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Help NASA and New Horizons nickname the icy world they’re targeting after Pluto
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
2014 MU69 just won’t cut it, so NASA and the folks behind the New Horizons mission want you to help pick out a cooler nickname for the icy object that’s in their sights for New Year’s Day in 2019. The contest is the latest suggest-a-name campaign from New Horizons’ scientists, who provided a similar suggestion box for the moons that were discovered during the run-up to the mission’s momentous Pluto flyby in 2015. That earlier contest eventually led to the naming of the Plutonian moons Styx and Kerberos (but alas, not Vulcan, the people’s choice). Now the piano-sized New Horizons… Read More
'The Pain Won't Go Away.' Sister of Charleston Shooting Victim Reacts to Texas Attack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"But you can live through it"
President Trump Praises Saudi Purges: 'They Know Exactly What They Are Doing'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Saudi leaders have arrested dozens of powerful princes
Air Force admits it failed to report Texas shooter's conviction for abuse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In the developing case of the shooting massacre that killed at least 26 at a small church in Texas Sunday, one thing is now undoubtedly clear: The suspected gunman, Devin Kelley, should not have been allowed to obtain a gun.
Living Solar Panels Printed on Wallpaper Harvest Sun's Energy by Photosynthesis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new type of ultra-thin solar panel made from living organisms could lead to next-generation electrical devices that can be made on a home printer, researchers say. A team of scientists from Imperial College London and Central Saint Martins, also in London, created a bio-solar panel using a micro-organism called cyanobacteria, which uses photosynthesis to harvest energy from sunlight. Potential applications of these bio-solar panels include paper-based diabetes monitors and air quality sensors that resemble wallpaper.
‘I Just Did What I Thought Was the Right Thing.’ Man Describes High
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“I just did what I thought was the right thing"
This year, as winter nears, residents of China's coal country turn to gas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With winter approaching, she’s happy to have it in place of her old coal furnace, which covered her courtyard in soot and required frequent upkeep. “The gas heater is clean and convenient,” she says. Recommended: How much do you know about China?
Long Valley Supervolcano: Huge Pool of Magma Was in Cold Storage Before Ancient Eruption
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The supervolcano below Long Valley, California, near Yosemite National Park hasn't erupted in 765,000 years—but when it did, if geologists had been around to watch it, they may have been surprised by how little warning they had of the impending eruption from the magma deep inside the volcano. That's according to a new paper published today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The paper suggests we may be thinking about volcanoes and their eruptions in the wrong way. "The historical view of volcanoes as fed by basically these tanks of magma in the crust isn't really a useful way to think about the physical processes," said first author Nathan Andersen, a geologist at the Georgia Institute of Technology.
What Does the Trump Administration Want at the COP 23 Climate Talks? The World Is Watching Nervously
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The world will get a look at climate policy in the Trump era this week when diplomats gather in Germany this week
These Numbers Show Just How Devastating the Texas Church Shooting Was
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Eight members of one family were killed in the attack
Are You Ready for Election Day? Test Your Knowledge With This Fun Word Game
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Try the newest edition of our "Crosswalk" puzzle
21st Century Fox Reportedly Looking To Sell Majority Of Company To Disney
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
21st Century Fox, which owns Fox Entertainment Group, has been reportedly been in talks to sell most of the company to The Walt Disney Co., according to CNBC.
'Thoughts and Prayers Are Not Enough.' Gun Control Advocates Demand Action After Texas Shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Let's also pray that you find the courage to do your job"
Air Force admits it failed to report Texas shooter’s conviction for abuse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A woman and her children take part in a vigil for victims of a mass shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas on November 5, 2017. In the developing case of the shooting massacre that killed at least 26 at a small church in Texas Sunday, one thing is now undoubtedly clear: the suspected gunman, Devin Kelley, should not have been allowed to obtain a gun.
