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Scarborough leaves GOP: ‘You apologize for your party for so long…’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
“Morning Joe” host Joe Scarborough, a former Republican congressman, announced Tuesday that he plans to leave the GOP to become an independent.
US Customs agents find cobras inside mail at JFK Airport
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents received a slithery surprise when they checked a mail container at Kennedy International Airport.
36 Top Diet Plans That Are Actually Worth Trying
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
If you're looking to lose weight, these can actually help you see results. From Redbook
EPA chief wants his useless climate change 'debate' televised, and I need a drink
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you ask nearly all the world's climate scientists, there's simply no debate: The planet is warming as amounts of greenhouse gases rise in the air — and human activity is primarily to blame. But Scott Pruitt, head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, insists on debating climate change. And that debate, apparently, might be televised, Reuters reported on Tuesday. SEE ALSO: Antarctic ice shelf crack is moving at record speeds, poised to cleave off massive iceberg any minute Doubters of mainstream climate science, including Pruitt, argue that dissenting views haven't been heard by the scientific community. They falsely claim that plenty of questions still remain about the scientific evidence for human-caused global warming. In reality, however, while there is uncertainty about how quickly and severely rising temperatures will affect the planet, there's virtually no doubt among climate scientists that climate change is happening — and that it's happening because of us. Image: NASA GISSBy calling for a debate, Pruitt creates a false narrative that casts his critics as stubborn, inflexible bullies who are hell-bent on destroying the fossil fuel industry. In this scenario, climate scientists and their allies are jealously guarding the climate discussion. Why don't other folks, like coal company executives, get to have a say? Rather than inform the public, all this does is cast clouds of distrust and disbelief over the scientific community. That's why climate scientists say calls for such debates are disconcerting: According to the Trump administration, satellite observations, ground measurements, field research, and deeply scrutinized results — gathered over decades and from across the globe — simply aren't sufficiently convincing. In the interview with Reuters, Pruitt called for a "robust discussion" about climate change, though he didn't explain how the scientists participating in that discussion would be chosen.  Asked if the debate should be televised, Pruitt told Reuters: "I think so. I think so. I mean, I don’t know yet, but you want this to be open to the world. You want this to be on full display. I think the American people would be very interested in consuming that. I think they deserve it."  Image: Ed HawkinsThe TV debate would likely build on or coincide with the Trump administration's plans to host so-called "red team, blue team" debates on climate science. Pruitt, who denies that carbon dioxide is the main cause of global warming (it is), would reportedly help pick the experts. He's floated the idea in recent weeks, saying such discussions would be modeled on processes used for evaluating military battle plans and ways that spacecraft engineers test critical systems or investigate accidents.  Many climate scientists said they see this plan as a direct assault on the scientific process. Looping in non-experts to debate climate science would be like asking a person who likes looking at the stars to go head-to-head with actual astronomers and physicists. "It's one thing to respond to legitimate scientific criticism, quite another to refute unconstrained nonsense," Kate Marvel, a scientist at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, previously told Mashable . WATCH: It's official, 2016 was Earth's warmest year on record
A Prelude To The Sixth Mass Extinction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A study of almost half of all known terrestrial vertebrate species found that populations and ranges of over 30 percent of them have declined since 1990.
Battle over selfies taken by macaque monkey back to court
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The battle over now-famous selfie photographs taken by a macaque monkey will head back to federal court.
Chinese scientists just teleported an object into Earth's orbit for the first time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Not long ago, in the early 1990s, scientists only speculated that teleportation using quantum physics could be possible. Since then, the process has become a standard operation in quantum optics labs around the world. In fact, just last year, two separate teams conducted the world's first quantum teleportation outside of a laboratory.
Google's PAIR project wants to make it easier for humans to interact with AI
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new research project called People + AI Research initiative (PAIR) attempts to address bias in machine learning, and offers tools to help those who work in AI.
Donald Trump Jr. finds safe harbor with Sean Hannity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Facing a frenzy of criticism over emails showing he had sought incriminating information on Hillary Clinton from the Russian government, Donald Trump Jr. said he would have “done things a little differently” with regards to a 2016 meeting with a Kremlin-linked lawyer. In a Tuesday interview with Fox News host Sean Hannity, Trump Jr. gamely attempted damage control over back-to-back New York Times reports regarding a June meeting he took with Natalia Veselnitskaya, a lawyer with alleged ties to the Russian government and its spy agency. The meeting was set up by Bob Goldstone, a publicist who had previously helped broker a deal between President Trump and a Russian oligarch close to Vladimir Putin, and who had promised Trump Jr. dirt on the Clinton campaign in June 2016.
'Pen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
TOKYO (AP) — "Pen-Pineapple-Apple-Pen" and the U.N. are rhyming.
