moon on March 31. As it was the second full moon of the month, it was a blue moon – the second of 2018. The moon is the largest and brightest object in our night sky and has enchanted and inspired mankind for centuries. Blue moons are a rare breed, but full moons can be admired every month. Here is everything you need to know about Earth's only natural satellite, from all its different names to how it was formed. Super blue blood moon, in pictures How often does a full moon occur? Afull moon occurs every 29.5 days and is when the Moon is completely illuminated by the Sun's rays. It occurs when Earth is directly aligned between the Sun and the Moon.  Why do full moons have names? The early Native Americans didn't record time using months of the Julian or Gregorian calendar. Instead tribes gave each full moon a nickname to keep track of the seasons and lunar months. Most of the names relate to an activity or an event that took place at the time in each location. However, it wasn't a uniform system and tribes tended to name and count moons differently. Some, for example, counted four seasons a year while others counted five. Others defined a year as 12 moons, while others said there were 13. Colonial Americans adopted some of the moon names and applied them to their own calendar system which is why they're still in existence today, according to the Farmer’s Almanac. January: Wolf Moon This moon was named because villagers used to hear packs of wolves howling in hunger around this time of the year. Its other name is the Old Moon. This January there are two Wolf Moons - and stargazers will be in for a treat as both will be supermoons. When two moons occur in one month, the second is called a blue moon. While blue moons typically occur only once every two to three years, this year we will be treated to two moons - the second appearing at the end of March. The night following the first full moon of the month saw the Quadrantid meteor shower light up the skies. When? January 2 and January 31 February: Snow Moon Snow moon is named after the white stuff because historically it's always been the snowiest month in America. It's also traditionally referred to as the Hunger Moon, because hunting was very difficult in snowy conditions.  However this year there won't be a Snow Moon - with a full moon occurring at the end of January and another at the beginning of March, we won't see one light up the skies during the year's shortest month. When? There will be no full moon this month The full Snow Moon appears red above London's Albert bridge and Battersea Bridge in 2012 Credit: Anthony Devlin March: Worm Moon As temperatures warm, earthworm casts begin to appear and birds begin finding food. It's also known as Sap Moon, Crow Moon and Lenten Moon. There will be two moons this March, one at the start of the month and one at the end. As in January, the second moon of the month is called a blue moon. The second moon of the month is important because it is used to fix the date of Easter, which is always the Sunday after the first full moon following the spring equinox. This year, that moon appears on Saturday March 31, which means Easter Sunday falls the day after, on April 1. When? March 1 and 31 April: Pink Moon April's full moon is known as the Pink Moon, but don't be fooled into thinking it will turn pink. It's actually named after pink wildflowers, which appear in the US and Canada in early spring.  This moon is also known as Egg Moon, due to spring egg-laying season. Some coastal tribes referred to it as Fish Moon because it appeared at the same time as the shad swimming upstream.  When? April 30 A couple watch the Pink Moon rise beside Hartshead Pike on April 29, 2018 in Manchester, England Credit: Anthony Devlin May: Flower Moon Spring has officially sprung by the time May arrives, and flowers and colourful blooms dot the landscape. This moon is also known as Corn Planting Moon, as crops are sown in time for harvest, or Bright Moon because this full moon is known to be one of the brightest. Some people refer to it as Milk Moon. When? May 29 Night sky June: Strawberry Moon This moon is named after the beginning of the strawberry picking season. It's other names are Rose Moon, Hot Moon, or Hay Moon as hay is typically harvested around now. This moon appears in the same month as the summer solstice, the longest day of the year (June 21) in which we can enjoy approximately 17 hours of daylight. When? June 28 The so-called 'Strawberry Moon' rises behind Glastonbury Tor on in June 2016.  Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images July: Thunder Moon Named due to the prevalence of summer thunder storms. It's sometimes referred to as the Full Buck Moon because at this time of the year a buck's antlers are fully grown.  When? July 27 August: Sturgeon Moon Tribes in North America typically caught Sturgeon during this month, but also it is when grain and corn were gathered so is also referred to as Grain Moon.  This moon appears in the same month as the Perseid meteor shower. When? August 26 September: Harvest Moon The Harvest Moon is the name given to the first full moon that takes place closest to the Autumn equinox, which this year will come on September 23. The Harvest Moon arrived late last year, on October 5 - it normally rises in September. It was during September that most of the crops were harvested ahead of the autumn and this moon would give light to farmers so they could carry on working longer in the evening. Some tribes also called it the Barley Moon, the Full Corn Moon or Fruit Moon.  