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Our fossil finger discovery points to earlier human migration in Arabia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
How we found the oldest human fossil ever discovered outside Africa and the Levant.
A Tabloid's Claim That Buzz Aldrin Saw Aliens In Space Is Way Off
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A viral Daily Star article claimed NASA astronauts had passed lie detector tests when asked about the existence of aliens.
Monitors Say 14 People Were Killed in a Missile Strike on a Syrian Air Base
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.S. officials have denied launching airstrikes in Syria
Canadian Town Mourns 15 Killed in Youth Hockey Team Bus Crash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Friends, relatives and others gathered at the team's hockey arena to mourn
The Federal Deficit Will Hit $1 Trillion by 2020
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The CBO says tax cuts and spending increases signed by Trump don't boost economic growth
The first NASA spacecraft that will ‘touch the Sun’ is just about ready to launch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You probably don't think about it on a daily basis but the Sun is pretty darn important. Without it, we wouldn't be here, and our friendly little star has been powering life on our planet for a long, long time. NASA has studied it at a distance for a long time, but actually getting up close and personal with a giant volatile ball of incredibly hot plasma is a tricky thing. The Parker Solar Probe, named after scientist Eugene Parker, who first theorized the existence of solar wind, aims to be the first manmade tool to "touch the Sun," as NASA says, and it just reached a big milestone. Just days ago, the probe, which is slated to launch on July 31, 2018, made a midnight trip from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to the Joint Base Andrews, both located in Maryland, and was then flown to Florida to continue testing. Assuming all goes according to plan, final assembly of the spacecraft will take place at Astrotech Space Operations, and then it will await its fateful trip skyward. “Parker Solar Probe and the team received a smooth ride from the Air Force C-17 crew from the 436th,” Andy Driesman, the project manager of the Parker Solar Probe, explained in a statement. “This is the second most important flight Parker Solar Probe will make, and we’re excited to be safely in Florida and continuing pre-launch work on the spacecraft.” At the end of July, the probe will be launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida, and from there it will begin a seven-year mission to make observations of our star and hopefully answer some burning questions (pun maybe intended) that have perplexed scientists for decades. Ultimately, data gathered from the mission could help improve forecasting of space weather, which is still a rather inexact science. All told, the mission will cost $1.5 billion, and the probe will make 24 passes of the Sun as it orbits. At its nearest point, it will reach a distance of 3.9 million miles, at which point the temperatures it will be subjected to will be hot enough to melt steel. Thick carbon shielding will prevent the probe from being destroyed as it gathers its data, and hopefully delivers some neat images at the same time.
Cyber analyst: Facebook could face 'draconian' regulations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Morgan Wright, cybersecurity analyst and senior fellow at the Center for Digital Government, says the social network needs to get ahead of the curve on user privacy and fix its governance issues.
Why Is Jupiter's Great Red Spot Shrinking?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The most recognizable storm in the solar system used to be so big that it could fit three whole Earths. Now, it has room for only one.
Child Abuse Claims Could Be Key to Answering Mystery Question in California Cliff Crash: Why?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The family moved from Minnesota to Oregon to Washington as child welfare agencies and schools launched investigations
Out of Africa: 90,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers have directly dated the earliest-ever fossil from an anatomically modern human found outside of Africa and the Levant. This 90,000-year-old fossilized finger rewrites traditional theories of early migration, beating expectations by some 25,000 years. Homo sapiens, the team thinks, were exploring what was once the wet grassland of Saudi Arabia far earlier than previously thought. Humans may not have left Africa in one big wave, but in a series of trickles.
At Least 27 Children Dead After School Bus Skids Off Mountain in India
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three adults were also killed in the crash
President Trump Threatens to Strike Syria Over Chemical Weapons Attack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He called the deadly attack "heinous"
Why the number of new jobs for people with disabilities grew fourfold
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For years, Donald Minor says, he blamed a disability – a lack of muscle control in his arms and legs – for his unemployment. From there he found a job in customer service with Rails to Trails Conservancy in Washington, D.C., where he’s been for 2-1/2 years. “Employers need to give people with disabilities an opportunity,” says Mr. Minor.
In Syria, changing tack to match new realities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump wants to get the United States out of Syria. Over the weekend, the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad apparently unleashed an asphyxiating chemical attack on Douma, a rebel-held suburb of Damascus. “Big price to pay,” Mr. Trump tweeted on Sunday, threatening almost certain retaliation for an action that defiantly crossed a red line established a year ago, when the US ripple-fired cruise missiles at Syrian airfields in retaliation for a similar atrocity.
