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Democracy’s darkest moment: the Watergate scandal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It was famously described by the White House press secretary as a “third-rate burglary,” but it brought down a presidency. On the night of June 17, 1972, five men were arrested for breaking in to the Democratic National Committee headquarters in an office and hotel complex whose name has become synonymous with political scandal: the Watergate.
Controversial Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke says he is joining Trump administration
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Clarke met with President Trump back in November and was considered a potential candidate to run the department, but the post went to Gen. John Kelly.
Rep. Maxine Waters: Paul Ryan has ‘not done his job’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., slammed House Speaker Paul Ryan Wednesday, saying he “has not provided any real leadership.”
Alex Jones of Infowars retracts slurs against Chobani and an Idaho city
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Infowars host and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones has settled a lawsuit with yogurt company Chobani after spreading false information about the company and the city of Twin Falls, Idaho. Chobani filed a defamation suit against Jones last month after he posted stories about a wave of refugee-fueled crime and disease in Twin Falls, the Idaho city where Chobani opened a factory in 2012.
What is the 25th Amendment, and could it be used to remove Trump?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Critics of President Trump are invoking the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution as means for removing him from office. But for law scholar Brian C. Kalt, it’s doubtful that this would actually work.
House majority leader in 2016: 'I think Putin pays Trump'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., right, speaks with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016, following a House Republican leadership meeting. As Donald Trump was laying waste to a field of 18 Republican challengers en route to claiming his party’s presidential nomination, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy was caught making a quip about about his relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin.
In Iran election, lackluster economy opens door to a populist push
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Perched just off Revolution Square in central Tehran, Mehdi’s tiny fast-food joint is doing brisk-enough business selling burgers and pizzas – because everyone has to eat.
Lucrative project tantalizes builders – except that it's Trump's wall
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
This week, a nascent national movement takes to the streets to protest the building of a border wall with Mexico. Many of the largest and best-known design, engineering, and construction firms – even those with decades of experience overseeing controversial projects in the Middle East and Africa – have decided not to bid on the border wall. Many in the contracting world worry that partisan politics will spill over into other work.
Democracy experts to Trump: Just because you can, doesn't mean you should
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Here’s a bit of advice for President Trump from experts who study the processes of democracy: Just because you can do something, doesn’t mean you should. It can prevent partisans from locking into fights so bitter they risk tearing democracies apart. In recent years, norms have withered in countries such as Hungary and Turkey where democratic structures have started to deteriorate.
14 of the Most Dramatic Celeb Makeunders
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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12 Celebrity Couples Who Couldn't Resist Twinning
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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30+ Scrumptious and Easy Picnic Recipe Ideas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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10 Moments That Will Make a Guy *Really* Realize He's About to Be a Dad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Like when he's making plans for 6 months from now and realizes he that needs to account for the fact that you guys are going to have *a baby*.
This Sweet Video of What a Normal Day for a Mom Looks Like Will Make You Feel Things
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It shows the perspective of the mother *and* her kids.
The 'Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants' Cast Reunited for Amber Tamblyn's Directorial Debut
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Um, how do they look like they haven't aged a minute?
5 Ways You Can Use Coconut Oil to Lose Weight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
More coconut oil may be the key to hanger management.
New ‘cold spot’ discovery could prove existence of a parallel universe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists believe they have moved a step closer to proving the existence of a parallel universe with the discovery of a mysterious ‘cold spot’. This cool patch of space, that was first spotted by the NASA WMAP satellite in 2004, is part of the radiation that was thought to have been produced during the formation of the universe some 13 billion years ago. Professor Shanks theorises that this is ‘the first evidence for the multiverse – and billions of other universes may exist like our own”.
Nasa's Hubble successor and most advanced telescope James Webb ready for testing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The James Webb Space Telescope, which is reported to be the most advanced telescope to be put into space ever, is entering its final stage of testing on Earth. The telescope is a joint venture between the NASA, ESA (the European Space Agency) and the Canadian Space Agency. The world's most advanced space observatory will not replace the Hubble Space Telescope, but will be more like its scientific successor as their capabilities are not identical, according to Nasa.
How excessive use of technology can impact brain health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dr. David Rosenberg studies brain scans of teenagers who are compulsively online.
