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Canada glacier melt rerouted in rare case of 'river piracy'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study documents the first modern case of 'river piracy.'
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
PicoBrew just added a PicoStill to its latest Kickstarter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PicoBrew's latest Kickstarter project, Pico Model C, is already way past its funding goal. The countertop brewing machine is a cheaper, smaller, easier-to-use version of earlier models, and 1,000,000 Kickstarter bucks say this is what the people want. Now, in a surprise addition to the existing Kickstarter, PicoBrew is offering a PicoStill, which can be purchased in a bundle with the Pico C, or separately (via TechCrunch).
Wearable sweat sensor could help diagnose disease
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An ultra-sensitive, wearable sweat sensor may improve diagnosis and treatment of cystic fibrosis, diabetes and other conditions, researchers said Monday. "This is a huge step forward," said co-author Carlos Milla, associate professor of pediatrics at Stanford University. The wearable device, designed in collaboration with researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, contains flexible sensors and microprocessors that stick to the skin and stimulate sweat glands.
'River piracy' is the latest weird thing to come out of climate change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A pirate is lurking in northern Canada, and global warming is only making it stronger. The Alsek River recently stole water flowing into the Slims River and took it for itself, a phenomenon known as "river piracy" — which scientists blame on a massive retreating glacier distributing water in new ways.  The development is the first known case of river piracy in the modern era, and it's the first to be pinned in part on climate change, researchers wrote in a study published Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience.  It also points to an unexpected consequence of human-caused global warming, which is melting the planet's polar caps at an unprecedented rate. SEE ALSO: NASA photos capture a strange new crack in a massive Greenland glacier and we might be doomed "So far, a lot of the scientific work surrounding glaciers and climate change has been focused on sea-level rise," Dan Shugar, the study's lead author and a geoscientist at the University of Washington, Tacoma, said in a news release. "Our study shows there may be other under-appreciated, unanticipated effects of glacial retreat." A Sept. 2, 2016, photo shows the meltwater stream along the toe of Kaskawulsh Glacier, on the left, that is diverting fresh water from one river to the other.Image: Dan Shugar/University of Washington TacomaThe river piracy began at the edge of the massive Kaskawulsh Glacier, which spans some 15,000 square miles across Canada's Yukon territory. For hundreds of years, the glacier poured meltwater into river basins of the Slims, which ends in the Bering Sea, and the Kaskawulsh, which empties into the Gulf of Alaska.   Researchers found that a new, 100-foot canyon in the glacier's toe had abruptly rerouted meltwater away from a glacial lake that feeds the Slims River and instead delivered that water to the Kaskawulsh River, which feeds the Alsek River. As a result, the Alsek River — a popular whitewater rafting destination — ran higher than normal last summer, bloated with stolen water. The Slims River, meanwhile, was rapidly reduced to a trickle. Kluane Lake, which is fed by the river, was so low that residents struggled to launch their boats. Dust swirled in the parched valley, making it hard to fly on certain days, Yukon News reported at the time. Satellite images in 2015 and 2016 show a dramatic drop in the Slims River's flow. The receding toe of Kaskawulsh Glacier is seen at the bottom. Kluane Lake isseen at the top of the 2016 image.Image: European space agencyShugar and his co-authors, including Jim Best at the University of Illinois and John Clague at Canada's Simon Fraser University, had originally planned to study the Slims River in August 2016. Instead, they found "a long, skinny lake," Shugar said. Gauges showed that the river, once 10 feet deep, had dropped suddenly from May 26 to 29, not long after the canyon was formed in the glacier. "Day by day we could see the water level dropping," he said. Scientists said there are two main reasons why the Kaskawulsh Glacier has retreated by about mile over the last century. After expanding during a cold period centuries ago, known as the Little Ice Age, the glacier is naturally readjusting its size in these warmer times. But it's also melting in part because of greenhouse gases. The team found only a tiny probability — 0.5 percent — that the glacier's retreat could have happened in a "constant climate," meaning there's a 99.5 percent probability that the glacier is responding to modern climate change. The ice fields of Ellesmere Island, Canada, are retreating due to warming temperatures.Image: Mario Tama/Getty Images"I always point out to climate-change skeptics that Earth's glaciers are becoming markedly smaller, and that can only happen in a warming climate," Clague, one of the co-authors, said in the news release. Canadian scientists who observed this river piracy last year were more ambivalent about the role of human-driven global warming in the glacier's retreat. "Would this particular event have happened without anthropogenic climate change? Probably," Kristen Kennedy, a geologist with the Yukon Geological Survey, told the Yukon News in June 2016.  "It's neat to see. It's really just an interesting natural phenomenon that's happening right before our eyes, and not very many people get to see something like this," she said. But outside scientists praised Monday's study and said it was significant. Richard Alley, a glacier expert at Pennsylvania State University who wasn't part of the study, told the Associated Press that the findings reconfirm "that climate change has large, widespread and sometimes surprising impacts." WATCH: NASA timelapse shows just how quickly our Arctic sea ice is disappearing
California utility launches first hybrid power systems
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NORWALK, Calif. (AP) — A California utility has launched unique systems combining a hybrid battery and gas turbine to produce and store electricity for use during hot summer months and other times when power demand soars.
