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A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Life on Mars? Study Showing Martian Soil Kills Bacteria Dims Hopes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astrobiologists—researchers who search for microbial life elsewhere in the universe—have known for some time that the surface of Mars contains perchlorates, or salt minerals. On Earth, perchlorate is used to produce rocket fuel and fireworks. Perchlorate was initially discovered in the Martian soil in 2008, from samples collected by the Phoenix Mars Lander and analyzed on board the craft.
Three tonnes of ivory seized in Vietnam
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Vietnamese authorities have seized nearly three tonnes of ivory hidden among boxes of fruit, officials said Sunday, the latest haul to spotlight the country's key role in the global wildlife smuggling trade. Police in the central province of Thanh Hoa found 2.7 tonnes of tusks inside cartons on the back of a truck that was on its way to Hanoi, according to a report on their website. "This is the largest seizure of smuggled ivory ever in Thanh Hoa province," the report said.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
When And How To See The Full Buck Moon And Other Astronomical Events Happening This Month
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Don't miss the full moon for the month of July and other astronomical events happening this month.
Richard Branson Wants to Be in Space by Next Year on Virgin Galactic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Richard Branson wants to bring Virgin Galactic back to space by the end of the year, and he hopes to fly to space himself by the middle of 2018.In an interview with Bloomberg, Branson said that powered tests of Virgin Galactic’s spacecraft will begin this fall, with new tests every three weeks. By November or December, he hopes the rocket will be able to reach space. These tests will be the first powered runs since the company’s 2014 crash that killed the spaceship's pilot.If all goes according to plan, by mid-2018 Richard Branson himself will be on board a test flight.Commercial flights are expected to begin towards the end of next year. Tickets to space aboard Virgin Galactic cost $250,000. At least 500 people have reportedly already bought their tickets, including Stephen Hawking, Ashton Kutcher, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Justin Bieber. The 2.5-hour experience will include six minutes of weightlessness.Virgin Galactic is in a space race with SpaceX, owned by Elon Musk, and Blue Origin, owned by Jeff Bezos. However, Branson said he believes there is enough room in the market for all three companies to compete.“There is definitely the demand for all three,” Branson told Bloomberg. “We can take off at 24-hour’s notice, put a couple of satellites up and come back again. With ground-based rockets, there’s quite a long waiting time. Elon has bigger rockets, so he has advantages there.”Branson’s announcement came on the same day that SpaceX successfully launched its 10th rocket of the year. Last week, the company sent 11 communication satellites to space.
'Charming' Heavy Particle Discovered at World's Largest Atom Smasher
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The discovery of the particle, which is made up of two so-called charm quarks, validates the predictions of the Standard Model, the current reigning model of particle physics. The new particle was discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 16-mile-long (27 kilometers) underground ring near Geneva, Switzerland, where protons zoom at near light-speed before smashing into each other. The most famous baryons are protons and neutrons, which make up everyday matter.
In NASA speech, Mike Pence shoots for the Moon (and Mars)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Taking a break from touching pieces of sophisticated technology labeled "do not touch" in a Kennedy Center clean room, Vice President Mike Pence made a speech to NASA yesterday that further signaled the Trump administration's apparent enthusiasm toward space exploration.The one where Vice President Mike Pence visits the Orion clean room...
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Orphan Black Recap: The Clinical and the Humane
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
P.T. Westmoreland will stop at nothing to achieve everlasting life.
This Is What The Ideal Genetically Modified Baby Looks Like In Europe And America
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A blue eyed, blonde-haired baby girl was the ideal child for most European parents.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Trump offers bold space goals but fills in few details
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The White House has championed a new era of US leadership in space, but its aspirations are complicated by tight budgets, vacancies in top posts and the rising role of private industry in aerospace innovation, experts say. "'Moon' could mean anything -- commercial, robotic, international or otherwise," said Phil Larson, a White House space adviser under president Barack Obama and formerly an official with privately owned SpaceX.