Cotton Swabs Send 34 Kids to the ER Every Day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The message can't be simpler: Don't put cotton swabs in your ear canals. A new study, the first of its kind to look at a nationally representative sample, found that between 1990 and 2010, an estimated 263,000 children were treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments for injuries to their ears from cotton tip applicators. "It's concerning that while these products have been around for almost 100 years and many of the manufacturers put warning labels on the products stating to not use them in the ear canal, we are still seeing a significant number of injuries in children using them for the purpose of cleaning their ear canal," said the study's senior author, Dr. Kris Jatana, a pediatric otolaryngologist at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and associate professor at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.
IBM constructs a 17
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
IBM has announced the creation of its most powerful quantum processor to date, which will serve as the basis for future commercial systems, alongside plans to upgrade the system currently available for public usage.
Open SESAME: science centre inaugurated in Jordan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jordan's King Abdullah II on Tuesday formally launched an international research centre whose members include experts from around the world including arch-rivals Iran and Israel. The International Centre for Synchrotron-Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East, known by the acronym SESAME, "is the first research centre of its kind in the region," said the royal court. SESAME council president Chris Llewellyn Smith said the centre, located in Balqa province just northwest of Amman, was "the fulfilment of many hopes and dreams".
How parents can help prevent kids from becoming obsessed with digital devices
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kevin Roberts, who works with teenagers who have learning challenges, said parents should not use technology as babysitters.
To Avoid Being Eaten, Tadpoles Aren't Choosy About Escape Vehicle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Newborn poison frogs of Peru have quite an appetite. If left home alone in their hatching pool, the ravenous tadpoles will eat each other. To keep the tadpoles from gorging on their siblings, their doting father will carry them one at a time on his back and drop them in separate pools, where other food is available.
Elon Musk is rushing to beat NASA to Mars, perhaps during Trump presidency
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk plans to send a robotic mission to Mars by 2024, way ahead of NASA's timetable. A public-private partnership may be in the offing.
How parents can tell if their child's electronics use is harming them
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Addiction expert Nicholas Kardaras offers his advice for how parents can recognize the warning signs of digital obsession.
Elon Musk has a trick to make the world fall behind his vision of the future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A former Google China president and now venture capitalist says Elon Musk uses shiny cars and the promise of medical implants as bait for his real goals: Distributing energy away from traditional power companies and turning humans into cyborgs. First, says Kai-Fu Lee, were Tesla cars. “By selling us fancy, beautiful Teslas—luxury cars that none…
Here's how the ransomware attack was stopped – and why it could soon start again
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Things might not be over for the WannaCry malware.
ICE arrests of undocumented immigrants without criminal records up more than 150 percent, U.S. officials say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
While the Trump administration initially said that it would focus its deportation efforts on undocumented immigrants with criminal records, figures released Wednesday show that the arrests of those without criminal records have more than doubled this year.
Senate Republicans seeking Comey’s memos — and his testimony
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Senate Intelligence Committee has asked the FBI to turn over all Comey’s memos with WH officials about the investigation into Russian meddling in the election.
Democracy’s darkest moment: the Watergate conspiracy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It was famously described by the White House press secretary as a “third-rate burglary,” but it brought down a presidency. On the night of June 17, 1972, five men were arrested for breaking in to the Democratic National Committee headquarters in an office and hotel complex whose name has become synonymous with political scandal: the Watergate.
Head in the clouds: Dutch king was guest pilot for 21 years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Dutch passengers on KLM flights might have recognized the co-pilot's voice when he introduced himself on the airline's Cityhopper services.
Does US need a new crime crackdown? Prosecutors see generational divide
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At the core of the debate over the role of prosecutors in keeping America safe, some experts and prosecutors believe, is a generational divide. Attorney General Jeff Sessions represents one view, epitomized by his decision to restore mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenses on Friday – undoing guidance aimed at reducing prison overcrowding. “It is a core principle that prosecutors should charge and pursue the most serious, readily provable offense,” he said in the memo.
As controversy swirls around Trump, Russia watches helplessly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Russian President Vladimir Putin offered on Wednesday to provide Congress with a transcript of his foreign minister's controversial meeting last week with President Trump in the Oval Office, it was not warmly received by US politicians. Rather, its greater significance may be as a sign of just how alarmed Mr. Putin and the Kremlin are becoming about what's happening in Washington. Recommended: Sochi, Soviets, and czars: How much do you know about Russia?
Zika and Pregnancy: What You Need to Know Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. It has been a year since scientists officially confirmed that Zika, a mosquito-borne virus that can also be spread throu...
