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Museum finds cases of 2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
UNION, N.J. (AP) — A restoration project at a New Jersey museum unearthed cases of wine nearly as old as the United States.
One test case for voter fraud vs. suppression: Sparta, Ga
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In 2014, the rodent chewed some wires at the historic Hancock County, Ga., courthouse in downtown Sparta, Ga., about 100 miles from Atlanta. Marion Warren, a city election official, happened to be present. Once it’s signed off on, it will make Hancock County the first jurisdiction to earn federal election oversight since the United States Supreme Court invalidated part of the Voting Rights Act in 2013.
How to Decode Sunscreen Labels
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It can be tough to keep your sunscreen facts straight when you’re studying bottles of lotions and sprays in the sun-care aisle. “There are still a lot of misconceptions among consumers about what...
Boost the Benefits of Fruits and Veggies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Summer’s bounty of fruits and vegetables does more than tempt your taste buds; it can have a powerful impact on your health. When you have more choices, there’s a greater chance that you’ll eat m...
Shingles May Raise Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke, Says Study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
You might want to get that shingles vaccine after all.
How maths helps us understand why music moves people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Expressing music into mathematical formulae can help us understand why some pieces and performances can send shivers down your spine.
Eva Ekeblad Facts On Her 293rd Birthday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Swedish scientist was the first to discover that potatoes could be used to make flour or distilled to make alcohol.
It's Astonishingly Easy to Bring Back Smallpox
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
All it'll take is $100,000 and a bit of biology knowledge.
Aryan Invasion May Have Transformed India's Bronze
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An influx of men from the steppe of Central Asia may have swept into India around 3,500 years ago and transformed the population. The same mysterious people — ancient livestock herders called the Yamnaya who rode wheeled chariots and spoke a proto-Indo-European language — also moved across Europe more than 1,000 years earlier. Somehow, they left their genetic signature with most European men, but not women, earlier studies suggest.
Scientists Say That to Get the Most Successful Smile, Less Is Always More
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When you think of a perfect smile, chances are you think of a wide grin with gleaming, straight and perfectly-aligned teeth, but new research suggests that’s not entirely the case. A recent study by researchers at the University of Minnesota discovered that what others perceive as a “successful smile” has less to do with how much of your teeth you show and more to do with facial symmetry and balance. Published recently in the PLOS ONE journal, researchers throughout the ...
Hypersonic air travel on horizon with creation of new heat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists from the UK and China have created a new ceramic coating that could be used to develop a hypersonic plane capable of flying between London and New York in two hours. 
A strange and beautiful sunset is happening in New York City this week — here's how to see it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Twice each summer, the sun, Earth, and monuments of human industry create a spectacle of light in...
Turns Out That Even Moving To Mars Won't Save Us From Global Warming
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Is this the part where people start caring?
Suzuki, Fiat Chrysler in Dutch emissions data probe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dutch vehicle authorities said Monday that carmakers Suzuki and Fiat Chrysler were being referred to the public prosecutor for possibly misusing emissions software. The Netherlands Vehicle Authority (RDW) revealed its findings in its second report since the so-called Dieselgate scandal erupted two years ago. Volkswagen admitted in September 2015 that it had installed software devices in 11 million diesel-engine cars worldwide that reduced emissions of harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx) when the devices detected the vehicle was undergoing tests.
Congress Wants a New U.S. Military Branch, a 'Space Corps'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Congress Wants a New U.S. Military Branch, a 'Space Corps'
Trump walks back joint U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After seeming to propose a collaboration with Russia on Sunday morning, the president dismissed the idea later in the day.
‘Had to listen’: Trump Jr. confirms meeting Russian lawyer to discuss Clinton
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president’s oldest son dismissed the importance of a new report on his June 2016 meeting with a Kremlin-connected lawyer.
‘That is so illegal!’ Trump lashes out at Comey after report that memos may have been classified
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
But in his Senate Intelligence Committee testimony in June, the ex-FBI director said the memo he shared with a friend contained no classified information.
Conway clashes with CNN’s Cuomo over Trump Jr.‘s Russian lawyer meeting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump’s counselor sparred with the “New Day” host as she tried to defend Donald Trump Jr.’s pre-election meeting with a Russian lawyer who had promised him dirt on Hillary Clinton.