Correction: Dino Discovery story
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MOAB, Utah (AP) — In a story April 14 about a newly named dinosaur, The Associated Press erroneously attached photos from a different fossil dig in Utah. The photos have been removed.
Watch what happens when you put a drone though 1 million
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Drones are fair-weather friends, according to this lightning machine and a group of researchers. But this is a video you will want to see for yourself. Try not to cringe when you see what happens to the "protected" drone.
Interactive map: Where weed is legal in the U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Twenty-eight states and the District of Columbia have now legalized medical marijuana. And eight states — including Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Alaska — plus D.C. have passed laws legalizing recreational marijuana.
White House says Trump won’t release his 2016 taxes, either
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Monday afternoon that President Trump does not plan to release his 2016 tax returns.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
12 Fights You're Not Having But Should
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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13 Things You Didn't Know About Ivanka Trump as a Mom
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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When Your Seasonal Allergy Symptoms Aren't Allergies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
April showers bring May flowers—and for many people, congestion, sneezing, and itchy, watery eyes. But sometimes those seasonal allergy symptoms, even in the spring, don’t stem from plant and tre...
The Important Reason Tess Holliday Posted This Old Breastfeeding Photo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It's from "a dark time."
You Will Never Guess What Song Calms This Crying Baby Down
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Spoiler alert: It's not exactly a lullaby.
Chrissy Teigen Wants to Remind Everyone That Not Every Woman Wants to Be a Mother
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"I don't think any of us should assume all women's goals are to have kids."
A Definitive Timeline of Kim Kardashian's Pregnancy Journey, In Her Own Words
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"I was waiting for this amazing experience where I can just do whatever I want, eat whatever I want, feel great...and it hasn't been that way."
Stop Praising TV Dads for Doing the Bare Minimum
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The bar is set so low for fathers that they're literally celebrated just for showing up.
This Is Where George and Amal Clooney Want to Raise Their Twins
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The jet-setting couple has one city in mind.
This Woman Was Supposed to Die from Cancer, But Now She Has 3 Kids
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"It didn't look good," Ashley Hallford said.
Carrie Underwood Says You 'Just Make Room' for Family Time When You're a Working Mom
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"Our whole life has changed," according to the singer.
Two unconventional tools help researchers detect buried land mines
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A team of researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have developed an innovative method for detecting buried land mines, and it combines two unconventional tools: lasers and fluorescent bacteria.
An Interview With Behavioral Economist Dan Ariely
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We talk to Dan Ariely about investing, information overload, and more.
Women's Periods Don't Really Sync Up When They Live Together
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Women's periods don't actually synchronize if they live together, according to a new study from a period- tracking app. For example, if two women have cycles that are 28 days long, the maximum they could be out of sync would be 14 days, Strassmann wrote in a 1999 opinion paper on the topic published in the journal Human Reproduction.
NASA providing 1st live 360
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA providing 1st live 360-degree view of rocket launch
Trump family kicks off White House Easter Egg Roll
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“This is the 139th easter egg roll. Think of it, 139,” Trump said from the balcony overlooking the south grounds of the executive mansion. “We will be stronger and bigger and better as a nation than ever before,” said Trump, before wishing the crowd a happy Easter under overcast skies in Washington.
YouTube channel showing giraffe birth 2nd most live
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
The long-awaited arrival of April the giraffe's baby in upstate New York has made Animal Adventure Park the second most live-viewed channel in YouTube's history. YouTube says April's livestream had more ...
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
7 Ways Inflammation Affects Your Body
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
You may be well-informed about health conditions linked to inflammation, what exactly is the deal with it? Watch this video to learn more how inflammation affects your body.
Loud and Rosy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new species of pistol shrimp — small, burrowing crustaceans with one oversize claw — doesn't live on the dark side of the moon, nor is it a lost soul swimming in a fishbowl. Nevertheless, the researchers who described the shrimp proposed a name for the new species that is inspired by moody British rockers Pink Floyd, who just happened to be the scientists' favorite band. If Synalpheus pinkfloydi had adorned the cover of Pink Floyd's 1977 album "Animals," rather than the famous dirigible pig.
Searching the Skies for Alien Laser Beams
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study scanned 5,600 stars for tiny emissions of light, which may be the best way for an extraterrestrial civilization to signal its existence.