How Life Began: Missing Link Chemical in First Living Cell Discovered
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A team of scientists working to replicate the conditions of early Earth in modern lab experiments may have cracked one of the key problems in understanding how life began. "It reminds me of the Fairy Godmother in Cinderella, who waves a wand and 'poof,' 'poof,' 'poof,' everything simple is transformed into something more complex and interesting," senior author Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, a chemist at the Scripps Research Institute in California, said in a press release. A tap from DAP's magic wand may not turn a pumpkin into a carriage, but what it does do is attach a small chemical building block called a phosphate onto the compound it meets—a process called phosphorylation. Phosphorylation, and the reverse process that removes a phosphate group, is an incredibly common process in life that underwrites chemicals ranging from neurotransmitters to proteins.
Donald Trump Was Criticized for Overfeeding Fish in Japan. But the Prime Minister Did It First
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The report seems a little...fishy
Lifelong Protection Against Flu? New Vaccine Shows Promise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new type of flu vaccine that contains "ancestral" flu virus genes shows promise in providing broad protection against many different strains of the flu, according to an early study in animals. When researchers gave this new vaccine to mice, it protected up to 100 percent of the animals, meaning they survived after being given typically lethal doses of nine different flu viruses. Mice that were given high doses of the vaccine didn't even get sick from the typically lethal doses of flu, the researchers said.
These Are the Victims of the Texas Church Shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At least 26 people were killed when a gunman opened fire on a church in a rural community in Texas
The October Revolution Changed the World 100 Years Ago. But the Shocking Downfall of Russia's Last Tsar Made It Possible
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just four years before the October Revolution of 1917, the Crown had appeared to be at the height of its powers
Eyewitness to church shooting: 'It just went on and on'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
From her café across the road, Terrie Smith heard the gunfire at the First Baptist Church and saw the black-clad gunman. A wounded survivor fled the church and took shelter with her and others. “We’re a good community,” she says.
Hariri's shock resignation: What Saudis gain, and Lebanon could lose
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The sudden resignation of Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri has plunged Lebanon into political uncertainty and raised fears that this tiny Mediterranean country is going to be dragged into the center of the burgeoning and at times violent regional confrontation between Sunni Saudi Arabia and Shiite Iran. Saudi Arabia, reacting to the increasing influence the Islamic Republic wields in Lebanon, Syria, and Iraq, has in recent months steadily escalated its hostile rhetoric toward Iran.
How Snapchat Avoided Fake News
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These are today's best ideas
We have to rethink what “educated” means in a post
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It used to be fairly easy to explain what it means to be educated. Education involves schooling, and as a general rule, the more schooling you have, the better educated you become. Unfortunately, as I will argue below, that answer may no longer be sufficient; there is evidence to suggest that the causal link between…
On the Natural Selection of Words
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New research suggests that languages evolve a lot like organisms do.
The Atlantic Launches “Life Up Close,” A Multi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Washington, D.C. (November 6, 2017)—The Atlantic is expanding the global footprint of its science writing today with a multi-year series to investigate life in all of its multitudes. The series, “Life Up Close,” created with support from Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education (HHMI), begins today at TheAtlantic.com. In the first piece for the project, “The Zombie Diseases of Climate Change," The Atlantic's Robinson Meyer travels to Greenland to report on the potentially dangerous microbes emerging from thawing Arctic permafrost.
Bad for Health? How a Universal Calendar Could Make Time Uniform and Eliminate Daylight Saving Trouble
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Whether you're turning the clock backward or forward, numerous reports suggest that daylight saving time is not only outdated and unnecessary, but also pretty unhealthy. One possible solution could be a universal calendar that literally puts time on hold, eliminating the need for daylight saving and all other time anomalies caused by our current calendar system. The proposed universal calendar is based on a very specific mathematical formula that allows all 12 calendar months to be identical.
What is an artificial neural network? Here’s everything you need to know
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Neural networks are behind some of the biggest advances in artificial intelligence. But what exactly is an artificial neural network? Check out our beginner's guide to clue you in.
