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How Germany forced a rethink of Africa
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Just this year alone, an estimated 400,000 African migrants will flee to Germany, escaping either war or poverty, or both. Among the 400,000 companies in Germany, fewer than 1,000 invest in Africa, officials found. “That has to change!” declared Gerd Müller, Germany’s development minister, in February.
Klondike Gold Drills 2.4 g/t Au Over 40.9 Meters and 2.1 g/t Au Over 41.1 Meters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
VANCOUVER, BC / ACCESSWIRE / July 11, 2017 / Klondike Gold Corp. (TSX-V: KG; FRA: LBDP) ("Klondike Gold" or the "Company") has received drill assay results from the first two holes ...
As L.A. anticipates being chosen to host Olympics, Trump prepares to take credit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president appeared poised to take credit on Tuesday for what is expected to be a winning bid by the city of Los Angeles to host the Summer Games. The California mega-city has been working on a plan to host the Olympics since 2015.
Lawmakers call for questioning Donald Trump Jr. over Russia meeting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., ranking member of the Senate Select Intelligence Committee, awaits the start of a hearing June 28, 2017. The committee heard testimony on Russian intervention in U.S. and European elections. After the latest revelations about Donald Trump Jr.’s meeting with a Russian lawyer, members of both parties are calling on him to cooperate with congressional investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.
Trump Jr. releases emails saying he’d ‘love’ Russian dirt on Clinton
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Donald Trump Jr. published emails Tuesday containing apparently explosive information about Russia’s efforts to aid President Trump’s 2016 campaign. The emails show Trump Jr. agreeing to meet with a Russian lawyer in order to receive damaging information about his father’s opponent, Hillary Clinton.
Economy races ahead, but land
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Some have left behind drought-affected farmland in the country’s south. The 4.5-mile irrigation dyke, constructed with forced labor when the Khmer Rouge regime controlled Cambodia between 1975 and 1979, offered a small piece of free land on which to attempt to rebuild their lives. Just 45 minutes north by car lies the booming capital, Phnom Penh, where skyscrapers and malls illustrate Cambodia’s ongoing economic transformation: today, the country enjoys about 7 percent annual economic growth, and the number of Cambodians living under the poverty line is steadily dropping.
Mary Matsuda Gruenewald graduates from her high school – 74 years later
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For 17-year-old Mary Matsuda, a not-so-funny thing happened on the way to her high-school graduation: Soldiers armed with rifles and bayonets forced Mary to abandon her family’s strawberry farm here, weeks before the end of her junior year at Vashon High. It was May 16, 1942, and Mary, along with 110 others of Japanese-American ancestry, were “evacuated” from this bucolic agricultural island in the Puget Sound and sent to the first of four federal internment camps Mary would inhabit during World War II. “My friends accompanied me to the ferry,” Mary, now 92, recalls.
Thai seafood giant commits to major fishing reforms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thai Union, one of the world's largest seafood conglomerates, said Tuesday it will overhaul its fishing practices to protect against labour abuses and unsustainable trawling, a move hailed by Greenpeace as "huge progress". The Thai food giant -- which owns major global brands such as Chicken of the Sea, John West and Petit Navire -- has long been a bete noire to those campaigning against overfishing and abusive working conditions on boats. "This marks huge progress for our oceans and marine life and for the rights of people working in the seafood industry," Greenpeace International Executive Director Bunny McDiarmid said in the statement.
Print me a pint: 3D
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers at the University of Washington have invented a new, cheaper, more efficient way to ferment yeast. Their five-minute 3D-printed bioreactor continues fermenting for months at a time.
Bill Nye: Other countries more curious about science than U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The "Science Guy" says rational thinking is vital to solving problems facing humanity, like climate change -- and health care
‘They wanted it so badly’: Russian lawyer who met with Trump Jr. denies having dirt on Clinton
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“I never had any damaging or sensitive information about Hillary Clinton. It was never my intention to have that,” Veselnitskaya told NBC News though a translator. Saturday, the New York Times reported Trump Jr. orchestrated the meeting shortly after his father sealed the Republican nomination.
Artists and architects think differently to everyone else – you only have to hear them talk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
People in visually creative professions have their own way of seeing the world.
