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Facebook's mysterious hardware group is working on everything from AR to mind reading
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The all-star roster of tech veterans that Facebook began assembling one year ago is quietly...
Young, sexy, and adventurous? Guess says its new Android Wear 2.0 smartwatch is for you
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Fashion brand Guess has announced the Guess Connect smartwatch range, new models powered by Android Wear 2.0 and Qualcomm's Snapdragon Wear platform. The watches will come in styles suitable for men and women.
Say hi to Samsung Bixby, the new voice assistant in the Galaxy S8
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Samsung has a new voice. And it has world-changing ambitions. In the upcoming Galaxy S8, users will find an extra button on the left side of the phone, just below the volume controls. Pressing it will activate Bixby, Samsung's new voice assistant. Once activated, Bixby will help you navigate what's arguably the most sophisticated piece of technology you own — the smartphone in your hand. If Samsung gets its wish, though, Bixby will eventually do much more than just help you order Lyfts or set up complex calendar appointments. The long-term vision is for Bixby to act as a kind of uber-interface for all of Samsung's products: TVs, wearables, washing machines, even remote controls. SEE ALSO: Samsung Galaxy S8: all the leaks in one place Samsung designed Bixby with a specific goal in mind, one that veers away from its fellow voice assistants — Apple's Siri, Amazon's Alexa, Microsoft's Cortana and the Google Assistant. Those platforms were generally built to help users quickly perform common tasks ("Remind me to buy milk") and perform search queries ("What's the capital of Brazil?"). Bixby, on the other hand, is all about making the phone itself easier to use, replicating the functions of many apps with voice commands. Yes, Siri et al. already do that to a certain extent — you can easily set a reminder with your voice, for example — but the voice integration typically only handles the basics. The goal of Bixby is to voice-enable every single action in an app that you'd normally do via touch, starting with Samsung's apps. So, not just "set a reminder to buy pickles at 6 p.m., but "Set a reminder on my Shopping List to buy pickles at 6 p.m. and make it repeat every week, then share the list with my wife." Bixby speaks Injong Rhee, CTO of Samsung Mobile and the architect behind Bixby, says the voice assistant is nothing short of an "interface revolution," freeing users from hunting down hidden functionality within menus and hard-to-find screens. "Bixby is an intelligent user interface, emphasis... on 'interface,'" Rhee says. "A lot of agents are looking at being knowledgeable, meaning that you can ask questions like, 'Who's president of the U.S.?' A lot of these are glorified extensions of search. What we are doing with Bixby, and what Bixby is capable of doing, is developing a new interface to our devices." Bixby architect Injong Rhee, CTO of Samsung Mobile. Image: Pete Pachal/Mashable Although it makes its debut on the Galaxy S8, it will soon spread. Rhee sees the Bixby button eventually spreading to all kinds of smart-home devices, from TVs to refrigerators to air conditioners. "Anywhere there is an internet connection and a microphone, Bixby can be used," he says. "There is some technology in the device, but a lot of it lives in the cloud. That's why the range of devices goes beyond just a smartphone. It means it can be in any device we produce." Samsung began work on Bixby about 18 months ago, Rhee says. It grew out of the company's S Voice tool, which has been on Samsung phones since 2012. (The timing might explain why Samsung's smart fridge — announced right around then — failed to deliver on its planned integration with Alexa.) S Voice hadn't progressed much over the years, but then last year Samsung acquired the much-hyped Viv Labs and its sophisticated assistant, a strong indicator of the company's renewed interest in voice control. However, Rhee says Viv's technology is planned for future updates to Bixby and doesn't have a role in the initial release. The name Bixby came out of Samsung's focus groups, but it was actually their third choice overall. It was the top pick among millennials — a demographic the company is specifically targeting with the Galaxy S8 — so it won out. (Rhee declined to say what the other names were.) It's also distinctive enough, with hard consonants, for it to work well as an activation word. Bixby, which will initially speak just English and Korean, is intended to be a user's "bright sidekick," helping them navigate their devices in a more natural way. "[What came before], it's been people trying to learn how the machine