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Can Trumpism Survive Without Donald Trump?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Results from the latest elections are bad news for Trump's movement
The Trump Administration Ended Protection for Nicaraguans Who Fled Disaster. These Three Countries Could Be Next
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trump administration's approach to temporary protected status aligns with its greater immigration policy goals
Democrat Ralph Northam Has Won the Race for Virginia Governor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Virginia's hard-fought race was closely watched as a swing-state test of President Donald Trump's popularity
Top Trump campaign adviser admits he was 'fooled' by a Russian Twitter bot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Brad Parscale, like Kellyanne Conway and Donald Trump Jr., retweeted a purported group of ”Tennessee Republicans” that was actually a Russian troll account.
Republicans explain why they're retiring: 'You've got this administration that's taken the fun out of dysfunction'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The number of departing members is still within historical averages, but one source says more House Republicans are waiting until 2018 to announce their retirements.
Resilient, or just numb? As atrocities mount, Americans become adept at moving on
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Americans are developing a shortened attention span in the wake of tragedies. Like Israelis, they have learned the routines of national grief, and move on quickly. But is that really healthy?
Police: Thief didn't get far in motorized grocery store cart
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
FAIRBANKS, Alaska (AP) — A man accused of stealing a motorized shopping cart from an Alaska grocery store didn't get very far or go very fast before his low-speed getaway attempt was foiled by police.
Sheep can recognize Baaaa
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LONDON (AP) — A new study shows that sheep have the ability to recognize human faces from photographs on computer screens.
Russian man says he lived on Mars in a past life, and that Martians are still there
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There are lots of crazy people walking around on our planet, and even if they honestly believe some of the things they say — that the Earth is flat, or a mysterious hidden planet is going to slam into the Earth — they're not really worth listening to. A 20-year-old Russian man named Boriska Kipriyanovich may very well be crazy, but his claims that he is a reborn former Martian has stolen headlines thanks to his unusual life story, and oddly specific "knowledge" of the cosmos. Kipriyanovich was reportedly something of a child prodigy from the very first years of his life, allegedly learning to read and write before the age of two. As he grew older, he began telling a tale of a previous life on Mars that would make for a great sci-fi movie, but the young Russian claims it's 100% real. Kipriyanovich says that he once lived on Mars many years ago, and that he died when then planet was in the midst of a nuclear war. He says that as a Martian he stood seven feet tall, and that he was 35 years old, though that's only because Martians had mastered the prevention of aging and all martians stopped aging and became semi-immortal at 35 years of age. He further claims that he was part of a Martian military organization and flew raids both on Mars as well as traveling to Earth, where Martians freely interacted with the ancient Egyptians. The iconic Sphinx has some kind of a mechanism built into it that allows it to be "opened," he says, and doing so will unlock "the secrets of the universe." Of course, scientists have never stumbled upon any remnants of a Martian civilization, but Kipriyanovich has an explanation for that, too. He says the surface of the planet was wiped out in a nuclear holocaust, and that while Martians do still live on the planet, they have actually made their home deep underground, and breathe carbon dioxide. It's a wild tale, and the timeline of the entire thing doesn't exactly match up with what we know thanks to space agencies and researchers from around the world, including Russia. In an interview, Kipriyanovich's parents note that, thanks to his ability to read at a very young age, he would often read books on space and astronomy. Is it possible a 3-year-old brain studying space literature fabricated it all? Well, it's more likely than Mars being destroyed in a nuclear holocaust, that's for sure.
Marie Curie Was Born 150 Years Ago and Women Are Still Fighting to Be Scientists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Today, November 7, marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of Marie Sklodowska, later known as Marie Curie. It's hard to quibble with the statement that she changed the world: She was awarded two separate Nobel Prizes, in two separate disciplines, she discovered two elements and entire concept of radioactivity, and she helped bring the life-saving medical power of X-rays to the battlefields of World War I. Only her husband and lab partner's lobbying on her behalf ensured she wasn't cut out of the first Nobel Prize that honored their work, and only her taking his professorship after his death earned her the title.
A Giant Exoplanet Is Hiding at the Center of the Milky Way Galaxy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have spotted a gigantic exoplanet that they believe is hiding deep at the center of the Milky Way, about 22,000 light-years away from Earth, a large team is reporting in a paper recently posted on the physics pre-print server arxiv and submitted to The Astrophysical Journal. The new planet orbits a star a little smaller than our own sun at about twice the distance that Earth orbits the sun. The exoplanet has been given the clunky label OGLE-2016-BLG-1190Lb, but don't let the name bore you. It's a little bigger than 13 Jupiters smooshed together, which means that for a planet, it's really, really big—in fact, it may actually be large enough to be a tiny little star, what's called a brown dwarf, instead.
Bill de Blasio Cruises to an Easy Re
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bill de Blasio, an outspoken Trump critic, cruised to re-election for a second term
LGBT sweep in historic election for transgender candidates
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
LGBT candidates won groundbreaking elections in Virginia, Pennsylvania, Minnesota Washington state. Dems see big gains as repudiation of Trump's first year.
