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Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Ossoff to face Handel in Georgia runoff
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Democrat Jon Ossoff jumped to an early lead in the suburban Atlanta 6th Congressional District special election Tuesday, a contest that has drawn national attention as an early test of Democratic efforts to challenge President Trump.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
What Is Nauli?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Nauli is a yoga exercise that promotes digestion, and also happens to be a pretty serious tummy-toning ab workout, but it can be risky without proper supervision. Watch the video to learn more.
Kathy Ireland Honors Liz Taylor's Fight against HIV/AIDS
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
One of Dame Elizabeth Taylor’s most enduring legacies is her activism on behalf of HIV/AIDS patients. Liz’s longtime friend, model and entrepreneur Kathy Ireland, sits down with Rosie Mercado to talk about how Liz’s good deeds go on – and how The Doctors viewers can help! The images she’s posing for will be part of a new documentary for World AIDS Day.
Exclusive: Terra Jole’s Breast Cancer Test Results Revealed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Terra Jole of “Little Women: LA” is proud of her recent accomplishment as the first little person ever to compete on “Dancing with the Stars.” But fans didn’t know that even as she was burning up the dance floor, she was dealing with a frightening health crisis. “The thing that scares me the most is I have two hernias,” Terra says. Between pregnancy, recovery, and making TV history, Terra has put off having her breasts examined for cancer.
Is Sex in Hotel Rooms Better?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains mature subject matter. Viewer discretion is advised.
Man's 130
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A Gulfport, Mississippi, man has had his life-threatening 130-pound tumor removed successfully. Roger and his wife, Kitty, have been through a long ordeal that began when Roger noticed a lump in his side. The lump was now so large that surgery to remove it would pose a 50-percent risk of death.
'Heart in a Box' May Double Time that Organs Are Viable for Transplant
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains graphic images that may be disturbing. Parents are advised that these images may not be suitable for young children. A new device can keep donor hearts alive and beating for twice as long as a conventional transport cooler.
Build your own DIY video game console
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Have you ever wanted to build your own retro gaming device from scratch?
Questions for Facebook after murder video posted
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gregg Jarrett weighs in on the debate over social media's responsibility to police a user's content
You Could Make The Next Exoplanet Discovery With This New Game
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A video game is going to help researchers discover new exoplanets.
Life on a small moon is a real possibility
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Is there an alien ecosystem up there?
Underwater warehouses? Amazon’s aquatic fulfillment centers could make it so
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Amazon has patented some crazy ideas, including flying fulfillment centers that drop packages from the air. But its patent for “aquatic fulfillment centers” could be the craziest one yet. The concept calls for warehousing packages underwater in specialized tanks – or even in a designated area of, say, Seattle’s Lake Union. Packages could be dropped from the air, parachute down to the water, and then sink to a specific water level based on its density. When it’s time to select a package for delivery, a coded series of acoustic tones could be beamed through the water, activating a device on the… Read More
Serene underwater footage shows whale's
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists are diving deep off the coast of Antarctica to help protect whale feeding areas. But they're not jumping into the frigid Southern Ocean themselves. Instead, a team of researchers has attached non-invasive sensors and cameras to the backs of humpback and minke whales. The project, supported by World Wildlife Fund's Australia office, has gathered a bounty of information so far, including when, where, and how whales eat krill; what their social lives are like; and how they're able to blow through sea ice so they can breathe.  SEE ALSO: Watching orcas swimming in the wild on live cam is why we have internet Whales in the Southern Ocean face two main threats to their food supply: overfishing of krill, and climate change. Warming ocean temperatures are causing ice to shrink, which is altering Antarctic ecosystems. In the whale study, each whale wears the suction-cup cameras for between 24 and 48 hours at a time. Scientists then retrieve the "whale cams" and apply them to other whales. "We have been able to show that whales spend a great deal of time during the days socializing and resting, and then feeding largely throughout the evening and night time," said Ari Friedlander, lead scientist on the whale study and an associate professor from Oregon State University. "Whales are aggregating in a number of bays — including Wilhelmina Bay, Cierva Cove, Fournier Bay, Errera Channel — in high numbers and are feeding there for weeks at a time," he said in a news release. "Every time we deploy a tag or collect a sample, we learn something new about whales in the Antarctic."
More Than Half of American Adults Have Tried Pot
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just over half of American adults have tried marijuana, and 14 percent use it regularly, a new survey finds. Funded by Yahoo News and carried out by Marist Poll, the phone survey asked adults over age 18 about their personal use of marijuana and their opinions on the drug. Acceptance of marijuana's legalization is increasing along with experimentation: A 2016 Gallup poll found that 60 percent of Americans think the drug should be legalized.
