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Is Your Insurance Company Facebook
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
A North Carolina couple had their home-owner’s umbrella insurance revoked when they posted a cute picture of one of their three pups on Facebook. Nationwide Insurance claimed that the photo showed a Rottweiler mix, which they considered a dangerous breed.
Years Battling Bulimia Has Ruined Woman's Teeth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Brandy never received proper dental care as a child. Later as an adult, an abusive relationship led her to bulimia – eating and then purging – in an attempt to appease her abuser. Brandy tells The Doctors, “For the first time ever, my life is where I want it to be.” But her teeth had already been ruined.
Domestic Abuse Survivor's Amazing Makeover!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Donna first visited The Doctors earlier this season. Face Forward is a nonprofit that provides pro-bono reconstructive surgery for survivors of human trafficking and domestic abuse. Facial Surgeon Dr. David Alessi takes cartilage from Donna’s ribcage to replace her lost septum.
Three Easy Ways to Save Big Bucks!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The Krazy Coupon Lady, Joanie Demer, is here to discuss three apps that can help you pinch your pennies.
Can Yoga Be Your Therapist?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Yoga is great for your body, but is it also therapy for your mind? Doctors are starting to prescribe yoga to help with anxiety, stress, insomnia, and depression.
Hubble Finds Runaway Star In Orion Nebula
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The star, traveling at the dizzying speed of about 125,000 miles an hour, is likely the missing component of a multiple-star system that broke up 540 years ago.
You can now watch declassified nuclear test footage from the 1950s on YouTube
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pouring over declassified materials may not generally sound like a fun weekend plan, but when those materials are comprised of Cold War nuclear test films, you may want to clear your schedule.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Could Elon Musk's Space X Falcon 9 rocket take first private mission to the moon?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A group of European scientists hopes to make the first private moon landing next year as the race to get to Earth's nearest neighbour hots up. The engineers, called PTScientists, have built a landing module which can deploy two rovers when it touches down on the moon after hitching a ride with Elon Musk's Space X Falcon 9 rocket. Its Autonomous Landing and Navigation Moduline (Alina) will carry experiments from other researchers with information sent back to Earth through a high-speed link provided by Vodafone.
This fiery video captures Mount Etna's magical oozing lava
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Italy's Mount Etna is still fired up. The Sicilian volcano has been spewing lava and belching ash on and off for nearly three months now. After the latest eruption on March 16, fiery-hot lava began flowing down the volcano's slopes. The video shown above captures the flow only two days later. SEE ALSO: Watch this Mexican volcano blow some serious smoke But as Mount Etna reminded visitors, lava is best viewed from afar. The brilliant red lava recently caused an explosion when it hit snow on the mountainside, injuring 10 people and catching groups of tourists by surprise, the Associated Press reported. Molten rocks and steam rained down on hikers, journalists and a scientist, who scrambled to escape the volcanic firestorm. In the eastern Sicilian city of Catania, the airport was forced to close last week after thick clouds of volcanic ash made it impossible to land or launch airplanes. By Saturday, however, flights had resumed at the Catania airport, AP reported. Video credit: Giuseppe Tonzuso via Storyful
Trump: Kim Jong Un ‘acting very, very badly’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump reiterated on Sunday that he believes North Korea and its leader, Kim Jong Un, are misbehaving with their nuclear provocations.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Will Steve King’s immigrant comments keep wary tourists out of Iowa?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A travel boycott of Iowa could have serious economic impact on the state, which takes in around $8 billion a year in tourism revenue, according to state officials. Last week, staffers grappled with an unwieldy influx of correspondence following Representative King's retweet of a post endorsing Geert Wilders, a controversial, far-right candidate for Dutch prime minister who came in second place during a Wednesday election. "We’re in a politically charged environment," Shawna Lode, the tourism office’s manager, said Friday, according to The Des Moines Register.
In conflicts, faith leaders must often stay above
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
 If faith leaders take sides in a conflict, do they give up any possible role as a trusted mediator? The North African country, which had a budding democracy in 2011 after ousting dictator Muammar Qaddafi, is fast descending into violent chaos. Libya is no backwater country whose internal strife can be ignored.
Surprise! Biofuels reduce jet engine pollution in the atmosphere, NASA says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As it turns out, when jet engines use biofuels, they emit fewer particle emissions in their exhaust trails. So yes, biofuels are, in fact, better for the environment than their fossil fuel alternatives. Shocking, we know.
