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Science reveals why the EU’s mission for equality in Europe is likely unattainable
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a single swoop in 2004, the EU added 10 new member states. The mostly Eastern European countries were considerably poorer than the old guard. But the hope was that the EU’s founding ideals of increasing prosperity among all its members would help them become more equal sooner. Scientific research has been shown to be…
How a handful of South American protestors took Europe’s space program hostage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cayenne, French Guiana The Guiana Space Center in Kourou, French Guiana—a tiny territory wedged into the peak of South America between Suriname and Brazil—hosted unexpected visitors on the afternoon of April 4. A protest march, estimated about 10,000 strong, advanced on the space center and was standing at the gates, chanting their movement’s rallying cry,…
Saudi seeks 10% renewable energy in six years: minister
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Saudi Arabia wants 10 percent of its electricity to come from renewable sources within several years as part of a transformation in its power sector, the energy minister said Monday. Khaled al-Falih said his country, the world's biggest oil exporter, will also sell renewable energy and its technology abroad. At a forum seeking investment in the sector, he announced "30 projects to be implemented" in order to reach a goal of about 10 gigawatts of renewable energy production early next decade.
After 7 years in prison, a small
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Corinna Fields, a second-grader, sent former President Barack Obama a letter last year outlining all the things she wanted to do with her dad if he got out of prison. On his last day in the White House, the president granted Corinna her wish, including her father, Paul, among the 310 drug offenders who received clemency as he prepared to leave office. In his two terms, Obama pardoned or commuted the sentences of nearly 2,000 people, mainly nonviolent drug offenders, who he believed were serving sentences that were overly harsh.
Behind the poll: A look at our Yahoo News/Marist poll on pot in America
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
An exclusive new Yahoo News/Marist Poll shows that as the legal landscape evolves — and as social attitudes evolve along with it — more and more Americans are overcoming old taboos and accepting marijuana into their family lives. Getting high has lost its stigma in the majority of homes where adults use marijuana, according to the survey of 1,122 Americans 18 or older. Sixty percent of parents who use marijuana at least once or twice a year say their children are aware that they use it, and a majority (54 percent) of them have spoken directly to their kids about their use.
This Is Your Teenager's Brain on Pot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A series of studies point out that vulnerable, still-developing adolescent brains don’t mix so well with marijuana, but definitive research is elusive.
Who Cares Whether a Celebrity Smokes Marijuana? Not Many, Says New Yahoo News/Marist Poll
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A new Yahoo News/Marist Poll shows that most Americans — 74 percent — say it makes no difference to them if their favorite celebrity uses the drug.
When it comes to weed, Americans are still more open with friends than family
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
While more Americans than ever say attitudes toward weed have relaxed within families, most still expect greater acceptance for pot use (especially recreational) from close friends than relatives.
Most Americans support medical marijuana but are divided on legalizing recreational weed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
According to an exclusive new Yahoo News/Marist Poll, more than eight in 10 U.S. adults support legalizing pot for medicinal purposes. But when it comes to recreational marijuana, the country is much more divided.
How a single dad turned weed bus tours into a $1.8 million business
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Marijuana enthusiast Michael Eymer founded Colorado Cannabis Tours in January 2014, the year it became legal to sell recreational weed in the state. Eymer, the 35-year-old single dad, raked in $1.8 million in sales last year. He’s up 66 percent this year so far.
Solitary consumption: 31 percent of marijuana users prefer using alone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
According to a new Yahoo News/Marist Poll, more than four in 10 consume cannabis with people other than their family, while roughly the same amount hide their stash.
Buying weed for grandpa
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Somewhere in a suburban New York basement there is a small, unused bag of marijuana, a last attempt to help an elderly father in his final days. One day last spring, in one of his series of hospital rooms, his family — a wife and four grown children — argued over what straws they might grasp to build his strength. Pot could help with that, said his son.
For African
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Jesce Horton is the owner of Panacea Valley Gardens, a cultivation center and boutique edibles line serving cannabis patients in Portland, OR. Jesce Horton still remembers the advice his father often imparted to him while he was growing up. Marijuana, said the 34-year-old Horton, was always a big part of those conversations.