interacts with the world, but... it should be the machine learns how the human interacts with the world," Rhee says. "The learning curve shouldn't be steep." All talk, all action For an app to be considered Bixby-supported, every possible touch action needs to be mapped to a voice command. Rhee explains that, for a typical app, there are about 300 different actions the user can perform. That doesn't sound too bad until you consider there are around 15,000 different ways to perform them. And the ways to verbalize those actions number in the millions. That's a lot of stuff to map out. Still, Samsung says it's up for the challenge, at least as far as its built-in apps are concerned. But what about third-party apps? Considering the amount of development work, will Snapchat or Facebook ever work as well with Bixby as Samsung's apps? Rhee says Samsung has a plan to get third-party apps talking to Bixby, and an SDK to be released at a later date will introduce tools that make the mapping much easier. He also suggests Viv's technology can help here, too. "Viv Labs is coming in by way expanding our vision into third-party ecosystems. It doesn't necessarily have to be all of the touch commands that they can perform. At a minimum, [Bixby will perform] the basic functionalities: like the settings, or changing the language from English to French." On the Galaxy S8, a total of 10 apps will be Bixby-supported, Rhee says, with a second "wave" coming a few weeks later. Out of the gate, users will be able to use Bixby with Contacts, Gallery, Settings, Camera, Reminders and a few others. Another way Bixby is different from its peers: it will be aware of what you're doing on the phone and suggest different actions depending on what's on screen. So if you press the button while, say, looking at a single photo in the Gallery, editing and sharing controls are probably more relevant to you than searching. And if Bixby doesn't understand every aspect of a complex command, it will take you as far as it can rather than just hitting you with a "Sorry, I didn't catch that." All this "awareness" brings up an important question: How much data is Samsung collecting about you? Rhee says most user-specific data is kept on the device, but, as a cloud service, Bixby needs to store some information in the cloud. It's not yet clear what the exact breakdown is. The button Having a dedicated button for Bixby brings a number of advantages. For starters, it means Samsung won't have any need for Clippy-style pop-ups directing users to the assistant — people will inevitably find it on their own. It also ensures there will be far fewer accidental activations than if Bixby were mixed into a home button — something users of Siri are all too familiar with. "We actually have done a lot of research to have the Bixby button as part of the home button like our friends in Cupertino," Rhee says. "A lot of people find it a little awkward to use it in public. The home button is a very overloaded place — there's a lot of functionality into it. Having a dedicated button really removes a lot of friction." And since the idea is to press and hold, lifting your finger when you're done, Bixby will know definitively when you're done speaking. Still, there will also be a wake-up phrase — you can just say "Hi Bixby," to activate the assistant at any time. It's the dedicated button that really epitomizes Samsung's approach, and if it indeed ends up on all Samsung products, Bixby will become much more than just a smartphone assistant — it'll become the gateway for Samsung to finally, truly become a major player in the internet of things. Sure, Samsung has had its "Smart" devices for a long time, and its low-power Tizen OS is ideal for powering the many products with connections to the internet. It also acquired SmartThings in 2014 to strengthen its IoT brand. But until now, Samsung has lacked a gateway for its customers to really take advantage of that interconnectivity. For most, it's hard work hunting down the right settings on your phone to connect a smart TV to an air conditioner, but what if you could just tell Bixby to do it? And if you can talk to it from all those devices — asking any question or even making phone calls — then you're really onto something. "It's actually omnipresent in a sense," Rhee says. "Even if I speak to Bixby in, say, a washing machine, you can still do a lot of things that you do on your phone. For instance, you can say, 'Bixby, send a text to my friend Michael,' or 'Make a phone call.' That's the vision." The more capable assistant Amazon and Google already know this, and the success of Alexa and buzz around Home are a testament to the unquestionable efficiency of adding voice control to devices. But Samsung, with its high standard of controlling all functions of a device via Bixby, might end up with the advantage. Alexa, for