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The Best Joke George W. Bush Ever Told in Office
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Presidents can make fun of themselves
2,000 7
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The possible exposure affects customers who have consumed fresh fruit, self-serve drinks, any items from the hot foot case or used the restroom
Watch for Falling Iguanas! Bomb Cyclone Drops Frozen Lizards
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You know what they say: When it rains, it pours — and when it snows in Florida, it hails frozen iguanas. As a so-called bomb cyclone continues lashing the U.S. East Coast with historic cold temperatures, weird weather abounds. Photos posted on social media show the green reptiles lying belly-up and stock-still on lawns, seemingly dead.
US energy watchdog rejects plan to subsidize coal, nuclear sectors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The US energy watchdog terminated Monday a key proposal by President Donald Trump's administration to subsidize coal and nuclear plants, finding it neither justified nor reasonable. The decision by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) was handed down in a unanimous verdict by its five members, a majority of whom belong to the president's Republican Party. Energy Secretary Rick Perry had in September proposed providing federal aid to nuclear and coal power plants with at least 90 days' worth of production capacity, arguing the move was necessary to make the national grid more resilient in case of extreme events.
SpaceX says rocket performance OK in secret satellite launch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX is defending its rocket performance following the weekend launch of a secret U.S. satellite
Oprah and Trump go way, way back together. Here’s proof.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
If Winfrey runs, expect to see a continuous loop of clips from Trump’s numerous appearances on her daytime talk show — and never-ending analysis of Trump’s long public friendship with his fellow media billionaire, whom he once said would be his ideal running-mate.
Rome's mangy Christmas tree to be carved up into souvenirs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROME (AP) — Rome's pathetic Christmas tree, so droopy and dried out that residents nicknamed it "The Mangy One," will be carved up and turned into souvenirs and a lactation hut for mothers and babies, city officials said Tuesday.
North Korea’s Olympic challenge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When South Korea proposed last year that North Korea participate in next month’s Winter Olympics, it hoped to turn the event in its Taebaek Mountains into a “peace Olympics.” Sure enough, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un not only accepted the offer in a New Year’s speech, he agreed to hold talks – which took place for 10 hours on Jan. 9 –  with the aim to “defuse military tensions” between the two countries. A sampling of how the February Olympics might play out in Pyeongchang was seen last summer when North Korea’s top athletes for the Olympics, figure skating pair Ryom Tae-ok and Kim Ju-sik, trained in Canada alongside South Korean skaters for two months.
What to expect from CES 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The 'Cyber Guy' Kurt Knutsson looks at the good and bad.
Intel is building brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
During his keynote at CES 2018 Monday night, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich revealed two processors: one "Loihi" chip for neuromorphic computing, and Tangle Lake for quantum computing. Intel believes these areas are the future.
Human muscle tissue grown from stem cells: US study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Working human muscle has been grown from stem cells in the lab in a breakthrough that holds promise for sufferers of degenerative muscular diseases, scientists said on Tuesday. The team from Duke University in North Carolina said they were the first to achieve this feat using adult skin or blood cells which were "reprogrammed" into a juvenile, versatile state. Like naturally-occurring stem cells found in embryos, they can become any other type of human cell.
After a Two
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Olympics may provide an avenue for resurrecting dialogue
Mother Is Suspect in Family's Apparent Triple Murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The apparent murder-suicide happened at an upscale beachfront resort in Texas
Swiss police arrest 80
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BERLIN (AP) — Swiss authorities say they have apprehended an 80-year-old man on allegations he robbed a bank near the city of Lucerne.
Good Samaritans rescue moose calf trapped in snow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CROUSEVILLE, Maine (AP) — A group of concerned citizens in Maine saved a young moose trapped in the snow.
Speaking of America: 'An optimist who wears body armor'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Robert Lewis describes himself as “an optimist who wears body armor.” He has seen the need for both.
