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N.Korea's Kim Jong Un says engine test is "new birth" of rocket industry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korea conducted a test of a newly developed high-thrust engine at its Tongchang-ri rocket launch station and leader Kim Jong Un said the successful test was "a new birth" of its rocket industry, the country's official media said on Sunday. The engine will help the country achieve world-class satellite launch capability, KCNA said, indicating the test was likely of a new type of rocket engine for long-range missiles. The United States and China have pledged to work together to get the North to take "a different course" and move away from its weapons programmes after U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson met his Chinese counterpart on Saturday.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Secret Service laptop stolen: Can the agency shake its scandals?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A Secret Service laptop with details about floor plans and evacuation protocol for Trump Tower was stolen from a car parked in the driveway of an agent’s Brooklyn home on Thursday. A Secret Service press release said that agency laptops have “multiple layers of security including full disk encryption” and were not permitted to contain classified information – though it could be used to access a server which does, according to the New York Daily News. A backpack and other goods were also stolen from the car, including an access keycard, an agency radio, and lapel pins with Secret Service insignia that gave the agent, Marie Argentieri, access to security details that protected President Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Pope Francis, according to CNN.
Meals on Wheels donations spike: Is Trump making America care again?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump is changing America in at least one easily measurable way, and it has nothing to do with any of his campaign promises. When the administration’s so-called “skinny budget” blueprint came out on Thursday, cuts threatening the Meals on Wheels program in particular caught the country’s attention. The proposal is already facing bipartisan opposition, but that isn’t stopping people from supporting Meals on Wheels themselves, resulting in a donation spike.
Trump's budget cuts dampen 50th anniversary of public broadcasting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Nearly 50 years ago, President Lyndon Johnson signed the “Public Broadcasting Act of 1967” into law, hoping it could encourage more diverse programming and non-commercial broadcasting. 
How Do Tardigrades Survive Extreme Dehydration?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Also known as water bears, the tiny animals are the most resilient life form known to us, and can survive without food or water for over 30 years.
New NASA Budget Cuts Earth Science and Education, Boosts Space Exploration and Human Flight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trump administration's new NASA budget report outlines the future focus of the agency.
Preserving the memory of glaciers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Locked up in about 140 metres (460 feet) of ice capping a Bolivian mountain lie 18,000 years of climate history, dating back to an epoch when humans were only just learning to farm. An international team will set out in May on a gruelling trip up Bolivia's 6,400-metre Illimani peak to drill three ice cores from its crowning glacier. "Eventually, these ice cores will be all that is left of the glaciers," said Jerome Chappellaz of France's CNRS research institute, a partner in the endeavour dubbed Ice Memory.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Why Trump wants power to remove director of Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On Friday, the Department of Justice (DOJ) filed an amicus brief in an appeal of a case involving the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), a consumer watchdog, and the PHH Corp. mortgage company. In its brief, the DOJ sided with a three-judge panel that had originally described the CFPB’s structure unconstitutional, saying it gave the bureau’s director too much power. “There is a greater risk that an independent agency headed by a single person will engage in extreme departures from the president’s executive policy,” the DOJ wrote in the brief, according to The Wall Street Journal.
Two pharaohs, one statue: A tale of mistaken identity?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A colossus recently found in Matariya, a working-class neighborhood in Cairo, has proven tricky to identify. Shortly after the 26-foot tall statue was unearthed on March 7, it was identified as Pharaoh Ramses II, one of ancient Egypt’s best-known rulers, but now Cairo officials say it likely portrays Psamtik I, a lesser-known pharaoh of the 26th Dynasty. Recommended: How much do you know about Egypt?
Campaign heats up to make heroin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A vial of Naloxone, which can be used to block the potentially fatal effects of an opioid overdose, is shown at an outpatient pharmacy at the University of Washington. Jennifer Plumb, MD, was driving through downtown Salt Lake City with her son in tow when she saw a woman lying face-up on the sidewalk.
Scientists Unveil New Trappist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Cornell University researchers say life forms live on and have traveled across three exoplanets.
Where Charles Manson and his followers are today: Part 11
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Manson and some of his followers continue to serve life sentences in prison.
Skull Evolution Linked To Bipedalism In Humans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A key feature of the skull changed to accommodate the shift from walking on four feet to two, a new study claims.
Ancient Roman temple the size of St Paul's Cathedral discovered in Italy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The remains of a huge Roman temple, the size of St Paul's Cathedral in London has been found by a Cambridge University archaeological team in central Italy. The sacred site was uncovered several feet below Falerii Novi, an abandoned town around 30 miles north of Rome. Theories on its use have given insight into a period of Roman expansion and urbanisation in Italy.
