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'That Doesn't Represent Me.' The Man Whose Mom Made Him the Face of a Viral #HimToo Meme Wants No Part of It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I'm a proud Navy Vet, Cat Dad and Ally"
Richard Branson gives Elon Musk some advice: Learn to delegate and get some sleep
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Richard Branson gives Elon Musk some advice: Learn to delegate and get some sleep|| 105495362
Investigators want to know who left gator in Lake Michigan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WAUKEGAN, Ill. (AP) — Authorities don't know who dumped a four-foot-long reptile into Lake Michigan, but they now know what kind it is.
Inflatable sea monster takes over a rusting warehouse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A giant sea monster has taken over a building at Philadelphia's Navy Yard, but only temporarily.
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
A Nobel for ennobling ingenuity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In scholarly work done more than three decades ago, economist Paul Romer proposed that societies look beyond the material drivers of long-term growth, such as oil, ports, or labor. Economic progress, he showed by dint of data, relies more on how well a society manages an intangible good: the discovery of new ideas that propel innovation. Dr. Romer, now at New York University, especially focused on ways to reward people who come up with useful ideas in technology or management.
After historic Van Dyke verdict, Chicagoans look to the future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At the front of a crowd of 200 people in Chicago on Friday, Antonio Magitt was still in shock. For the first time in 50 years, a Chicago police officer had been found guilty of murder for an on-duty shooting. Many businesses and schools had closed early in anticipation of unrest following the verdict in the Jason Van Dyke trial and the streets were eerily quiet that afternoon, despite the marchers.
Brett Kavanaugh Sworn In As Supreme Court Justice in White House Ceremony
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brett Kavanaugh Sworn In As Supreme Court Justice in White House Ceremony
Jupiter’s Europa might be a spiky, dangerous place to land a ship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As telescope technology and other observational tools has improved over the decades we've learned more and more about the planets and moons in our Solar System. We've begun to check off the places that could have possibly harbored life, but a handful of promising destinations still remain. Jupiter's moon Europa is one of the most tantalizing. The ice-covered world hides a vast ocean beneath its surface, and cracks in its thick ice sheets regularly spew water out into space, teasing us with the possibility that something lives far below. Actually traveling to Europa is still little more than a dream, but when we eventually make it happen we may need to grapple with something unexpected: a surface covered in brutal blades of ice. \ In a new study published in Nature Geoscience, researchers studying Europa reveal that conditions on the planet might support a phenomenon that occurs on Earth which turns ice into large spiky blades. "On Earth, the sublimation of massive ice deposits at equatorial latitudes under cold and dry conditions in the absence of any liquid melt leads to the formation of spiked and bladed textures eroded into the surface of the ice," the study explains. The researchers go on to explain that the same conditions exist on the surface of Europa, and that the icy blades "could pose a hazard to a future lander on Europa." You might not think it when you peer out at an ice-covered lake in the dead of winter, but perfectly flat, smooth ice is actually somewhat rare. When ice is exposed to the elements for long periods of time — specifically when it's bathed in sunlight but ambient temperature remains well below freezing — it tends to form valleys and peaks which become more pointed and "sharp" over time. We haven't seen images of Europa that were detailed enough to determine the details of the texture on its surface. We know it's frozen ice, but not what condition the outermost surface is in, and if the researchers are right and there's sharp blades and spikes of rock-hard ice, sending a lander down could be an incredibly tricky task. Sometime in the early 2020s NASA is planning on launching an orbiter to Europa called the Europa Clipper. It will come packed with nice instruments for observing the moon, including radar that will map the ice and determine how thick it is. It should also give scientists a much better idea of what the surface looks like, and if it sees a bed of icy spikes, NASA will have to figure out how to deal with them for future missions.