'Flagrantly Unconstitutional.' Fire and Fury Publisher Attacks Trump's Attempt to Block Book
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We will not allow any president to achieve by intimidation what our Constitution precludes him or her from achieving in court"
Physics: Spinning Protons Change Direction When They Collide With Larger Particles, ‘Shocking’ Scientists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Physicists studying atomic spin surprised themselves by discovering that spinning protons bizarrely change direction when they crash into larger particles, like the nuclei of gold atoms. On a pool table, you’d expect a left-spinning cue ball to deflect off to the right after it hits another ball. What the physicists observed would be the equivalent of a left-spinning cue ball acting normally when striking another billiards ball, but deflecting to the left—and way more forcefully—after striking a bowling ball, according to a press release from the Brookhaven National Laboratory.
Climate change turns one of the world's largest green sea turtle populations mostly female
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Climate change has been disastrous for coral on Australia's Great Barrier Reef.  It's also spelling trouble for the more than 200,000 green sea turtles which make the area home, one of the world's largest populations.  SEE ALSO: Weather and climate disasters cost the U.S. a record $306 billion in 2017 Researchers are seeing young populations in the Great Barrier Reef turn almost entirely female, according to a study published in Current Biology.   Unlike humans and most other mammals whose development of sex is determined by chromosomes, the sex of reptiles (such as turtles) is determined by an egg's incubation temperature.  Warmer temperatures results in a female being born, while cooler temperatures means males. For an exact number of female and males to be born, scientists refer to the pivotal temperature which sits at 29.3 degrees Celsius (84.74 degrees Fahrenheit) for the green sea turtle. But here's the thing: There's a range of only a few degrees separating the possibility of 100 percent males or females. Certainly a concern, as global warming continues. "This research is so important because it provides a new understanding of what these populations are dealing with," the paper's lead author and NOAA marine biologist, Michael Jensen, said in a statement. "Knowing what the sex ratios in the adult breeding population are today and what they might look like 5, 10 and 20 years from now when these young turtles grow up and become adults is going to be incredibly valuable." Image: WWF-AUSThere are two distinct populations of green sea turtles along the Great Barrier Reef. On warmer northern nesting beaches, researchers noted 99.1 percent of juveniles, 99.8 percent of subadults, and 86.8 percent of adults were female. Down in the cooler south, the population was 65 percent to 69 percent female. Left unchecked, the lack of males in future could be detrimental to green sea turtle populations. "First back-to-back mass coral bleaching and now we find that virtually no male northern green turtles are being born," WWF-Australia CEO Dermot O’Gorman said in a statement. "Finding that there are next to no males among young northern green turtles should ring alarm bells, but all is not lost for this important population. Scientists and wildlife managers now know what they are facing and can come up with practical ways to help the turtles." In the case of the endangered loggerhead turtle, Queensland's Department of Environment have experimented with shade cloths help keep nests cool and produce more males. Ultimately, as O'Gorman notes, more needs to be done to achieve ambitious climate change targets — something much of the world is proving to be not good at committing to, so far. WATCH: This robot can plow the snow for you
Robert Mueller Is Interested in Interviewing President Trump as Part of the Russia Probe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
No details have been worked out if the interview were to take place
Lawsuit: Google discriminates against white conservative men
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ex-employee James Damore files lawsuit after being fired; William La Jeunesse has the latest details on the case.
Pizza Hut Plan To Bring 'Black Mirror' Prediction To Life Freaks Folks Out
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pizza Hut plans to turn a slice of the dystopian “Black Mirror” universe into a reality, and it’s too much for some folks online to handle.
Explosion risk for oil tanker ablaze off China: authorities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An Iranian oil tanker ablaze off China's east coast was at risk of exploding or sinking on Monday, as fears grew for 32 missing sailors amid warnings of a potential environmental disaster. The huge fire was still raging Monday morning around the stricken vessel, which had been carrying 136,000 tonnes of light crude oil, some 36 hours after it collided with a cargo ship. Earlier the transport ministry said rescuers trying to locate the crew of 30 Iranians and two Bangladeshis were being beaten back by toxic clouds.
