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Thursday, April 27, 2017

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New Vi Headphones Use Artificial Intelligence to Make You a Smarter Runner
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
These days, headphones for runners can track steps and heart rate. But a brand-new pair attempts to take that concept a stride further with a coach, powered by artificial intelligence (AI), that ...
Half of Parents Who Co
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
They're afraid being shamed and stigmatized by others, according to a new study.
Everything We Know About Katie Holmes and Jamie Foxx's Super Secretive Relationship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Here's a timeline — of the few details there are.
You Won't Believe How Big Beyoncé's Twin Baby Bump Is In These New Easter Photos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Queen Bey made pregnancy look flawless during a family celebration of Sunday's holiday.
Skipping This Tradition Is One of the Biggest Wedding Trends of 2017
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Many brides are completely ditching bridal parties.
You Have to See This Dad's Hilarious "Maternity" Photo Shoot Parody
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Francisco Pérez channeled his inner ~earth mother goddess~.
Interesting Facts About Albert Einstein On His Death Anniversary
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The German-born theoretical physicist died April 18, 1955, in New Jersey from an abdominal aortic aneurysm.
Steve Ballmer’s new project: find out how the government spends your money
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has launched a new project aimed at providing a comprehensive database of government revenue and spending. The website, called USAFacts, brings together a wide range of financial data from various US government sources, compiled by a team of economists, professors, and researchers over the last three years. In an interview with The New York Times, Ballmer said USAFacts aims to “figure out what the government really does with the money,” describing the site as “the equivalent of a 10-K for government.” The former Microsoft chief and current Los Angeles Clippers owner spent more than $10 million on the project, according to the Times, which was used to assemble a team of researchers in Seattle and provide a grant to the University of Pennsylvania.
Telepathic typewriter: Scientists create mind
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The system is capable of translating brain activity into numbers and syllables and could be used to create a telepathic 'typewriter' for people who are unable to communicate. Researchers at Toyohashi University of Technology claim the system can recognise the numbers zero to nine with a 90% accuracy rate and also recognises 18 types of Japanese monosyllables with an accuracy of 60%. Trending: Will I have a heart attack?
Snapchat adds world lenses to further its push into augmented reality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Snapchat today is rolling out world lenses, a new twist on its popular face filters that continues the company’s exploration of augmented reality. Starting today, tapping the camera screen while using the rear-facing camera will bring up new 3D lenses. In this it’s different from Snapchat’s 3D stickers, which are flat objects that you pin after capturing your image.
Here's what to do if you're stung by a jellyfish
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Relying on urban myths is the last thing you'd want to do when dealing with an extremely painful...
Tucker mocks CNN legal expert's analysis of Facebook killing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tucker: A CNN legal analyst says the real problem is that we haven't yet made it illegal to post a homicide video to Facebook - as if fear of illegal broadcasting and the FCC would have struck fear in a homicidal killer #Tucker
People with Mental Illness Struggle with Health Disparities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Despite the implementation of major health care reforms in the United States, people with mental health conditions are still finding it difficult to get the health care services they need, a new study suggests. The researchers found that adults with mental illnesses were about 10 times more likely to put off buying the medications they needed because of the cost of these meds. In addition, adults with mental illnesses were about three times more likely to delay seeking medical care, compared with adults without mental illness.
Trump: I won’t say whether we sabotaged North Korea missile test
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In an interview with “Fox & Friends,” the president would not comment on Pyongyang’s failed weekend launch of ballistic missile. Trump also appeared to conflate supreme leader Kim Jong Un with Un’s late father, Kim Jong Il.
Hillary Clinton reportedly said ‘that was my last race’ after losing election
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
According to a new book, “Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign,” the Democratic nominee said her stunning loss to Donald Trump was her “last race.”
Durham farmer runs off with coal carrying crown
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
A Durham farmer has beaten dozens of rivals to the title of World Coal Carrying Champion after charging through a northern England town with a 50kg (110 pounds) sack on his back. Andrew Corrigan collapsed on a bed of hay after completing Monday's 1.1-km (1,200-yard) race in a time of four minutes, 31 seconds, receiving warm applause from the crowd who lined the course in Gawthorpe, near Wakefield. The quirky race started in the old mining town in 1963 when a man entered a pub and accused another of looking a bit unfit, leading to a race involving a sack of coal.
Danish diplomat chases off burglar from Manhattan apartment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — A Danish diplomat put aside diplomacy for the night — chasing away a burglar who broke into her Manhattan apartment.
Audubon: First spotting of vermillion flycatcher in Maine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BREMEN, Maine (AP) — The National Audubon Society says a web camera has captured the first confirmed sighting in Maine of a colorful species of bird typically seen in the southwestern part of the country.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Sultan Qaboos has been everything for Oman. But has he secured its future?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Sultan Qaboos, Oman’s ailing leader, is this small but wealthy nation’s prime minister, foreign minister, defense minister, head of state, and commander-in-chief, all in one. The largest mosque in every major town is named after Qaboos – a distinction many Muslim communities reserve for the deceased. Nearly every Omani has a story of when the sultan visited their town or village, aided their father, or personally opened a school or water plant.