After SpaceX's 17th Mission in 2018, Richard Branson Says Virgin Galactic Will Put People In Space in 'Weeks, Not Months'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After SpaceX's 17th Mission in 2018, Richard Branson Says Virgin Galactic Will Put People In Space in 'Weeks, Not Months'
Brett Kavanaugh to Hear First Arguments as a Supreme Court Justice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It will be a moment that conservatives have dreamed of for decades, with five solidly conservative justices on the bench
The Fat Bear Week finals are here. Which fat bear will reign supreme?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Welcome to Fat Bear Week at Mashable! Each fall, Katmai National Park holds a competition as Alaska’s brown bears finish fattening up for their long winter hibernation. This year, Mashable is getting in on the salmon-munching action. Check back with us all week as we follow the fat bear face-offs each day, and remember to get your votes in for each round. Happy fishing! After six days of strong competition, the Fat Bear Week finals have arrived. Katmai National Park, where these wild bears live and hibernate, amusingly calls the pinnacle of the week-long contest "Fat Bear Tuesday."  This year's Tuesday match features two profoundly fat bears, both of whom clearly exploited a Brooks River that teemed with 2018's exceptional and long run of 4,500-calorie salmon.  The showdown features Bear 409, known as "Beadnose," a former Fat Bear Week Champion who delighted the internet last week after Katmai posted images of her dramatic summertime fattening. In years past, Bear 409 has successfully raised cubs. But this year, the cub-less bear didn't need to sacrifice any fish to her largely helpless offspring. Image: Dustin drankoski/bob al-greene/mashableHer competitor, Bear 747 — who really has no need for a nickname — is the fattest bear Katmai ecologist Mike Fitz has ever seen.  "He seems to be more hippopotamus than bear at times," Katmai ranger Andrew Lavalle noted last week. Voting opened at 10 a.m. ET on the Katmai Facebook page, and the winner will be announced at 7 p.m. ET.  To vote, simply click on the images of the bear you choose as the 2018 champion, and then "Like" that image. Your "Like" is your official vote. To help you place an informed vote, see the ursine comparisons below. Bear 747Image: nps Bear 747Image: nps Bear 409Image: nps Bear 409Image: nps Here are other images of each bear, to clear up any uncertainties as to which bear has fattened up the most this summer.  Bear 409Image: nps Bear 747Image: npsWhoever becomes the crowned champion, each of these bears — all 13 in the competition — have shown to be well-prepared for the long, unrelenting, Alaskan winter. They won't eat for six months, and during that time will lower their metabolisms in profound ways.  In their coma-like state, the bears gradually consume their ample fat stores, and awake each spring in remarkably good health. But when they emerge from their dens, both bears 409 and 747 will be quite skinny.  They'll likely return to Katmai Brook's river and start fishing, obsessively, once again. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?
Court orders diesel ban on major Berlin roads
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Berlin could shut out diesel drivers from major arterial roads next year, after a court Tuesday ordered the German capital to follow in the footsteps of Hamburg, Frankfurt and Stuttgart with exclusion zones. A renewed focus on air quality in the wake of Volkswagen's 2015 "dieselgate" scandal -- in which the car giant admitted to cheating regulatory tests on 11 million cars worldwide -- has seen a wave of courtroom action across Germany.
Nikki Haley to resign as U.N. ambassador
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations said on Tuesday that she plans leave her post at the end of the year.
Turkey prepares to search Saudi Consulate for missing journalist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Diplomatic tensions are boiling over missing and presumed dead Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.
Hillary Clinton calls Trump's Kavanaugh swearing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“I guess that’s why she lost,” Trump responded. “She doesn’t get it, she never did.”
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
Hundreds Attend Candlelight Vigil to Mourn 20 Victims of Limousine Crash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A ceremony for the victims of the limousine crash that killed 20 people has ended with participants lifting candles above their heads to signal unity and perseverance.
Pompeii volcano ‘boiled people’s blood instantly’ and made their heads explode
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At least it would have been quick
From Gary Hart to Donald Trump: How politics went tabloid
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It may seem hard to believe now, but three decades ago, a single news story about a presumed extramarital affair upended a U.S. presidential campaign.
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
Denmark Wants Food Labels to Include Environmental Impact
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The initiative aims to better inform consumers of their environmental impact
President Trump Calls on Chicago to Embrace Stop
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The crime spree is a terrible blight on that city," the president said about Chicago
Seoul Says Kim Jong Un Would 'Enthusiastically' Welcome Pope Francis if He Visited North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un wants Pope Francis to visit the officially atheist country, South Korea said Tuesday.
Japan space tourist says moon training 'shouldn't be too hard'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Billionaire Japanese tycoon and future space tourist Yusaku Maezawa's training to go the moon should not be too tricky, he joked Tuesday, adding that he planned to use free time from his six-hour work day to squeeze it in. The 42-year-old Maezawa paid an undisclosed sum for a ticket on fellow tycoon Elon Musk's SpaceX rocket around the moon as early as 2023 and the passionate art collector also plans to take around half a dozen artists with him on the trip. Asked how he could fit astronaut training around his already hectic schedule, he said he adhered to his own company policy of working a six-hour day and devoting the rest of the time to personal projects.
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
President Trump Apologizes to Kavanaugh, Says Judge Was 'Proven Innocent'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He says that "under historic scrutiny," Kavanaugh was "proven innocent"
Why This Town Is Rebuilding One Year After a Destructive Wildfire—Knowing Another Fire Will Likely Come
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"It’s not a question of if the fires come again — but rather when the fires come again"
The U.N.'s Climate Report Exposes How Badly Wrong Leaders Like Trump Have Got Climate Change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Agreement was politically short-sighted, and scientifically wrong"
The nearly five decades of Nobel Prize
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Since the early 1970s, William Nordhaus has been studying climate change and its economic impact. Yesterday, the Yale University professor won the Nobel Prize in economics (jointly with NYU’s Paul Romer) for his decades of work, especially the efforts that led to a model used widely to understand the effects of climate change and energy-…
Hubble in trouble: space telescope out of action as gyroscope fails
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Hubble Space Telescope has been put out of action by a gyroscope problem. Nasa announced Monday that one of Hubble’s gyroscopes failed last Friday. As a result, the telescope is in so-called safe mode with non-essential systems turned off. That means all science observations are on hold. Rachel Osten, Hubble's deputy mission head at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, said: "It’s true. Very stressful weekend. Right now HST is in safe mode while we figure out what to do. "Another gyro failed. First step is try to bring back the last gyro, which had been off, and is being problematic. We’ll work through the issues and be back." Nasa said mission controllers are working to restore the 28-year-old telescope. An image of Saturn taken by Hubble Credit: AP In a statement the space agency said: "Mission experts are taking steps to return Hubble to great science." Gyroscopes are needed to keep Hubble pointed in the right direction during observations. Astronomers use the orbiting observatory to peer deep into the cosmos, revealing faraway solar systems as well as galaxies and black holes. Launched in 1990, Hubble has had trouble with its gyroscopes before. Spacewalking shuttle astronauts replaced all six in 2009. The telescope could work with as few as one or two gyroscopes, although that leaves little room for additional breakdowns. The problem with Hubble comes after Nasa's Opportunity Mars rover went silent on June 10 following a dust storm on the red planet.