When? September 25 October: Hunter's Moon As people planned ahead for the cold months ahead, the October moon came to signify the ideal time for hunting game, which were becoming fatter from eating falling grains. This moon is also known as the travel moon and the dying grass moon. When? October 24 November: Frost Moon The first of the winter frosts historically begin to take their toll around now and winter begins to bite, leading to this month's moon moniker. It is also known as the Beaver Moon. When?November 23 December: Cold Moon Nights are long and dark and winter's grip tightens, hence this Moon's name. With Christmas just a few weeks away, it's also referred to as Moon before Yule and Long Nights Moon. When? December 22 Clouds clear to allow a view of the final full moon of the year, a so-called 'Cold Moon' on December 13 2016 in Cornwall. Credit: Matt Cardy/Getty Images Once in a blue moon Does this well-known phrase have anything to do with the moon? Well, yes it does. We use it to refer to something happening very rarely and a blue moon is a rare occurrence. It's the name given to a second full moon that occurs in a single calendar month and this typically occurs only once every two to three years. There's lots of other moons, too: Full moon: We all know what these are. They come around every month and light up the night at night. Harvest moon: The full moon closest to the autumn equinox. Black moon: Most experts agree that this refers to the second new moon in a calendar month. The last black moon was at the start of October 2016 and the next one is expected in 2019. Blue moon: A phenomenon that occurs when there is a second full moon in one calendar month. Joe Rao from space.com explains: "A second full moon in a single calendar month is sometimes called a blue moon. A black moon is supposedly the flip side of a blue moon; the second new moon in a single calendar month." Supermoon is seen behind the Christ the Redeemer statue in Rio de Janeiro, in May 2012. Credit: AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano The infrequent nature of this lunar event led to the phrase "once in a blue moon" to signify a rare occurrence. It does not actually mean the moon will be blue. Blood moon: Also known as a supermoon lunar eclipse. It's when the shadow of Earth casts a reddish glow on the moon, the result of a rare combination of an eclipse with the closest full moon of the year.  There was one in the UK in September 2015, and before that in 1982 but the next one won't be until 2033.  Strawberry moon: A rare event when there's a full moon on the same day as the summer solstice. It happened in June 2016 for the first time since 1967 when 17 hours of sunlight gave way to a bright moonlit sky. Despite the name, the moon does appear pink or red. The romantic label was coined by the Algonquin tribes of North America who believed June’s full moon signalled the beginning of the strawberry picking season. What is a supermoon? Ever looked up at the night sky to see a full moon so close you could almost touch it? Well you've probably spotted a supermoon. The impressive sight happens when a full moon is at the point in its orbit that brings it closest to Earth. To us Earth-lings, it appears 30 per cent brighter and 14 per cent bigger to the naked eye.  How a supermoon is generated Supermoon is not an astrological term though. It's scientific name is actually Perigee Full Moon, but supermoon is more catchy and is used by the media to describe our celestial neighbour when it gets up close. Astrologer Richard Nolle first came up with the term supermoon and he defined it as "… a new or full moon which occurs with the moon at or near (within 90 per cent of) its closest approach to Earth in a given orbit", according to earthsky.org. How many supermoons are there in 2018? There are two full moon supermoons this year, both of which took place in the first month of the year. The first appeared on January 2 and the second appeared on January 31. As it was the second moon of the month, the latter moon was also known as a blue moon. There will also be two new moon supermoons in 2018: one on July 13 and another on August 11. Unfortunately, stargazers were unable to see these moons as new moons are generally obscured by the light of the sun. Last year we were lucky enough to have four supermoons. The first three - April 26, May 25, June 24 - were new moons.  The fourth supermoon of 2017 appeared on December 3 and was a full moon supermoon. This will be a full moon supermoon. In fact, it's the first of three full moon supermoons in a row.  Supermoon rises over Auckland, New Zealand in August 2014. Credit: Simon Runting/REX What do I look for? Head outside at sunset when the moon is closest to the horizon and marvel at its size. As well as being closer and brighter, the moon (clouds permitting) should also look orange and red in colour. Why? Well, as moonlight passes through the thicker section of the atmosphere, light particles at the red end of the spectrum don't scatter as easily as light at the blue end of the spectrum. So when the moon looks red, you're just looking at red light that wasn't scattered. As the moon gets higher in the sky, it returns to its normal white/yellow colour.  