Turkey’s potential shift on mosque and state
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For nearly a century, Turkey’s political history has been one of largely secular rule over a mostly Muslim people. The vote itself remains contested because of a crackdown on dissent since last July by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. In Turkey, President Erdogan has promised to “raise pious generations,” a goal he could soon pursue by dictate.
Best Course of Action on Gold: Sell
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The precious metal is at extreme overbought levels.
Microsoft is buying another 10 million strands of DNA for storage research
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DNA storage could allow vast amounts of data to be stored for thousands of years.
Sea level rise could send U.S. 'climate migrants' fleeing to Austin, Atlanta
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sea level rise is typically thought of as a coastal problem, with cities from New York to San Francisco pondering new coastal defenses such as sea walls and sturdier buildings.  However, by making large swaths of the U.S. shoreline uninhabitable by the end of this century, sea level rise could reverberate far inland, too. In fact, every single U.S. state will be affected by climate change-induced sea level rise, a new study found. SEE ALSO: This March was the second-warmest March in 137 years, because why stop now? If the global average sea level rises by 1.8 meters, or nearly 6 feet, by 2100 — which is well within the mainstream projections from recent studies — 13.1 million Americans could migrate away from coastal areas during this time period, according to research published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change. Miami under a 6-foot sea level rise scenario.Image: climate centralThe biggest net population gain would be in Texas, which would see migrants from Louisiana, Virginia, and low-lying areas in the Lone Star State, the study found. In particular, the Austin and Round Rock area of Texas could see a net gain of as many as 820,000 people, depending how well coastal areas adapt to sea level rise.  Orlando and Atlanta are also projected to receive more than 250,000 climate migrants through 2100. Phoenix and Las Vegas, both of which are already struggling to keep up with water and electricity demand, could also see an influx of people. The biggest population-losing cities are not that surprising: New Orleans and Miami.  In Florida, the area from West Palm Beach south to Miami is projected to lose as many as 2.5 million people by 2100 due to sea level rise-related flooding, the study found. Some 2 million people could still flee the area even if climate change adaptation measures are undertaken, such as building sea walls, raising coastal roads to prevent them from flooding regularly, keeping salt water from entering water supplies, and other projects. Nine states could see a net population loss, including Massachusetts, South Carolina, California, Virginia, New Jersey, Louisiana, and Florida.  The study, by Matt Hauer of the University of Georgia, claims to be the first to show how climate change may reshape where people live across the country. Most sea level rise studies focus on the risk to coastal residents, but this one goes significantly further by trying to determine the inland areas that may be placed under strain when climate migrants move in droves.  "We typically think about sea level rise as a coastal issue, but if people are forced to move because their houses become inundated, the migration could affect many landlocked communities as well," Hauer said in an email. Hauer said he was surprised that many people are projected to move from coastal areas hit hard by sea level rise to other more resilient coastal regions — such as from one part of coastal California to another, at least according to the modeling he used for the study.  Globally, climate migrants from sea level rise alone could reach as many as 180 million, the study found. When including other climate change impacts, such as drought, more severe storms, and longer-lasting and hotter heat waves, entire regions of the world, such as the Middle East and North Africa, may be virtually uninhabitable as soon as the end of the current century. Tick marks show the number of migrants (inflows and outflows) in thousands. States are ordered clockwise by the size of inflows. The top ten outflow states are colored; all other states are in grey.Image: Hauer, Nature Climate change 2017.According to the new study, only wealthy households with incomes of greater than $100,000 will remain in coastal areas because they can afford to take adaptive measures to prepare for sea level rise. However, it could also be argued that poorer residents won't be able to migrate because they can't afford to resettle.  Both the study itself and an accompanying article in Nature Climate Change show that there are many uncertainties involved with trying to determine where climate migrants will go once they are displaced from coastal areas. For example, it's not clear where the best economic opportunities will be in 30 to 50 years from now, which would affect migration patterns.  WATCH: Watch how global warming heats up the world from 1880-2016
Scientists find giant black 'shipworm' in Philippines and it'll haunt your sleep
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists in the Philippines have discovered the first living giant shipworm. The living specimen’s discovery was detailed in US science journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS). The shipworm is part of the bivalve family, in the same group as mussels and clams, and spends its life encased in a hard shell, feeding on mud.
In or out? Trump aides to huddle on climate accord Tuesday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's top aides will huddle Tuesday to discuss whether or not the U.S. should remain part of the Paris Climate accord — a global effort to cut down on climate-warming carbon emissions.