Teachers Are Learning New Skills: How to Stop Bleeding, Apply Tourniquets and Treat Gunshot Wounds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Learning to help and not just stand there is important"
Inside Sexual Harassment's Hidden Toll on Equal Pay
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From a woman who experienced it first hand
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle Are Asking for Donations to These Charities Instead of Wedding Gifts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They've selected a number of charities to receive donations
Elon Musk's next Hyperloop test will aim for half the speed of sound
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“This is kinda nutty for such a short distance,” says the billionaire tech titan.
FBI Solves Mystery of a 4,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The FBI became a “very unusual partner.”
The Wrong Family Was Told Their Son Was Dead in the Wake of a Horrific Hockey Team Bus Crash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Officials did not explain how the error occurred
Jail job applicant not hired, arrested instead in theft case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — A woman applying for a job at a New Hampshire county jail has been arrested because it turns out she was wanted on a charge in Maine.
In the Philippines, divided politics feed – and feed on – a divided web
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In this setting it’s hard to picture Esther Margaux Uson, known countrywide as “Mocha,” sashaying across a stage in vinyl hot pants or dispensing advice on sex and relationships. Then in 2015, she learned about Rodrigo Duterte. Take our geography quiz.
A chemical attack felt round the world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The latest chemical attack on civilians in Syria, which killed at least 49 people over the weekend, has evoked a rare response to the conflict from President Trump. As Mr. Trump and other world leaders now weigh a response, it is worth noting how much his words are an echo of the response to the Holocaust seven decades ago. Perhaps the best answer to the horrors of World War II was a document, adopted by almost every nation in 1948, called the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
Humanity's first space hotel set to open in 2021, will cost $792,000 per night
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Step inside the Aurora Space Station, the world's first hotel in space.
Elon Musk shows off manufacturing hardware for SpaceX's Mars rocket
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Musk shared a photo of the "main body tool" to weave the carbon fiber that will comprise the upper stage of the rocket.
Exercise Could Lower Your Chances of Getting Heart Disease Even if You’re Genetically at Risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This study is another good reason to hit the gym
A Global Arms Race for Killer Robots Is Transforming the Battlefield
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More than 20 countries have already called for a ban on autonomous weapons that could decide who to target and kill without human input
Apple Just Announced a New Red iPhone to Raise Money for HIV/AIDS Research
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A percentage of sales go to the Global Fund to fight HIV/AIDS
The evolutionary advantage of having eyebrows
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Having movable eyebrows – and evolving beyond the Neanderthal ridge – may have played a crucial role in early human survival.
Watch the Debut Trailer for Mercury 13, Netflix’s Documentary About the First American Women to Train for Space Travel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new film gives a group of pioneering women some long-overdue attention.
German physics Nobel laureate Peter Gruenberg dead at 78
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
German physicist Peter Gruenberg, a joint Nobel Prize winner whose work revolutionised digital data storage, has died aged 78, his research centre said Monday. Professor Gruenberg died last week, said a statement by the Research Centre Juelich near Cologne, mourning the loss of "an excellent researcher" and "well-respected and popular colleague". Gruenberg received the 2007 Nobel prize for physics, together with French scientist Albert Fert, after both had separately discovered so-called giant magnetoresistance (GMR) which led to a breakthrough in the development of gigabyte hard disks.
Why Increased Snowfall in Antarctica Is Actually a Bad Thing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In the past 200 years, there has been a 10 percent increase in the amount of snowfall in Antarctica, a new study published November 2017 revealed. The increase in snowfall is a sign that the consequences of climate change may be occurring now rather than in the distant future. Scientists previously predicted that rising temperatures would eventually increase snowfall, but new research from the U.K. proved that this increase is already happening in Antarctica.
Fossil finger points to early humans entering Saudi Arabia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An ancient human finger bone found in Saudi Arabia provides a new clue about when and how our species migrated out of Africa
Russia and Syria Say Israel Was Behind the Missile Attack on an Air Base in Homs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Syrian military official also said Israel was behind the attack
Temasek stake values 'Salt Bae' Turkish restaurant owner at $1.2 billion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Singapore's Temasek and Britain's Metric Capital have bought into Nusr-Et steakhouse owner D.ream in a deal valuing the Turkish firm at $1.2 billion.
After hurricane Maria, he's helping the ocean – and its fishers – recover
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Raimundo Espinoza Chirinos leans over the side of a fishing boat and points at a dark blur rising up slowly beneath the choppy water. It’s a fish trap – an illegal one, given that it’s made of plastic – that was lost when hurricane Maria tore across Puerto Rico last year. “There are no markings on the surface [for these lost traps], which means only someone under the water every day is likely to find them,” says Espinoza, founder of Conservación ConCiencia, a nonprofit supported by The Ocean Foundation that works on sustainable fisheries and climate resilience here.
