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Suicide Hotline Calls Spiked 25% After Kate Spade's Death
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Calls to the lifeline can spike following celebrity suicides because of a “collective sense of loss"
An Air Force Officer Who Disappeared 35 Years Ago Has Been Found in California
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
William Howard Hughes, Jr., a captain, was 33 years old when he vanished in 1983
Can ranked
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Electoral reform experts believe ranked-choice voting has the potential to shake up the two-party system without destabilizing American politics. It is seen as a way to give voters more choices, reduce polarization, and make room for candidates to run as independents.
Trump finds time to tweet before meeting with Kim Jong Un
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president fired off a series of messages on Twitter just hours before meeting North Korea's leader.
Larry Kudlow suffers heart attack, Trump says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The White House economic adviser had spent the past day defending his remarks over the president's appearance at the G7 meetings in Canada.
Trump meets Kim Jong Un in Singapore
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After months of saber-rattling that gave way to flirtation, President Trump finally met face-to-face with Kim Jong Un at a hotel on Sentosa Island in Singapore on Tuesday morning.
Plane taxis to Orlando gate _ after alligator crosses tarmac
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Most times it's bad weather or bird strikes that delay flights. This time it was an alligator.
The chatter of birds, frogs, monkeys, and bugs can help illuminate the evolution of human language
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you listen closely to the sound of birds chirping, you’ll hear that they’re taking turns. The same goes for croaking frogs and dolphin whistles. Fireflies flirt in alternating flashes, called “courtship dialogues.” And monkey parents will refuse to respond to offspring if they’re interrupted. Scientists have long observed that creatures seem to convey a…
Oprah Winfrey Is Now an Exhibit in a Smithsonian Museum
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Smithsonian debuted an exhibit dedicated to Oprah Winfrey at its National Museum of African American History and Culture on Friday.
Don't Forget the Dark Side of Living in South Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
South Korea may not be a dictatorship but it has its own human rights problems
Could the Next Flu Pandemic Come from Dogs?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You've heard of the swine flu and the bird flu," but now scientists are concerned about dog flu — and, in particular, dog flu jumping to humans. Specifically, the researchers found that flu viruses can jump from pigs to dogs and that, once in dogs, these "pig" flu viruses can mix with dog flu viruses — in turn, producing new flu viruses. For example, scientists think the 2009 H1N1 (swine flu) pandemic happened when a bird flu virus jumped to pigs, exchanged some of its genes with pig flu viruses, and then jumped to humans.
This Wily Wolverine Threw Scientists for a Loop
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We were not expecting a familiar face as we cracked open the wooden box trap we'd carefully set on the remote north slope of Alaska. With feet large enough to act like snowshoes, strong musculature and a honed set of teeth and claws, wolverines can take down an animal as large as a caribou in the middle of winter, but they'll also hunt small rodents, such as ground squirrels, when they're looking for a tasty morsel. Scientists from the WCS Arctic Beringia program are studying wolverines' movements and diets, as well as the creatures' relationship with the spring snow, in which they den and raise their kits.
Decapitated Snake Head Bites Man. But How?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Shortly after a man killed a rattlesnake in his backyard, the rattlesnake's severed head bit and injected venom into the man, seriously injuring him, according to news reports. The zombie-like incident happened when Jennifer Sutcliffe and her husband were working in their backyard near Corpus Christi, Texas, over Memorial Day weekend, according to KIII, an ABC-affiliated station. Because snakes don't need to internally maintain their body temperature, they don't need as much energy — which is burned up using oxygen — as warm-blooded "endotherms" do, said David Penning, an assistant professor of biology at Missouri Southern State University who wasn't involved in the Texas case.
Global warming will make veggies harder to find: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Global warming is expected to make vegetables significantly scarcer around the world, unless new growing practices and resilient crop varieties are adopted, researchers warned on Monday. By the end of this century, less water and hotter air will combine to cut average yields of vegetables -- which are crucial to a healthy diet -- by nearly one-third, said the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. A 7.2 Fahrenheit (4 Celsius) increase in temperature, which scientists expect by 2100 if global warming continues on its current trajectory, reduces average yields by 31.5 percent, said the report.