‘Cooper’s Treasure’: The Search for Shipwrecks an Astronaut Spotted From Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Discovery's new series 'Cooper's Treasure,' premiering tonight, has it all: A space mystery, a search for buried silver and gold, and pure family drama.
Supremely Annoying: Female SCOTUS Justices Get Interrupted More
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just because a judge makes it to the Supreme Court, that doesn't mean the person gets to speak freely: A new study finds that female justices are interrupted more than male justices. In the study, the researchers analyzed transcripts of court proceedings during three Supreme Court terms: 1990, 2002 and 2015. The researchers tallied up the interruptions that took place when lawyers were presenting their cases to the court, a process called oral arguments.
GOP Sen. Ernst says Trump should spend less time at Mar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, said she has “concerns” about the frequency of President Trump’s trips to his Mar-a-Lago residence and particularly about his use of the Palm Beach, Fla., venue to host foreign leaders.
Ossoff leads in Georgia special election, but lacks votes to avoid runoff
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Democrat Jon Ossoff jumped to an early lead in the suburban Atlanta 6th Congressional District special election Tuesday, a contest that has drawn national attention as an early test of Democratic efforts to challenge President Trump.
Images show North Koreans playing volleyball at nuclear test site
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
U.S. experts who have been forecasting an imminent North Korean nuclear test said on Tuesday they were surprised when they viewed their latest satellite images of the country's nuclear test site and saw volleyball games under way. With tension mounting between Pyongyang and Washington, analysts had thought they would see activity suggesting preparations for an underground explosion at the Punggye-ri nuclear test site and were not expecting what the photos, taken on Sunday by a commercial satellite, revealed. "We see that at three locations in the facility – in the main administrative area, at the support area, at the command center and at the guard barracks near the command center - they have volleyball games going on," said Joe Bermudez, an expert with 38 North, an independent North Korea monitoring project based in Washington.
Live video feed that showed giraffe birth to be taken down
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HARPURSVILLE, N.Y. (AP) — A livestreamed video of a pregnant giraffe that has enthralled millions of YouTube viewers since February is coming to an end.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
As historic drought ends, Californians vow to retain water
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Cooper Olson was relieved when he first heard that California Gov. Jerry Brown had declared the end of the state’s drought this month. Drought has marked six of the 15 years he’s lived in the state, he says, and it was uplifting to know that the recent rains had restored life to the parched lawns and dusty hillsides.
A borderless world in curbing corruption
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The worldwide push to root out corruption has achieved a new landmark. For the first time, the International Monetary Fund has insisted that a country set up a special court to deal with anti-corruption cases as a condition for receiving financial aid. In 2007, for example, Guatemala outsourced its anti-corruption fight to a United Nations-backed investigative agency.
This Couple Took a Year
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It wasn't the fancy, luxurious escape you're thinking of, though.
Watch Melania Trump Remind Donald How the National Anthem Works
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The First Lady in action.
This Is the Most Popular Nail Polish on Pinterest This Spring
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It’s probably not what you’re expecting.
The first flying car is available for pre
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The company unveiled their flying car in 2014 but it was not commercially available. Now it’s ready and being presented at the Top Marques car show in Monaco. The vehicle is fully functional as both a car and an aircraft, and its hybrid engine makes it environmentally friendly.
Wikipedia’s great experiment: Finding a definition of “happiness” we can all agree on
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Wikipedia is a lot more than its most common use as a repository of basic information about famous people, historical events, and obscure terms. Its editors and writers must attempt to answer questions that have confounded history’s greatest philosophers, like “What is ‘happiness,” all while accounting for input from the entire world. If thousands of…
Cognitive science shows that humans are smarter as a group than they are on their own
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As individuals, the amount we know about the world is miniscule. One psychologist estimated that an individual’s knowledge store is about one gigabyte, much less than fits on a typical USB thumb drive. This is why most of us struggle to name even a few foreign leaders or accurately draw a picture of a bicycle.…
Hollywood asteroid disasters unlikely in real life
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists reveal new findings about asteroids and likely scenarios if one were to hit the earth
'Cooper's Treasure' Sneak Peek: The Pursuit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Premiering April 18, the Discovery series follows one man as he tries to find the treasure astronaut Gordon Cooper believes he spotted from space.
White House cancels meeting to decide stance on climate pact
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — A White House meeting Tuesday where President Donald Trump's aides were to hash out whether to keep the U.S. as part of an international agreement to reduce climate-warming carbon emissions has been postponed.
