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Iraqi Supreme Court Suspends Kurdish Region's Independence Referendum
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The vote was due on Sept. 25
APNewsBreak: Water project's cost falls to more Californians
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Water districts and households across California could be compelled to help pay for Gov. Jerry Brown's plans to build two giant tunnels to ferry water to cities and farms mainly in central and Southern California, under newly revealed plans to shore up funding for the struggling $16 billion project.
Rex Tillerson Says U.S. Might Close Cuba Embassy After Mystery Attacks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The two former foes reopened embassies in Washington and Havana in 2015
Trump visits UN: As a global leader, can the US do more with less?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
President Trump has already shaken the post-World War II global order by pulling the United States out of American-led international pacts like the Paris Climate Accords and the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal – and by threatening to dump others, like the Iran nuclear deal. For many in the community of 193 UN member states who have been anticipating General Assembly week to see for themselves how Mr. Trump intends to meld his nationalist policies with America’s global role, the impression may be that of the incredible shrinking superpower.
Apple thinks different – and the same – about the ‘town square’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Ten years after Apple made the smartphone “cool,” it wants to turn its retail stores into something warm. It announced last week that the nearly 500 Apple Stores will no longer really be stores but “town squares.” In the era of social everything, Apple’s glass-and-white-walled boxes are to become gathering places. If that sounds a lot like your local mall, Starbucks, or even McDonald’s – commercial places designed to be social spaces – Apple’s idea goes further.
In South Sudan's capital, a bridge – and a nation – on hold
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
South Sudan’s largest city needed a new bridge, and a Japanese aid agency was going to build one. “The way the city was growing was unbelievable,” says Justin Tata, the head of the department of architecture and urban planning at the University of Juba. Every day, a huge portion of the country’s economy rattled over the 45-year-old bridge’s two narrow lanes, as heaving 18-wheelers carried imported goods from the port of Mombasa, in Kenya, into the growing capital city.
Stephen Colbert and Sean Spicer Just Pulled Off the Perfect Trump Joke at the Emmys
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stephen Colbert needed someone to assess just how many people were tuning into the Emmy. Who better to assess than Sean Spicer?
President Trump Arrives for His U.N. Debut, With Baggage
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As a candidate for president, Trump labeled the U.N. as weak and incompetent
China’s Out
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China announced it had lost control of the Tiangong-1 space station in September 2016 and initially thought the spacecraft would fall back to Earth in “late 2017.” Since then, refined estimates have put the date of re-entry at some point between December 2017 and March 2018. Now, The Aerospace Corporation, a California-based nonprofit that provides assistance to the government’s national security space programs, has announced that the date of re-entry will be late January or February of next year. Because of the spacecraft's size—34 feet by 11 feet, and 18,740 pounds—The Aerospace Corporation says some material may survive.
The Strange, Grisly World of Crocodile Hunting in Australia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Humans nearly wiped out the north Australian crocodile; then they brought it back. Now the government controls the population through hunting.
Ancient Rome: Mass Grave Filled With Skeletons Baffles Archaeologists in Turkey
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The unearthing of an ancient mass grave filled with Roman skeletons has left archeologists in modern Turkey grappling for answers after they uncovered the multiburial tomb dating back to the first and third centuries A.D. The skeletons of 24 people including one child were uncovered during excavations in the ancient city of Parion, formerly a part of Rome’s vast eastern empire. The first unofficial excavations began at the site in 2011 but were taken over by the Ondokuz Mayıs University Archaeology Department shortly afterward.
What if America Had a Detective Agency for Disasters?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A National Disaster Investigation Board could make sure everyone learns the lessons that hurricanes, outbreaks, and explosions can teach.
Rhino horn smugglers shift to jewellery: report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rhino horn smugglers in South Africa are increasingly supplying the jewellery trade, marking a shift away from sales to traditional medicine makers, according to a new report published Monday. Conservation group TRAFFIC said Chinese gangs were processing horns into beads, bracelets and bangles to supply Asia's booming luxury goods market while also helping traffickers evade detection at airports. Julian Rademeyer, a project director at TRAFFIC, said that the market for horn from the endangered species had been transformed in recent years.