France could close a third of nuclear reactors: minister
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
France's new environment minister said Monday that nearly a third of the country's nuclear reactors could be shut under plans to scale back the amount of electricity produced from atomic power. In 2015, the previous Socialist-dominated parliament passed a law obliging the government to reduce the proportion of electricity generated from nuclear to 50 percent by 2025 compared with around 75 percent now. "We can all understand that to reach this target, we're going to have to close a certain number of reactors," Nicolas Hulot told RTL radio.
Asimov’s Laws won’t stop robots harming humans so we’ve developed a better solution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Robots should be empowered to pick the action that most helps humans.
NASA spacecraft to fly over 'Eye of Jupiter' for first ti...
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Juno spacecraft to come within 2,200 miles of Jupiter's surface
German official to hold talks with Turkey on climate issue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The German government says an official will hold talks with Turkey next month on an issue delaying Ankara's ratification of the Paris accord against climate change. At the Group of 20 summit, Turkey was ...
How we're using ancient DNA to solve the mystery of the missing last great auk skins
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists turn detective to find out what happened to the last specimens of an extinct bird.
Amelia Earhart mystery: Forensic dogs scent human remains on remote Pacific island
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Four dogs trained to detect the scent of human bones have located a site on a remote Pacific atoll where Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, may have died on their ill-fated attempt to circumnavigate the globe in 1937. The four border collies were taken to Nikumaroro, part of the Republic of Kiribati, as part of the latest expedition to the atoll by The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) and the National Geographic Society. TIGHAR believes Ms Earhart managed to land on Nikumaroro - which was at the time an uninhabited British territory known as Gardner Island - but soon succumbed to hunger, thirst or illness. Amelia Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, vanished on their ill-fated attempt to circumnavigate the globe in 1937. The Delaware-based organisation has carried out numerous visits to the island and discovered some compelling indications that Ms Earhart's Lockheed Electra landed there after being unable to find Howland Island, its intended target. That evidence included aluminium skin from an aircraft, plexiglass from a cockpit, a zip made in Pennsylvania in the mid-1930s, a broken pocket knife of the same brand that was listed in an inventory of Ms Earhart's aircraft and the remains of a 1930s woman's compact. Amelia Earhart - Jaluit Atoll The theory is supported by British colonial records in Fiji reporting the discovery of the partial skeleton of a castaway who perished shortly before the island was settled in 1938. The bones were found in the shade of a tree in a part of the island that fits the description of the encampment that TIGHAR has been excavating. The site is dotted with the remains of small fires on which meals of birds, fish, turtle and even rat were cooked. In an attempt to locate conclusive evidence, such as a bone or DNA, forensic dogs were brought to the island for the latest search, with all four dogs independently sitting at the bases of a tree at the castaways' site and locking eyes with their handler - the way they are taught to "alert" for the scent of human remains.  Amelia Earhart, Fred Noonan Scientists say the dogs are able to detect the odour of human bones long after the bones have decomposed and subsequent excavation of the site did not recover human remains. Instead, archaeologists have recovered soil samples from different depths and will submit the samples to a laboratory in Germany that specialises in extracting DNA. Amelia Earhart final flight map Researchers told National Geographic magazine that DNA from Neanderthals has been extracted from soil in a cave in France, although "the odds of securing DNA from a tropical environment like Nikumaroro are very long". The TIGHAR expedition has coincided with the airing of a documentary on The History Channel in the US that claims a photo discovered in US archives proves that Ms Earhart and Mr Noonan were captured by the Japanese and transported to Jaluit in the Marshall Islands. The theory adds that they were both later executed. This 1937 photo shows Amelia Earhart before takeoff in Miami for an attempted round-the-world flight. Les Kinney, a long-time proponent of the theory that Ms Earhart and Mr Noonan were on a spying mission for the US government shortly before the outbreak of World War II, told the Associated Press the image shows Ms Earhart sitting on a sea wall with her back to the camera, Mr Noonan standing with a group of islanders and a Japanese survey ship identified as the Koshu towing a barge carrying the Electra. TIGHAR researchers say they have been aware of the photo for several years but have discounted it for a number of reasons. Documentary argues Amelia Earhart was captured by the Japanese military 02:47 The person identified as Ms Earhart in the grainy picture has hair much longer than when she took off on the final leg of her journey, they claim, while the image used to corroborate the suggestion that the man is Noonan has been horizontally reversed, meaning that his distinctive parting and hairline no longer match. TIGHAR also points out that the ship is too small to be the Koshu and that what Mr Kinney claims is the aircraft on a barge "is just an indistinct blob". It has also been pointed out that the photograph is marked as being taken in 1940, three years after Ms Earhart's disappearance. Profile | Amelia Earhart  
ISIS, driven out of Mosul, leaves behind a city in ruins and a society shattered by distrust
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The operation to retake Mosul from ISIS has been a success, but it has come at a heavy price of destruction and the displacement of hundreds of thousands of civilians.