Top Trump campaign adviser admits he was ‘fooled’ by a Russian Twitter bot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Brad Parscale, the digital media director for President Trump’s 2016 election campaign, admitted he was duped by a Russian Twitter bot during an interview with Yahoo News’ Michael Isikoff. Parscale, who spoke with Isikoff at the Web Summit in Lisbon, Portugal on Wednesday, was one of several top Trump allies who retweeted messages posted by the Twitter account @TEN_GOP during last year’s campaign. While the account purported to be run by “Tennessee Republicans,” it was recently revealed to have been operated by the Kremlin backed Internet Research Agency. ...
Imitating 'Curb,' St. Louis man ticketed for honking at cop
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ST. LOUIS (AP) — A St. Louis man is feeling pretty ... pretty ... pretty ... pretty miffed over a recent traffic ticket.
There's Now an App That Tells You If McDonald's Ice Cream Machine Is Broken
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Come one, come all for McFlurries
'The Opposite of Game of Thrones.' What the Arrest of Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Really Means
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Part of a sweeping effort to consolidate a young crown prince’s power within the Saudi state
Everything you need to know about Neuralink: Elon Musk’s brainy new venture
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk wants computer chips in our brains -- but it's for a good cause. Here's everything you need to know about his latest venture, Neuralink.
'We Need to Clean Up Our Democracy.' Former DNC Chair Donna Brazile on Her New Tell
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Donna Brazile opens up about whether the 2016 election was rigged, the flawed DNC and Hillary Clinton.
One Year After Trump's Election, Voters Still See Him as a Hero
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Despite what the polling numbers say
Baltimore Police Van Driver Found Not Guilty in Freddie Gray Case
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Caesar Goodson was found not guilty on all charges in a case that sparked riots in the city
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman Suggests Iran Committed 'Act of War'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mohammed bin Salman says Iran supplied missiles to rebels in Yemen, in a "direct military aggression"
A year in the life of Donald Trump, and the country
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
When Donald Trump became the president-elect one year ago, his elated supporters and his crestfallen detractors had two very different ideas of the president he would become.
Screams of "Help!" draw 911 call, but parrot is the screamer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CLACKAMAS, Ore. (AP) — A deliveryman in Oregon who heard a woman's screams for help had his wife call 911, but when a deputy showed up it turned out the screamer was a parrot, not a woman.
Lift up your hearts, not your cell phones, pope tells priests, bishops
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Pope Francis on Wednesday chastised priests and bishops who take pictures with their cell phones during Masses, saying they should focus on God instead. Not only by the faithful, but also by some priests and even bishops! "The Mass is not a show ... so remember, no cell phones!" he said, prompting laughter and applause from the crowd.
Basic Painkillers Are Just As Effective as Opioids, Study Finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers provide more evidence that not all pain needs to be treated with powerful and potentially addictive opioids
United's Final Boeing 747 Flight Is in the Air. Here's How to Track It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The route replicated that of United's first 747
Exploring Egypt's Great Pyramid from the inside, virtually
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Lucien Libert PARIS (Reuters) - A team of scientists who last week announced the discovery of a large void inside the Great Pyramid of Giza have created a virtual-reality tour that allows users to 'teleport' themselves inside the structure and explore its architecture. Using 3D technology, the Scan Pyramids Project allows visitors wearing headsets to take a guided tour inside the Grand Gallery, the Queen's Chamber and other ancient rooms not normally accessible to the public, without leaving Paris. "Thanks to this technique, we make it possible to teleport ourselves to Egypt, inside the pyramid, as a group and with a guide," said Mehdi Tayoubi, co-director of Scan Pyramids, which on Nov. 2 announced the discovery of a mysterious space inside the depths of the Pyramid.
'Do Not Underestimate Us.' President Trump Sends a Stern Warning to North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Speaking to South Korea's National Assembly, Trump called on all nations to join forces "to isolate the brutal regime "
Texas Church Shooter Contacted His Father Before He Died, Officials Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Wearing all-black tactical gear, he "moved around freely” inside the church
Polish government asks citizens to multiply like rabbits
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — The Polish government is urging citizens to go forth and multiply like rabbits.
