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How to avoid the massive WannaCry ransomware attack
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
On Friday a major piece of malware hit the web, and throughout the weekend infected hundreds of thousands of computers, taking down everything from businesses to the U.K.’s National Health Service. The software, dubbed WannaCry 2.0, is what’s known as ransomware. A type of malware that burrows into your computer, ransomware encrypts the files on your machine, keeping you from being able to access them.
No, your Apple computer isn't immune from ransomware
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The WannaCry 2.0 ransomware is affecting Windows PCs, but Apple's Macs are just as susceptible to such malware.
The simple reason so many companies were hit by the WannaCry 2.0 ransomware
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The WannaCry 2.0 ransomware hit a slew of major companies, but it's not entirely their fault for falling victim to the attack.
‘Injustice 2’ review: Kneel before this sublime superhero fighter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
‘Injustice 2’ brings back the all the super hero brawling you loved from its predecessor. All heroes are not created equal, especially when it comes to the expanded universes of comic book titans Marvel and DC. “Batman Vs. Superman” scored eight (and won four).
Why leaked NSA hacking tools are not like stolen Tomahawk missiles
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Microsoft's claim that the loss of an NSA vulnerability for Windows is the same as losing a Tomahawk missile is overblown.
Android O: Google tries to fix Android's biggest weakness
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Android O aims to fix a problem that’s afflicted Android since its debut almost nine years ago: the zombie-like persistence of obsolete versions.
Amazon's Alexa Calling is like a Jetsons version of the home phone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Now that more than 10 million people have Echo devices, Amazon has just taken another trailblazing step: With a free software update, it has turned them into hands-free speakerphones.
Google Home's mastermind has no intention of losing to Amazon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
This year at Google's big developers conference, one of the most interesting developments was Google’s continued push to make its Google Home device—basically an Amazon Echo clone—distinctive and essential.
How Google's trying to make the mobile web look less ugly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
At its I/O conference here, Google (GOOG, GOOGL) touted the progress of Accelerated Mobile Pages, an ambitious initiative to remake the mobile web into a faster, lighter and less irritating medium—yes, even the ads that help pay for it.
Fake Caterpillars Can Have Their Uses Too
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists made thousands of caterpillars with modeling clay and glued them on plants across over 30 sites around the world.
Professor Stephen Hawking says, ‘we need to find a new planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Professor Stephen Hawking has said that the human race needs to develop technologies to find a new planet to live on – or face annihilation. Professor Hawking spoke at an announcement event for next month’s Starmus festival in Norway – a combination music and science event at which Hawking will speak. ‘We are running out of space on Earth and we need to breakthrough the technological limitations, preventing us from living elsewhere in the universe.
New Zealand’s Alpine Fault to Produce a Massive Earthquake—so Scientists Drilled a Big Hole Into It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An international team that drilled almost a kilometre deep (0.6 miles) into New Zealand’s Alpine Fault, which is expected to rupture in a major earthquake in the next decades, has found extremely hot temperatures and high fluid pressures. The Alpine Fault is one of the world’s major plate boundaries and New Zealand’s most hazardous earthquake-generating fault. It runs for 650 kilometres (400 miles) along the spine of New Zealand’s South Island and we know that it ruptures on average every 300 years, producing an earthquake of about magnitude 8.
Growth Takes Off When Smart People Are Neighbors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Governments everywhere need policies to get the best and brightest in proximity to one another.
Survey: New Hampshire lost an average 65 percent of beehives
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A first-time survey by the New Hampshire Beekeepers Association shows the state lost an average of 65 percent of its beehives this winter.
50,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The earliest known human settlements in Australia, now submerged by the sea, have been discovered. The unprecedented find of bones and artefacts were discovered in a cave at the coast of Barrow Island, which lies about 50 kilometres from mainland Western Australia. Much of the land inhabited by the first Aboriginal people of Australia is now deep underwater.
A Grand New Theory of Life's Evolution on Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The modern world gives us such ready access to nachos and ice cream that it’s easy to forget: Humans bodies require a ridiculous and—for most of Earth’s history—improbable amount of energy to stay alive.