Northrop Grumman to buy missile maker Orbital for $7.8 billion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The all-cash deal comes as North Korea tests threatening missiles and nuclear weapons, heightening tensions with the United States and its allies. "Clearly, as we watch what's happening around our globe, the rather rapid advance of some of our potential adversaries is quite concerning," Northrop Chief Executive Wes Bush said on a call with analysts.
Kellyanne Conway knocks Emmys for show’s digs at Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Appearing on “Fox & Friends” Monday, White House counselor Kellyanne Conway criticized Sunday's Emmys telecast, agreeing with a host who called it a "political rally."
Trump lawyers dish on Russia probe at steakhouse as NYT reporter listens in
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Two of President Trump’s lawyers were overheard by a New York Times reporter “loudly discussing” the Russia investigation at a Washington, D.C., steakhouse next to the newspaper’s D.C. bureau. The conversation led to a front-page story about tension within Trump’s legal team.
Striking a pose – Trump makes his United Nations debut
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Donald Trump made his debut at the United Nations taking his complaints about the world body straight to the source.
Cops: Man who didn't want to drink alone breaks in with beer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
STEWARTSTOWN, Pa. (AP) — Police say a drunken Pennsylvania man who didn't want to drink alone forced his way into a woman's home and sat down with two 12-packs of beer.
Geneva toilets flush with cash
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Geneva prosecutors are investigating after toilets in a bank and three restaurants were blocked by about $100,000 in high-denomination euro banknotes, they said on Monday. "We are not so interested in the motive but we want to be sure of the origin of the money," spokesman Vincent Derouand said, adding that neither throwing money away nor blocking a toilet was a crime. The Tribune de Geneve newspaper, which first reported the unusual deposit, said the first blockage occurred in the toilet serving the vault at UBS bank in Geneva's financial district, and three nearby bistros found their facilities bunged up with 500-euro notes a few days later.
Activist urges walrus rafts in absence of Arctic sea ice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — An environmental activist is calling on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reconsider placing anchored rafts in the ocean as resting platforms for walruses after stampedes killed 64 animals on Alaska's northwest coast.
To Fix Its Toxic Ad Problem, Facebook Must Break Itself
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Facebook stress-tests its tech. It could do the same for its moral compass.
In Elon Musk’s Hyperloop Contests, Students’ Main Goal Is Scoring a Job
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As the billionaire lays plans to build a tube-based train system, young talent is competing for a chance to be by his side.
APNewsBreak: Millions of Californians on hook for water plan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Water districts and households across California could be compelled to help pay for Gov. Jerry Brown's plans to build two giant tunnels to ferry water to cities and farms mainly in central and Southern ...
Dozens Arrested During St. Louis Protests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hundreds of police in riot gear have been mobilized and dozens arrested
Here’s What Kids Should Know About Tattoos and Piercings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Three in 10 American adults have at least one tattoo
Google Doodle Explores Thailand's First National Park
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Featuring elephants, macaque monkeys and more
The 4 American Tourists Attacked With Acid in France Are Boston College Students
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They have all been released from the hospital
Rex Tillerson Says the U.S. Might Shutter Its Embassy in Cuba
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The two former foes reopened embassies in Washington and Havana in 2015
Staying fit: Japan's elderly hits record in challenge to labor market
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
The event to mark Respect for the Aged Day in Japan drew over 200 people in an exercise meant to increase their body strength and balance. The exercise was more than just symbolic, as the number of people aged 65 and above has risen to a record high of 27.7 percent of Japan's population, government figures showed. Japan has been struggling with a declining workforce for decades, and its elderly ratio is the highest among Group of Seven nations, followed by Italy at 23.0 percent, Germany at 21.5 percent, and France at 19.7 percent.
Pet deaths in Japan: dignified but dog
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
(Reuters) - In Japan, caring for pets goes beyond the grave. At Pet Rainbow Fiesta, a pet funeral expo, held in Tokyo on Monday, visitors were given a host of options on performing rites for dead pets, including cremation, constructing a household altar and making offerings of incense. The basic funeral service fee starts from 95,800 yen ($860.66) for a one-kilogram hamster or bird and can go up to 114,800 yen for a 20-kilogram dog, according to funeral services company Kokolone.