Students are locked in a Beijing bunker for a space isolation experiment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
While in the Lunar Palace 1 bunkers the students will be restricted to self-sustainability, using just what they brought in while recycling everything from human waste to plant clippings.
Tech companies wage war on disease
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
American technology companies are bringing automation and robotics to the age-old task of battling mosquitoes in a bid to halt the spread of Zika and other mosquito-borne maladies worldwide. Firms including Microsoft Corp and California life sciences company Verily are forming partnerships with public health officials in several U.S. states to test new high-tech tools. In Texas, Microsoft is testing a smart trap to isolate and capture Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, known Zika carriers, for study by entomologists to give them a jump on predicting outbreaks.
Wildfires rage in sweltering California forcing thousands to flee
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Wildfires roared Sunday across much of California, forcing thousands to evacuate homes as the most populous US state sweltered in record heat and flames menaced thousands of structures. Some 8,000 people were sent fleeing as thousands of firefighters were battling 14 large wildfires throughout the state, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, known as Cal Fire. The Alamo fire had scorched 23,867 acres (96.58 square kilometers) after starting in San Luis Obispo County and spreading to Santa Barbara County along the state's central coast, officials said.
Man charged in mailing of severed finger, fake bomb to IRS
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — An Olympia, Washington man who authorities say mailed one of his fingers to the IRS is now facing federal charges.
Amazon takes aim at Best Buy's Geek Squad service
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The new offer includes installation of smart-home gadgets for a fee as well as free Alexa demos
How we found St Columba’s famous writing hut, stashed in a Cornish garage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists believed there was too little left from the time of the saint who Christianised the Scottish Picts to prove the legend. Turns out they were wrong.
Who is Natalia Veselnitskaya, the Russian lawyer who met with Donald Trump Jr.?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Veselnitskaya reportedly lured Trump Jr. and other campaign team members to the meeting with the promise of compromising information on Hillary Clinton.
Drink Coffee and You May Live Longer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Two large new studies published today in Annals of Internal Medicine provide even more evidence that your daily coffee ritual is likely a very healthy habit. While most previous coffee research h...
The Mideast Can Expect Rain — In 10,000 Years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Climate change effects: Rock samples have shown scientists a pattern for rainfall in the Middle East, and it looks like the dry spell is going to continue for a while.
With Paul Allen’s backing, Tri Alpha Energy revs up ‘Norman’ device for fusion research
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tri Alpha Energy, the fusion energy venture backed by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, says it has achieved first plasma in its latest generator. The $100 million device at Tri Alpha’s lab in Foothill Ranch, Calif., had been known as C-2W, but it’s been renamed “Norman” in honor of company co-founder Norman Rostoker, a fusion physicist who died in 2014 at the age of 89. “We believe this machine will continue to prove the approach to plasma physics he first envisioned and to which he dedicated his life,” Michl Binderbauer, Tri Alpha’s president and chief technology officer, said in a news release.… Read More
Columbus innovates safety in transportation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Smart & Safe Tech: In 2016, Columbus, Ohio won the U.S. Department of Transportation Smart City Challenge and received $40 million dollars to develop smart technology in their city
Researchers searching for signs of extraterrestrial life just got some very bad news
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By using Earth and our sun as a reference, scientists have spent decades honing in on the conditions required for a planet to support life. The identification of the so-called "Goldilocks zone," which is the area around a star in which liquid water can exist on the surface of a planet, has been the key for researchers spotting exoplanets which are good candidates for extraterrestrial life. Unfortunately, new research conducted by astronomers at the University of Hull in England suggests that there's plenty of stars in our own galaxy that simply cannot support life whatsoever, and it's a huge bummer. The study was initially prompted by research from 2013 which proposed that as many as 70 billion of the up to 400 billion stars in our galaxy were of the "failed" brown dwarf variety. Brown dwarf stars are too hot to support life on their surface, but too cold to provide much heat to any planets that might be in their orbit. This results in a star which has no "Goldilocks zone," and essentially rules out the possibility that life exists on the surface of the planets nearby. Using that earlier study as a baseline, the team set its sights on a nearby star cluster in an attempt to estimate how many brown dwarf stars it contained. The density of the "failed" stars in that cluster led the researchers to conclude that the 70 billion estimate reached in 2013 for our own Milky Way might actually be much lower than reality. The team now believes that as many as 100 billion of the 400-billion-or-so stars in our galactic backyard might be brown dwarves. That means that, potentially, a full quarter or more of the stars nearest us can't even provide the conditions required for the formation and support of life. It's not great news in the search for aliens, but with astronomers already spotting systems with multiple potentially life-support planets like Trappist-1, there's no reason to rule out the possibility of meeting ET one day.