What's Evidence of a Genetic Link to ADHD?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Anything from genes and brain injuries to low birth weight and exposure to environmental toxins at a young age may play a role. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reinforces this notion, outlining that in addition to the "important role" genetics plays in ADHD, other possible risk factors and causes may include brain injury, exposure to lead during pregnancy or at a young age and premature delivery. According to James M. Swanson, professor of pediatrics at the University of California, Irvine, whether genetics is the main reason a person develops this disorder remains "a tricky question." He explains that while " ADHD does seem to run in families" and that the "statistical estimate of heritability is very high," he stresses that this does not necessarily mean that all ADHD cases have a genetic basis.
Russia, China pursuing space warfare by building anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The US has indicated an increased threat of space warfare from Russia and China. The director of national intelligence, Dan Coats in a written testimony to a Senate hearing has said the two countries are focusing on satellite destruction capabilities to undermine the efforts of the US military on ground. "Russia and China perceive a need to offset any US military advantage derived from military, civil, or commercial space systems and are increasingly considering attacks against satellite systems as part of their future warfare doctrine," Coats told a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.
Strange Snail Love Triangle Leaves 'Lefty' Jeremy Without a Partner
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It may sound like the plot of a twisted romantic comedy, but after a public campaign to find Jeremy — a snail with a rare left-spiraling shell — another "lefty" partner, the poor snail is still looking for love. Two "lefty" suitors that were sent to woo Jeremy have hooked up with each other, leaving Jeremy out in the cold. Even more intriguing (at least for scientists) is that the snail babies of this renegade couple have right-spiraling (or dextral) shells, unlike their lefty (or sinistral) parents, said Angus Davison, an associate professor and reader in evolutionary genetics at the University of Nottingham's School of Life Sciences.
Artists ask Polish leaders to stop primeval forest logging
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Writers and artists have appealed to Poland's top leaders to stop the logging in Europe's last primeval forest.
Trump to address Muslim leaders. But will he say ‘radical Islamic terrorism’?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump faces a test of rhetorical resolve on his foreign trip: Will he use the expression “radical Islamic terrorism” when he addresses the Muslim world?
Trump said firing ‘nut job’ Comey took pressure off Russia probe; White House official now ‘person of interest’: reports
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Two more bombshell reports delivered a one-two punch to the Trump White House regarding the investigation into its potential ties to Russia.
Oil company watches over pregnant polar bear under bridge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A pregnant polar bear seeking to dig her maternity den chose an unlikely spot: a snow drift along a bridge leading to an artificial production island off the north coast of Alaska.
Owner: No flak from the law for floating Alaska strip club
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — An Alaska man says he didn't have problems with authorities after he reopened a strip club on his converted crabbing boat as a way to protest his conviction on federal charges.
Trump's first trip: Can he offer leadership on both security and values?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For national security adviser H.R. McMaster, President Trump’s first overseas trip is about proclaiming the return of America’s global leadership. The president’s nine-day, five-country trip to the Middle East and Europe, which begins Friday, will “reverse a trend of America’s disengagement from the world and from the world’s biggest problems,” Lt. Gen. McMaster said recently. The challenge Mr. Trump faces, however, is that the leaders he will meet with and the publics he’ll address in the two regions he’ll visit are looking for different things from America and will have very different aspirations for US leadership.
10 Books You *Have* to Read This Summer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
The 32 Most Overlooked Reasons Why Marriages Fail
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
This Bizarre Breathing Technique Can Literally Make Pregnant Women's Baby Bumps Disappear
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
But where does the baby go?!
7 Things You Didn't Know About Being a Royal Heir
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
There's more to it than a prestigious title.
Mom Posts Heartfelt Warning to Parents After Toddler Accidentally Overdoses On Medicine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"You can never be too vigilant when it comes to your children but also remember accidents happen to all of us, even the most cautious of us."
You Have to Read Amber Tamblyn's Sweet Poem to Her Daughter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
If this doesn't make you feel things, you're dead inside.
I Fed My 4
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Here's how that went.
This Adorable Toddler Dresses Up As Famous Female Role Models
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Her mom uses the photo opps to teach her about strong, fierce women who have succeeded in the face of adversity.
This Health Insurance Company Is Hiring 300+ Work
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
With full benefits!
The Kid from 'The Santa Clause' Is All Grown Up—Here's What He Looks Like Now
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Can you believe it's been over 20 years since this Christmas classic hit theaters?