Trump trolls Chelsea Clinton in defense of letting Ivanka take his chair at G
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump defended his daughter Ivanka Trump after she was ridiculed for filling in for him at a Group of 20 summit meeting. In her defense he invoked both German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Chelsea Clinton, the daughter of his former opponent Hillary Clinton. “When I left Conference Room for short meetings with Japan and other countries, I asked Ivanka to hold seat.
California teen wins lottery twice in a week
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A California teen is celebrating two big lottery wins in a week.
Monkey business: Florida man says primates swarm property
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
OCALA, Fla. (AP) — A Florida man says he's got a monkey problem.
This AR lunar model takes you as close to the moon as you can get (without a spaceship)
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The moon may be 238,900 miles away from Earth, but with a new lunar model and accompanying AR app, it might as well be in the palm of your hand. AstroReality, a Bay Area-based startup whose co-founder is an astro-photographer, is creating hand-painted, 3D-printed moon models to bring the moon's surface down to Earth. SEE ALSO: 15 best items for those who are obsessed with outer space The Lunar Pro is a softball-sized, one-pound orb that recreates the moon and all its craters, edges, and other topography based on NASA's lunar orbiter data. It's made at a resolution of 4,000 DPI, which is incredibly precise. It's then molded with a poly resin material that is hand-painted to mimic what the moon looks like. It comes shockingly close. Image: sasha lekach/mashableWith a free AR app from your phone, you can hone in on famous landmarks, like the Apollo landing site or the Mare Marginis plain, dead volcanoes, craters, seas, and lava flows. As you spin the moon on its stand, more facts, photos, and other locations pop up on the app.  "The moon comes to life," AstroReality head of marketing and lead producer Joanne Dai said while demonstrating how the model and app work. Pictures and facts pop out as you move around the moon.Image: sasha lekach/mashableThe app tracks the model in real-time, similar to how Snapchat's filters track your face so you can vomit rainbows and wear a flower crown. There are 900 landmarks scattered throughout the model, complete with facts and trivia. Dai wants space enthusiasts and home astronomers who are accustomed to looking at the moon through a telescope to use the model to get even closer to the moon's surface. She also wants the model to be used as an educational tool — especially as more features come to the app, like simulated missions. The online crowdfunding campaigns kicks off Tuesday (that link will go live then) with packages for the Lunar Pro starting at $179 for early backers. A mini lunar model and a full outer space collection are also available as perks. The 3D model is expected to be delivered by the end of November — just in time for the holidays for any moon-obsessed people you know. First, the startup is aiming to raise $50,000 to produce the moon models.  Shoot for the moon. WATCH: Watch clouds move above Saturn's largest moon in new NASA video
Malaysia foils bid to smuggle 'bearded dragons'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Malaysia has foiled an attempt to smuggle dozens of bearded dragon lizards and tortoises into the country from neighbouring Thailand to be sold as pets, authorities said Monday. Two Thais and one Malaysian were arrested as they drove an SUV with the animals hidden inside, according to local border security chief Syed Basri Syed Ali. Authorities found 58 bearded dragons and eight African spurred tortoises.
To counter China’s rise in the Indian Ocean, India must dive deeper
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Beijing recently made public its ambitions to create a world-class navy with strong operational capabilities on, above, and below the ocean’s surface. It is investing its energies in establishing elements of dual-purpose communications, reconnaissance, exploration, and manned infrastructure on the ocean floor. These efforts are designed to technologically fortify the Jinhai Fangyu (offshore defense) stratagem…
Four volunteers will live in a sealed lab for 200 days as China preps for its first manned moon mission
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Four volunteers at China’s top aeronautics university will live in a sealed laboratory for 200 days without any outside interaction as the country prepares to send its first manned mission to the moon. According to the People’s Daily (one of the Chinese Communist Party’s official newspapers), the group started their stint on Sunday in the...
Google Doodle Honors Swedish Scientist Eva Ekeblad On Her 293rd Birthday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Today we celebrate Eva Ekeblad’s 293rd birthday. The Swedish scientist brought potatoes, then a greenhouse curiosity, to the people," the company writes. "Eva discovered the starch was humble but mighty – potatoes could be ground into flour or distilled into spirits.