G20 summit shows Trump took U.S. from first to worst on climate change in under a year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At the 2016 G-20 summit, in Hangzhou, China, world leaders united in a common determination to implement the Paris Climate Agreement before the end of the year.  The U.S., led by then-President Barack Obama, was a key player in rounding up support for the agreement. It was difficult to imagine then that the U.S. would ever turn away from this agreement, widely regarded as the world's last, best chance to rein in global warming, that it had worked so hard to forge. Then President Donald Trump came along.  Fast forward one year later, and the U.S., now under President Donald Trump, has become such a pariah on climate change that leaders of 19 of the 20 largest economies in the world signed onto a climate and energy agenda that demotes the U.S. to a mere footprint — literally — on one of its pages.  SEE ALSO: How clean energy is transforming the world, in 5 charts In addition, America's major contribution to the climate change portion of the G-20's summary document, known as the G-20 communiqué, was to call for helping countries more easily obtain fossil fuels, such as coal and oil, whose use is causing global warming in the first place. The G-20 communiqué issued Saturday by all the leaders struck a compromise that German Chancellor Angela Merkel had sought, by declaring that "the Paris Agreement is irreversible" while taking note of Trump's widely criticized June 1 decision to withdraw from the agreement.  The communiqué, which also addresses a host of other contentious issues including trade, lays bare the stark divide that has opened up between the U.S. and the rest of the world when it comes to climate and energy priorities.  Take this language the U.S. inserted into the document: "The United States of America states it will endeavor to work closely with other countries to help them access and use fossil fuels more cleanly and efficiently and help deploy renewable and other clean energy sources..." In other words, let's ship countries more oil and gas to burn, and also some renewable energy too. Meanwhile, the climate and energy action plan discusses the need to devise plans to make deep cuts to greenhouse gases by the middle of this century, something climate scientists say is necessary in order to avert the worst consequences of global warming, but which the Trump administration is not devoting any time or resources to thinking about.  “The direction of travel toward clean energy is loud and clear. The question remains how quickly the world will surge forward and how far behind the Trump administration will let the United States fall,” said Andrew Steer, president and CEO of the World Resources Institute, in light of the communiqué and the climate and energy action plan. Leaders of environmental groups praised the heads of the 19 nations that stood up to Trump on climate change.  “The other 19 leaders of the world’s largest economies stood shoulder to shoulder in unified support for the Paris Agreement," said Sierra Club executive director Michael Brune, in a statement.  "Given the choice between following Trump or standing strong for climate action, not a single world leader decided to back him," Brune said. "That’s unprecedented, and it shows how deeply unpopular and misguided Trump’s attack on the Paris Agreement has been, and how much damage it has done to U.S. credibility and standing in the world." WATCH: Trump is getting crushed at his own handshake game
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Shepherds mauled in Romania bear attack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Two shepherds were seriously injured in a bear attack Saturday in Romania's remote Carpathian mountains, reigniting debate over a government decision to suspend an annual culling programme. Romania is home to around 60 percent of Europe's brown bears -- some 6,000, a quarter of which roam the mountains around Harghita. There have been seven bear attacks there in 2017 alone, prompting anger among locals.
Extreme Sea Levels Could Occur More Frequently Than Scientists Previously Predicted
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
High tides, storm surges, and waves. (Oh my.)
Congress Could Be Launching a New Branch of the Military... Into Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Congress is proposing a "Space Corps" that would potentially fight in space and protect U.S. assets in orbit.
Bus hops curb, dislodges war memorial cannon in Pittsburgh
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PITTSBURGH (AP) — Authorities say a bus hopped a curb and dislodged a war memorial cannon at a parklet in Pittsburgh.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Bananas: Scientists Create Vitamin A
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists in Australia have created golden-orange-fleshed bananas rich in pro-vitamin A that could save the lives of hundreds of thousands of children who die from a deficiency of this vitamin every year. Researchers from Queensland University of Technology have been developing the bananas over the last 10 years thanks to $7.6 million funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. In the study, the team presented results from their proof of concept field trial in Australia, in which they had aimed to achieve a specific level of provitamin A within the fruits produced.