A Japanese start
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Japanese venture hopes to reap millions by being an interstellar garbage collector for dead satellites in space.
NSC head McMaster knows what it will take to defeat ISIS. But will Trump listen?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Donald Trump, right, listens as Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, left, talks at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla. on Feb. 20, 2017, where Trump announced that McMaster will be the new national security adviser. NEAR TAL AFAR — On the rolling hills of the battlefield near Tal Afar in northern Iraq, fighters belonging to the armed brigades known as the Popular Mobilization Forces [PMF], made up of mostly Shiite tribal members, hustle to and from a front-line base confronting forces of the Islamic State. The city was once held up as an example of tribal unity between Shiite and Sunni Muslims after it was liberated from al-Qaida by American troops commanded by then Army Col. H.R. McMaster.
On This Day:  You have a right to an attorney
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
It was on this day in 1963 that the Supreme Court handed down the Gideon decision, which guaranteed the rights of the accused to have a public defender in court.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
20,000 leagues beneath the ice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The harmonic sounds of Weddell seals penetrate the thick ice. In fact, a significant part of what we know about underwater life in Antarctica comes from within a two-hour driving radius of the McMurdo Station research base.
Why Antarctica is Earth's petri dish
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Some studies have revealed critical insights, such as the infamous hole in the ozone layer that appears over Antarctica during the region’s spring. In 1985, British Antarctic Survey scientists discovered that there was about half as much ozone over their research station as there had been just 30 years earlier. Recommended: Are you scientifically literate?
Letter from Antarctica
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Indeed, most dispatches from the “end of the world” paint a romantic image of scientists working in the field, buffeted by the elements, an apotheosis of man versus nature. While Antarctica has indeed been a showcase for international collaboration and peace since then, there’s still a geopolitical and strategic undertone to the presence of the United States here.
The campaign heats up to make overdose
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A vial of Naloxone, which can be used to block the potentially fatal effects of an opioid overdose, is shown at the University of Washington. Jennifer Plumb, MD, was driving through downtown Salt Lake City with her son in tow when she saw a woman lying face-up on the sidewalk. Plumb, who is an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Utah and has spearheaded the campaign to make naloxone kits more readily available to Utahans, had just come from a naloxone training session with a local fire department and happened to have the opioid overdose reversal drug in the trunk of her car.
Skull of monster 'king' polar bear discovered in remote Alaska
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A giant skull discovered in remote Alaska may belong to a mysterious ancient polar bear, referred to by natives in their stories as "king bear". The find was reported by a team led by Arctic archaeologist Dr Anne Jensen at the Alaska Marine Science Symposium last January. The skull represents the fourth largest polar bear skull ever found, measuring just over 40 centimetres from the tip of the nose to the back of the skull, with large teeth sticking out.
Tony Robbins swears by this 7
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Biocybernaut is a 7-day retreat that claims it can make you smarter, more creative, and a better...
Map Shows How Climate Change Will Affect Health Across US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Doctors in every part of our country see that climate change is making Americans sicker," Dr. Mona Sarfaty, the director of the new group, called the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health, said in a statement. But few Americans are aware of the impact climate change has on health, according to the report. Only about a third of Americans can name a specific way climate change affects people's health, according to the report.
Rare butterfly killer convicted in Britain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A British man has been convicted of capturing and killing two of Britain's rarest butterflies, the endangered Large Blues, which have been a prized collector's item since the Victorian era. Judges at the court in the southwest city of Bristol late on Thursday found 57-year-old Philip Cullen guilty of killing the Large Blues, which have protected status, and he faces a possible prison sentence to be decided next month. There has never been a prosecution in terms of capturing and killing in the past," prosecutor Kevin Withey told the court.
10 fascinating facts about Grover Cleveland, the only double President
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Grover Cleveland stands alone in American history as the only President to serve non-consecutive terms. On the anniversary of his birth, here’s a look at one of most fascinating White House occupants.
Simple Steps to a Healthy Home This Spring
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Giving your home a thorough spring cleaning can certainly make it shine. But a few other steps will help you make sure you're living in a healthy home. Here's what our experts advise: Pick House...
Canada Is Finally Getting Its Own Spaceport
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The proposed launch facility would be the first place Canada could launch rockets into orbit on their own soil.
How chemistry can make your ironing easier
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If it weren't for chemistry, that pile of wrinkled shirts would take even longer to sort out.