Athlete Convicted of Rape Can Play in Football Game Despite University's Objection
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He had served about 10 months in a juvenile prison
Alec Baldwin Says Playing Donald Trump Was 'Birth Control' For Him and His Wife
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alec Baldwin, who won an Emmy for his work playing President Donald Trump on Saturday Night Live, says playing Trump was 'birth control.'
Giant sea snail plan to rescue Barrier Reef
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A giant starfish-eating snail could be unleashed to help save the Great Barrier Reef, officials said Monday, with a trial underway to breed thousands of the rare species. Now Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) research has shown they avoid areas where the Pacific triton sea snail -- also known as the giant triton -- is present.
5,000 'Dieselgate' deaths in Europe per year: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Emissions from diesel cars rigged to appear eco-friendly may be responsible for 5,000 air pollution deaths per year in Europe alone, according to a study published on Monday. The numbers are in line with previous assessments of deaths due to the so-called "Dieselgate" scandal, which erupted when carmaker Volkswagen admitted in 2015 to cheating on vehicle emissions tests. In May this year, a study in the journal Nature said "excess" emissions from diesel vehicles exceeding certification limits were associated with about 38,000 "premature" deaths globally in 2015.
President Trump Dubs North Korea's Kim Jong Un 'Rocket Man' Amid Rising Tensions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Another dig in the war of words between the U.S. and North Korea
How your morning cup of coffee can help save the world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Editor's note : Bambi Semroc is a senior strategic adviser in Conservation International's Center for Environmental Leadership in Business. In this role, she leads the Sustainable Coffee Challenge, an industry-wide effort to make coffee the first sustainable agricultural product in the world. By 2050, the area suitable for growing coffee around the world is projected to be cut in half. I don't even drink coffee, but this is enough to keep me awake at night. Coffee trees are picky, growing only in parts of the tropics with the right mix of temperatures, rainfall, and soil. As such, they're extremely vulnerable to climate change. Rising average temperatures and erratic rainfall will mean that coffee won't be able to thrive in many of the places it now grows, and coffee farmers will need to move their farms to new areas — mostly to higher altitudes, clearing tropical forests as they go — or switch to other crops to earn a living. The end result: There could be less coffee overall, and the coffee that is available will likely taste different (and not necessarily good). SEE ALSO: The cleanest cup of coffee: Sustainable farming meets low emissions shipping This affects a lot of people. There are more coffee lovers than ever: More than 2.25 billion cups of coffee are consumed every day, and global demand for coffee is expected to rise by up to 150 percent rise by 2050. Shrinking supplies, more demand: There is, quite literally, no time to lose to protect the coffee that you drink, the climate and ecosystems that coffee needs, and the tens of millions of small-scale farmers who make their living growing the crop. I came to work in conservation through my love of trees. But in the past few years, it's the coffee tree — yes, a tree that produces a beverage I don't even drink — that has taken up much of my time and effort. I'm happy to report, then, that the coffee industry is waking up to the new climate reality, and is now taking serious steps to make coffee sustainable. That's where the Sustainable Coffee Challenge comes in. The Challenge was born two years ago to bring together players from throughout the coffee sector, big and small, to make coffee the world's first sustainable agricultural product. It's eminently achievable — already, fully 48 percent of all coffee is being produced under some sustainability standard.  From growers to roasters to retailers — and even governments of countries where coffee is grown — the Sustainable Coffee Challenge has been gaining members and momentum since 2015, and retailers and public-facing campaigns are mobilizing to educate billions of coffee-drinking customers on why sustainability matters (as if the prospect of a poorer-tasting brew wasn't reason enough). But just as efforts were brewing to head off the coffee-pocalypse, the Challenge ran into some big questions: Where to begin? What coffee-producing regions of the world are most likely to feel the burn in a changing climate? And where are tropical forests — the same forests that regulate global climate — most at risk from coffee farmers who have to shift their crops to higher ground? Fortunately, we're finding answers to these questions with science. New research is helping us map and monitor coffee and the forests where they grow — and identify specific places where climate change is causing a shift in coffee production, and how best to manage it. A recent study by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) found that coffee grown at lower altitudes already requires adaptation today. (It also found that in the future, coffee grown in the areas it studied wouldn't taste as good). Another new study by one of my colleagues at Conservation International, Lee Hannah, showed that nearly 90 percent of the land suitable for growing coffee in Latin America is under threat from climate change by 2050. But it's not all bad: Authors of both studies noted that smart management of coffee trees — as well as the surrounding forests and bees that the trees require — can help farmers, and coffee trees, to adapt.  