all of its "skills," often falls short of full control (you can turn on or dim LED lights, for example, but might not be able to select specific colors), so the market has room for a more capable competitor. Of course, how and when Bixby will mix with third-party products and services remains an open question. "Philosophically, what we are looking at is revolutionizing phone interfaces," Rhee says. "We understand our applications better than anybody else out there — that's why we started with our own technology, but going forward we have plans to work with our partners." Eventually, Rhee says a Bixby app might come to non-Samsung Android phones and even iOS, possibly partnering with Google Assistant for search-related queries (though he cautions Google and Samsung haven't "gotten to the specifics" on how that would work). At the same time, Bixby control could extend to all kinds of smart products, not just Samsung ones. That would probably take a level of cooperation with competitors that Samsung hasn't really shown before, but if Bixby becomes ubiquitous in the long term, whatever OS this or that device is running will become less relevant. That's a future Samsung is clearly hoping for, since software has traditionally been its weakness. Samsung may be a chief Android partner, but it's struggled to differentiate its many services from Google's, and the company lacks an OS of its own (Tizen notwithstanding). Samsung's browser, Samsung Pay, S Health — they're all duplicates of Google products, and are widely regarded as inferior. That's why Bixby may be the best thing to happen to Samsung software in a long time. If customers respond, Bixby could, in the long term, finally get Samsung users to think of its phones as Samsung phones rather than just the best-performing Android phones on the market. All Android vendors try to differentiate to some extent, but Bixby's app-simplifying skills and potential IoT capabilities are a compelling sell. Bixby represents an important step for Samsung when it comes to services: finally a good answer to "Why should I use your software?" Effortless voice control of everything — not just your phone — is a tantalizing promise, and if Samsung can pull it off in the long term, its "bright sidekick" might end up being the only assistant we actually want to talk to. WATCH: Samsung's wireless earbuds double as a fitness-tracker
Physicist Lawrence Krauss on the greatest scientific story ever told
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lawrence Krauss wants you to see the poetry in the universe. A theoretical physicist, Krauss proclaimed in a recent talk: "Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded, and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand.
New study finds more evidence for a link between vitamin D and autism
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New research provides further evidence to suggest that sufficient vitamin D while pregnant can have health benefits for future children, with a recent Australian study suggesting that the vitamin could help prevent autism traits in offspring. Autism -- or autism spectrum disorder -- is a lifelong condition where sufferers experience developmental disabilities such as an inability to communicate with others, interact socially, or fully comprehend the world. In their animal study, a team of researchers from the University of Queensland's Queensland Brain Institute used the most widely accepted developmental model of autism, in which the mice behaved abnormally and demonstrated problems with social interaction and basic learning.
Here Comes the Sun: Spring Equinox Arrives Today in the Northern Hemisphere
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In mid-March, snow and ice still frost the ground and winter's grip feels as strong as ever in many parts of the Northern Hemisphere. But an annual celestial alignment between Earth and the sun known as the spring equinox, which occurred today (March 20) at 6:28 a.m. ET, announced that the seasons are shifting and spring is on the way. Twice in a year, the Earth reaches a point during its annual journey around the sun when the Northern and Southern hemispheres — the two planetary zones bisected by the equator — receive the same amount of daylight, a phenomenon called an equinox, or "equal night" in Latin.
Scientists Discover Parts Of Earth's Original Crust
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The discovery of the 4.2 billion-year-old crust, found in samples harvested from the Canadian Shield, could help geologists better understand Earth's formative years.
McBoatface lead scientist: how famed submarine will help unlock the causes of deep sea warming
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The new sub allows scientists to access some of the most remote and hazardous environments in the ocean.