Our eyes reveal when we're about to have an epiphany
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When an epiphany strikes, it's rare and fleeting. Something clicks in our minds, and what was once confusing is suddenly obvious, illuminating, and even exciting. Such moments are not purely internal events, it turns out. Our eye movements and pupils can broadcast these "aha!" moments, making it possible to predict epiphanies even before they occur, a new study found. Scientists at Ohio State University conducted the research. They wanted to better understand what happens in people's heads as they make various types of decisions — an area of study known as neuroeconomics. SEE ALSO: Why some people think cilantro tastes like soap In this fledgling field, researchers have tended to focus on how people respond to feedback and gradually, deliberately adjust their thinking as they learn. But few studies had looked at so-called epiphany learning. "We had this intuition that there are situations where you don't figure things over time — it sort of comes to you all of a sudden," said Ian Krajbich, a co-author of the study and assistant professor of psychology and economics at Ohio State. "There was a gap in what we know about that kind of learning," he said in an interview. For the study, published Monday in the   Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Krajbich and doctoral student James Wei Chen enlisted 59 students. Participants played a relatively simple game on a computer against an unseen opponent. Beneath the screen, a camera monitored where the player was looking on the computer and tracked their pupil dilation. The screen showed 11 numbers (0 to 10) arranged in a circle like a rotary phone. In the game, each participant picked a number. The researchers then took the average of those two numbers and multiplied that by 0.9. Participants had to guess what the resulting number might be, and one opponent was deemed the winner. If that gives you brain cramps, you're in good company. To win the game, it turns out, all participants had to do was guess a lower number than their opponent.  "If you think of it that way, the obvious strategy is to pick zero, because zero is always going to be the smallest number," Krajbich explained. Participants played the game 30 times in a row, always against a new opponent.  For 42 percent of the participants, a light bulb flipped on at some point. Eye tracking data showed a sudden change in their behavior. After choosing other numbers, their eyes remained fixated on the lowest numbers. These players no longer looked at their opponents' number and instead studied the outcome of each game. As their strategy formed, their pupils dilated. Soon after this, the students made a firm decision. They clicked a specific button that committed them to using zero in every upcoming game. Participants didn't mull over whether or not to click a particular button during multiple games — they only looked at it once, and pressed enter. "That tells us they were building up confidence over time. They had no interest in committing until all of a sudden, they had that epiphany and jumped right to zero," Krajbich said. About 37 percent of participants did commit to using the same number, but they didn't pick zero, which suggests they didn't actually learn the game-winning strategy, the study found. The remaining 20 percent never committed to a number, and probably needed a drink afterward. The study doesn't prove that some people have epiphanies while others don't. Additional research and different types of games and challenges are needed to answer those types of questions. Krajbich said he and his research partners would like to devise settings where they could observe multiple epiphanies within the experiment, and focus more on what happens physically in those "aha!" moments through brain imaging and other methods. However, the early results do suggest that, in order to experience epiphany learning, we must look inward and focus on our own strategy, rather than scrutinizing the moves of our opponents. "One thing we can take away from this research is that it is better to think about a problem than to simply follow others," the professor said. "Those who paid more attention to their opponents tended to learn the wrong lesson." WATCH: Mind-reading machine helps 'locked-in' patients communicate
Obama attends funeral of ‘great friend’ Dan Rooney
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Nearly three months after leaving office, former President Barack Obama made his first public appearance Tuesday at the funeral of Dan Rooney, the Pittsburgh Steelers chairman and longtime Obama ally. The 44th president did not make any remarks at the ceremony, held at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Pittsburgh’s Oakland neighborhood. After Rooney died Thursday, Obama released a statement lauding the “championship-caliber good man.” Rooney served as the U.S. ambassador to Ireland during the Obama years.
Starbucks calls shifting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Starbucks is calling a limited-time beverage that changes colors and flavors with a stir of the straw a "Unicorn Frappuccino." The chain says the drink was inspired by the trend of unicorn-themed ...
Oklahoma police chief issues himself a speeding ticket
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SPERRY, Okla. (AP) — The police chief of a small northeast Oklahoma community says he issued himself a citation for speeding, but only after being caught on video.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
As global famine aid comes up short, Somalis abroad step up
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Long before major international pleas for anti-drought funding in Somalia began, or images of the gaunt and hungry started to circulate in the world’s newspapers, Amir Sheikh knew exactly what was happening. To stop them from tipping over into catastrophe, the agency’s humanitarian chief said, it needed to raise $4.4 billion by July.
Kylie Bamberger Alopecia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Busy Philipps Shared a Gorgeous No
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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13 Things You Didn't Know About Melania Trump As a Mom
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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