Salvadorans Fear Their Country Is Not Prepared for Return
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Under President Donald Trump, nearly 200,000 may be forced to return
4 Dead in Apparent Beach Hotel Murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The apparent murder-suicide happened at an upscale beachfront resort in Texas
Oprah 'intrigued' by presidential run, Gayle King says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“I don’t think she’s actively considering it at this time,” King said on “CBS This Morning.” “I do think she’s intrigued by the idea.”
Maine whale biologist says whale protected her from shark
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BRUNSWICK, Maine (AP) — A marine biologist believes a humpback whale shielded her from a 15-foot tiger shark in the South Pacific.
The Internet Loved Natalie Portman's Scathing Mic Drop at the Golden Globes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
While presenting the nominees for Best Director at the Golden Globes, Natalie Portman drove home the evening's theme with a sharp rebuke.
NASA astronaut John Young, who flew first Space Shuttle mission, dies at 87
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA astronaut John Young, who flew the agency's first Space Shuttle mission and walked on the surface of the Moon, has died. He was 87.
With Bannon exiled by Trump, what happens to the candidates he backed?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Steve Bannon hoped to parlay Trump’s victory in 2016 into a nationwide insurgency against the Republican establishment, backing a slate of primary challengers to sitting senators. But his guerrilla campaign lost a crucial battle in Alabama, and now seems to have collapsed entirely, as Trump has disavowed him in the wake of the “Fire and Fury” book. What happens now to the candidates he was backing?
Kansas Rep. Steve Alford Apologizes for Racist Comments Linking Black People to Marijuana
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alford had sad that African-Americans had a lower tolerance to the drug due to their "character makeup" and "genetics"
Scientists Identify What Genes Most Profoundly Shape Your Face
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Our faces look they way they do for an important reason.
Most sea turtles now female in north Great Barrier Reef
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The vast majority of green sea turtles in the northern Great Barrier Reef are now female because of warmer temperatures due to climate change, which influences their sex during incubation, researchers said Monday. "With average global temperature predicted to increase 4.7 Fahrenheit (2.6 Celsius) by 2100, many sea turtle populations are in danger of high egg mortality and female-only offspring production," said the report. Since figuring out the sex of buried eggs is too difficult, researchers decided to catch sea turtles and use genetic tests to find out where they'd come from.
200,000 Salvadorans Have Lived in the U.S. for Decades. The Trump Administration Says They Have to Leave
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trump administration will announce the end of TPS protection for nearly 200,000 migrants from El Salvador
Judge Drops Standoff Case Against Nevada Rancher Cliven Bundy and Sons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The ranchers were accused of leading an uprising against federal authorities
Did NASA’s Mars rover just find ancient Martian fossils?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you're one of the many casual science observers hoping that mankind will one day discover evidence that life once thrived on Mars, 2017 was a very, very exciting year for you. From derelict alien ships to cannonballs, NASA spotted lots of weird things on the Martian surface last year. It seems 2018 is going to continue the trend, and the Curiosity rover is starting the year strong with the discovery of some incredibly strange "stick-like figures" laying exposed on the planet's dusty surface. "Each is about a quarter-inch long," NASA explains on the official Twitter account of the Curiosity rover. "Maybe they're crystals? Or they could be minerals that filled spaces where crystals dissolved away. Stay tuned! Science continues." https://twitter.com/MarsCuriosity/status/948726639893991425 The odd whitish lines in the tan rock are reminiscent of fossils, and plenty of people both on Twitter and elsewhere are incredibly intrigued. Theories about what the lines represent range from ancient tire tracks or Martian dinosaur bones to "angel poop," but as usual there's a much more realistic explanation waiting to rain on the alien parade. At present, the most realistic explanation is that the odd lines are simply crystals that formed inside cracks in larger rocks. As erosion took its toll, the hardened crystals remained, withstanding the wind and dust slightly better than the surrounding rock. Today, the crystals stick out from the eroded rock, catching our eye and making us dream of alien worms. To help give viewers some context, NASA also tweeted out a wider shot of the same feature. As you can see in the surrounding rock, there doesn't appear to be any out of the ordinary about the area, and certainly nothing that would indicate a larger collection of "fossils" or remnants of past life. https://twitter.com/MarsCuriosity/status/948976462350069760 Realistically, the odds of finding signs of life on the surface of Mars are very low, and not just because recent research has suggested the planet may have always been hostile to life. Even if Mars was a lush green paradise filled with amazing life forms, that would have been hundreds of millions or even billions of years ago. On a timeline like that, erosion would have long since wiped the planet clean, leaving behind the cold, dusty rock that we see today. Deep underground, however, is another story.