Colorado’s Governor John Hickenlooper warily learns to live with pot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
When the people of Colorado voted in 2012 to legalize recreational marijuana, they instantly transformed their governor, John Hickenlooper, into America’s most reluctant pot pioneer. “If it was up to me, I wouldn’t have done it,” Hickenlooper admitted. “We were worried about everything,” Hickenlooper tells Yahoo News.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
The world's greenest island
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At the outset of an interview with a Dutch journalist, Søren Hermansen apologizes for being tired. The reporter asks Mr. Hermansen how the Australians discovered him, a community leader on a Danish island half the size of Martha’s Vineyard that’s home to just 3,750 people and a few shaggy sheep. “I’m famous,” says Hermansen, adding that he isn’t boasting, it’s just a statement of fact.
Cannabis Advocate Melissa Etheridge: ‘I’d Much Rather Have a Smoke With My Grown Kids Than a Drink’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The singer has been smoking marijuana recreationally since 21 but didn’t learn of its medicinal benefits until years later when she was battling cancer.
A top Indian engineering school will now teach an 8,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An 8,000-year-old body of knowledge is finding its way into the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT)-Kharagpur, the oldest of India’s elite engineering schools. From August this year, architecture students at the institute, which counts Google’s Sunder Pichai among its alumni, will be taught vastu shashtra, the ancient Indian “science of architecture.” Believed to have been…
Weed hits home: In a new Yahoo News/Marist Poll, parents and children are surprisingly open about pot use
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
 When Michelle, a 40-year-old lawyer from Connecticut, visited her son at college in Colorado, it did not occur to her at first that she would be venturing from a state where recreational marijuana was still against the law to one that had recently voted to legalize it. Michelle and Schuyler, a 19-year-old organismal biology and ecology major, are pioneers in the brave new world of pot use.
How Republicans and Democrats in Congress are joining forces to defeat Sessions’ war on weed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rep. Carlos Curbelo is a two-term Republican from a South Florida district that was once the epicenter in the country’s war on drugs. Dubbed the Small Business Tax Equity Act, Curbelo’s bill would let legal pot dealers take advantage of the same tax deductions and credits as any other business, a move that industry experts say would slash the effective tax rates for weed dispensaries in half.
Interactive map: Where weed is legal in the U.S
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Twenty-eight states and the District of Columbia have now legalized medical marijuana. And eight states — including Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Alaska — plus the District have passed laws legalizing recreational marijuana.
These mothers of suicides don’t think marijuana is harmless
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sally Schindel sits in front of a painting of her son Andrew Zorn, who took his own life after saying he became addicted to marijuana. Sally Schindel couldn’t remember the last time she’d stood in the rain so long. Police had prohibited Schindel from going into the house where her son, Andy, lived, so she waited for hours in the driveway, alongside officers and a court-ordered psychiatrist, pleading with them to allow her to go inside and ensure that her 31-year-old son was OK.
American families embracing pot as never before, Yahoo News/Marist Poll finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
An exclusive new Yahoo News/Marist Poll shows that as the legal landscape evolves — and as social attitudes evolve along with it — more and more Americans are overcoming old taboos and accepting marijuana into their family lives. Getting high has lost its stigma in the majority of homes where adults use marijuana, according to the survey of 1,122 Americans 18 or older. Sixty percent of parents who use marijuana at least once or twice a year say their children are aware that they use it, and a majority (54 percent) of them have spoken directly to their kids about their use.
‘Cannabis Has Made Me a Better Parent’: One Mom’s Confession
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Postpartum depression (PPD) affects one in nine new mothers. Hours after the birth, cradling her new baby girl in her arms, Behar believed she had dodged the bullet. What followed was what Behar describes as despair: uncontrollable fits of crying, thoughts of hurting herself, and eventually the upsetting realization that she was experiencing postpartum depression.