Astronomers Spy Stellar Outburst In Cat's Paw Nebula
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronomers believe the outburst was triggered by a protostar in the nebula undergoing a period of intense growth spurt.
Check Out This Incredible Photo Of London From Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Well, one astronaut has posted a stunning image of London from space that is bound to fill you with awe – and remind you just how small you are. NASA’s Robert Shane Kimbrough took the image of the capital at night time from the International Space Station, which orbits the Earth at an altitude of 250 miles. Key landmarks can also be seen, including Tower Bridge, Wembley Stadium and a bright-white O2 arena in Greenwich.
Abattis Welcomes Dr. David Galvez as Science Advisor to Northern Vine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
VANCOUVER, BC / ACCESSWIRE / March 20, 2017 / Abattis Bioceuticals Corp. (OTCQB: ATTBF) (CSE: ATT) (the " Company " or " Abattis ") is pleased to announce that Dr. David Galvez, PhD, ...
Neil deGrasse Tyson unleashes hot fire on Trump in angry tweetstorm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Neil deGrasse Tyson took a break from sharing science facts and nerdy dad jokes on Sunday to blast Donald Trump in a raging tweetstorm.  SEE ALSO: Maybe the GOP will finally get to kill Big Bird after all Specifically, Tyson targeted Trump's proposed slashing of federal funding for programs that support the arts, education, and the EPA, which has long been in the crosshairs of the Trump administration.  The fastest way to Make a America Weak Again: Cut science funds to our agencies that support it. — Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) March 19, 2017 The fastest way to Make America Sick Again: Cut funding to the National Institutes of Health — Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) March 19, 2017 The fastest way to Make America Stupid: Cut funds to programs that support education. — Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) March 19, 2017 The fastest way to thwart Earth's life-support systems for us all: Turn EPA into EDA — the Environmental Destruction Agency. — Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) March 19, 2017 The fastest way to melt glaciers & flood the World's coastal cities: Ignore scientists and do nothing to stem the rise of CO2 — Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) March 19, 2017 We can all imagine a land that provides no support for Art. But is that a place you’d want to Live? To Visit? To Play? — Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) March 19, 2017 Tyson also addressed climate change, a topic close to his heart and one the Trump administration has gone to absurd levels to downplay in the face of mounting scientific evidence.  But then Tyson shifted gears from attacking Trump's policies and went straight at the president, his aides, and his cabinet.  The very best way to support and feed your delusions: Surround yourself with people whose world views match yours exactly. — Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) March 19, 2017 Savage.  He's a bit more gentle in his tweetstorm wrap-up.  We all want to Make America Great Again. But that won't happen until we first Make America Smart Again. — Neil deGrasse Tyson (@neiltyson) March 19, 2017 As expected, Twitter users flooded Neil's mentions with hundreds of replies, some supporting him, others calling him a precious snowflake or whatever the Twitter insult du jour is. But there was one response that too perfectly summed it all up. @neiltyson pic.twitter.com/j6R4SVIyVR — Frank In Las Vegas (@PapiElGuapo) March 19, 2017 WATCH: Watch how global warming heats up the world from 1880-2016
Trump touts poll showing decline in approval rating
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump punched Monday at one poll of his approval ratings while touting another. But the latter poll, by Fox News, showed him with a steadily declining performance rate.
FBI Director James Comey confirms investigation of potential Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
FBI Director James Comey confirmed that bureau investigators were looking into whether Donald Trump’s presidential campaign colluded with Moscow during the 2016 election. The FBI chief made the disclosure in his opening statement Monday morning before the House Intelligence Committee, which is looking into Russian interference in the election, leaks of classified information and charges by the president that his campaign was wiretapped by President Barack Obama. Comey noted that the FBI customarily does not confirm ongoing investigations — especially those concerning classified matters — but it may be appropriate to do that, as the Justice Department (DOJ) recognizes, if it is in the public’s interest.