'True Blood' Actor Dead at 39: What Causes Heart Failure?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Actor Nelsan Ellis, who starred on the HBO show "True Blood," has died of heart failure at the age of 39. On Saturday (July 8), Ellis' manager, Emily Gerson Saines, told The Hollywood Reporter that the actor had died "after complications with heart failure." There are many conditions that can lead to heart failure. On Monday (July 10) the news site TMZ reported that Ellis' heart failure was triggered by alcohol withdrawal complications when the actor attempted to quit drinking.
US need for four polar icebreakers 'critical,' warns report
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The rapid pace of global warming and ice melting at the poles have underscored the "critical" need for the United States to build four new polar icebreaker ships, US officials said Tuesday. Congress called for the report amid concerns about the United States' lack of a fleet -- with just three aging icebreakers, one of which is entirely broken down, and another designed mainly for science research. "For more than 30 years, studies have underscored the need for US icebreakers to maintain presence, sovereignty, leadership, and research capacity, but the nation has failed to make the recommended investments," said an accompanying statement by Richard West, retired rear admiral of the US Department of the Navy and chair of the committee that authored the report.
Amazon Prime Day: Best strategies for scoring deals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tech experts Daniel DeSilva and Andrea Smith share their tips on how to make the most of Amazon's third annual Prime Day sales
The US will fund brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Today, the U.S. Department of Defense selected Angle’s small San Jose-based company, Paradromics Inc., to lead one of six consortia it is backing with $65 million to develop technologies able to record from one million individual neurons inside a human brain simultaneously. In April, Elon Musk announced he was backing Neuralink, a $100 million company working on a brain-computer interface. Facebook followed up by saying that it had started work on a thought-to-text device to let people silently compose e-mails or posts.
‘Dynamic defrosting’ tech promises to clear your windshield 10 times faster
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hate waking up early to defrost your car windshield? Researchers from Virginia Tech are here to help, courtesy of new technology that’s capable of defrosting surfaces 10 times faster than normal.
U.S. Military Gives Out $65 Million to Develop Brain Implants That Could Treat Blindness and Deafness
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The quest to create a real link between machines and human brains has potentially groundbreaking consequences. If high-functioning implants can be developed to link human brains with computers, people who have gone blind or deaf could possibly receive sensory information that would restore some, if not all, of their lost capabilities. An agency of the U.S. military announced Monday that it was stepping up its investment and pursuit of this goal.
Trump FBI pick Christopher Wray expected to field questions on independence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump’s nominee for new FBI director, Christopher Wray, will face the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday morning, when he’s expected to be grilled about Russian interference in the 2016 election and his ability to keep the FBI independent from the White House.
Trump Jr.’s meeting with Russian lawyer: A timeline
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Key events related to the Trump campaign and Moscow, June 2016 — present.
Report: Foe of Venezuela's government bites steakhouse diner
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — A diner at one of New York's best-known steakhouses was bitten on the arm during a protest against the socialist government of Venezuela.
Thieves go big, steal tiny home in Missouri
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PITTSBURG, Kan. (AP) — Thieves targeting a so-called tiny home in Missouri decided to go big — and steal the whole house.
Hippo happiness: Both parents join Cincinnati Zoo baby Fiona
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CINCINNATI (AP) — And Daddy makes three.
Trump’s challenges escalate, with son’s email of ‘love’ for Russia help
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With those three words, Donald Trump Jr. has brought the Justice Department’s investigation of Russian meddling into the 2016 election deep into the immediate Trump family, setting up a possible confrontation with the FBI and perhaps altering the future course of President Trump’s administration. Mr. Trump Jr. wrote this in June 2016, in response to the prospect of receiving Russian-government produced derogatory information on then-presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. It was part of the Russian government’s support for presidential candidate Donald Trump, according to the friend.
For conservatives, health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In the crucible that Republicans hope will produce a health-care bill acceptable to at least 50 GOP senators, key conservative values – such as more choice in health plans – are taking precedence over another important one: attitudes about government spending. Or at least that’s the case with a much-talked-about change to the bill offered by conservative Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Sen. Mike Lee of Utah. The title of their amendment says it all: The Consumer Freedom amendment. It favors the ability to choose no-frills insurance plans instead of being forced to pay a fine or buy a plan with guaranteed benefits that people may not want, as mandated under the Affordable Care Act.
25 Things That Don't Exist In Schools Anymore
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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15 Fun and Spooktacular Halloween Games for Kids
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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30+ Spooktacular Outdoor Halloween Decorations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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25 Spooky Halloween Dinner Ideas
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Maui
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Maui wins the award for 2017
What Makes Cape Town the Best City in Africa?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Cape Town, South Africa has won the best city in Africa.