Spies and Threats: How Harvey Weinstein Allegedly Tried to Silence Accusers and Journalists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What to know about the latest report about the disgraced Hollywood mogul
FBI Seeks Access to Texas Church Shooter's Cellphone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
10 victims remain hospitalized in critical condition
Sen. Bob Menendez's Bribery Trial Goes to Jury
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Menendez is charged with accepting gifts from Dr. Salomon Melgen
Saturn’s frosty ocean moon Enceladus might actually support life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mankind has sent fancy robots and probes to a whole bunch of our nearest planetary neighbors and found nothing to suggest life exists (or ever existed) on them, but if you've given up hope that humanity would find extraterrestrial life in our very own Solar System, you might want to rethink that. A new study published in Nature used data gathered by the reliable Cassini spacecraft to gauge the possibility that life could be supported on Saturn's icy ocean moon Enceladus. The verdict? It's looking very, very good. Enceladus is a massive ball of thick ice covering a salty water mixture and, scientists believe, a rocky core. Scientists are virtually certain that there is hydrothermal activity present deep within the planet, as massive plumes of water have been observed shooting out from between cracks in the ice, and the newest round of data reveals that this activity has been ongoing long enough that it may have spawned life. The ice around Enceladus is incredibly thick, measuring many miles deep, but it's thinner near the planet's poles. Massive geysers have been spotted prominently in the south polar region, but the planet is thought to be completely covered in an ocean underneath its ice. With billions of years under its belt, and an ocean which ranges from frigid to steaming hot near its core, life as we know it may have had a very good chance at forming. Prior research had failed to figure out how Enceladus had remained warm enough to support liquid water over such a long time period. It was thought that if radioactivity at its core was the engine that drove the planet, it would have fizzled out after a few million years, but that obviously didn't happen, so scientists came up with a new theory that seems to fit the bill. A new computer model using a porous core structure, whereby heat from the planet's core (powered by energy from its ocean tides) is pushed outward in a jet-like fashion. Whether life ever did spring forth — and more importantly, if it's still there, thriving underneath the incredibly thick layer of ice — is anyone's guess. NASA has proposed missions to Enceladus in the past, but these so-called "Life Finder" efforts have not yet been set in stone.
Syria indicates it will join Paris climate accord
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BONN, Germany (AP) — Syria plans to join the Paris climate accord, an official from the war-ravaged country said Tuesday, a move that leaves the United States as the only United Nations member state not supporting the agreement.
What A U.S. Electric Grid Attack Looks Like
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The electrical system is the backbone of modern life, but what would happen if the whole of the United States were to lose electricity?
Germany: police detain man hiding python in his pants
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BERLIN (AP) — A young man detained by police during a drunken argument in Germany was found to be carrying a baby python in his pants, and may be in trouble under animal welfare laws.
Everyone Needs a "Mean" Friend—Here's Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study from the University of Plymouth found that people may try to make someone else feel negative emotions if they think experiencing those...
President Trump Wants an Extra $4 Billion for North Korea Missile Defense
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The safety and security of the American people is my top priority"
Stephen Hawking issues dire warning: We have less than 600 years until Earth becomes a sizzling fireball
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Renowned physicist Stephen Hawking has issued yet another warning for Earth and this time, he says we have less than 600 years before the Earth turns into a sizzling fireball.
'I've Never Seen Our State So Miserable.' Voters Head to the Polls in Virginia and New Jersey
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Both Republicans and Democrats are seeking momentum heading into 2018
Someone Figured Out How Long 'A Long Time Ago' Is In The 'Star Wars' Films
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Star Wars movies take place a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. In his new book The Physics of Star Wars: The Science Behind a Galaxy Far, Far Away, author (and Georgetown University assistant professor) Patrick Johnson used physics to determine the timeline of George Lucas’ creation. “The best theories that we have indicate that our universe is about 13.7 billion years old,” he wrote in an excerpt from Forbes.
Stephen Hawking AI Warning: Artificial Intelligence Could Destroy Civilization
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
World-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking has warned that artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to destroy civilization and could be the worst thing that has ever happened to humanity. Seaking at a technology conference in Lisbon, Portugal, Hawking told attendees that mankind had to find a way to control computers, CNBC reports. "Success in creating effective AI, could be the biggest event in the history of our civilization.
7 of the Most Important Moments Since Donald Trump Was Elected
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It has been quite a year
Domestic Violence is the 'Canary in the Coal Mine' for Mass Shootings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
54% of recent mass shootings involved domestic or family violence
Ralph Northam rebuffs Trumpism in Virginia gubernatorial win
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Democrats across the country are breathing a sigh of relief after Ralph Northam was elected Virginia’s next governor Tuesday night.
Democrats make huge gains in Virginia House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As of 9:30, Democrats had picked up 13 seats and had a 47-46 edge in called races, with seven contests still too close to call, putting them on the cusp of a majority in the 100-seat chamber.
Canadian Mounties arrest 5 naked suspects after kidnapping
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NISKU, Alberta (AP) — Police arriving at a car crash in western Canada found five naked people inside, and ended up accusing them of kidnapping a mother, her father and her baby.
New Zealand's Prime Moggy, Paddles the six
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Paddles, the New Zealand prime minister's ginger cat, may have had six toes and a wide social media following but she has run out of lives. Jacinda Ardern, the charismatic new leader of New Zealand, announced the death of the Prime Moggy on Wednesday after Paddles was hit by a car the previous evening, prompting an outpouring of grief on social media. Paddles' rise to social media fame matched her 37-year-old owner's meteoric ascent to the prime ministership after only taking over as leader of her Labour Party in August.