Electrified Droplets Create Mini Saturn Planets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By electrifying tiny drops of fluid, scientists have created miniature versions of the ringed planet Saturn. When a drop of electrically conductive liquid is exposed to an electric field, the droplet responds by forming two electrically charged poles. Previous research has shown that these poles can get pulled toward the sources of the electric field, taking on cone shapes.
Mars Is Even Less Hospitable Than We Thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New research shows the unique cocktail of Martian surface chemicals is extremely deadly to bacteria.
How we discovered that brain connections shape memories
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Neuroscientists have struggled to explain whether certain types of memory involve distinct parts of the brain. Now a study suggests it's mainly down to pathways in the brain's white matter.
Thai police say they made progress in ivory trade crackdown
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BANGKOK (AP) — Efforts by Thailand's government to curb sales of ivory have been successful following criticism of widespread trafficking in the country, police and conservationists said.
Rivers do not have same rights as humans: India's top court
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
India's sacred Ganges and Yamuna rivers cannot be considered "living entities", the country's top court ruled Friday, suspending an earlier order that granted them the same legal rights as humans. The Supreme Court stayed a March order by a lower body that recognised the Ganges and its tributary the Yamuna as "legal persons" in an attempt to protect the highly polluted rivers from further degradation. Petitioner Mohammad Saleem, on whose plea the Uttrakhand High Court bestowed the legal rights to the water bodies, will have the opportunity to appeal the ruling by a bench headed by chief justice J S Khehar.
Driving under the influence in car powered by whisky biofuel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Mark Hanrahan LONDON (Reuters) - Alcohol and automobiles famously do not mix - but one Scottish scientist has disproved that maxim by driving a car powered by biofuel derived from making whisky. Edinburgh-based Celtic Renewables has developed a process to manufacture the biofuel biobutanol from draff and pot ale - barley kernels and a yeasty liquid that are produced when whisky is made and then usually thrown away. Martin Tangney, the president of Celtic Renewables and director of Edinburgh Napier University's Biofuel Research Centre, said that a desire to effectively manage resources had inspired him to pursue the project.
Parasitic Worm in Walrus Meat Infects 10 People in Alaska
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ten people in Alaska were recently infected with what is now a relatively rare parasitic worm that they got from eating walrus meat, according to a new report. All 10 were infected with a parasitic worm called Trichinella, that they likely got from eating undercooked walrus meat. The worm causes an illness called trichinellosis, and people with it may have a range of symptoms, including nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, fatigue and fever, as well as swelling of the face and eyes, aching joints and muscle pains, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
The Latest: French leader hopes to persuade Trump on climate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Latest on the Group of 20 summit (all times local): 6:40 p.m. French President Emmanuel Macron says he harbors the hope of convincing President Donald Trump to bring the United States back into the ...
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg share this trait—and it makes complete sense
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CEOs Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk share a trait that's helped them to succeed, according to data from IBM.