These Are the Victims' Names of the Texas Church Shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At least 26 people were killed when a gunman opened fire on a church in a rural community in Texas
Eyewitness to church shooting: ‘It just went on and on’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
From her café across the road, Terrie Smith heard the gunfire at the First Baptist Church and saw the black-clad gunman. A wounded survivor fled the church and took shelter with her and others. “We’re a good community,” she says.
Why mass shootings at a church are different
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
 Just hours after the Nov. 5 mass shooting at a Baptist church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, about a hundred people held a vigil for the victims. Some mourned, some prayed, some held candles high. To one local resident, Mike Gonzales, the vigil’s purpose was both simple and grand: “to show the world that now, in the midst of darkness, there is light.”
Securing the vote: How efforts to prevent fraud, and voting rights, collide
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Richard Gabbay says he wasn’t trying to suppress anyone’s vote. To help in his political organizing, he obtained a list of all registered voters in his precinct. Ultimately, Mr. Gabbay identified 629 voters who he believed were no longer eligible to vote.
In race for Virginia governor, selectively playing the 'Trump card'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Sen. Tim Scott storms the stage, the final – and most animated – speaker at a rally for Virginia’s Republican candidate for governor, Ed Gillespie. “Ed is my brother from another mother!” jokes Senator Scott of South Carolina, the only black Republican in the US Senate. It was a poignant moment in the final days of a contest marked by brutal ads on racially charged topics – crime, illegal immigration, the future of Confederate monuments – following the violent rally three months ago not far away in Charlottesville.
In Texas, a small town reels – and rallies – after church shooting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On a normal day in Sutherland Springs, Texas, all there is to fill the country air is the barks of local dogs and the hum of cars passing by. Instead, a lone, black-clad gunman shattered the town’s tranquility with a hail of bullets that left at least 26 dead and 20 wounded in the First Baptist Church. The tragedy in a close-knit, rural town that considers itself just outside of San Antonio’s commuting range was a reminder that in America, while a town may not have a single traffic light, it can still have a mass shooting.
50 Years Ago This Week: In Soviet Russia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Also in this issue: Scottish independence and wildfires
Here's What the Lincoln Center Fountain Looked Like After a Prankster Dyed It Neon Yellow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
photos circulated on social media before the fountain was turned off
Massive Galaxy That Formed Just After Big Bang Is Second Oldest Cosmic Object Ever Discovered
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronomers announced today they've spotted the second-oldest object in the universe to date, a star-forming galaxy located 12.8 billion light-years away. Because astronomical observations act as a sort of time machine based on the speed of light, that means we're seeing the region as it looked 12.8 billion years ago—less than a billion years after the Big Bang.
Red Cross: $6 Million Meant to Fight Ebola Was Stolen Through Fraud
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There was "likely collusion" with Red Cross employees and bank employees
What to Know About the Asylum Seeker Standoff on Manus Island
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Over 600 refugees have refused to leave, citing concerns for their safety in Papua New Guinea
Universal Flu Shot Promising Lifelong Protection Edges Closer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Flu vaccines are tricky because they have to be recalibrated each year, and vaccine production needs to start at least six months in advance. To figure out how the vaccine should be changed each year, the CDC watches to see which flu viruses are around and tries to guess which ones might crop up next. This system does work—for many people, the benefits of the flu vaccine will outweigh the risks, such as headaches, soreness or allergic reactions.
First luxury Perigord truffle is cultivated in Britain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A black Perigord truffle has been cultivated in Britain for the first time, and the scientists who announced the breakthrough on Monday said climate change could make it a new British crop. The 16-gramme (0.6-ounce) specimen was cultivated in Wales in the roots of a Mediterranean oak tree that had been treated with truffle spores. Scientists from Cambridge University and Mycorrhizal Systems Ltd (MSL) said they also added lime minerals in the surrounding soil to make it less acidic.