FBI chief Comey on Trump wiretapping claims: ‘I have no information that supports those tweets’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
At a House Intelligence Committee hearing Monday morning, FBI Director James Comey said there was no evidence to support President Trump’s claim that former President Barack Obama wiretapped his campaign. “With respect to the president’s tweets about alleged wiretapping directed at him by the prior administration, I have no information that supports those tweets,” Comey said. “And we have looked carefully inside the FBI.
Patriots star's missing Super Bowl jersey recovered in Mexico
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By Scott Malone BOSTON (Reuters) - The football jersey that New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady wore in last month's Super Bowl victory in Houston, Texas, which disappeared hours after the game, has been found in Mexico, the National Football League and police said Monday. Both the jersey worn in Brady's fifth league championship over the Atlanta Falcons, and the one he'd worn two years earlier when the team topped the Seattle Seahawks, were recovered "in the possession of a credentialed member of the international media," the NFL said in a statement.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
To boost its economy, Tennessee is creating more college grads
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Amy Haddock, a 41-year-old stay-at-home mom, may not seem like a mechanically minded tinkerer, but she wants a career. Haddock is in the academy’s mechatronics program – a combination of mechanical engineering and electronics. It was developed by the German automaker in partnership with Chattanooga State Community College, where the academy’s current class of 72 students is enrolled.
Does Germany owe 'vast sums' to US for NATO defense? Germany says no.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Germany has flatly rejected a claim President Trump tweeted on Saturday morning, when he wrote that Germany owes “vast sums” of money to NATO and the United States for underspending. “There is no debt account at NATO,” German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen said in a statement on Sunday, adding that it was wrong to link the alliance’s target for members to spend 2 percent of their economic output on defense by 2024 solely to NATO. "Defense spending also goes into UN peacekeeping missions, into our European missions and into our contribution to the fight against IS terrorism," Ms. von der Leyen said.
North Korea's nuclear threat: Where do the US and China go from here?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For the Chinese, their proposal perhaps seemed obvious: North Korea would suspend its nuclear and missile tests in return for the United States and South Korea halting their annual joint military exercises. It became yet another wishful attempt at compromise as the two heavyweights struggle to forge a common strategy over North Korea’s expanding nuclear program. As tensions escalate on the Korean peninsula, China’s patience with the US is growing thin, says Wu Riqiang, a nuclear expert at Renmin University in Beijing.
Global Teacher Prize awarded to Canadian educator who works with Inuit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In the Inuit village of Salluit, far north in the Canadian Arctic, winters are so harsh and life so remote that most teachers leave midway through the school year or apply for stress leave. Ms. MacDonnell’s perseverance helped her stand out among the ten finalists for the Global Teacher Prize, which the Canadian teacher received, along with the $1 million award that comes with it, at a ceremony in Dubai on Sunday, beating out thousands of applicants from around the world. MacDonnell’s story illustrates her commitment, both in time and effort, to tackling even the most pervasive issues among students from underprivileged backgrounds.
This Valkyrie R5 humanoid robot is put to the test with Mars colonization on the horizon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Northwestern University has a Valkyrie R5 robot that is now undergoing agility tests in a Massachusetts warehouse to prepare for the NASA's Space Robotics Challenge finalist round this June.
Five biotech inventions the US is not ready for
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Whether it's lab-grown burgers or genetic drives, US regulators have a challenge on their hands.