What Makes Quebec City the Best City in Canada?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
With its distinctly European vibe, Quebec City enchants travelers with its old-world charm. But it’s not just the 400-year-old buildings and cobblestoned streets that made Quebec the No. 1 city in Canada.
Queen Mary II Wins Best Mega
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Cunard's Queen Mary II takes the prize in 2017
What Makes The Galapagos the Best Islands in Mexico, Central and South America
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Travelers are always struck by the Galápagos Islands’ wealth of wildlife and natural beauty — it’s just one of the reasons the Galápagos Islands were voted No. 1 in the region.
What Makes Palawan the World’s Best Island?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
For the second year in a row Palawan has won World's Best island.
Padma Lakshmi Announces the World’s Best City
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Few people know travel quite like Padma Lakshmi, the entrepreneur, model, author, and Top Chef host. After all, she’s on the road several times a month.
What Makes the Seychelles the Best Islands in Africa and the Middle East?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Ultra-luxury resorts, untouched beaches, and incredible natural beauty. These are just a few reasons why travelers ranked the Seychelles No. 1 in the region.
What Makes Changi the World's Best International Airport
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Singapore's Changi International Airport wins the award for 2017
What Makes Portland the Best Domestic Airport
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Travelers love flying in and out of PDX, which is known for its local art and restaurants, memorable teal carpet, and incredible on-time performance.
What Makes Singapore Airlines the World's Best International Airline
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
For the entire history of Travel + Leisure’s World’s Best Awards, Singapore Airlines has been voted the No. 1 international airline. Find out why.
A Tour of San Miguel de Allende: The World’s Best City
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Learn how a quiet colonial town in Mexico became the No. 1 city on the planet.
How to Tell If a Work
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
There's a big red flag you should be looking out for.
The warm glow of giving starts in your brain: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What inspires humans to acts of generosity? Economists, psychologists and philosophers have pondered this question for millennia. If one assumes that human behaviour is primarily motivated by self-interest, it seems illogical to willingly sacrifice resources for others.
How to Make Alcohol From Potatoes? Eva Ekeblad, Google Doodle Scientist, Knows What to Do
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Today potatoes are one of the most widely-consumed foodstuffs in the entire world. The Swedish scientist, who was born 293 years ago on on Monday—she died in 1786—discovered that potatoes could be made into moonshine or flour, revelations that helped avert famine in Sweden (but probably led to a few damaged livers). Ekeblad, a Swedish countess, grew her own batch of potatoes for study.
Artist to debut 3D portraits produced from Chelsea Manning's DNA
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Around thirty three-dimensional portraits of Chelsea Manning, created using the DNA of the transgender U.S. Army soldier imprisoned for leaking classified data, will greet visitors at eye-level at an exhibition opening in New York City next month. Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg based the portraits on a range of possible facial variations generated by software that analyzed DNA samples sent her by the former intelligence analyst when she was behind bars. Manning, 29, was released in May from a U.S. military prison in Kansas where she had been serving time for passing secrets to the WikiLeaks website in the biggest breach of classified data in the history of the United States.
THAAD Anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The U.S. once again successfully tested the THAAD Anti-Missile System amid heightened North Korean tensions. Here's how THAAD works
White House, Congress point fingers at each other over nominee delays
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
With a historically large number of key executive positions unfilled nearly six months into President Trump’s term, the White House and members of Congress are pointing fingers at one another over what the White House called “needless obstruction” of qualified candidates.
Pence distances himself from Trump Jr. revelations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The vice president earlier denied the Trump campaign had contacted Russians trying to affect the election. Now he’s simply “not focused” on such stories.
New details emerge on Moscow real estate deal that led to the Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Goldstone’s account offers new details of the proposed Trump project that appears to have been further along than most previous reports have suggested,
‘Ridiculous!’: White House dismisses talk of treason after Trump Jr. revelation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sarah Sanders dismissed talks of "treason" Tuesday after Donald Trump Jr. revealed he had an undisclosed meeting with a Russian lawyer to talk about dirt on Hillary Clinton.
With Russia sanctions stalled in the House, White House pushes for weaker provisions
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
U.S. President Donald Trump gestures as he meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin during their bilateral meeting at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany July 7, 2017. WASHINGTON — Amid a new round of revelations surrounding potential Russian involvement in the 2016 election, a bill ramping up sanctions on the Putin regime is stalled in the House of Representatives. The bill is intended as a response to Russia’s efforts to influence U.S. elections, as well as its continued provocations in Ukraine.
Black gun owners ask: Does the Second Amendment apply to us?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Like many African-Americans of his generation, Phillip Smith, a Californian in his 50s, grew up without a gun in the house. To his parents, gun ownership was not just politically unacceptable, but morally wrong – a fount, if anything, of trouble and tragedy. Mr. Smith was intrigued.