Greenpeace activists charged after unfurling 'Resist' banner at Trump Tower in Chicago
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Activists protesting the Trump administration's rollback of U.S. environmental and climate policies are facing felony charges after unfurling a banner from Trump Tower in Chicago. Six people, including four Greenpeace USA activists, were charged on Sunday after "causing a disturbance" during a July 7 action, according to Chicago Police Department. The 50-by-35-foot sheet they unfurled from the tower's 16th floor caused "extensive damage to the building," police said in an emailed statement. SEE ALSO: 'Babe' actor sentenced to one week in jail for climate protest The banner, emblazoned with the words "Resist" and "Defend," was meant as a show of defiance to the President Trump's anti-climate agenda, Greenpeace said. ICYMI, something BIG happened in Chicago yesterday! Watch activists deliver a #RESIST message at Trump Tower >> https://t.co/2BddNHQl8d pic.twitter.com/MiZF19GoW3 — Greenpeace USA (@greenpeaceusa) July 8, 2017 Trump on June 1 announced he would withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, an international treaty to fight global warming supported by almost the entire world. He's also started unraveling U.S. policies to curb greenhouse gas emissions from power plants and vehicles.  His administration, meanwhile, has reversed several Obama-era rules to limit air and water pollution from fossil fuel production, in a bid to boost coal, oil, and gas development despite the environmental consequences. "These are things that are going to damage the health and well-being of American communities and communities across the world," Jason Schwartz, a spokesman for Greenpeace, said by phone. "These activists [in Chicago] were trying to bring light to that," he said. Four Greenpeace activists were all charged with one felony count each of criminal damage to property and a misdemeanor count of reckless conduct. They are: Jeremy Alpert of Glencoe, Illinois; Taylor Blevons of Deerfield, Illinois; Wendy Jennings of Minneapolis; and David Khoury of Leslie, Arkansas. Two other women were charged with misdemeanor reckless conduct but weren't connected to Greenpeace. On Sunday afternoon, Schwartz said Greenpeace was in the process of posting bonds for the four activists, who have been held in jail since Friday. He said he was confident officials would drop the felony charges. WATCH: Watch this incredible piano concert courtesy of Greenpeace
Skintight Space Suits for Mars: What Kind of Suits Do Astronauts Need to Survive on the Red Planet?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The space suit is torn between humanity’s two chief desires: exploration and protection. None more so than the one some of us will be wearing on Mars—which could determine astronauts’ survival while farther from Earth than humans have ever traveled before. Space suits are as important as thruster types and rocket fuels—and maybe more so—for the eventual success of a mission to Mars.
Scientists to Launch Kidney Cells Into Space to Accelerate Research
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers at the University of Washington are planning to launch kidney cells into space in order to speed up the research process.
Two states ban dicamba weed killer after drift complaints
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Missouri joined Arkansas on Friday in banning the use and sale of the weed killer dicamba after a rise in complaints that the agricultural chemical is drifting into neighboring fields and damaging crops, the states agriculture departments said on Friday. Dicamba use and complaints about its use have spiked in the past two years in the United States.
Nuking the moon, and 5 more insane space missions that never happened
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Over the years, scientists have proposed some rather bizarre missions to better understand our cosmos. Here are 6 of the weirdest space missions ever considered.
Can We Stop Climate Change? Maybe, If We Take Steps Now to Stop Emitting Greenhouse Gases
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The primary cause of that change is the release of carbon dioxide from burning coal, oil and natural gas. One of the goals of the international Paris Agreement on climate change is to limit the increase of the global surface average air temperature to 2 degrees Celsius, compared to preindustrial times. There is a further commitment to strive to limit the increase to 1.5℃.