Shaq is a flat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Now Shaq is doing it. Is it possible that current and former members of the NBA have mutually agreed to troll the planet — which is provably spherical in shape — with preposterous flat-Earth theories? The only other explanation is that they believe it, and just ... no. No. SEE ALSO: Check out this glorious map of lightning striking around the globe Retired NBA star and current media personality Shaquille O'Neal is the latest pro basketball player to assert that our definitely globe-shaped planet is, in fact, a flat surface. His proof: when he drives between Florida and California, "it's flat to me." Shaq's descent into laughable pseudoscience came out of a recent chat on his podcast. The talk turned to NBA star Kyrie Irving, another flat-Earther who recently drew headlines for speaking his truth to Big Science. After a brief "yes it is/not it's not" back-and-forth with podcast co-host John Kincade, Shaq laid out his thinking. "So, listen. I drive from coast to coast and this sh*t is flat to me. I'm just saying," he explained — at which point, Kincade interjected: "That is the dumbest thing you have ever said." Laughter followed, but Shaq wasn't finished. "I drive from Florida to California all the time, and it's flat to me. I do not go up and down at a 360-degree angle, and all that stuff about gravity. Have you looked outside Atlanta lately and seen all these buildings? You mean to tell me that China is under us? China is under us? It's not. The world is flat." This really happened. I'm not even going to unpack the "360-degree angle" thing, as I'm still stuck on the physics of how that would work. Would he just bounce up and down — like an Earth-shaped basketball! — while spinning in circles? Amazingly, Shaq is the fourth basketball-famous living human to espouse flat-Earth beliefs in recent weeks. After Irving asserted that our absolutely, positively round planet is just a stone pancake floating in space, fellow NBA stars Wilson Chandler and Draymond Green stepped up to voice their agreement. The claims have created such an atmosphere of fascinated consternation that league commissioner Adam Silver brought them up publicly in February, in his annual "state of the NBA" address. Adam Silver believes the Earth is round + thinks Kyrie was making some sort of statement on fake news with this flat-Earth theory. pic.twitter.com/YE8l1ePulS — Ben Rohrbach (@brohrbach) February 19, 2017 Silver pointed out at the time that Irving's comments were intentionally provocative, his way of engaging with the "fake news debate that's going on in our society right now." Silver also noted — with a faint grin on his face — that he believes the world is round. Irving addressed the "flat-Earth" stuff himself more recently when he appeared again on "Road Trippin' with RJ & Channing." It's the same podcast where he first let loose with his controversial take on established science. There is a fundamental point to all of this, Irving said: "It's OK to have your own thoughts and be able to function and be able to formulate your own thoughts and opinions and still be able to convey them to other people." While that may be true, "the Earth is actually flat" is a hell of a hill to die on. Whether he realizes it or not, Irving is implying that equal credence should be given to all perspectives, even those that are objectively, provably wrong. That kind of thinking is why people are still talking in serious terms about the validity of "alternative facts." As for Shaq and his own flat-Earth beliefs, he's probably now killed any shot he might have had at joining the cast of Space Jam 2. WATCH: B.o.B's flat earth conspiracy explained (and obviously debunked)
These insects have been locked in the throes of passion for 100 million years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Amber specimens from the mid-Cretaceous Period discovered in Myanmar show how male damselflies courted females 100 million years ago. Now three males of an extinct damselfly species – named Yijenplatycnemis huangi – that died while pursuing females have been described in a paper in the journal Scientific Reports. Damselflies are carnivorous insects that belong to the same group as dragonflies.
Siberia permafrost: Over 7,000 methane
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There are over 7,000 gas-filled bubbles in remote parts of Siberia that are set to explode, scientists have discovered. Following extensive field expeditions and satellite surveys, researchers in Russia have identified thousands of bulging bumps in the Yamal and Gydan peninsulas – far more than they had expected. Alexey Titovsky, director of Yamal department for science and innovation, told the Siberian Times that understanding the bubbles is of paramount important to assessing the risk they pose.
CERN Installs New Experiment To Study Antimatter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The experiment — Gravitational Behaviour of Antihydrogen at Rest — is designed to study how gravity affects antimatter particles.
Can science produce better passport control officers?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers are looking for ways to improve our ability to recognise and match faces.