Will the tides be larger? Yes. When full or new moons are especially close to Earth, it leads to higher tides. Tides are governed by the gravitational pull of the moon and, to a lesser extent, the sun. Because the sun and moon go through different alignments, this affects the size of the tides. Tell me more about the moon The moon is 4.6 billion years old and was formed between 30-50 million years after the solar system. It is smaller than Earth - about the same size as Pluto in fact. Its surface area is less than the surface area of Asia - about 14.6 million square miles according to space.com Gravity on the moon is only 1/6 of that found on Earth. The moon is not round, but is egg-shaped with the large end pointed towards Earth. It would take 135 days to drive by car to the moon at 70 mph (or nine years to walk). The moon has "moonquakes" caused by the gravitational pull of Earth. Experts believe the moon has a molten core, just like Earth.  How was the Moon formed? How the Moon was formed Man on the Moon Only 12 people have ever walked on the moon and they were all American men, including (most famously) Neil Armstrong who was the first in 1969 on the Apollo II mission.  The last time mankind sent someone to the moon was in 1972 when Gene Cernan visited on the Apollo 17 mission. Although Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, Buzz Aldrin was the first man to urinate there. While millions watched the moon landing on live television, Aldrin was forced to go in a tube fitted inside his space suit. Buzz Aldrin Jr. beside the U.S. flag after man reaches the Moon for the first time during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969.  Credit: AP When the astronauts took off their helmets after their moonwalk, they noticed a strong smell, which Armstrong described as “wet ashes in a fireplace” and Aldrin as “spent gunpowder”. It was the smell of moon-dust brought in on their boots. The mineral, armalcolite, discovered during the first moon landing and later found at various locations on Earth, was named after the three Apollo 11 astronauts, Neil ARMstrong, Buzz ALdrin and Michael COLlins. An estimated 600 million people watched the Apollo 11 landing live on television, a world record until 750 million people watched the wedding of the Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer in 1981. One of President Nixon’s speechwriters had prepared an address entitled: “In Event of Moon Disaster”. It began: “Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay to rest in peace.” If the launch from the Moon had failed, Houston was to close down communications and leave Armstrong and Aldrin to their death.  How the Daily Telegraph reported Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon in 1969
The Mysterious Woman Who Could Answer a Key Question About RFK's Legacy—If Only We Could Find Her
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After the Indianapolis primary, Kennedy met two college kids working for his rival's campaign. Their meeting left an impression on him
Futuristic mini
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Allison Barrie shares an up-close look at the Proteus, a miniature submarine that acts as a hybrid of an underwater vehicle and a drone. The Proteus fit up to 6 combat divers at one time, is capable of driving itself, running its own missions and launching teams of mini-drones for reconnaissance missions.
Giuliani insists that Stormy Daniels has no credibility because she's a porn star
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Speaking to CNN Thursday, Rudy Giuliani, who is the public face of President Trump’s legal team, again asserted that adult film actress Stormy Daniels isn’t credible because of the work she does. Giuliani had made similar remarks in Israel the day before.
South Dakota sheriff loses re
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
TYNDALL, S.D. (AP) — A South Dakota sheriff waited a whole minute after polls closed to fire a deputy who undid his re-election bid this week.
Bees get death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Bee keepers and environmental activists staged a mock funeral in Paris on Thursday for bees, to protest against the pesticides they say are killing insects crucial for the eco-system. Green campaigners say bee colonies in western Europe have been ravaged by the use of neonicotinoids, a group of pesticides based on the chemical structure of nicotine. Bee keepers in France have pressed the government to take more action to protect their livelihoods.
Push to enshrine consent in rape laws encounters obstacles in Europe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The case went public just as the sex assault claims came showering down on Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein, and France, like much of the West, was in the throes of the #MeToo movement. Many in France were outraged. President Emmanuel Macron promised to set a minimum age of consent, putting France in line with the norm in many European countries.