Your Women's Healthcare Checklist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Making healthy food choices and getting at least two and a half hours of exercise every week are important throughout li...
Lucas VonCranach and Ijad Madisch to speak at TechCrunch Disrupt Berlin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Disrupt Berlin 2017 is coming up in December, and even though that is a ways off, we are already building out our content.We're also here to remind you to sign up for our next 2-for-1 ticket release on our website here. We'll send you an email with more details on how you can obtain these limited supply tickets. By signing up now, you can use...
Scientists grew a working 'prosthetic ovary' for a mouse — and it could be a game changer for humans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you want to fix that problem, one approach would be to build new ovaries from scratch. Medical science is on the way to doing just that. A team of biologists, pediatricians, and engineers at Northwestern University have devised and executed a method for constructing new ovaries for mice.
Teen's Death: How Caffeine Can Kill a Healthy Person
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A teen in South Carolina has died after drinking three caffeinated beverages over a 2-hour period. The 16-year-old boy drank a large diet Mountain Dew, a McDonald's cafe latte and an unnamed energy drink in that time, USA Today reported today (May 16). The Richland county coroner, Gary Watts, said the teen's death was caused by a "caffeine-induced cardiac event causing a probable arrhythmia," according to USA Today.
The Technology Behind Bluebird Bio
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
May.19 -- Bluebird Bio CEO Nick Leschly discusses gene therapy, Boston's biotech scene, and venture capital with Bloomberg's Caroline Hyde on "Bloomberg Technology" at the Museum of Science in Boston on May 9.
Combining Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Works Best for Older Adults
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
People who are both elderly and obese face a tough conundrum: Weight loss is critical for health and mobility, but weight loss can also lead to a decline in muscle and bone mass. The trick for this doubly challenged group is to achieve weight loss without increasing the risk of falls and fractures that can result from shrinking muscle mass and bone density. The ideal prescription, according to new research published today (May 17) in the New England Journal of Medicine, is a combination of diet and an exercise regimen that includes both aerobic and resistance training.
Hubby's Dislike of Wife's Friends Linked to Greater Divorce Risk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers studying marriage and friendships found that among white couples, when husbands disapproved of their wives' friends during the first year of marriage, the couples were more likely to end up divorced than when husbands were fine with their wives' friendships. The results did not hold true for black couples, the only other race surveyed in this study. However, in both black and white couples, when the husband felt the wife's friends interfered with the relationship, their chance of divorce was nearly doubled.
Single mosquito bite might be enough to transmit multiple viruses, study finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The bites can carry several viruses.
The Trump effect shows Dems a path to putting the Senate in play
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As the Trump-Russia investigation expands and Beltway insiders on both sides of the aisle begin to buzz about impeachment, the 2018 election is probably not the GOP’s No. 1 problem right now. “Don’t fall in love with the map,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell warned last month. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., holds an April press conference before the vote to confirm Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court.
Like most things in politics today, Montana House race is a referendum on Donald Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Many in Montana still think Gianforte could have pulled off a party sweep had he cozied up to Trump a little more. And Gianforte now evidently agrees.
The fall of the Confederacy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
With a Robert E. Lee statue slated to be removed Friday, New Orleans will have officially taken down all remaining monuments to the Confederacy.
Trump to address Muslim leaders. But will he say ‘radical Islamic terrorism’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump faces a test of rhetorical resolve on his foreign trip: Will he use the expression “radical Islamic terrorism” when he addresses the Muslim world?
Trump said firing 'nut job' Comey took pressure off Russia probe; White House official now 'person of interest': reports
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, left, next to Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Sergei Kislyak at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 10, 2017. Two more bombshell reports published Friday afternoon delivered a one-two punch to the Trump White House regarding the investigation into its potential ties to Russia, capping off a week where each day dealt a fresh blockbuster blow to the administration.
Last show for Ringling: Why it’s not really the end of the circus
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
On May 21 the circus long promoted as “The Greatest Show on Earth” is closing down with a final performance in Uniondale, N.Y. – attended by no small dose of bittersweet nostalgia from fans and the media. Richard Bukowski can tell you. To many, the demise of Ringling – a circus that defined the word for a century and half – seems unfathomable.