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Fox dropped O’Reilly, but activists want more from the network
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Fox News’s decision to drop Bill O’Reilly from the network’s popular primetime slate was seen only as a first step by groups that have been pushing for his ouster. The company announced Wednesday afternoon that "after a thorough and careful review of the allegations, the company and Bill O'Reilly have agreed that Bill O'Reilly will not be returning to the Fox News Channel."
Hillary Clinton campaign biographer: Here’s where she went wrong
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The co-author of a new book detailing her loss in the 2016 presidential election says the Democratic candidate and her top aides could see the “tsunami” of populism building in places like Britain, but refused to prepare for its arrival in the United States.
Bill O’Reilly: ‘Completely unfounded claims’ caused my Fox News departure
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Bill O’Reilly said the claims that resulted in his departure from Fox News “unfounded” and wished the network the best in a statement released Wednesday afternoon.
Arena bans cowbells after some are thrown during hockey game
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ERIE, Pa. (AP) — A Pennsylvania arena has decided it really needs less cowbell.
Why North Korea may be a threat to itself
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As the Trump administration continues to rattle a saber at North Korea, it should take note of a new survey by two economists at South Korea’s central bank. In interviews with hundreds of recent North Korean refugees, they found the United States has already invaded the country in one big way: The preferred currency among North Koreans for buying food, goods, and services is the American dollar, not the local currency. This is a sure sign of a thriving underground market despite the official line of a state-run economy.
Fight Back Against Foot Pain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
If your feet ache after a day of walking and you’re looking for relief, you’re not alone. In 2015 Americans spent about $4.7 billion on orthotics sold in supermarkets, drugstores, sporting goods ...
5 Move Full
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Just because dumbbells are a classic doesn’t mean they can’t do a stellar job of sculpting and toning. This video shows you how to do five dumbbell exercises that will leave you sore (in a good way) the next day.
The Health Benefits of Garlic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
There’s nothing like a little garlic to punch up a stir-fry, roast chicken, or pasta dish, but for centuries it has been purported to add some oomph to your health, too. Ancient civilizations use...
Automated agriculture: Can robots, drones, and AI save us from starvation?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In their never-ending quest for increased efficiency, many farmers are now turning to agricultural robots to cut down on operation costs. But can automation give agriculture the boost it needs to meet the demands of 9 billion people?
How to succeed as a data scientist even if you aren't an analytic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Although analytics are a natural fit for big data jobs, other personality types can be great data scientists. Get the specifics.
Facebook is working on tech to let you type with your brain and 'hear with your skin'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Facebook wants to let you type with your thoughts and "hear with your skin." The social network...
Ghost in the Machine? Mysterious 'Sterile' Neutrinos May Not Exist
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Proposed elusive subatomic particles that only fleetingly interact with matter through gravity may not exist, at least if new data from a nuclear reactor is any indication. Scientists had long noticed a discrepancy between the predicted and actual number of antineutrinos, or the antimatter partners to neutrinos, produced in nuclear reactors. Now, a new analysis suggests that this reactor antineutrino discrepancy isn't the result of a new hypothetical particle known as a sterile neutrino.
This Startup Uses Mini Cameras to Track Animals’ Brain Activity
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Silicon Valley-based Inscopix monitors neural activity in animals, helping scientists derive useful insights from the data.
Which body part hurts the most when stung by a bee? A scientist put himself through a torturous experiment to find out
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pain is notoriously subjective — some people can take more of it than others. But we need...
The Science of 'S
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fans of the podcast "S-Town" know that the main character, John McLemore, enjoyed a dangerous hobby called fire-gilding. The ancient process may sound like magic — turning dingy metals into brilliant gold or silver — but what's really going on is some straightforward science. Fire-gilding was used to transfer gold or silver onto another object, said Tami Clare, an associate professor of chemistry at Portland State University in Oregon.
NASA Images Reveal Huge New Crack on Greenland’s Petermann Glacier
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A huge new crack has appeared on the Petermann Glacier, a large ice shelf in northern Greenland. NASA images show the rift has opened up at the center of the floating ice shelf and, should it continue to grow, it could break off into a large iceberg and float away. NASA took the aerial images of the glacier on April 14 as part of its Operation IceBridge mission.
Pilot, meteorologist vying to be 1st German female astronaut
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A fighter pilot and a meteorologist have made the finals in the race to become Germany's first female astronaut
Rob Gronkowski's world tour continues as he crashes Sean Spicer's White House media briefing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
From WrestleMania to “stealing” Tom Brady’s jersey at Fenway Park to the White House press briefing, New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski is showing up everywhere this offseason.
Mike Huckabee knows people hate his Twitter jokes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Mike Huckabee’s 140-character comedy show frequently pops up in Twitter feeds of journalists and political operatives, inspiring professional critiques and even a Jimmy Kimmel skit, along with countless pleas to give his thumbs a rest.
Loud sex sounds interrupt pro tennis match in Florida
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SARASOTA, Fla. (AP) — An outdoor professional tennis match in Florida came to a brief halt amid sounds of loud sex.