Aerial videos capture terrifying wildfires scorching California
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Menacing red-orange flames and towering plumes of smoke smothered parts of California this weekend amid record-breaking heat and bone-dry gusts. Firefighters and scientists filmed the latest rash of Western wildfires from helicopters, drones, and stationary cameras, offering smoldering views. Dozens of structures have been destroyed and thousands of people fled their homes, though no deaths have been reported. SEE ALSO: Summers in Madrid could be as hot as those in Erbil, Iraq by 2100, research shows Videos taken on Saturday evening from the Oroville Dam in Northern California showed the ebb and flow of the Wall Fire in Butte County, which has so far scorched 4,400 acres. About 5,000 firefighters are now battling 14 large wildfires throughout the Golden State. In Southern California, wildfires burned amid record-setting heat. Downtown Los Angeles saw a high of 98 degrees on Saturday, beating out the 131-year record of 95 degrees set in 1886, according to the National Weather Service. To make matters worse, about 140,000 city residents suffered through the heat wave without air-conditioning late Saturday after an electrical receiving station exploded and caught on fire in the Northridge neighborhood. DWP plant #fire in #Northridge. The northridge mall has no power. pic.twitter.com/6Bx2JeV06o — Logan Byrnes (@LoganByrnes) July 9, 2017 Meanwhile, north of the city in San Luis Obispo County, the Alamo Fire ballooned overnight to encompass more than 24,000 acres, making it the largest fire currently burning in California, fire officials said Sunday. Operations continue on the #alamofire West of Tepesquet Canyon. #fire firefighters #fireseason #santamaria #biennacido #iaff #cpf A post shared by @santabarbaracountyfirefighters on Jul 8, 2017 at 2:17pm PDT #AlamoFire [update] off Hwy 166, near Twitchell Reservoir (San Luis Obispo Co) is now 19,000 acres & 10% contained. https://t.co/3KR0HM0UMK pic.twitter.com/KfA7fP27BU — CAL FIRE (@CAL_FIRE) July 8, 2017 The nearby Whittier Fire, currently the third-largest wildfire, barreled over more than 5,000 acres and engulfed Los Padres National Forest. Flames and smoke temporarily prevented some 80 people — mostly children — from being evacuated from their campsite on Saturday, authorities said. The blaze "has real potential for growth" because the area hasn't burned in around seven decades, Andrew Madsen, the national forest public affairs officer, told NBC News . Vegetation Fire-#WhittierFire- A US Forest Service firefighter surveys flames as they continue to burn along Highway 154 near Cachuma Lake. pic.twitter.com/BXDbYKcJUt — SBCFireInfo (@EliasonMike) July 9, 2017 Wildfires are scorching California even as the state recovers from five years of severe drought. Record rainfall and snowpack in parts of the state earlier this year delayed the state of the wildfire season in some places. But it also led to explosive growth of vegetation, which could fuel future fires, the Associated Press noted. Firefighters battle a wildfire as it threatens to jump a road near Oroville, California, on July 8, 2017.Image: AP/REX/ShutterstockWhile blazes are often sparked by careless campers or arsonists, they're also striking more frequently, and burning for longer periods of time, due in part to human-caused climate change. As average temperatures rise, heat waves strike and rainfall disappears, the soil and plants are drying out faster, raising the long-term risk of wildfires, scientists say. WATCH: Firefighters in Dubai are using jetpacks to put out fires
Australian reporter tears into Trump’s performance at G
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“Donald Trump has pressed fast-forward on the decline of the United States as a global leader. He managed to isolate his nation, to confuse and alienate his allies and to diminish America,” said Australian reporter Chris Uhlmann.
An Easier Way To Screen For Birth Defects May Be In Our Future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Wayne State University researchers have developed a test that may be able to screen for birth defects as early as five weeks into pregnancy.
China tests self
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sealed behind the steel doors of two bunkers in a Beijing suburb, university students are trying to find out how it feels to live in a space station on another planet, recycling everything from plant cuttings to urine. "I'll get so much out of this," Liu Guanghui, a PhD student, who entered the bunker on Sunday, said. President Xi Jinping wants China to become a global power in space exploration, with plans to send the first probe to the dark side of the moon by 2018 and to put astronauts on the moon by 2036.
Trump: Putin ‘vehemently denied’ election meddling after I ‘strongly pressed’ him
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president tweeted Sunday that he talked to Russia's president about interference in the 2016 campaign during their highly anticipated meeting at the G-20 summit — and that Vladimir Putin disputed that Russia was behind it.
Nikki Haley: ‘We can’t trust Russia, and we won’t ever trust Russia’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations offered a remarkably different account Sunday of President Trump's meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin than other U.S. and Russian officials.
How Cleveland has become a leader in trying to eradicate human trafficking
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On a recent Friday night, when many women are spending time with their families or going to see a rom-com movie with friends, Renee Jones is doing something unconventional. It is to connect with them in hopes of preventing the women from falling prey to one of the country’s most overlooked but vexing social problems: sex trafficking.
New Report: The Best College Degrees to Get a Home of Your Own Someday
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When will you become a homeowner? You might be surprised to know your college degree could be a factor. Here are the 15 best degrees.
Pence cracks Twitter jokes after touching NASA hardware labeled "do not touch"
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The vice president showed his sense of humor after he reached out and touched a piece of equipment labeled "do not touch" at Kennedy Space Center