Republicans increasingly think colleges are harming the U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A majority of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents think that colleges and universities are having a negative impact on the United States.
White House defends meeting between Russian lawyer and Trump’s inner circle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A June 2016 meeting that involved members of Trump’s campaign and a Kremlin-linked lawyer was routine, as the White House sees it.
Chris Christie’s turn as WFAN host goes exactly as you’d expect
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Filling in on an NYC sports talk radio show, Christie sparred with callers over President Trump and infamous photos of him lounging on a closed public beach.
After spending 9 months alone in mountains, lost dog is home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A lost Boise dog is back home after nine months and a brutal winter alone in the Idaho mountains.
Wyoming sulfur pile burns with otherworldly effects
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WORLAND, Wyo. (AP) — If you ever wondered what a burning pile of sulfur looks like, the answer is like a UFO crash site or maybe a scene on another planet.
In G20 protests, a different view of extremism
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recent years have seen rallies by Pegida, an anti-Islamic group, gain momentum, as well as those by the far-right Alternative for Germany party. Germany, it seemed, was in the midst of its own turn to the populist right.
Sanction China over North Korea? The cases for and against
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Nikki Haley, President Trump’s ambassador to the United Nations, says the United States has “multiple forms” of “ammunition” yet to use to stop North Korea’s growing nuclear and ballistic missile threats. If Beijing fails to do more – or undermines international efforts to do more – to pressure Pyongyang over its advancing nuclear and intercontinental ballistic missile programs, the US will slap the Chinese with punitive economic measures to encourage them to reconsider. Recommended: Kim 101: How well do you know North Korea's leaders?
Amazon's Echo and other smart speakers do much more than you realize
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Harman Kardon’s Invoke is Microsoft’s first true Amazon Echo competitor. When Amazon first debuted its Alexa-powered Echo smart speaker in 2014, expectations for the device were relatively high. More than two years later, the Echo’s success has spurred a new war of the tech titans: Companies including Apple (AAPL), Google (GOOG, GOOGL), Microsoft (MSFT), Samsung and a slew of their Chinese counterparts have either released their own smart speakers or will likely release them soon.
New material bismuthene could boost spintronics information technology
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A newly developed material that mimics properties of graphene, called bismuthene, could open the door to new innovations in the field of spintronics, due to its ability to provide much-needed properties at room temperature.
Why Do Corals Glow in the Dark?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s one of the ocean’s most beautiful and striking mysteries: Why do corals fluoresce? In shallow waters, they glow a brilliant pink and purple. In deeper waters, corals turn red and green against a dim blue background. The view is most unforgettable at night with a flashlight and mask filter, when the fluorescent corals provide a “psychedelic adventure.”
How The Earliest Large Animals Suddenly Gained Size
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Till about 635 million years ago, life on Earth was mostly microscopic, but rangeomorphs that appear in the fossil record around that time grew up to over 6 feet tall.
Four lions escape from S.Africa's Kruger Park
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Four male lions escaped over the weekend fromm South Africa's famed Kruger National Park, officials said Monday, two months after five others slipped out. Park management said in a statement that the majestic predators were believed to have sneaked out on Sunday night, and that they had been spotted in a nearby village. Kruger Park, which borders Zimbabwe and Mozambique, is home to about 1,500 lions, and nearly the size of Belgium.