Maine town works to save statue of famous harbor seal Andre
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ROCKPORT, Maine (AP) — A Maine town is raising money to save the statue of a beloved harbor seal that brought the community together.
On sidelines of two
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe flew to Washington last week, he delivered an urgent message to President Trump ahead of tomorrow’s unprecedented US-North Korea summit: Don’t forget about us. For Mr. Abe, the visit was a last-ditch attempt to ensure that any deal Mr. Trump reaches with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un doesn't harm Japan's interests. China, South Korea, and Russia have all tried to influence the strong-headed leaders before they sit down together for the first time.
A newly populist Italy tests Europe's bonds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The European Union, the alliance of nearly 30 countries stretching across the continent, is facing its most serious political crisis for years. Both issues will surely figure at an EU summit this month hosted by French President Emmanuel Macron, not least because the Trump administration followed its broadside on the G7 host nation, Canada, with a further hint at possible new tariffs on Germany’s car exporters. Instead, the key danger signal comes from Italy, where a combination of economic stagnation and the influx of hundreds of thousands of refugees in the past few years has led to a new, unabashedly Euroskeptic government.
Why Trump fans largely shrug off president's 'authoritarian' talk
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Tending to his garden shop that’s brimming with bright marigolds and purple petunias, John Young has some choice words when it comes to President Trump and the ongoing Mueller investigation. “I really believe the Russia thing will end up being nothing,” Mrs. Young says firmly. In this picturesque southern New Hampshire town, where 53 percent cast ballots for Trump in 2016, some Republican voters express unease with the president’s brash – critics would say authoritarian – rhetoric about the unconstitutionality of the special counsel or his ability to pardon himself.
The source of Jordan’s river of discontent
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In an interview last year, King Abdullah of Jordan admitted he can do only so much to end a deep cultural practice known in Arabic as wasta. One in 3 Jordanians, for example, works for the government, plum work often gained through favoritism, such as a tribal connection or even bribery. For nearly a week, tens of thousands of Jordanians took to the streets in protests that, while initially focused on economic issues such as a proposed income tax, ended up venting public frustration with wasta and the lack of a meritocracy in business and government.
Kate Middleton Comforted Princess Charlotte After She Fell During Her Big Moment at Trooping the Colour
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Princess Charlotte appeared to fall backward and started to cry at Trooping the Colour. Kate Middleton knelt down to comfort her.
Gene editing tool may raise cancer risk in cells, scientists warn
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A gene-editing technology that is being explored by scientists worldwide as a way of removing and replacing gene defects might inadvertently increase cancer risk in cells, scientists warned on Monday. Researchers from the Britain's Cambridge University and Sweden's Karolinska Institute said more research needs to be done to assess whether using CRISPR-Cas9 – a type of molecular "scissors" that make gene editing a possibility – might lead to the development of treatments that have added cancer risk. The team, led by Jussi Taipale at Cambridge, found that CRISPR-Cas9 triggers a mechanism designed to protect cells from DNA damage, making gene editing more difficult.
Robert De Niro Gets Bleeped for Saying 'F**k Trump' at the Tony Awards
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He got a standing ovation in the room, but the TV audience didn't hear what he said
How Community Health Workers Could Save 30 Million Lives By 2030
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Dr. Raj Panjabi spoke about how Last Mile Health trains community health workers during a TIME 100 x WeWork speaker series.
'An Unprecedented Scandal': How Newspapers Around the World Reacted to Trump's Behavior at the G
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
America's closest allies were left reeling after the summit—and their media had harsh words about the American president's performance
Here's the Story Behind Netflix's Latest True Crime Docuseries The Staircase
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Here's what to know about the case examined in the series
'Shocking' die
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Some of Africa's oldest and biggest baobab trees -- a few dating all the way back to the ancient Greeks -- have abruptly died, wholly or in part, in the past decade, researchers said Monday. The baobab is the biggest and longest-living flowering tree, according to the research team.