Cook looks to lead
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tyler Cook is back for his junior year and at the top of his list is to grow as a leader in the Iowa program.
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
Don’t Let the Battle Over Kavanaugh Overshadow the Nobel Peace Prize’s Recognition of Sexual Violence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There's still a lot of work to be done, but it's a milestone worth celebrating
Here's What Humanity Must Do Immediately to Prevent Catastrophic Climate Change, According to the New U.N. Report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Reducing carbon emissions by 45% by 2030 is just the beginning
New York Limo Crash: Driver Didn't Have Appropriate License
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New York Limo Crash: Driver Didn't Have Appropriate License
Indonesia expert warned of quake, gov't mapped risk areas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PETOBO, Indonesia (AP) — When the violent shaking from a massive magnitude 7.5 earthquake finally stopped, Selvi Susanti stood up and realized something strange was happening.
President Trump Says He's 'Concerned' About Missing Saudi Journalist Jamal Khashoggi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I am concerned about it. I don't like hearing about it," President Donald Trump told reporters
Owner of Limo That Crashed and Killed 20 May Be in Pakistan, Officials Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Investigators believe he is outside of the U.S.
Finding resolution when justice is unlikely during #MeToo, The Vatican does the math in China, Russia struggles to control Syria narrative, Balancing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It’s hard to describe how it feels to be a woman living through the #MeToo era,” writes Nesrine Malik. “Not at the centre of anything, but reflecting on your personal experiences.... For me and many of the women around me, the Brett Kavanaugh case in the US has triggered some unexpectedly profound emotions.... To walk into a world ... where the accused man has the US president on his side and take a swing, you had better not miss. “[T]he Vatican has long resisted Beijing’s appointment of bishops.
'Father of climate change economics' and former World Bank chief economist win Nobel prize
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The economists Paul Romer and William Nordhaus have been awarded 2018's Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The two men were awarded the prize for their roles in changes to long-term economic forecasting. Romer was awarded for his work on the integration of technological change into forecasting, while Nordhaus received the prize for looking at climate change in economic modeling.
Google Stocks Plummet After Report Company Failed to Notify Users About Security Flaw in Google+
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Google chose not to disclose the flaw due to concerns for regulatory backlash
SpaceX is launching an Argentine satellite today
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX is set to launch its seventeenth mission of the year tonight to put an Argentine satellite into orbit. The satellite, called SAOCOM 1A, will be operated by Argentina’s space agency, CONAE, and use radar sensors to track soil moisture and other indicators that help farmers decide when to plan and irrigate crops, predict pestilence,…
Former Trump Aide Hope Hicks Lands Job as Communications Director for Fox
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump’s former communications chief Hope Hicks has been hired as communications director at the newly revamped Fox company.
US bans new mining claims on public land near Yellowstone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke approved a 20-year ban on new mining claims in the towering mountains north of Yellowstone National Park on Monday, after two proposed gold mines raised concerns that an area drawing tourists from the around the globe could be spoiled. As Zinke signed the mineral ban at an outdoor ceremony in Montana's Paradise Valley, a bank of clouds behind him broke apart to reveal the snow-covered flank of Emigrant Peak. The former Montana congressman was joined by local business owners and residents who pushed for the ban after companies began drafting plans for new mines in an area frequented by wolves, elk, bears and other wildlife.
Nordhaus, Romer Win Nobel for Thinking on Climate, Innovation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The two Americans “have designed methods for addressing some of our time’s most basic and pressing questions about how we create long-term sustained and sustainable economic growth,” the Royal Swedish Academy said on Monday. Nordhaus, 77, began working on environmental issues in the early 1970s as part of an effort to put an economic costs on global warming.
'There Is a Risk to Democracy.' Brazil Wakes Up to the Reality of a Bolsonaro Presidency
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“It is important for the establishment to hear this message”
Limo That Crashed and Killed 20 People Failed State Inspection Last Month, Governor Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cuomo said the company, Prestige Limousine, 'has a lot to answer for'
UN report on global warming carries life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet, an international panel of scientists reported Sunday. But they provide little hope the world will rise to the challenge.
At White House ceremony, Trump says Kavanaugh was 'proven innocent'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president uses an unusually partisan tone as he presides over a ceremonial swearing in of the Supreme Court's newest justice.