Are this year's Amazon Prime Day deals worth the effort?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Vera Gibbons details everything shoppers need to know on 'America's News HQ'
No, New York Mag: Climate change won't make the Earth uninhabitable by 2100
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Climate change is a tough issue to cover as a journalist. It's like following a slow-motion train wreck, except significant portions of the population dispute whether there really are trains involved and whether they will, in the end, crash.  There's a constant tension between portraying doom-and-gloom scenarios of drowning cities and deadly heat waves, compared to hopeful stories of mayors and governors and world leaders (outside the U.S.) who are working to cut emissions of global warming pollutants.  The science can be scary, but it shouldn't be paralyzing, and it certainly doesn't justify worrying about whether humans will even be able to survive on this planet by the end of this century.  SEE ALSO: How clean energy is transforming the world, in 5 charts However, a new, widely-read story in New York Magazine by David Wallace-Wells, goes down the doomsday path and never looks back. It's worth addressing here since it's generating so much conversation online, and climate scientists and journalists are being asked to attest to its veracity.  The magazine cover story, entitled, "The Uninhabitable Earth," takes the bleakest climate science projections and assumes the worst from there. It's one of the darkest portrayals of our climate future that's been written recently, at least from a nonfiction perspective.  This Week's Issue: The Uninhabitable Earth https://t.co/zBtIpS06Uh pic.twitter.com/32ryki9osI — New York Magazine (@NYMag) July 10, 2017 In several places, the story either exaggerates the evidence or gets the science flat-out wrong. This is unfortunate, because it detracts from a well-written, attention-grabbing piece. It's still worth reading, but with a sharp critical eye.  In recent years, scientific evidence has solidified around central findings, showing that sea level rise is likely to be far more severe during the rest of this century than initially anticipated, and that key temperature thresholds may be crossed that make life difficult for some kinds of plants and animals to survive in certain places.  A tourist drinks water from a fountain to cool himself in St. Peter's Square in Vatican City, on July 9, 2017.Image: ONORATI/EPA/REX/ShutterstockSuch threshold crossings may even make it tough for humans to live and work in parts of the Middle East, Asia, and tropics.   All of this is scary. However, climate scientists nearly universally say that there is still time to avert the worst consequences of global warming, and that this message needs to be driven home again and again in order to encourage leaders to act. Doom and gloom only leads to fear and paralysis, studies have shown.  The feature story in New York Magazine says scientists, as well as the public, are being too timid in their climate change scenarios.  Wallace-Wells writes: One prominent climate scientist, Michael Mann of Penn State University, has posted a rebuttal to the piece on Facebook. Mann says he was interviewed, though not quoted or cited by name in the article, and he is disappointed with the published story. "I have to say that I am not a fan of this sort of doomist framing," Mann said. "It is important to be up front about the risks of unmitigated climate change, and I frequently criticize those who understate the risks. But there is also a danger in overstating the science in a way that presents the problem as unsolvable, and feeds a sense of doom, inevitability and hopelessness." It's not a journalist's job to serve up a healthy dose of hope in every story. However, it is our job to be accurate, and according to Mann and others, Wallace-Wells' piece falls short in this regard, too.  In his post, Mann says the story fails to back up its claims that parts of the Earth will be uninhabitable by the end of the century.  "The article argues that climate change will render the Earth uninhabitable by the end of this century. Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. The article fails to produce it," he says.  "The article paints an overly bleak picture by overstating some of the science. It exaggerates for example, the near-term threat of climate 'feedbacks' involving the release of frozen methane (the science on this is much more nuanced and doesn't support the notion of a game-changing, planet-melting methane bomb. It is unclear that much of this frozen methane can be readily mobilized by projected warming: http://www.realclimate.org/…/2012/01/much-ado-about-methane/)." Mann also pointed out other factual errors in the piece, including the claim that satellite data shows the globe has been warming more than twice as fast as scientists thought since 1998.  Climate change is a real/present issue but I think we can reach a broader audience by talking about impacts/solutions rather than hyperboles — Zack Labe (@ZLabe) July 10, 2017 This is a deeply irresponsible article, cherry-picking doomsday scenarios. Climate change is real and serious, but this is stretching... https://t.co/kEPhvGaywf — Jon Foley (@GlobalEcoGuy) July 10, 2017 "The evidence that climate change is a serious problem that we must contend with now, is overwhelming on its own," Mann said. "There is no need to overstate the evidence, particularly when it feeds a paralyzing narrative of doom and hopelessness. I'm afraid this latest article does that." Andrew Dessler, a climate researcher at Texas A&M University, also faults the piece for being overly pessimistic and containing a few factual inaccuracies.   "I think the picture painted by the author is probably a worst, worst, worst case scenario that combines the strongest response of the climate system to carbon dioxide, combined with zero effort by the world to reduce emissions," he said in an email.  "While that could happen, I think a more likely scenario is not as bleak. And as someone who talks to climate scientists a lot, I've never heard anyone tell me that they think this is a likely scenario for the planet." Sea level rise scenario for Miami, Florida, showing much of the metro area under water with 6 feet of rise.Image: climate centralPerhaps Mann, Dessler, and even myself, to some extent, are being too tough on Wallace-Wells. After all, the story does say that it offers up details on where we are currently headed given the pace of climate change and greenhouse gas emissions, it's not a guaranteed vision for the future.   "In between scientific reticence and science fiction is science itself," the article states.  "It is unlikely that all of these warming scenarios will be fully realized, largely because the devastation along the way will shake our complacency. But those scenarios, and not the present climate, are the baseline. In fact, they are our schedule." Wallace-Wells does accurately capture the prevailing optimistic attitude of many climate scientists,  including those who have been studying this issue for decades. These people don't have a bleak outlook, and they are not preparing bunkers to shelter in for the end of days.  Instead, it's unfathomable to them that we would continue much further down a path of increasingly painful consequences before veering off, slashing emissions, and working to adapt to the global warming already guaranteed by the delayed response time of the climate system.  As Wallace-Wells writes, "... Climate scientists have a strange kind of faith: We will find a way to forestall radical warming, they say, because we must."  Katharine Hayhoe, a climate researcher at Texas Tech University, posses the optimism that Wallace-Wells writes about.  June 20, 2017 in Phoenix, ArizonaImage: Ralph Freso/Getty Images"The problem is that we’ve continued smoking long after the physicians have warned us of its impacts, and some of the damage is already setting in," she said in an email.  "Yet the choices we make today will still have a profound impact on our future. The worst and most dangerous outcomes can be avoided, and to do so we need to understand that our actions DO make a difference." Hayhoe said that doomsday fears won't get us where we need to go.  "The time to act is now — but not out of fear, with panicked, knee-jerk reactions that burn us out," Hayhoe said. "We need to act based on measured hope and confidence that the science is right, the impacts are serious, and there are solutions to the gravest threats climate change poses if we choose them now." In more than a decade of reporting on climate science and policy, I have yet to meet a pessimistic climate scientist. Sure, they know better than most people what unfortunate scenarios lie around the corner, but they also have faith in people to work to avert them. They also tend to posses an innate curiosity about the ways the climate system, and society, may still surprise them.  They have plenty of evidence to back up this optimism, including the rapid shift to renewables taking place in global energy markets and the determination to go around the United States in implementing the Paris Climate Agreement.  This isn't to say that climate scientists are sanguine about the future, though.  As Dessler said, "While I don't think the future painted by the author is likely, the more likely scenarios are still personally worrying to me." Count me in that camp as well.  WATCH: Aerial footage shows Chernobyl 30 years after the world’s worst nuclear disaster
3 Inspirational Elon Musk Quotes About the Future
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Love him or hate him, Elon Musk is, without a doubt, one of the most important figures in the technology industry today. Let's take a look at a few of Musk's most poignant quotes about the future to see if this seasoned tech veteran can reveal anything about what we should expect.
Oil, gas key to world energy for 'decades to come': Saudi Aramco boss
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Oil and gas will remain central to the world's supply of energy for decades to come, the chief executive of giant producer Saudi Aramco said Monday, urging market players to ensure energy security by bolstering faltering investment. Oil major bosses and energy ministers are meeting at the World Petroleum Congress in Istanbul, with the outlook clouded by the low price of crude oil, currently trading at around 45 dollars a barrel compared with a peak of over 145 dollars in 2008. This has driven down investment to record lows, while oil majors are also grappling with the new importance of unconventional sources like shale and renewables.
Life on the Moon: China Is Testing a Self
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
While some nations may be content to simply set foot on the moon, China has bigger things in mind. President Xi Jinping has said he wants his country to become a force in space exploration, and the plan is to start at the celestial body closest to Earth. China wants to send a probe to the dark side of the moon by next year, and put astronauts on its surface by 2036, Reuters reports.