The Death Throes Of A Red Giant Star
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A “striking spiral pattern” of gaseous emissions was seen around LL Pegasi and its companion star, about 3,400 light-years away from Earth.
Earth just had its second
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As the saying goes: Another month, another disconcerting report from top U.S. climate agencies. Last month was Earth's second-hottest February on record since at least 1880, NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recently reported.  At the same time, the extent of sea ice in the Arctic and Antarctica hit record monthly lows. SEE ALSO: Here’s why it's so frickin’ hot right now In February 2017, the average global temperature was 1.76 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century average of 53.9 degrees, NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information said late last week.  February 2017 land and ocean temperature percentiles, Image: NOAA/NCEI Only February 2016 was warmer, at a staggering 2.43 degrees Fahrenheit above average, NOAA said. The entire year of 2016 was also the hottest on record, with last year's temperatures exceeding all previous years since record-keeping began 137 years ago.  NOAA and NASA scientists said human-caused global warming was responsible for a majority of the annual temperature gains — a fact the Trump administration seems determined to ignore. For U.S. residents, it's probably not surprising to learn that last month was exceptionally warm. February 2017 saw widespread record warmth across the country and a series of record highs.  Other parts of the world similarly experienced an atypically warm winter. Image: NOAA From December 2016 to February 2017, the global average temperature was 1.60 degrees Fahrenheit above the 20th-century average of 53.8 degrees, NOAA said. This was the second warmest for this season, second only to December 2015 to February 2016. The first two months of 2017 also landed in second place. The year-to-date average temperature for January through February 2017 was 1.69 degrees Fahrenheit above average, just below the first two months of 2016. Those balmier temperatures meant troubling news for the planet's sea ice.  Sea ice extent for Arctic (left) and Antarctic regions. Image: National snow ice and data center/university of colorado, boulder Both the Arctic and Antarctic seas logged the smallest February sea ice extent since satellite records began in 1979, according to NOAA data analyzed by the Rutgers Global Snow Lab. The average Antarctic sea ice extent was 24.4 percent below the 1981-2010 average for February, the U.S. climate agency reported. In the Arctic region, the average sea ice extent was 7.6 percent below average. But warmer air temperatures aren't the only culprit in shrinking sea ice. Ocean temperatures are similarly heating up, in part because of human-driven climate change. Sea ice extent for 2016 (blue) compared to other record low years, as of Dec. 5, 2016. Image: national snow and ice data center A new study found oceans may be warming about 13 percent faster than scientists previously thought. The warming rate from 1992 is nearly two times the warming rate from 1960, according to a paper published March 10 in the journal Science Advances. In its monthly report, NOAA said the globally averaged sea surface temperature also ranked as second-highest on record for February, the December-February season and the two-month year-to-date. Anyone want to guess how March's report will look? WATCH: Watch how global warming heats up the world from 1880-2016
Beijing shuts last coal power plant in switch to natural gas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The last large coal-fired power plant in Beijing has suspended operations, with the city's electricity now generated by natural gas, the state news agency reported as smog enveloped the Chinese capital this weekend. The shuttering of the Huaneng Beijing Thermal Power Plant comes on the heels of China's annual legislative sessions, where Premier Li Keqiang promised to "make our skies blue again" in his state-of-the-nation speech. According to Xinhua, Beijing has become the country's first city to have all its power plants fuelled by natural gas, an objective laid out in 2013 in the capital's five-year clean air action plan.
Newer type 2 diabetes drugs show heart protective quality in study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Bill Berkrot WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A newer class of type 2 diabetes drugs significantly cut the risk of death and hospitalization for heart failure compared with other medicines for the disease, according to data released on Sunday from a so-called real world study sponsored by AstraZeneca. The drugs, known as SGLT-2 inhibitors, work by removing blood sugar via the urine and include Astra's Farxiga, Jardiance from Eli Lilly and Co and Boehringer Ingelheim, and Invokana from Johnson & Johnson. Jardiance caused a stir in 2015, when a clinical trial conducted to reassure it does not cause heart problems instead showed it reduced the combined risk of hospitalization for heart failure or death from heart failure by 39 percent in high risk patients.