The latest Republican conspiracy theory about environmental groups is a doozy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
House Science Committee Chairman Lamar Smith thinks that the Russian government is funding environmental groups in return for their activities to hinder U.S. oil and gas production.  A six-page letter sent by Smith and another Republican lawmaker on June 29, asks Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin to launch an investigation into "what appears to be a concerted effort by foreign entities to funnel millions of dollars through various non-profit entities to influence the U.S. energy market." The letter was revealed in a Friday press release from the Science Committee. The Russians' goal, Smith and Rep. Randy Weber of Texas wrote, is to prop up their domestic oil and gas industry by stymying the hydraulic fracturing, known as fracking, for oil and gas resources in the U.S.  SEE ALSO: Summer's here: Time for people to get weird about sleeveless dresses in Congress The natural gas boom in the U.S. has driven prices down and diminished Russia's role in the global energy market. The Trump administration is moving quickly to shelve regulations on oil and gas producers that could interfere with their efforts to take advantage of natural resources, regardless of the environmental and public health consequences.  .@LamarSmithTX21, @TXRandy14 sent @USTreasury a letter re Russian attempts to influence US energy market. READ HERE: https://t.co/vaFna8zzDb pic.twitter.com/Sn03z8O2Uk — Sci,Space,&Tech Cmte (@HouseScience) July 7, 2017 The administration is also moving to increase U.S. oil and gas exports, which would compete with Russian exports to Europe in particular.  The letter alleges that the Russian government has been funneling money through Bermuda-based shell companies to environmental groups. Those groups are fighting for restrictions to oil and gas exploration activities.  The letter cites news reports in conservative publications, including this story in the Washington Free Beacon, and points to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's emails released by Wikileaks, among other sources, as evidence of Russia's interest in bankrolling environmental groups in the U.S. However, the Free Beacon story, along with several others, were based on research done by a PR front group, known as the Environmental Policy Alliance, with a record of ties to the energy industry. This raises the question of whether Smith is using the alleged Russian activities as cover to go after environmental groups, who are no friend of his.  Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, in the Capitol on Sept. 7, 2016.Image: CQ Roll Call via AP ImagesThe Sierra Club, which is one of the groups named in the letter as receiving Russian funding, pushed back strongly against the allegations.  "It is pathetic that Congressional Republicans are making absurd and false smears dreamed up by deceitful front groups doing the dirty work for big polluters and big tobacco," said Melinda Pierce, the group's legislative director. "If Congressional Republicans are so concerned about Russian influence, they should start seriously investigating that country's interference in our election, not attacking long-standing environmental organizations," she said in a statement.  "The Sierra Club’s staff, donors, and our 3 million members and supporters have been fighting for clean energy and climate action to protect the health of our communities for decades, because it is what our planet requires and what our families deserve. That’s not just key to our organization’s historic mission, it’s what huge majorities of Americans across the country support.”  Since his chairmanship began in 2013, Rep. Smith has turned the Science panel, which was one of the last bastions of bipartisanship in Congress, into a committee that regularly plays host to climate deniers and critics of the science research conducted at federal agencies. In particular, Smith has been a harsh critic of the Environmental Protection Agency and climate research at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). WATCH: It's official, 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Scientists Are Fighting over Whether Monkeys Could Ever Talk like Humans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Updated | The question of whether monkeys could ever talk like humans has been debated in scientific circles since the 1950s and now scientists from the U.S., Austria and Belgium claimed to have the answer—yes, physically they could, but they lack the cognitive abilities to do so. The study, published in Science Advances, analyzed the vocal tracts of monkeys by taking X-ray videos and tracking the movements used to grunt, as well as observing their faces, tongues and larynxes to see how they used them to make sounds. Anatomically, the team, led by Tecumseh Fitch, found monkeys made sounds in a similar way to humans.
Gianni Versace is murdered in front of his Miami Beach mansion: Part 4
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Andrew Cunanan disappeared after he shot and killed the Italian fashion designer in front of his mansion.
UNESCO declares China's Hoh Xil nature reserve a heritage site
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
UNESCO on Friday declared the Hoh Xil nature reserve in China's Qinghai Province a natural heritage site in a controversial decision challenged by pro-Tibet activists. The Hoh Xil nature reserve, located on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, is home to over 200 animal species. More than 20 of them are state-protected, including the Tibetan antelope.
Groom arrested over New York backyard wedding fireworks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MASSAPEQUA, N.Y. (AP) — Guests watching a fireworks display after a New York wedding were cheering the bride, groom and booms when police arrived. The groom ended up under arrest.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
5 Smart Summer Skin Savers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
During the warmer months, most of us spend more time exposed to the elements—and to a variety of summer-related troublemakers. “Warmer temperatures, prolonged sun and heat exposure, the increased...