Mammals were nocturnal until dinosaur extinction, then emerged into daylight 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With enormous predators like Tyrannosaurus Rex skulking around in the daytime it is not surprising that the first mammals chose to live under the cover of darkness. In fact, a new study, from University College London has found that our ancestors did not emerge from the shadows until after the dinosaurs became extinct, around 66 million years ago. Before then, all mammals were nocturnal, sleeping in the daytime and hunting or foraging at night, new data suggests. Researchers used computer algorithms to analyse details from 2415 species of living mammals to reconstruct the activity patterns of their ancestors. Early mammals like Kayentatherium were nocturnal, scientists now believe  Credit: Mark Witton  They found that following the comet strike which killed off the dinosaurs, mammals shifted to an intermediate stage of mixed day and night living, before primarily venturing into the daylight. “We were very surprised to find such close correlation between the disappearance of dinosaurs and the beginning of daytime activity in mammals, but we found the same result unanimously using several alternative analyses,” said lead author, doctoral student student Roi Maor of UCL. The team found that the ancestors of gorillas and gibbons were the first to give up their nocturnal activity, a discovery which fits in with the fact that their descendants - which include humans - are the only mammals that see well in daylight. The ancestors of gorillas were the first mammals to become diurnal, which is why their eyesight is so good  Their vision and colour perception is comparable to those of diurnal reptiles and birds – groups which never left the daytime. “It’s very difficult to relate behaviour changes in mammals that lived so long ago to ecological conditions at the time, so we can’t say that the dinosaurs dying out caused mammals to start being active in the daytime,” added co-author Professor Kate Jones. “However, we see a clear correlation in our findings.” Ancestral reconstruction is the extrapolation back in time from measured characteristics of individuals, or species, to their common ancestors. For example, if  a mammal had long fingers and its sibling also has long fingers  it is likely that a parent had long fingers.  The research was published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.
President Trump and Japan's Shinzo Abe Vow 'Maximum Pressure' on North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump said that both men were “working to counter the dangerous aggression of the regime in North Korea"
The Latest: US will continue participation in climate talks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Latest on global climate change talks in Bonn, Germany (all times local): 4:25 p.m. A senior U.S. diplomat says Washington will continue to take part in talks about implementing the Paris climate accord, ...
Texas A.G.: Churches should consider armed worshipers or private security
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After a mass shooting at a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, left 26 people dead Sunday, state Attorney General Ken Paxton suggested that institutions have to decide either to allow firearms or hire private security to defend against future carnage.
Trump’s presidency could last longer than some expect, Poland is chipping away at people’s freedoms, Too early to celebrate a Palestinian reconcil
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Not so long ago ... Donald Trump and ... Senator Rand Paul were at war. “ ‘Donald Trump is a delusional narcissist....’ This was after Mr. Trump had called Mr. Paul, among other niceties, ‘a spoiled brat....’ So what are they doing now? “Since it came into power in October 2015, Poland’s ruling Law and Justice Party (PiS) has gone to great lengths to dismantle the fundamental checks and balances against government abuse of power...,” writes Lydia Gall.
The uncomfortable secret to creative success is “disequilibrium”
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s a Wednesday morning in the IDEO San Francisco studio. Bright sunshine reflects off the Bay and through the floor-to-ceiling windows. But in the project space, the mood is darker. The team is on week five of their project. They’ve been conducting tons of human-centered interviews and broad design research, and they’re writing and re-writing…
What to Know About the 'Paradise Papers' Leak
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The leak of more than 13 million documents dubbed the "Paradise Papers" contain information on the financial transactions of 120,000 people and companies
Hydroelectric dams threaten Brazil's mysterious Pantanal – one of the world's great wetlands
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The region relies on seasonal flooding, yet energy demand is year-round.
Humans to Blame for Climate Change, Government Report Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The climate report, released today (Nov. 3), paints a dire picture of the present and future effects of global climate change, from sea levels that could rise by as much as 8 feet (2.4 meters) by 2100, to more-frequent heat waves and other extreme weather events. It is also in stark contrast to climate change stances taken by President Donald Trump, who has ranged from calling it a hoax to saying he had an "open mind" about whether human-caused climate change is actually happening. "Many lines of evidence demonstrate that it is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century," the authors wrote.