In an Israeli warehouse, clues about Jesus' life and death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ahead of Easter, Israel's antiquities authority opened up its vast storeroom to reporters for a peek at unearthed artifacts from the time of Jesus
Top Dem on House intel panel hopes Comey ends ‘wild goose chase’ over Trump wiretap claims
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The leaders of the House Intelligence Committee continue to say they have seen no proof of President Trump’s explosive, evidence-free claim that former President Barack Obama ordered the wiretapping of Trump Tower before the 2016 presidential election. “Was there a physical wiretap of Trump Tower?
You're nabbed! French gendarmes find thief stuck in window
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PARIS (AP) — Arrests can't come any easier than this.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Why Kellyanne Conway's husband has been tapped for a big post at the DOJ
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The husband of Kellyanne Conway and a partner at one of New York’s most prestigious law firms may take on a major role in defending the Trump administration. George Conway is expected to be nominated to head the civil division of the Department of Justice, The Wall Street Journal first reported on Friday. Mr. Conway would be responsible for leading the defense of the administration in lawsuits.
Meals on Wheels receives massive donations following proposed budget cut. Will it matter?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Following Thursday’s White House budget proposal release, Meals on Wheels, a nonprofit organization that delivers food to elderly isolated or disabled citizens received more than $100,000 in donations over a two-day period. The surge in contributions came after last week’s release of the White House budget proposal which includes a 17.9 percent cut for in federal funding for the Department of Health and Human Services, which according to Meals on Wheels, provides most of the organization’s government support, according to Reuters. Some local branches of Meals on Wheels are also reporting increases in both financial donations and interest in volunteering.
DARPA is calling for proposals to detect minuscule magnetic forces in the body
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DARPA is calling for proposals for its AMBIENT program for sensors to detect tiny magnetic signals from the brain and body. The greatest challenge is the earth's magnetic force, which DARPA calls 'the biggest buzzkill.'
Launching Twitter, Movies, Sound Recording And Electricity Distribution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This week’s milestones in the history of technology include the first practical system for electricity distribution, the first popular system for status updates/fake news distribution (i.e., Twitter), and the first playback devices for moving images and sound distribution.
Brilliant Immigrants Reveal America's True Greatness
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Quora Questions are part of a partnership between Newsweek and Quora, through which we'll be posting relevant and interesting answers from Quora contributors throughout the week. Read more about the partnership here.
Vintage US nuclear test films declassified and publicized
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — From the deserts of southern New Mexico and Nevada to islands in the Pacific Ocean, the U.S. government conducted dozens of nuclear weapons tests from the 1940s until the early 1960s.
SpaceX capsule returns space station science to Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A SpaceX capsule is back on Earth, with a full load of space station science samples
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
'Apartheid': How one word reignited UN tensions over Israel
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A report by a United Nations body accusing Israel of imposing an “apartheid regime” on Palestinians has ignited a fracas at the UN, prompting the withdrawal of the report – and the subsequent resignation of the senior official responsible for its release.
What will the wall look like? Trump administration unveils guidelines
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On Friday, President Trump's administration released details from a division of the US Department of Homeland Security outlining the requirements for Mr. Trump's promised wall along the US/Mexico border. The details for the project, provided by Customs and Border Protection (CBP), are meant to serve as guidelines for contractors who will submit their proposals for the first phase of the structure on March 29. "The wall design shall be physically imposing in height," the CBP outlines say, calling for a nominal height of 30 feet.
In Iowa, more constituents flood a GOP town hall to protest Trump policies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Sen. Joni Ernst (R) of Iowa jostled with a tense crowd of constituents Friday, becoming the latest GOP leader to field criticism over what voters see as dangerous complacency under President Trump’s agenda. Speaking at a town hall at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Senator Ernst was met by angry constituents who booed her responses to questions about Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, climate change, and healthcare policy.
In a Massachusetts warehouse, NASA’s Valkyrie robot helps lay the groundwork for Mars settlements
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA’s Valkyrie (R5) robot will never slip the surly bonds of Earth. The humanoid space robot is destined to spend the rest of its days on terra firma with the rest of us. But like Robonaut before it, the six-foot, 290-pound piece of machinery represents a link to the future.She’s a first step toward a goal of human colonization of Mars...
What To Do On The Next Mission To Venus?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists from Russia and the United States discussed the scientific missions for Venera-D at a three-day conference in Moscow this week.