Lemon Drop Energy Balls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
If you’re craving something sweet and satisfying that will also help fuel your body, watch this video to learn how to whip up a batch of lemon drop energy balls.
Thai Stuffed Avocado
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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The Truth About Hair, Skin, and Nail Supplements
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
There’s no shortage of products on the market that are claimed to thicken hair, remove wrinkles, and fix dry, brittle nails. Among these are a slew of dietary supplements, some topping $100. But ...
Using science to make humans more moral might just make us racist instead
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If there's one thing philosophers have learned over the course of human history it's that changing the way people think is a tricky business. Societies create rules that encourage "good" behaviors, but inevitably there are those who push back, offering their own criteria for what constitutes moral behavior. Now, with the possibility of a merger between man and machine being talked about in earnest, researchers from North Carolina State University and the Montreal Clinical Research Institute decided to explore whether behavioral modification in the name of morality could solve some of society's ills. The results aren't particularly encouraging. The study examined the overall effectiveness and results of a total of seven different "moral enhancement technologies" including the strategic application of oxytocin and amphetamines, and neurostimulation. The results showed that, while these technologies can have positive effects on an individual's morality and encourage "good" behavior, the drawbacks are many. "What we found is that, yes, many of these techniques do have some effects," Veljko Dubljevic, lead researcher, explained. "But these techniques are all blunt instruments, rather than finely tuned technologies that could be helpful. So, moral enhancement is really a bad idea." Ultimately, the side effects of the behavior-altering techniques were far too unpredictable, and even encouraged the opposite of moral behavior in some cases. Oxytocin, for example, was found to promote trust in subjects, but only in some cases or between certain individuals, resulting in a sharper divide between the subject and people with whom they don't relate, including other races and minorities. Meanwhile, amphetamines were found to increase all types of behavior, not just the good kind, and the brain stimulation technologies studied proved to have basically no effect one way or the other.
Controversial Theory Says Expansion of Universe Is Driven by Quantum Fluctuations—not Dark Energy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A team of researchers from the University of British Columbia, Canada, has proposed a radical new theory about the expansion of the universe. Scientists do not know exactly why the universe is expanding at an ever-accelerating pace, but the most popular theory is that this growth is being driven by dark energy, the theoretical force thought to make up 68 percent of the universe. Scientists discovered the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate in 1998.
When will North Korean missiles be able to reach the US? Satellite images offer clues
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kim Jong-un, the North Korean strongman, was pleased as punch on May 14 when his country shot a missile some 2,000 km (1,240 miles) into the air. The exercise may have demonstrated his country’s ability to launch nuclear weapons at targets like the US military base on the Pacific island of Guam, but it leaves…
The science of finding buried bodies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
50 years after the Moors Murders, UK police are still hoping to find a missing body. And scientists are working hard to help.
Democrats are still looking for a 2020 leader. But they are starting to figure out their message.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The speaking roster at Tuesday’s 2017 Ideas Conference read like a who’s who of 2020 Democratic presidential wannabes, and none was shy about their vision of how to defeat Trump.
‘We’re in impeachment territory’: David Gergen, former presidential adviser, on Comey’s Trump memo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“After watching the Clinton impeachment, I thought I would never see another one,” David Gergen said on CNN.
Paul Ryan: ‘It is obvious there are some people out there who want to harm the president’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
House Speaker Paul Ryan says Congress should gather the facts and not rush to judgment regarding President Trump and ex-FBI chief James Comey.
The Comey memo was also about Trump’s request to arrest reporters. Journalists call it ‘crazy and scary.’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Joel Simon, the executive director of the Committee to Protect Journalists, condemned President Trump’s apparent desire to jail reporters who publish classified information: “The threat is very real.”
Chelsea Manning celebrates release from prison: ‘First steps of freedom’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Chelsea Manning, imprisoned for leaking secret documents to WikiLeaks as a U.S. Army intelligence analyst, was released from prison Wednesday.
Trump: The media treats me worse than any politician in history
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump complained that the media has treated him more unfairly than any other politician in the history of the United States while delivering the commencement address to the U.S. Coast Guard Academy’s class of 2017 in New London, Conn.
Man sues woman for $17.31 movie ticket after bad date
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROUND ROCK, Texas (AP) — A Texas man is suing a woman he went on a date with for the price of a movie ticket after he says she texted through the film and left him at the theater.