How Oprah Could Beat Donald Trump at His Own Game in 2020
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From Twitter followers to magazines
John Young: Who Was Legendary Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA announced the death of pioneering astronaut John Young on January 6. A veteran space traveler, Young was the first astronaut to fly to space six times. John Young suits up for prelaunch test exercises.
Rudeness Wins: Bonobos Are Attracted to Creeps
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"You like me because I'm a scoundrel," interstellar smuggler Han Solo confidently told Princess Leia Organa in the 1981 film "The Empire Strikes Back." And scientists recently discovered a similar preference in bonobos, the great apes that are close relatives of chimpanzees. Bonobos (Pan paniscus) are helpful sweethearts compared with their more aggressive chimp cousins (Pan troglogytes). Prior research has shown that bonobos go out of their way to help others, even when their assistance hasn't been requested and they receive no reward for lending a hand.
Oprah's Powerful Golden Globes Speech Has the Internet Really, Really Wanting Her to Run for President
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Even Meryl Streep wants her to throw her hat in the ring
Teacher Fired After School Discovers His Ties to White Nationalist Richard Spencer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Greg Conte lost his job once it emerged he works for Richard Spencer
#MeToo Hits Norway: Top Politician Steps Down Amid Sexual Misconduct Allegations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trond Giske said he will step down as deputy leader of the Labor Party
Apple investors urge action against child gadget addiction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Two major Apple investors take tech giant to task about its role in curbing smartphone addiction among children as annual CES convention begins. #Tucker
Sen. Lindsey Graham: If President Trump Doesn't Call Himself a Genius 'Nobody Else Will'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But Graham immediately transitioned to highlighting President Trump's political accomplishments
Pi Delta Psi Fraternity Banned From Pennsylvania After 'Glass Ceiling' Hazing Death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Baruch College student Chun "Michael" Deng died in 2013
'We Can Destroy You Too.' Nikki Haley Denies President Trump Is Softening Stance on North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump recently suggested he would be open to talks with Pyongyang
Arizona high school put on lockdown as 4 bobcats are rescued
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ANTHEM, Ariz. (AP) — A high school north of Phoenix was put on lockdown for several hours as authorities rescued four bobcats from a drainage pipe.
Versace Calls American Crime Story Series on Gianni Versace Murder a ‘Work of Fiction’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The company said it did not authorize the series
Asteroid Mining Takes Its Next Baby Step to Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Arkyd-6 could pave the way towards mass production of small spacecraft to survey the Asteroid Belt for mineral riches.
'Pioneer' US astronaut John Young, dead at 87
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
John Young, a legendary US astronaut who went into space six times, orbited the moon and then walked on its craggy surface, has died, NASA announced Saturday. "NASA and the world have lost a pioneer," agency administrator Robert Lightfoot said in a statement. Young joined Gus Grissom on the Gemini 3 mission, then commanded Gemini 10, the first mission to rendezvous with two other spacecraft during a single flight.