Faced with the imperative to adapt, the industry is taking action, collectively investing some $350 million a year to tackle these issues through research, farmer support, sustainable sourcing and other programs. For example, organizations such as The Sustainability Consortium (TSC) are providing retailers with tools for measuring supplier performance on the most important issues, like deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions. Through its Commodity Mapping Project, TSC is helping companies get a better grasp of critical issues facing coffee supply chains, including the role of coffee in deforestation, and where we should focus our conservation efforts to minimize the impact on the farms and forests. The impact on people is no less important. At the heart of the coffee trade are 25 million small-scale farmers who produce 90 percent of the global coffee supply. These farmers and the workers they employ rely on the revenue from coffee sales to support their families. Coffee is one of Timor-Leste's most important crops, bringing much-needed revenue to the country. Magdalena Salsinha, holding coffee beans, has been picking coffee since she was 15 years old. Now 55, she lives near Ermera and is married with six children.Image: UNMIT/Martine PerretSo, what can you do? You can start by paying attention and asking questions: Find out if your favorite coffee shops and retailers are committed to sustainability and what they're doing to ensure the long-term availability of your favorite coffee. Remember that sustainability is about more than being earth-friendly — it's also about people's livelihoods and fair labor practices, so learn more about what it really takes to make a crop sustainable at sustaincoffee.org. Finally, use your buying power to support companies that are doing the right thing, and tell us about it with #SustainCoffee. We're heading into a critical time. What the coffee industry and the Sustainable Coffee Challenge achieve in the next few years will determine the future of a crop that billions of people enjoy, a crop that has huge implications for the health of Earth's tropical forests, a crop that supports entire economies. Whether you like coffee or not, this affects you. It's time to demand sustainability.  About Social Good Summit The intersection of technology and new media has redefined our understanding of human progress. In the midst of this rapidly changing world, the Social Good Summit focuses on where we’re headed. Held annually during the United Nations General Assembly week, the Summit unites a lively community of global citizens and progressive thought leaders around a common theme: #2030NOW. A dynamic exploration of the world we want to live in by 2030, the Social Good Summit will focus on how we can unlock technology’s potential to make the world a better place. This year's summit is brought to you by Mashable, the United Nations Foundation, the United Nations Development Programme, and the 92nd Street Y. For complete event details, visit socialgoodsummit.com. WATCH: Enjoy your sustainable java in this cup made out of coffee
Mars research crew emerges after 8 months of isolation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The six subjects were living in a Mars-like habitat on a remote Hawaii volcano.
U.K. Lowers Terror Threat Level as Subway Bomb Probe Advances
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Officials no longer consider a fresh attack to be imminent
Octlantis is a just
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gloomy octopuses—also known as common Sydney octopuses, or octopus tetricus—have long had a reputation for being loners. Marine biologists once thought they inhabited the subtropical waters off eastern Australia and northern New Zealand in solitude, meeting only to mate, once a year. But now there’s proof these cephalopods sometimes hang out in small cities. In…
Why Math Is the Best Way to Make Sense of the World
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
To tell truth from fiction, start with quantitative thinking, argues the mathematician Rebecca Goldin.
4 American Women Attacked With Acid in France
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Two of the tourists were injured in the face in the attack
Bernie Sanders: I Did Everything I Could to Get Hillary Clinton Elected
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He responded to Clinton's criticism in her book
Murder of 2 Black Men May Be 'Racially Motivated,' Police Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There's a suspect in custody