Small pot farms in Northern California thrive amid fears of Big Business
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Small pot farmers in the California Redwoods live a simple, rural life that revolves around growing marijuana, their own fruits and vegetables, and tending to their animals. For now, small-time farmers like Brad and Katherine are able to support themselves by selling pot to legal medical marijuana dispensaries, though they worry about Big Business taking over, as well as potential increased enforcement of federal laws outlawing pot under the Trump administration.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
ESA To Host Conference On Threats Posed By Space Debris
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It is estimated that over 200 million objects, of which only 1,100 are functional spacecraft, are currently locked in Earth's orbit.
Japan volcanic island may hold key to coral survival
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The key to the survival of the world's threatened coral reefs may lie in the waters surrounding a small volcanic island off the coast of Japan, scientists say. The seabed of Shikine island is a "living laboratory" for researchers aboard the schooner Tara, a French-led scientific expedition, who are looking for clues to help protect coral from the damaging effects of climate change. While coral reefs cover less than 0.2 percent of the ocean surface globally, they host some 30 percent of marine animal and plant species, serving as a source of food and offering protection from predators.
Hundreds evacuated after deadly Sri Lanka dump collapse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sri Lanka has moved over 400 families to temporary shelters after tonnes of rotting garbage collapsed onto a slum on Friday, killing 26 people. It came as the country celebrated the traditional new year and followed a warning to Sri Lanka's parliament that the 23 million tonnes of rotting garbage posed a serious health hazard. Disaster management officials said 1,700 people had been moved to temporary shelters in state schools while the government looked for alternative accommodation.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
The Craters On Mars House Lakebeds, Gullies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The HiRISE instrument aboard NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been capturing images of the Martian surface since 2006.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
‘Vanderpump Rules’ Star Stassi Schroeder’s Secret Health Struggle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
“My life might look glam on the outside,” says Stassi Schroeder of Bravo TV’s “Vanderpump Rules” – “but my skin condition more often than not makes me want to hide.”
Can a Fruit Tickle Meat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The Doctors sample jackfruit, a tropical fruit from the East Indies that is touted as a delicious vegan meat substitute. But does it live up to the hype?
New Fix for Sagging Elbows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Corinne wants to know if there’s any way to make her elbow skin tighter and less wrinkly.
Nutrition Food Fight!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Are eggs and coconut oil great for your health – or nutritional no-nos? Dr. Freeman is concerned about the choline and cholesterol content of eggs. U.S. dietary guidelines recommend consuming as little cholesterol as possible, and eggs may be linked to greater diabetes risk.
Dating Practice through Virtual Reality?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Can men hone their dating skills by interacting with a digital lady? Dating coach Magic Leone claims they can. Would-be Romeos put on their virtual-reality glasses and practice their moves with a woman who responds to their overtures.
Researchers Develop Technique To Identify Gene Pathways In Medicinal Plants
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The technique, described in a study published Thursday in the journal Plant Cell, could open the door to uncovering new plant products for use in medicine and agriculture.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Researchers Switch On 'Silent' Gene Clusters In Bacteria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The discovery of a global gene cluster regulator could eventually allow scientists to boost microbes' ability to generate drugs and biofuels.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Zen out this weekend while watching a craftsman turn a tree into a dugout canoe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sometimes, older forms of technology are just as fascinating as the latest gadget. A Latvian woodworker named Rihards Vidzickis recently posted up a mesmerizing video of a recent project: creating a dugout canoe from a single tree trunk. Vidzickis is a master woodworker who specializes in green wood (recently cut, as opposed to dried). The accompanying description explains that he earned his doctorate in engineering materials science, and knows the wood down to a scientific level. ...
Want a modern pool for your modern home? You may want to check out Modpool
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Meet Modpools, the Canadian company making patent pending pools that utilize the "structural rigidity of a modified shipping container to provide end users with a relocatable hot pool."
5 Of Our Solar System’s Most Important Moons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If we are going to find aliens in our solar system, we might have a better shot exploring moons rather than other planets.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
China Implements Electric Propulsion In Newest Satellite
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The country has a very ambitious space program, including building its own space station and landing on the far side of the moon.