Moscow plans to give people new apartments, but is there a catch?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Recommended: Sochi, Soviets, and czars: How much do you know about Russia? The effort to move about 1.6 million residents out of the nearly 8,000 targeted buildings – dubbed Khrushchevki after Nikita Khrushchev, the Soviet leader who ordered them built – is in principle a benevolent one. Many residents say they fear that they will be shifted into enormous housing developments on the city's outskirts, without the green space and the community surroundings they are accustomed to, while the often valuable downtown real estate their old buildings sat upon will be handed over to developers to construct luxury housing for the rich.
Crisis in Venezuela: Can Trump ‘lead from behind’ in Latin America?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The Trump administration, which is showing some unexpected glimmers of interest in promoting human rights and democracy, may have an opportunity to do both, right in America’s backyard – with increasingly volatile Venezuela. Instead, it will be through cooperation and partnership with Venezuela’s steadily more concerned and outspoken neighbors and Latin America’s solid democracies – which just might hold sway with a government in Caracas that rejects US pressures as same-old “yanqui” imperialism.
The twin goals behind North Korea's resolve on nuclear weapons
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The Trump administration has portrayed the US missile strike on a Syrian air field earlier this month as a sign its willingness to make tough decisions. “The logic is pretty simple,” says Wenran Jiang, an associate professor of political science at the University of Alberta, in Canada. As a small, impoverished nation focused on its own survival, North Korea is deeply committed to holding on to its nuclear arms.
Blue surge in Georgia: What election shows about shifts in suburban values
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
While he did not breach the 50 percent threshold to avoid a runoff in June, he did surge to an easy plurality over 17 other candidates in the district – the place where Newt Gingrich catapulted into national politics with a 1979 win. Recommended: Do you really know your Atlanta Braves baseball history? The Sixth has been no-man’s land for Democrats ever since.
Gear Up for a Safe Bike Ride
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The biggest key to a safe bike ride is seeing and being seen by approaching automobiles. A 2015 study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety revealed that while accidents in which a cyclis...
Top Quotes By Charles Darwin On His 135th Death Anniversary
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Often known as the “Father of Evolution,” Charles Darwin provided the world with explanations on the origin and evolution of living things on Earth.
Many Parents Stumble Over Giving Kids Allergy Medicine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When it comes to giving allergy medicine to kids, many parents are doing things that could potentially cause problems, a new poll finds. Parents who were polled said they had trouble figuring out the right dose of allergy medications to give to their children, and some said they used adult versions of the drugs instead of child versions, according to a new poll. When using adult allergy medications, "parents should be very careful to give their child the correct dose," Dr. Gary Freed, a pediatrician at the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital in Michigan and co-director of the poll, said in a statement.
Science is already political. So scientists might as well march.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The institutions and people who do science can’t remain neutral toward the Trump administration’s threats. To say that these are moral (and prudential) judgments, not scientific judgments, is not some kind demotion.
Alphabet seeks 10,000 volunteers — and their health data — for a massive medical study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alphabet’s Google division is, fundamentally, in the business of selling data. Verily’s Project Baseline is, in some sense, the health equivalent of those kinds of services — it has the potential to greatly expand our knowledge about what human health looks like. Researchers will collect genetic data, blood samples, medical images, and other information.
Solstice Alignments Discovered in 'Peter Pan' Gardens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The pathways of the "Peter Pan" gardens in front of Kensington Palace in London were designed to align with the rising sun during the summer and winter solstices, a researcher had found. Amelia Carolina Sparavigna, a physics professor at the Politecnico di Torino in Italy, discovered the alignments using a combination of satellite imagery and astronomical software. The gardens in front of the palace, which encompass 265 acres (107 hectares) of land, gained literary fame in the early 20th century when author J.M. Barrie used the palace gardens in his short story "Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens," published as part of the book '"The Little White Bird" (Hodder & Stoughton, 1902).
Solitary Confinement Makes Prisoners Behave Badly and Screws up Their Brains
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a new study published in March, another group of researchers spoke with recently released prisoners and found that those who spent time in solitary were more than two and a half times more likely to show post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. “If exposure to solitary confinement causes PTSD, then it may be harmful and dangerous and something we should think twice about,” says Dr. Aaron Fox at the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York, who was lead author of the study. “If people with PTSD are placed in solitary confinement, that’s also a problem, as it’s exacerbating their mental health problems.” He adds that if we have these questions about solitary confinement, we should be demonstrating that it’s safe before it’s used as punishment.
Mysterious New Crack in Greenland Glacier Revealed in NASA Photos
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There is a new crack in one of Greenland's largest glaciers, and NASA researchers have captured the first images of the ice shelf's mysterious rift. Operation IceBridge, NASA's airborne survey of polar ice, recently completed a land-ice mission over northwest Greenland. During the mission, researchers flew over and photographed a new rift near the center of Petermann Glacier's ice shelf (the floating end of the glacier).