Archaeologists find 1,000 statues in tomb in Egypt's Luxor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered more than 1,000 statues and 10 sarcophagi in an ancient noble's tomb on the west bank of the Nile River in Luxor
Ohio man turns in $14,000 found on side of road
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WORTHINGTON, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio man says he was trying to set a good example for his children when he turned in $14,000 he found on the side of the road.
Namaste: Florida judge teaches yoga on courthouse lawn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida judge sometimes wears yoga clothes under her black robe.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Fakers are best at career self
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
How too much confidence can impede your growth.
ANALYSIS: MoM poses next question for Boeing presence in Washington cluster
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Spread over about 71,000sq miles2, the state of Washington is home to diverse climates, with the Cascade mountains dividing a temperate rainforest in the west and semi-arid steppe in the east. It is also home to a diverse aerospace industry anchored by Boeing.
Second lease of life for abused circus bears in Ukraine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dental treatment by the best vets, open-air accommodation and fresh fish instead of dubious leftovers and abuse -- life has changed markedly for brown bears rescued from Ukrainian circuses and restaurants. Tortured for years by humans, the animals have received a second lease of life in the city of Zhytomyr in northwestern Ukraine. Opened in 2012 by the Vienna-based animal welfare charity Four Paws, the shelter soon became one of the region's prime attractions.
Microwaving tea is good for you, say scientists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But tea lovers think it's a terrible idea...
This Darpa machine can turn chemical warfare agents like sarin and mustard gas into harmless dirt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa) in US has successfully tested a field-deployable system for neutralising toxic chemicals like sarin, soman, and mustard gas by using a waterless soil-scrubbing technology. The system has been developed under Darpa's Agnostic Compact Demilitarization of Chemical Agents (ACDC) program, that aims to develop technology to neutralise bulk stores of chemical warfare agents (CWA).
Democrat Jon Ossoff leads in Georgia House race — a ripple, or the start of a wave?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Polls suggest that Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff is within range of getting 50 percent of the vote against a large field of Republicans, winning the seat outright and avoiding a runoff.
Alligator crawls out of Louisiana storm drain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
METAIRIE, La. (AP) — An alligator has been wrangled after crawling out of a storm drain in Louisiana.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Apollo 13 Capt. Jim Lovell Reflects On The Historic Flight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nearing the anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, NASA Capt. Jim Lovell reflects on the historic trip to space.
Giant Shipworm Found in Philippines
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kuphus polythalamia lives in a baseball-bat-like shell, burrows into the mud and eats swamp gas.
Arctic Palette: Vivid Blue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As if a giant ran a finger in a swirling manner through an icy sandbox, meltwater channels have carved out aqua-colored squiggly lines in an Arctic glacier. And a NASA scientist has captured the ice art in a gorgeous image showing part of the DeVries Glacier. The aerial photo was taken March 29, 2017, during NASA's Operation IceBridge mission, now in its ninth year.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Can Rosie's Extreme Motion Sickness be Cured?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
One member of The Doctors family has a secret problem – severe motion sickness. Just a few years ago, Rosie Mercado started developing motion sickness, and now it’s become severe. It’s constantly drive, drive, drive … pull over, and then I throw up.” Kirby, her husband adds, “She’s a very loud person.
Can You Get a Younger Looking Neck in Seconds?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains graphic images that may be disturbing. Parents are advised that these images may not be suitable for young children.
Instant Thigh Lift?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Clear adhesive strips that cling to the skin. The manufacturer claims users just need to stick them on for an instant thigh lift. Rosie Mercado and two audience volunteers have agreed to put them to the test.
Can an Injection Cure Joint Pain?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A tennis pro sidelined by joint pain hopes that a new treatment can get him back on the court. Paul’s rigorous athletic life, involving hours of tennis, running, and weight work, has kept him in great shape – but it’s also taken a toll on his joints. “I’ve had chronic pain since my mid-20s,” he admits.
A Retreat that Mends Broken Hearts?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Renew, a new weekend retreat in New York, promises to mend broken hearts. Can two days get you ready to love again?
Shipworm That Feeds on Gas Found in Philippines Lagoon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Although the giant shipworm was first categorized as a species more than 200 years ago, no living specimen had been examined by scientists and almost nothing had been known about it. The giant shipworm, or Kuphus polythalamia, live inside large shells on the seafloor and grow to a length of more than five feet.
Nasa captures images of mysterious crack in one of Greenland's biggest glaciers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A mysterious and worrying crack in Greenland's Petermann Glacier – one of the largest on the ice covered island – that connects the Greenland ice sheet to the Arctic Ocean has been photographed by Nasa. The images show that the new crack has appeared at the centre of the glacier's floating ice sheet, which is considered to be an unusual location, raising questions about how its formed. The images of the new rift were taken by Nasa's airborne mission – Operation IceBridge on Friday (14 April) after Stef Lhermitte, a professor at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, first discovered the unusually located crack in satellite images and provided coordinates to Nasa scientists.