Nasa's human Mars mission will cost $450bn but it's not enough to explore the Red planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nasa's "Journey to Mars", which aims to send humans to the Martian system in the 2030s, has been estimated to be the costliest space mission ever. A new report by the space agency however, says the cost for the entire mission could be well over a staggering $450bn (£359bn) over the next three decades. The cost estimation comes from an updated version of a study done by Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).
Cassini snaps closest ever photo of Saturn's bizarre 'flying saucer' moon Atlas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cassini-Huygens, the space orbiter designated for Saturn and its moons, has snapped the closest image yet of the icy planet's bizarre flying saucer-shaped moon Atlas. The images released by Nasa are raw and unprocessed, and were taken on Tuesday (12 April) by Cassini spacecraft.
NASA photos capture a strange new crack in a massive Greenland glacier and we're all probably doomed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A mysterious crack has been spreading across a giant Greenland glacier, and it's raising concerns that part of the floating ice shelf could splinter off into the ocean.  That's bad.  Scientists with the NASA field campaign Operation IceBridge recently captured the first photographs of the growing rift while flying over Petermann Glacier, a structure that connects the Greenland ice sheet to the Arctic Ocean. SEE ALSO: NASA photo reveals a startling 300-foot-wide rift in Antarctic Ice Shelf The new chasm appears in the center of the glacier's floating ice shelf — the tongue of ice that extends into the water from the grounded glacier on land.  In the photos, the crack appears relatively close to a larger rift spreading toward the shelf's center. Should the two intersect, part of the ice shelf in northwest Greenland could potentially break off. A portion of the new rift on Petermann Glacier's floating ice shelf is shown near the bottom center. The older rift appears near top center. The shaded feature, near the bottom center, is the "medial flowline."Image: NASA/Kelly BruntThere may be a savior for the shelf. A "medial flowline" in the ice could have a "stagnating effect" on the newer rift, helping to slow or halt its advance toward the older chasm, scientists with Operation IceBridge said on Facebook. Stef Lhermitte, a professor at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, first alerted the NASA team to the crack's coordinates after spotting it in satellite images, Washington Post reported. Polar-orbiting satellites showed the chasm for the first time in July 2016, and "it has been growing since then," Lhermitte said on Twitter.  .@Petermann_Ice @AndreasMuenchow @glacier_doc @CopernicusEU @ESA_EO The internal crack growth is clearly visible in this Sentinel-1 time series, also during polar night. 3/5 pic.twitter.com/AKY2czWFtR — Stef Lhermitte (@StefLhermitte) April 12, 2017 While scientists still aren't sure what caused the crack to form, Lhermitte said a possible culprit might be "ocean forcing," a phenomenon that happens when warm ocean waters melt the ice from underneath. Ocean forcing might have been a culprit in creating cracks in another part of the world. Researchers believe it caused deep subsurface cracks to form in Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier, a recent study found. There a 20-mile-long rift eventually split the ice from the inside out and cleaved off a 225-square-mile iceberg in July 2015. Many of the glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica that end in floating ice shelves have been shrinking due to warming ocean and air temperatures. Petermann Glacier's east wall near the terminus of the floating ice shelf.Image: NASA/John SonntagWhen ice shelves break off into icebergs it doesn't directly increase sea levels, because the ice is already floating in the ocean, like an ice cube in a glass. However, because the ice shelves act like doorstops to the land-based ice behind them, if the shelves disappear, the glaciers can start moving into the sea. This would add new water to the ocean and therefore raise sea levels. In the case of Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier, researchers said that warming waters causing cracks to form beneath "provides another mechanism for rapid retreat of these glaciers, adding to the probability that we may see significant collapse of West Antarctica in our lifetimes." Greenland, Antarctica, the message is we're all probably doomed.  WATCH: Watch how global warming heats up the world from 1880-2016
Trump lashes out after Tax March protest: ‘The election is over!’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump took swipes at tax day marches that featured thousands of protesters demanding the president release his tax returns.