Milestone on way to switching on world's biggest X
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists say they have reached a milestone on the way to switching on the world's biggest X-ray laser
‘I am all in’: Lindsey Graham boards Trump train after lengthy feud
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Sen. Graham was once one of Donald Trump’s harshest Republican critics. Now he has the president he’s “been dreaming of for eight years.”
GOP candidate Handel welcomes Trump support as Georgia special election heads toward runoff
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Trump called former Georgia Secretary of State Karen Handel on Wednesday morning, congratulating her on making it to the runoff with Democrat Jon Ossoff.
Austrian town finds its hermit after international search
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
VIENNA (AP) — A months-long international search by an Austrian town to find a new hermit has ended — and Stan's the man.
Testing begins after brown spots appear in 2 Florida cities
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SPRINGFIELD, Fla. (AP) — The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is looking into complaints about brown spots that are appearing on cars, boats, air conditioning units and other objects in a couple of cities.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
The 7 Highest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Are you trying to decide on a college major? Here are the ones that can give you the most bang for your buck.
Machine learning is being used to uncover the mass graves of Mexico’s missing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In March of this year, a massive grave was uncovered buried beneath the soil of the coastal Mexican state of Veracruz. The grave made national headlines because it contained more than 240 skulls and corpses, the remains of disappeared people (link in Spanish). But for many, the grave’s existence came as no surprise. In Mexico,…
Salty food increases sensation of hunger more than thirst says new study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By simulating a space mission to Mars, an international team of researchers noted that eating salty food led to greater hunger than thirst, at least in the long term. A new study has challenged the old saying that eating salty food makes you thirsty. Researchers from the Max Delbrûck Center for Molecular Medicine in Germany and Vanderbilt University in the US city of Nashville studied the link between salt intake and drinking habits on a simulated space mission to Mars.
In theory, science is not political. In practice, it needs a march.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Stand Up for Science Rally in Boston’s Copley Square, 2/19/2017.(Shutterstock)
Scientists Recreate Ancient Woman’s Face
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists used information from a skeleton to show what an ancient woman’s face looked like 13,000 years ago, so now you can look into the eyes of your human ancestor.
Mongolia launches its first satellite
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mongolia launched its first satellite on Wednesday, part of its efforts to make use of new technology to diversify its resource-dependent economy. The 1,227-megahertz satellite, called Mongol Sat-1, will help landlocked Mongolia expand its television, telecoms and broadband services, according to a video posted on the official website of Mongolia's parliament . The satellite was launched in partnership with Asia Broadcast Satellite (ABS), a telecoms and broadcast provider for the region.
Indian officials to lose red beacon lights atop their cars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW DELHI (AP) — India's officialdom is set to come down a notch.
Canada as international peacekeeper, US unilateral approach to North Korea may be a 'viable new alternative,' 'Righteous outrage' does
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"A government so eager to get back into peacekeeping, to have Canada 'step up' and assume its responsibilities as a committed member of the United Nations, now hesitates at the water’s edge," states an editorial. "There are plenty of understandable reasons for this. The international landscape has changed dramatically with the election of Donald Trump. "Donald Trump’s warning that he would deal with North Korea 'with or without China’s help' may in fact have a chance to succeed...," writes Lee Seong-hyon. "Solving the North Korean conundrum with the US initiative would mean sustained American leadership and enlarging U.S. interests in the region.... The obvious aim is to gradually spread 'capitalist elements' within the North Korea and expose its population to outside information.
Two supermassive black holes discovered hiding in tiny galaxies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The existence of two supermassive black holes in amazingly small galaxies could double the estimate of the number of supermassive black holes in the universe. Two ultra-compact dwarf galaxies called VUCD3 and M59cO were found to have supermassive black holes at their centres, finds a paper in The Astrophysical Journal. Supermassive black holes have only been found in such a tiny dwarf galaxy once before, by the same group of researchers at the University of Utah.
Archaeologists Discover 38,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One of the world’s first nature pictures was a wild cow. A team of archaeologists found the earliest known depiction of an animal on a slab of rock in Southwestern France. According to a research paper published in the journal, Quaternary International, in January, the artifact was created by the Aurignacians, the first humans to migrate from Africa to Western Eurasia between 40,000 and 50,000 years ago.
New NASA images reveal an alarming crack in the middle of a Greenland glacier
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New NASA photos have revealed an unusual crack forming across Greenland's Petermann Glacier, threatening to release a huge iceberg into the Arctic Sea. While cracks aren't an uncommon sight in ice sheets around the globe these days, this new discovery is alarming because it's formed in the middle of one of Greenland's glaciers, not at its edges, and it's not something scientists saw coming. In fact, NASA scientists were first notified of the rift on Twitter last week, by Dutch scientist Stef Lhermitte from Delft University of Technology.
Prosecutors move to toss more than 21,000 tainted drug cases
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BOSTON (AP) — Prosecutors moved to throw out more than 21,000 drug convictions on Tuesday, five years after a chemist at the state drug lab was caught tampering with evidence and falsifying tests.