Chimpanzee Mother Performs 'Funeral Rites' On Dead Son
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"To date, this behavior has never been reported in chimpanzees or any other non-animal human species."
Trump’s biggest budget cuts to NASA: ranked
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A rendering of NASA’s robotic Asteroid Redirect Mission. Out of all the federal agencies that received budget plans from President Donald Trump yesterday, NASA fared pretty well. The space agency is only facing a 0.8 percent cut in its overall budget — a relatively mild change compared to the Environmental Protection Agency, which could see its funding slashed by 31 percent.
Watch a Delta IV rocket launch a communications satellite for the military tonight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tonight, the United Launch Alliance is set to launch one of its Delta IV rockets from Cape Canaveral, Florida, sending a communications satellite into space for the US military. It’ll mark the first Delta IV launch of 2017, and the seventh launch of a certain configuration of the rocket known as the Medium+ (5,4). This version of the vehicle is equipped with four additional strap-on rocket motors at its base, to provide extra thrust during launch.
Elon Musk’s lab forced bots to create their own language
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Have you ever experienced the dread of overhearing two people, speaking a language you don't understand, begin laughing wildly? You just have to wonder what it is they're talking about, and if it's a joke at your expense. Heck, maybe you even check your teeth to make sure you aren't walking around with half of your lunchtime ham sandwich stuck to your gums. Now, thanks to Elon Musk's OpenAI lab, we're one step closer to experiencing the exact same thing, only with software bots doing the talking. As Wired reports, researchers at OpenAI have made some huge strides in getting bots to communicate with each other, and without actually telling them how to do so. The group published a research paper earlier this week explaining exactly how they were able to accomplish the complex task, and it's all based on reinforcement learning. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=liVFy7ZO4OA Reinforcement learning is the same concept that many pet owners use to train their animals, and centers on rewarding correct behaviors. In the case of AI, it means knowing what actions help it in completing a task, and continuing to do them. In OpenAI's experiments, bots were assigned assigned colors, red, green, and blue. Then they were given a task, such as finding their way to a certain point in a flat, two-dimensional world. Without giving the three separate AI a dictionary of commands to help each other, the bots were force to create their own in order to achieve their goal. The bots successfully assigned text characters to represent themselves as well as actions and obstacles in the virtual space, sharing that information with each other until they all understood what was going on. Check out the video above to see the bots in action.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Buzz Aldrin Debuts Virtual Reality Trip To Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I don't want to be remembered for just kicking moon dust," he told USA Today.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Scientist says there are over 100 planets in our solar system
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Most of us grew up learning that there are nine planets in our solar system. Back in 2006 that all changed, when Pluto was demoted from being labeled a proper planet to its new classification as a dwarf planet, leaving just eight true planets in our celestial neighborhood. Now, a group of scientists says Pluto should definitely be added back to the planet list — oh, and that there are over 100 other objects in our solar system that should also be called planets. Kirby Runyon of Johns Hopkins University headed a six-man team of authors from five different scientific bodies in preparing their own version of how planets should be classified.  Their argument and supporting information will be on display at next week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Texas. In their paper, the researchers insist that the factors that should define whether a celestial body is a planet or not should relate solely to the object itself rather than things like location. For example, the team's definition of a planet would include Jupiter's moon of Europa, as well as Earth's moon. Both moons are, for the record, larger than Pluto, which the team argues is no less of a "planet" under the current definition than Earth, Mars, Jupiter and Neptune. If the team's version of planetary definition is indeed widely adopted — and to be clear, that's a long shot at best — it would greatly expand the number of planets in our solar system from the current eight to around 110.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Beach Boys' Mike Love on meeting Charles Manson through Dennis Wilson
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We were invited by Dennis to come to dinner to meet Charlie and the family," Mike Love recalled.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
How big data is being mobilised in the fight against leukaemia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new data portal bypasses the big data bottleneck to find targeted therapies for leukaemia.
Sleepwalking is the result of a survival mechanism gone awry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Last night, most of us went to the safety and comfort of our beds before drifting off to a night’s sleep. Recent research from Stanford University shows that up to 4 per cent of adults might have had such an experience. In fact, sleepwalking is on the rise, in part due to increased use of pharmacologically based sleep aids – notably Ambien.