'He Had Everything.' Anthony Bourdain's Mother Says She Never Thought He Would Die by Suicide
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"He is absolutely the last person in the world I would have ever dreamed would do something like this"
What would 'success' at Singapore summit mean?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
What should we look for from the Trump-Kim summit? Reciprocity, concrete commitments by both sides and the designation of point persons by each side with the authority to drive the process forward.
Kellyanne Conway sat down for a remarkable Monitor Breakfast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The June 6 Monitor Breakfast with Kellyanne Conway was a classic. Ms. Conway, a top adviser to President Trump, arrived at the St. Regis Hotel at 9 a.m. on the dot, not long after the boss had started tweeting. “Fake News” was the operative phrase – Fake News about Tuesday’s primaries, Fake News about first lady Melania Trump, over and over.
NASA will visit an undersea volcano in Hawaii to figure out how to hunt for aliens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA will soon visit Hawaii's Lo'ihi volcano, which sits more than 3,000 feet beneath the Pacific Ocean, all in the name of one day hunting for life out in the solar system.  The NASA expedition, called SUBSEA, endeavors to visit underwater volcanoes — which are often rich in colorful mats of microbial life — to better grasp how life might exist in deep, harsh, lightless places in our solar system.  SEE ALSO: Deep beneath the Pacific, another active Hawaiian volcano waits to emerge Lo'ihi is an active volcano sitting about 50 miles off the coast of the Big Island.  NASA — which plans to launch the mission in August — will use the rocks and bacteria it collects from the volcano to plan ambitious robotic explorations of these water worlds, should the agency get funding. The space agency is specifically interested in Saturn's moon Enceladus and Jupiter's moon Europa — both of which are suspected to harbor heat-emitting vents and oceans beneath their thick, ice shells. A black smoker emitting jets of particle-rich fluid.Image: NoaaDeep sea vents are common below Earth's oceans, existing thousands of feet down in parts of the Atlantic and Pacific. There, the scorching vents are famous for emitting thick plumes of "black smoke," which feed extremophile microbes and worm-like creatures nearby. In some locations lobsters, snails, and crabs also rely on these vents.  "But Lo'ihi is different," Darlene Lim, a NASA geobiologist and head of the SUBSEA program, said in an interview.  Scientists suspect that if deep sea vents exist on other worlds, they're more like Lo'ihi's, which aren't quite as intensely hot as black smokers in the deep Atlantic, said Lim.  Black smokers reach over 700 degrees Fahrenheit, whereas planetary scientists think those on Enceladus might fall between 120 to 400 degrees Fahrenheit (50 to 200 Celsius), said Lim. NOAA's exploration vessel, the Nautilus.Image: noaaNASA doesn't have an exploration vessel, but the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) does, so NASA is partnering with the seafaring agency to study Lo'ihi for 21 days. Remote operated vehicles (ROVs) will be sent down to Lo'ihi to collect rocks and observe the vibrant microbial community around the volcano.  "It's extremely rich in diversity," Craig Moyer, a volcano microbiologist at Western Washington University who has been studying Lo'ihi for over two decades, said in an interview.  Life down around Lo'ihi isn't just abundant in microbial chemotrophs — which feed exclusively on chemicals in a lightless world — but these communities change in parallel with Lo'ihi's fluctuating activity, said Moyer. Tubeworms living off of vents 8,200 feet beneath the eastern Pacific Ocean.Image: noaaSince Lo'ihi's eruption in 1996, the volcano has been pretty quiet and the vents have cooled off, meaning the volcano isn't emitting much of its typical gases like hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide. This leaves the microbes down there to feed on the chemical available, iron.  But when Lo'ihi's activity ramps up again, heat and new chemicals will allow other microbes to prosper. "My fingers are crossed that we’ll see an uptick in the activity once again," said Moyer, noting Hawaii's vigorously erupting Kilauea is likely to share a deep plumbing system with Lo'ihi. The icy, cracked surface of Jupiter's moon Europa.Image: NasaNot only is Kilauea exceptionally active right now — erupting enough lava over the last month to fill over 45,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools — nearby Lo'ihi is relatively easy for NASA to study because it's in U.S. territory.   "It’s a wonderful confluence," said Lim.  By the end of SUBSEA, which plans to visit another volcanic vent system in 2019, Lim hopes to give NASA's future deep space planners an improved idea of where to best seek life on uncharted alien worlds like the moon Enceladus. Europa, too, has potential for life to thrive in the ocean sloshing beneath its thick ice crust.  "Anywhere you’ve got liquid water you’ve got a high probability of finding life," said Moyer.  "I'm rooting for both of them." WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?      