Having Two Or Three Suns Doesn't Seem to Hurt Alien Planets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The three-body problem, scientists' term for figuring out the orbital quirks of a planet circling not one star but two, is so tricky that its name has inspired an award-winning novel. It turns out that situation isn't quite as chaotic as might have been expected, according to new research presented at the annual conference of the American Astronomical Society held this week in Denver, Colorado. “Because of the complex dynamics between these stars and planets, it was previously thought improbable that many planets would have stable orbits in these regions,” lead author Frank Busetti, a scientist at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa, said in a press release.
Trump Will Agree to Interview If Mueller Winds Down Investigation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Trump's lawyers want the special counsel's office to promise to end its investigation within two months of an interview.
Facebook gave data access to Chinese firm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Chinese firm was flagged by U.S. intelligence. Brett Larson gives his take.
Kate Spade’s Husband Says She Suffered From Depression for Years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The designer had been seeking help for the last five years
Homes Destroyed, New Land Created as Lava Buries Hawaii's Vacationland
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The total number of homes destroyed in the eruption stands at about 400
Man beats huge odds: 2 My Million lottery wins in 18 months
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PARIS (AP) — A man who regularly plays the lottery with the same numbers at the same place in eastern France has beaten huge odds, winning the My Million lottery twice in 18 months.
World Bank: Global Economy Is Healthy But Growth Will Slow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At least for a couple of years
More U.S. Government Workers Are Being Evacuated From China After Mysterious Medical Symptoms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Testing revealed they might have been affected by unexplained health incidents similar to those in Cuba
Not much intelligent life in Washington. Outer space is another story.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
What’s the truth behind that strange aircraft spotted off the coast of San Diego in 2004? Go ahead and laugh. But in the age of entertainment, we can no longer differentiate what’s entirely superfluous from what seems superfluous but might really matter.
Meanwhile in ... Kazakhstan, an entire nation is struggling to learn a new alphabet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Kazakhstan, an entire nation is struggling to learn a new alphabet. Last year Kazakhstan’s president-for-life Nursultan Nazarbayev decreed that the country would switch from reliance on Cyrillic script to use of Latin script – a move away from the country’s former Russian colonizers and toward the West. In September 2016 the country held its first international women’s surfing contest.
'After #MeToo, Miss America Had to Change': A Former Winner on Saying Goodbye to the Swimsuit Competition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I did enjoy competing in a swimsuit but looking back, it really had nothing to do with the job I went on to undertake."
Facebook Shared User Data With Flagged Chinese Telecoms Firms, Report Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Facebook acknowledged it shared user data with Chinese handset manufacturer Huawei, flagged by U.S. officials as a national security threat
'You Can Sense That You’re Walking Above the Dead': A Volcano's Wrath in Guatemala
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A photographer's eyewitness account as rescuers look for survivors and bodies after the Volcán de Fuego erupts in Guatemala.
President Trump Hosts His First Iftar Dinner at the White House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The overture came as a surprise to many in the Muslim world, as Trump skipped the tradition last year
EPA Director Pruitt Laughs off Chick
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I love, she loves, we love Chick-fil-A as a franchise of faith"
New Mexico Moves Closer to Electing the First Native American Congresswoman
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Deb Haaland won the state's Democratic primary for a seat in the House
Despite Trump's Family Separation Threat, Border Arrests for Illegal Immigration Continue to Rise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Families trying to cross the border are up 435% over last year
Switch to e
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The growing use of electrified vehicles is expected to cost Germany's crucial car sector some 75,000 jobs by 2030, a study found Tuesday, with smaller auto parts suppliers set to be worst hit. The IG Metall union, which commissioned the study along with BMW, Volkswagen, Daimler and a string of car parts makers, said the pivot towards cleaner engines posed a "major challenge" to Germany's biggest industry, which employs more than 800,000 people. Electric engines are simpler to build and require far fewer parts than petrol- or diesel-fuelled cars.
California Voters Recalled the Judge Who Gave Stanford Swimmer Brock Turner a Short Sentence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Aaron Persky sentenced Turner to just six months in jail for sexual assault
Key White House official advocated for 'limited use of military force' in North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Fred Fleitz, the chief of staff of the White House National Security Council, says top officials are considering "regime change" and the so-called bloody nose strike.