Trump fumes before Comey testimony: ‘No evidence’ I colluded with Russia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Hours before FBI Director James Comey’s testimony before Congress on the bureau’s probe into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, President Trump took a few swings on Twitter. First, the president pointed out that former National Intelligence Director James Clapper had said in a recent interview that there was no evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow. “James Clapper and others stated that there is no evidence Potus colluded with Russia,” Trump tweeted.
Watch live: Comey testifies before Congress on Russia’s election meddling, Trump wiretap claim
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The FBI director is expected to discuss Russia’s interference in the U.S. election and President Trump’s evidence-free claim that his predecessor wiretapped Trump Tower.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
What Judge Gorsuch (and the rest of us) can expect at his confirmation hearing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A whole 13 months after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia left a vacancy on the Supreme Court, the Senate will hold confirmation hearings starting on Monday to probe the judge nominated to replace him. “It’s a fascinating process because clearly he has strengths in intellect and articulateness that make him an appealing candidate,” Mr. Blumenthal told The New York Times.
Best Ways to Protect Kids From Accidental Drug Poisoning
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Thousands of children accidentally ingest dangerous prescription drugs every year. Yet few people take the needed precautions that could protect kids from drug poisoning. A new Consumer Reports B...
Easy Steps for Getting Rid of Unused Medication
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Today is National Clean Out Your Medicine Cabinet Day, and chances are you haven't given much thought to the unused medications taking up space in your medicine cabinet. A new Consumer Reports Be...
What is killing bees? Why we should worry about Colony Collapse Disorder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The phenomenon is called Colony Collapse Disorder, which can kill off whole colonies of bees at once. The disorder has hit commercial honey bee-keepers hard, with some keepers who farm tens of thousands of hives losing half their bee population in one year. IBTimes UK spoke to Dave Goulson, professor of biology at the University of Sussex and founder of the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, about why the bees are disappearing.
Guess what? Biofuels are, in fact, better for the environment when used in jet engines
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As it turns out, when jet engines use biofuels, they emit fewer particle emissions in their exhaust trails. So yes, biofuels are, in fact, better for the environment than their fossil fuel alternatives. Shocking, we know.
Stephen Hawking is going to space on a Virgin Galactic flight thanks to Sir Richard Branson
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Professor Stephen Hawking knows a lot about space – and now he’s announced that he is actually going there. The physicist and cosmologist, 75, said he had not expected to have the opportunity to experience space but that Virgin boss Sir Richard Branson had offered him a seat on Virgin Galactic. Professor Hawking also shared his views on US President Donald Trump and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn during the interview – and he didn’t hold back.
Stephen Hawking: I may not be welcome in the US
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
British physicist Stephen Hawking fears he will not be welcome in the U.S. due to his criticism of how President Donald Trump is treating U.S. scientists.
2 reports, 1 conclusion: energy shift must start soon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BERLIN (AP) — The world must swiftly shift energy production away from fossil fuels if it is to prevent a dangerous increase in global temperatures, according to separate reports released Monday by two international agencies.
North Korea tests newly developed high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korea has tested a new type of high-thrust engine to propel its rockets
Democrats hope to corner Gorsuch in confirmation battle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Senate Democrats hope to force Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch into revealing his opinions on abortion rights and the legality of President Donald Trump’s travel ban during confirmation hearings that begin Monday. Supreme Court nominees are usually circumspect when asked to share their views on issues that could one day make their way to the court, a standard that Gorsuch’s defenders say was set by liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg during her confirmation hearing in 1993.
Syria’s refugee crisis is also a security nightmare, terrorism experts warn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
As the number of Syrian refugees fleeing the civil war climbs well into the millions, there are new warnings from top U.S. counterterrorism experts that the exodus is posing a national security threat far more serious than any the United States and Europe have seen in decades. Soufan’s message: The failure of the West to address the conditions of refugees flooding into neighboring countries creates a situation like the one that gave rise to the Taliban and al-Qaida in Afghanistan 25 years ago — with consequences that could potentially be more disastrous.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Ben Affleck's Return to Rehab: 5 Facts About Addiction Relapse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Actor Ben Affleck recently announced that he had completed rehab for alcohol addiction for at least the second time — a scenario that is not uncommon among people who experience alcoholism. In a Facebook post on Tuesday (March 14), Affleck said he had successfully completed a treatment program for alcohol addiction. The actor previously went to rehab for alcoholism in 2001, when he was 29 years old, according to The Hollywood Reporter.