Elon Musk's New Brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the course of composing this paragraph, which is theoretically about Elon Musk, I've been thinking about neuroscience and about electrode arrays. That's what tech guru Elon Musk wants: neural implants that would connect to the human brain and merge the mind with a machine. As a first step, Musk recently launched a company called Neuralink Corp., which appears poised to join the medical device market for implants designed for injured or diseased brains.
Why Hidden 'Darknets' Are More Resilient to Attacks Than the Internet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Darknets are computer networks of hidden services. The most popular darknet, and the one that most people think of, is the Tor network. Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency originally developed the core principles of Tor in the 1990s.
New window screen treatments could capture 90 percent of air pollutants
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By creating screens with these pollutant-filtering nanofibers, residents of smoggy cities like New York, Beijing, and Shanghai may be able to find respite from their urban environments.
Touch Screens May Be Ruining Toddlers' Sleep
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Toddlers are fiddling more with tablets and smartphones during the day, and it's robbing them of sleep at night, a new study from England suggests. In the study, children ages 6 months to 3 years who spent more time playing with touch-screen devices during the day got less sleep overall and took longer to fall asleep, compared with the youngsters who used touch screens less frequently, the researchers found. The findings also showed that compared with the kids who used touch screens less frequently, the babies and small children who used touch screens more often slept more during the day but less at night, according to the study, published today (April 13) in the journal Scientific Reports.
New Discoveries About San Andreas Fault Afterslip Shed Light on Earthquake Risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have discovered that the San Andreas Fault in California continued to slip for up to 12 years after the magnitude 6 Parkfield earthquake that hit the state in 2004. How long this movement lasts varies widely depending on the fault system. In a study published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, geophysicist James Lienkaemper from the U.S. Geological Survey and Forrest McFarland of San Francisco State University, have now analyzed the Parkfield earthquake to create better afterslip forecasts for parts of the fault expected to rupture.
The Strange History of Anthrax Cases Tied to Men's Shaving Brushes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Old-fashioned shaving tools are getting trendy with younger men these days, but one such tool has an interesting history: Men's shaving brushes made from animal hair were linked with cases of anthrax around the time of World War I, according to a new report. The report describes several hundred cases of anthrax, which occurred from 1915 to 1924, were tied to shaving brushes, mainly among men in the U.S. military. Shaving brushes are small facial brushes that are used to apply shaving cream or soap.
Half a Million Easter Toys Recalled for Risk to Kids
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More than half a million Easter toys sold at Target are being recalled because the products pose a serious health risk if ingested. In a recall notice posted on Thursday (April 13), the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) said that if a child ingested one of the toys, the object could expand inside the child's body and potentially block the intestines. The recalled products have the following names: Hatch & Grow Easter Eggs, Easter Grow Toys and Hatch Your Own Dino.
Trump Easter Egg Roll kicks off with a golden flair
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump’s White House will host its first Easter Egg Roll on Monday, continuing a tradition dating back to as early as 1872.
Scene of Trump and giant bunny sends Twitter hopping
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Kicking off the annual White House Easter Egg Roll on Monday, President’s Trump welcomed a most distinguished dignitary: the Easter Bunny.
Trump targets Democrat Ossoff ahead of key Georgia election
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president is weighing in on the special House elections, accusing the media of downplaying last week’s Republican victory in Kansas while disparaging the Democrat leading the polls in Georgia.
Massive flooding turns a New York park into small lake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
STILLWATER, N.Y. (AP) — A park in upstate New York has been flooded by 1 million gallons of water and turned into a lake.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Instead of a wall, an open door: Why Ethiopia welcomes an enemy's refugees
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Yordanos and her two young children slipped safely across the Mereb riverbed between Eritrea and Ethiopia late one recent night, they thought the worst of their journey into exile was over. Yordanos and her children began to yell for help, their panicked calls fading into the solid darkness. In some regards, Ethiopia – and in particular this sliver of Ethiopia’s arid north – is the last place you might expect an Eritrean refugee like Yordanos to receive a warm welcome.
Melissa Etheridge: ‘I’d Much Rather Have a Smoke With My Grown Kids Than a Drink’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The singer has been smoking marijuana recreationally since 21 but didn’t learn of its medicinal benefits until years later when she was battling cancer.
From corn to cattle, gene editing is about to supercharge agriculture
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dubbed the "CRISPR Revolution," scientific advances in gene editing have huge potential that many experts think could help fortify our food system and feed an increasing global population that's threatened by climate change.
Learning to distinguish “fear” from “fear of fear” is key to leading a happy life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There’s one piece of advice that’s always stuck with me: “The only way to not be scared of being punched in the face is being punched in the face.” This is quite true, as I learned after receiving the first (and only) punch in my life. Late one night, I inadvertently bumped into someone outside…