Trump’s budget is very bad news for science research
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump released his preliminary 2018 budget plan last night, and it’s a bloodbath for scientific research. Not only does Trump’s plan slash funding for the Environmental Protection Agency, as he promised, he’s also proposing cuts to agencies that have a history of receiving broad bipartisan support — like the National Institutes of Health, one of the biggest funders of biomedical research in the world. Investing in research and development has been one of the primary forces driving the US economy since World War II. But that advantage has been shrinking lately, as other nations — especially China — are catching up.
NSA head McMaster knows what it will take to defeat ISIS. But will Trump listen?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
On the rolling hills of the battlefield near Tal Afar in northern Iraq, fighters belonging to the armed brigades known as the Popular Mobilization Forces [PMF], made up of mostly Shiite tribal members, hustle to and from a front-line base confronting forces of the Islamic State. The city was once held up as an example of tribal unity between Shiite and Sunni Muslims after it was liberated from al-Qaida by American troops commanded by then Army Col. H.R. McMaster. Last month President Trump nominated McMaster, now a lieutenant general, as his national security adviser, a pick that was widely praised by both Republicans and Democrats.
With 'Battles Won,' Marines hope to attract more recruits
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
By the time the trailer wraps up, you’re probably expecting to see “The Few, The Proud, The Marines” flash across the screen. Recommended: Are you smarter than a US Marine? This slogan, and the decision to highlight community service alongside battlefield victories, marks the latest fine-tuning of the military’s recruitment machine.
Readers write: Examining populism, family entertainment, lack of trust
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? Regarding the Jan. 26 article “Mary Tyler Moore expanded America’s view of what a woman can be” (CSMonitor.com): Mary Tyler Moore was not only a TV trailblazer who embodied the modern woman, but her show’s genre provided entertainment well suited for family viewing.
PSVR Game 'Eclipse' Now A Google Daydream Exclusive
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
White Elk Studios has released the first trailer for "Eclipse: Edge of Light" and revealed that the virtual reality game is a Google Daydream exclusive.
Trump's budget would cut NASA asteroid mission, earth science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Under US President Donald Trump's proposed budget, NASA's funding would stay largely intact but the space agency would abandon plans to lasso an asteroid, along with four Earth and climate missions. The 2018 budget -- which must be approved by Congress -- asks for $19.1 billion for NASA, a 0.8 percent decrease from 2017, allowing the the space agency to emerge unscathed compared to the deep cuts laid out for other federal science and environmental agencies. The proposal "focuses the nation's efforts on deep space exploration rather than Earth-centric research," it said.
SpaceX is pushing hard to bring the internet to space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For months, SpaceX has been quietly meeting with the FCC to advocate for one of its least-known projects. According to recent disclosures, the company met with FCC officials twice in recent weeks: first with a wireless advisor on February 28th and again on March 10th with Chairman Pai himself. The same two topics came up at each meeting: the first was a stalled proposal to ease the regulatory demands on commercial space launches.
Sharon Tate's last night with Abigail Folger, Wojciech Frykowski, Jay Sebring: Part 5
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The four friends went to a restaurant to get food before returning to Tate's home in Benedict Canyon, California.
Trump's plan to cut climate programs won't hurt scientists that much — but it could hurt the economy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Climate scientists recently got some bad news: The White House released a budget Thursday...
Electrocution Experiment Shows People Can Be Cruel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Society has advanced in many ways in the last 50 years, but people are still as blindly obedient and cruel as they have always been apparently, results from an electrocution experiment show.
The murder trial against Charles Manson and his followers: Part 10
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Linda Kasabian was a star witness for the prosecution and the driver on both nights of the murders.
Sleepless in Seattle, and other places: Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Susan Rogers, a poet and attorney in California, is “hurtling through space with no direction” on a plane that, she discovers with horror, has no pilot. Alicia Bowman, a journalist from East Penn, Pa., is racing frantically through a train that is heading the wrong way, flinging off her belongings so she can run faster, calling frantically for her son, who is transgender. Rachelle Pachtman, who does canine rescue on New York’s Upper West Side, is searching fruitlessly through her refrigerator for something to serve Michelle and Barack Obama, who have just happened to drop by for lunch.
SpaceX And Elon Musk Are Planning To Bring The Internet To Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX has been in talked with the FCC regarding a constellation of satellites to make the Internet Universal.
Kansas man accused of tainting lab with radioactive waste
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Kansas chemist is accused in a federal indictment of illegally storing radioactive material that contaminated his now-closed lab in a suburban Kansas City industrial park, costing U.S. taxpayers $760,000 ...
Quacks on the tracks: NYPD rescues duck from subway line
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — It wasn't an ordinary police call for someone trying to duck a subway fare.