The World's Best Heart Health Found in Indigenous Amazon Group
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In an indigenous group of people in South America, researchers are finding the healthiest blood vessels ever studied, thanks in part to a diet that's rich in complex carbs. The Tsimane people — who live in the Bolivian Amazon — were five times less likely to have atherosclerosis compared with people in the United States, according to the study. Atherosclerosis is sometimes referred to as "hardening of the arteries" and is a major risk factor for heart disease.
Striking Image Shows 'Protruding' Feature in Woman's Eye
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Peering into the eyes of a 37-year-old woman in China, doctors were surprised to see a raised, rippled ring of tissue, encircling her irises in both eyes. The ring, called a protruding iris collarette, is a variation of a normally flat part of the eye called the iris collarette. The iris is the colored part of a person's eye, and has different layers and textures, said Dr. Andrea Thau, the president of the American Optometric Association, who was not involved with the new report of the woman's case.
Man's Rare Case: How Does a Strep Infection Lead to Amputations?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Michigan man will require amputations of parts of his hands and feet after experiencing a severe case of strep throat. The 44-year-old man, Kevin Breen, first went to the emergency room in late December with flu-like symptoms and stomach pain, according to CNN. Doctors found copious amounts of pus surrounding his organs, but they didn't know the cause of his illness.
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.
Stephen Hawking has a message for Trump: Don't ignore climate change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The UK's most renowned theoretical physicist and cosmologist is still using his exceptional mind to map a theory of how the universe works. But when it comes to matters here on Earth, Stephen Hawking is just as concerned about President Trump's science policies as anyone.  During a recent interview with Good Morning Britain, set to air Monday, Hawking bluntly laid out his views on U.S. administration's science policies.  SEE ALSO: Stephen Hawking reminds us technology will kill us all and it's all our fault "Climate change is one of the great dangers we face, and it's one we can prevent," said Hawking, according to the Guardian. "It affects America badly, so tackling it should win votes for his [Trump's] second term. God forbid." Hawking also suggested that Trump should, "replace Scott Pruitt at the Environment Protection Agency [EPA]." Pruitt, who has sued the organisation in the past over environmental issues, was a controversial choice to lead the EPA, with current and former staffers protesting his selection.  'People who boast about their IQ are losers.'Catch @PiersMorgan's exclusive interview with Professor #StephenHawking on tomorrow's GMB. pic.twitter.com/4GG6nFExhQ — Good Morning Britain (@GMB) March 19, 2017 But one of the biggest surprises from Hawking — a recipient of the U.S. Franklin Medal for science and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (from Barack Obama in 2009) — was his personal concerns regarding the new immigration policies in the U.S.  "I would like to visit again and to talk to other scientists," said Hawking, "but I fear that I may not be welcome."  The television program gave a small preview of Hawking's appearance via Twitter, where the scientist tossed off his now familiar quip about intelligence: "People who boast about their IQ are losers." WATCH: Take a dive with a marine biologist working to restore our ecosystem
Climate change presents us with a choice, Seeking an end to the Ukrainian conflict, Balancing Beijing’s displeasure and missile defense, The people
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Climate change today constitutes a threat to the well-being of our country, and not to confront it would be to put at risk the future of our children...,” writes Marcelo Mena, Chile’s vice minister of the environment. “The challenge that remains for us [in Chile] is in transportation, which accounts for 28.9 percent of our emissions.... The green tax means that vehicles will become more efficient, but it’s clear that public transport is the way forward.... We have two choices.