Let them be equal, but not too equal: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Human beings display a genuine aversion to income inequality, but this compassion is eclipsed by a competing desire not to upend the social pecking order, researchers said Monday. As for why humans behave in this way, the researchers speculated that it may be a question of survival.
NASA’s Hubble captures stunning photo that will make you feel insignificant
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We go about our lives here on planet Earth — doing our jobs, cashing paychecks, and raising families — and most of the time we don't question just how important we are. The jury is still out on whether life has meaning or if it's just a quirk of the universe, but a new photo captured by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope sure will make you feel small. The image shows the galaxy cluster known by the decidedly clunky name SDSS J1110+6459. It's a massive collection of hundreds of galaxies that are situated some six billion light years away, give or take a few eons. It's a colossal collection of star-building space engines with countless planetary systems and world beyond our imaginations. The question of what is out there — planets hosting intelligent life, or even civilizations far more advanced than our own — may never be answered, but the possibilities are quite literally endless. Of particular note in the image, the bright blue arc shape in the right hand side of the frame. It might appear to be the edge of something, but it's actually a background galaxy whose light has been bent and twisted by the gravity of the galaxy cluster in front of it. That background galaxy, called SGAS J111020.0+645950.8, is particularly hard for scientists to study due to its obscured position, but it's thought to contain newborn stars and lots of unorganized dust. Sometimes it's nice to have a little perspective of our place in the universe. We all still have to go to work on Monday, but at least you'll know exactly how insignificant those TPS reports really are.
Bizarre sulfur fire footage will leave you in awe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Worland Volunteer Fire Department in Wyoming was recently called upon to extinguish an unusual fire — and the footage they captured is stunning. Firefighters determined the otherworldly blaze was the result of a sulfur mound that had been ignited. They approached the flames in full personal protective equipment and self-contained breathing apparatus to avoid inhaling sulfur dioxide, a hazardous gas created when sulfur burns. SEE ALSO: Aerial videos capture terrifying wildfires scorching California The department shared a video of the mesmerizing fire on Facebook, which shows the flames looking like water rushing through a bowl-shaped area. After the 30-second mark, you can see flames begin to shoot up from the bowl. According to an update, a "minimal amount of water was used to cool the surface of the sulfur and reduce the temperature below the molten stage," and no one was injured. Source Credit: Worland Fire Protection District #1 & Worland Volunteer Fire Department via Storyful
Smart personal defense technology
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Smart & Safe Tech: Defender 24/7 is the first hand-held smart technology pepper spray that connects to your smartphone. The device also uses a camera that instantaneously takes a pictures of the perpetrator and provides 24/7 monitoring
NASA spacecraft to fly over ‘Eye of Jupiter’ for first time in history
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Juno probe will hover over the stormy red spot after a year of orbiting Jupiter.
Conway clashes with CNN’s Cuomo over Trump Jr.’s Russian lawyer meeting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president’s counselor tried to defend Donald Trump Jr.’s pre-election meeting with a Kremlin-linked Russian lawyer.
Back in session, Senate Republicans weigh starting over with health care bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Some Senate Republicans weigh a fresh start on health care reform; the president adds pressure; and more from our ongoing coverage.
High school journalist nabs interview with Defense Secretary Mattis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A high school sophomore scored an interview with Secretary of Defense James Mattis for his school newspaper after the Washington Post published a photo that inadvertently revealed the retired Marine’s cell phone number. In May, the Post ran a photo of President Trump and his bodyguard, who was seen toting a sticky note with Mattis’ name and cell phone number jotted down. Teddy Fischer, a rising junior at Mercer Island High School in Mercer Island, Wash., called the number and recognized Mattis’ voice on the outgoing message.
Senate Republicans scramble for support as health care vote remains in doubt
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaks to the media about plans to repeal and replace Obamacare on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., June 27, 2017. Now the clock is ticking on Senate Republicans’ efforts to pass a replacement for the Affordable Care Act as they scramble to vote on a bill as early as next week. Politico reported that a revamped version of the bill could be presented to lawmakers as soon as Thursday, after 10 GOP senators and counting have expressed opposition to the first draft of the bill.