Hedge Funds, Big Data And Tail Risk – The Millennium Bridge Example
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Markets are not governed by an unalterable rationality; rather they reflect the humanity of their participants. 
The manhunt for Gianni Versace's killer ends on a houseboat: Part 5
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Eight days after Versace's murder, police found Andrew Cunanan on a houseboat after he had shot himself in the head.
Gianni Versace, his killer may have met before his murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It has never been confirmed, but police say at least three witnesses claimed that Cunanan and Versace crossed paths in California.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Readers write: Breakfasts with Dad, Muslim coverage, ‘suburbia’s new face’ cover story, thoughtful investigation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Regarding the June 12 Home Forum essay, “Breakfasts that nourished my dreams”: This was an appropriate story for Father’s Day weekend. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? There’s an app for that”: I so appreciate the way the Monitor covers stories about the Muslim community, their culture, and beliefs.
Scientists are sending a probe to Mercury in an attempt to solve a mystery
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and even Uranus are getting lots of attention these days, with probes and rovers getting up close and personal with our planetary neighbors, but if we look in the other direction — towards the sun, rather than away from it — we find a planet that is just as interesting, and perhaps even more mysterious: Mercury. Now, a joint partnership between the European Space Agency and Japanese space program Jaxa will see a new probe launched to the tiny planet in the hopes of solving a very curious anomaly. The probe, called the BepiColombo, has a whole laundry list of things it aims to accomplish. The spacecraft will study Mercury's volcanos and also attempt to shed some light on the apparent existence of water ice on the planet. With a surface temperature that ranges between a boiling 800 degrees and a frigid -290 degrees Fahrenheit, Mercury is and extremely interesting place to study. Because of its hostile climate, it's been difficult to actually study the planet. Any spacecraft that hopes to actually get close enough to observe it needs to be extremely well suited to the intense heat of the sun at that distance, while also accounting for the glare that our star produces and its effects on cameras. But what's perhaps most interesting about Mercury and BepiColombo's mission is that it will attempt to answer a question that has puzzled researchers for some time: Mercury is shrinking. The most accepted hypothesis relates to the planet's core cooling, drawing in the crust which fractured as the planet shrank, but the probe will hopefully provide advanced maps of the surface and its cracks and determine how fast the planet is shrinking and provide insight into how the process actually works.
Scientists discover a way to extend a mouse’s memory while it sleeps
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers in Korea have discovered that the triggering of specific brain waves during sleep can almost double long-term memory. Although, sadly, it’s not available to humans just yet!
Gianni Versace, his killer may have met before his murder: Part 2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It has never been confirmed, but police say at least three witnesses claimed that Cunanan and Versace crossed paths in California.
'Oh my God, it is Obama': Alaska mom, baby meet ex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
An Alaska mother is cherishing cellphone photos she snapped of her wide-eyed 6-month-old baby in the arms of former President Barack Obama.
A bad election for Theresa May was good for democracy, Besides the snap election, what else cost the Tories?, Macron party’s primary victory is hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“It turned out to be a terrible June for [British Prime Minister Theresa] May, but perhaps for democracy, the Conservatives’ unexpected loss marks the beginning of a warm summer,” states an editorial. “Another round of mid-term elections cannot be ruled out, as May’s leadership of the Conservatives and the party’s proposed alliance with an Irish party with a theological bent are both shaky.... [T]he election result strongly proves popular disapproval of the kind of hard Brexit that May had been planning.... But the June elections did bring their share of good news. ASIDE FROM THERESA MAY’S SNAP ELECTION CALL, WHAT ELSE COST THE TORIES?
Praying Mantises Can Kill Birds and Eat Their Brains All Around the World
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Like all great assassins, praying mantises are patient. In all, 12 different types of mantises have been seen eating 24 types of birds, mostly hummingbirds. “The fact that eating of birds by praying mantises is so widespread, both taxonomically as well as geographically speaking, is a spectacular discovery,” says paper first author Martin Nyffeler, a zoologist at the University of Basel.