We’re Worrying About the Wrong Kind of AI
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
No computer has yet shown features of true human-level artificial intelligence much less conscious awareness. Now consider that biologists have been learning to grow functioning “mini brains” or “brain organoids” from real human cells, and progress has been so fast that researchers are actually worrying about what to do if a piece of tissue in a lab dish suddenly shows signs of having conscious states or reasoning abilities. While we are busy focusing on computer intelligence, AI may arrive in living form first, and bring with it a host of unprecedented ethical challenges.
How Trump Decided to Meet Kim Jong Un
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
His handling of the North Korea summit has been trademark Trump: focused on immediate personal and tactical advantage.
Champagne
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Champagne maker Mumm is set to "launch" a bottle of bobbly developed specifically to be consumed in zero gravity conditions. 
Strategic Ties Between India and the U.S. Are Growing. But Russia Is a Stumbling Block
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Indians perceive Russia as friendly and cooperative, but the Americans see it in a different light
The Dark History of the 'Tranquil' Island Hosting the Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The island's name means "tranquility"—but it has a troubled past
Penka the Bulgarian cow escapes death sentence after international outcry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Bulgaria agreed on Monday to spare the life of Penka the cow after plans to kill her for crossing European Union borders without paperwork triggered an international outcry. Penka wandered away from her herd near the Bulgarian village of Mazarachevo last month and walked out of the bloc into neighboring Serbia. When she was returned two weeks later, authorities said she would have to be put down as she had violated guidelines under which animals entering the European Union have to have papers verifying their health.
Rafael Nadal Wins 11th French Open Title
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nadal defeated Dominic Thiem
From Spy Games to Summits, Here Are 10 Historic Moments in U.S.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The leaders of these two longtime adversaries will meet Tuesday in Singapore
White House Advisers Take Up Fight Against 'Back
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"There's a special place in hell for any foreign leader that engages in bad faith diplomacy."
German prosecutors raid Audi boss over diesel cheating
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
German prosecutors said Monday they had raided the home of Rupert Stadler, chief executive of Volkswagen subsidiary Audi, over suspicion of fraud related to diesel emissions cheating by the firm. "Since May 30 the chief executive of Audi Professor Rupert Stadler and another member of the current executive board have been regarded as suspects," prosecutors in Bavarian capital Munich said in a statement.
Scientists in Germany seek to find mass of 'ghost particle'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers in Germany have started collecting data with a 60 million euro ($71 million) machine designed to help determine the mass of the universe's lightest particle
The 8th Circuit strategy: How abortion foes are lining up cases to challenge Roe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Abortion foes have a plan to bring a case to the Supreme Court that could overturn Roe v. Wade. Their strategy involves going through the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, which covers states from Arkansas to the Dakotas and is one of the most conservative in the nation.
What would ‘success’ at Singapore summit mean?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
What should we look for from the Trump-Kim summit? Reciprocity, concrete commitments by both sides and the designation of point persons by each side with the authority to drive the process forward.
The Band's Visit Leads the Tony Awards With 10 Honors, Including Best Musical
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" also won six awards
Here Are the Best, Weirdest, and Wildest Moments of the 2018 Tony Awards
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'Angels in America', 'Harry Potter', and Robert De Niro dominated during Broadway's big night
NASA Publishes SpaceX's Proposal for a Futuristic Kennedy Space Center
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The "rocket garden" might just get approved.
Italy's New Populist Government Blocks Rescue Ship Carrying 600 Migrants From Docking
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Driven by violent conflicts and extreme poverty, thousands of migrants have reached southern Europe recently by crossing the Mediterranean