How a tough UN resolution is making push for Yemen peace talks harder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Hoping to improve the chances for peace where his predecessors failed, the United Nations’ new Special Envoy for Yemen has completed his first meetings with key players in a devastating war. The good news may be that the envoy, Martin Griffiths, is encouraged about the prospects to ease a conflict that has left some 10,000 people dead in three years and ravaged one of the world’s poorest countries. “What I heard has inspired me and gives me hope that we can find a path to peace,” Ambassador Griffiths said in Yemen’s capital Sanaa March 31.
Starting Monday, Facebook Will Tell Users if Their Data Was Shared With Cambridge Analytica
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Get ready to find out if your Facebook data has been swept up in the Cambridge Analytica scandal
UN body names Messi responsible tourism ambassador
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The UN World Tourism Organization said Monday it has appointed FC Barcelona's Argentine star Lionel Messi as an ambassador to promote responsible tourism. "During my travels I have had the opportunity to know other cultures and societies as well as other ways to see the world and this is very enriching," Messi said in a statement released by the Madrid-based United Nations body announcing his nomination. "I am happy I can join this mission of promoting responsible tourism," the five-time winner of the FIFA World Player of the Year award added as the body steps up its campaign to minimise harm tourism can cause to the environment and historical sites.
Did Buzz Aldrin Really See UFO in Space, Pass Lie Detector Test?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Over the weekend, the internet exploded with reports that legendary astronaut Buzz Aldrin and others have convinced experts that they encountered aliens by passing lie detector tests. This quote likely comes from a mid-noughties science program called "First on the Moon: The Untold Story", which claimed Aldrin saw a UFO during the Apollo 11 mission. Aldrin and others have debunked any speculation that he actually witnessed evidence of aliens numerous times.
Dozens Are Injured After a Bus Full of High Schoolers Coming Back From Spring Break Hit an Overpass
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The bus was carrying 38 high school students as they returned from spring break
UN reopens talks on defining 'killer robots'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The world body hosted the first-ever killer robot negotiations last year and agreed to move forward, even if a treaty governing the use of such weapons remains a distant prospect. Activists say time is running out before weapons are deployed that use lethal force without a human making the final kill-order and have criticised the UN body hosting the talks -- the Convention of Certain Conventional Weapons (CCW) -- for moving too slowly. "It is a much more focused discussion now," said Richard Moyes, co-founder of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots.
Why zombie slugs could be the answer to gardeners' woes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The nematode that can turn slugs into zombies.
Do the Dead Have Rights to Their Own DNA? | Opinion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This article originally appeared on The Conversation. The remains of a 6-inch long mummy from Chile are not those of a space alien, according to recently reported research. The tiny body with its strange features—a pointed head, elongated bones—had been the subject of fierce debate over whether a UFO might have left it behind.
UK Wife Carrying champ beats the mud to win place in world final
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
With a sliding dive worthy of a rugby try, Chris Hepworth flung himself and his partner over the finishing line to become UK Wife Carrying champion, and now has his eye on the world title. Having set a course record of one minute and 37 seconds, Hepworth and his partner Tanisha Prince from London plan to take up the chance of competing in the world finals in Finland. "I think a Finnish guy wins it every year so it'll be good to go there and take them down," said Hepworth, who claims he did no practice for the race in Dorking, south of London.
Police, fed up with lingering cold weather, 'arrests' winter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
DEPEW, N.Y. (AP) — An upstate New York police department fed up with lingering cold weather has placed winter under arrest.
Police Say a Tennessee Man Confessed on Facebook After a Brutal Double Murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Casey James Lawhorn called police in Mississippi directing them to the scene of the crime
An Indian state is using blockchain to collect DNA data of 50 million citizens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Amidst a raging global debate over the massive data breaches involving both private firms and government agencies, an Indian state has sought to add another potent ingredient to this explosive mix: DNA data. The government of Andhra Pradesh (AP), India’s eighth-largest state, on March 28 announced that it had signed up a private firm to…
National Security Council Spokesperson Michael Anton Becomes Latest to Leave Trump's White House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He was among a small group of conservative intellectuals who defended President Trump's policies
AI like HAL 9000 can never exist because real emotions aren't programmable
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
2001: A Space Odyssey's sentient computer will only ever be a work of science fiction, says a cognitive neuroscientist.