APNewsBreak: Rare monk seal dies in fish farm off Hawaii
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
HONOLULU (AP) — An endangered Hawaiian monk seal has died after wandering into a net pen and becoming trapped at a fish farm that was partially funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Hawaii.
Great job, humanity: You killed the Great Barrier Reef.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Great Barrier Reef is in serious danger of dying, and stopping global warming could be the only way to save it. In 2016, a world-wide coral bleaching event devastated the reef, especially in its pristine northern reaches where the effect was deemed "catastrophic." Now, as the reef faces yet another bleaching event in 2017, a new report has found only one way to rescue the natural wonder: Fight climate change. SEE ALSO: Looking for hope on climate change under Trump? Cities are where the action is. Published in Nature, the research assessed the scope and severity of bleaching on the 2,300-kilometres-long (1,429 miles) reef in 2016, compared with past events in 1998 and 2002.  Aerial surveys of more than 1,100 reefs across the area revealed the extent of the damage caused by record high water temperatures — the result of a strong 2015-2016 El Niño and human-caused global warning. Coral surveyor Margaux Hein swims over a field of recently dead branching corals, northern Great BarrierReef, October 2016. Image: Greg Torda, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies The numbers are incredible: In 1998 and 2002, only about 10 percent of the surveyed reefs were in the extreme bleaching category (meaning more than 60 percent bleached), said Sean Connolly, a professor at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. In 2016, nearly 50 percent of the surveyed reefs were in the extreme category.  Likewise, only 8.9 percent of 1,156 reefs surveyed escaped its effect in 2016. Coral bleaching occurs when coral expels the colour and nutrient-giving algae that lives in its tissue. Caused by stresses such as increased water temperatures and pollution, this leaves the skeleton exposed, making it vulnerable to heat, disease and pollution. Without reducing carbon emissions, we are giving our reefs no time to recover from bleaching events — events that are predicted to occur with increasing frequency. It takes around 15 years for relatively fast-growing corals to recover from a significant disturbance like bleaching or a cyclone, Connolly explained. "There just won't be time for reefs to recover," he said. "How badly they degrade depends very much on how quickly we move to a zero emissions economy. Once global temperatures stabilise, then reefs will have time to adapt and catchup." Aircraft shadow over bleached reef. Image: James Kerry, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Aerial view of a severely bleached reef. Image: JAMES KERRY, ARC CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE FOR CORAL REEF STUDIES. Robert H. Richmond, a research professor at the University of Hawaii's Kewalo Marine Laboratory who was not involved with the report, said the paper's findings were sobering but not surprising. The most recent global bleaching event was "unprecedented in recorded history," he said. "We're seeing these happening more frequently, they're longer lasting and the geographic distribution is spreading." The report also found we cannot climate-proof reefs with only local measures. Water quality management, such as preventing agrochemical runoff and implementing fishing bans, for example, won't necessarily protect reefs from the effects of climbing ocean temperatures.  Bleached coral on the Great Barrier Reef, north of Townsville, March 2017. Image: Greg Torda, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies "That doesn't mean water quality doesn't have an important impact on reefs," Connolly added, explaining that sediment and algae caused by runoffs can make it harder for baby corals to grow. "The point is not that addressing water quality is useless, but that it doesn't protect us from the negative effects of climate change." This finding calls into question whether the Australian government's Reef 2050 Long-Term Sustainability Plan, which focuses largely on water quality and reducing the impact of ports and shipping on the reef, will do much to mitigate large-scale bleaching. Aerial view of wide spread coral bleaching, northern Great Barrier Reef, March 2016. Image: Terry Hughes, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies While past researchers have hypothesised that reefs exposed to bleaching might be able to adapt and survive future such events, the team did not see that in the data. "Bleaching is an episodic event," Connolly said. "The pace of temperature change is very, very fast. It doesn't seem to be the case that corals are able to adjust their physiology to warmer water so that they have higher bleaching thresholds." There's no question that coral reefs are severely threatened, Richmond said, but they're not doomed if climate change can be halted. Authored by 46 scientists, the report asks the world to take notice. "Things are changing even faster than many of us feared," Connolly added. "We can keep burning fossil fuels or we can try to protect functioning coral reefs.  "But we're not going to be able to have both." WATCH: NASA designed grippers that can lift celestial rocks in microgravity
3 Women in Florida Left Blind by Unproven Eye Treatment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three women went blind after receiving an unproven stem cell treatment on their eyes at a Florida clinic, according to a new report of the cases. However, there's no evidence that the stem cell treatment the women received can help restore vision in people with macular degeneration, wrote the authors of the new report. In addition, there is a lack of information on the safety of this treatment, and some of the techniques used by the Florida clinic were unsafe, the report said.