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Mysteries of Shipwreck Hundreds of Years Old Revealed by 3D Scanning Off the Italian Coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists in Italy have discovered a Byzantine shipwreck off the coast of Sicily and are using cutting-edge 3D technology to further uncover the secrets of the vessel that had been submerged beneath the sea for hundreds of years. The experts in underwater archaeology from the University of Udine, Texas A&M University and Sicily’s local marine authority discovered the wreck at a depth of ten feet below the water line just off Ragusa. According to a University of Udine press release the team constructed a trench along the center of the ship to facilitate their work and documentation.
The U.N. Says Australia Is Responsible For the Remaining Asylum Seekers on Manus Island
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The U.N. Human Rights Committee insists Australia resettle the 600 asylum seekers who remain at the facility
A Radioactive Cloud from Russia Swept Over Europe — and No One Knows Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The radioactive nuclide Ruthenium 106 is believed to have originated in Russia or Kazakhstan
Republicans Are Stuck With Roy Moore. Here's What Could Happen Next
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
5 Alabama Senate race scenarios after Moore was accused of sexual misconduct with minors
Large U.S. farm study finds no cancer link to Monsanto weedkiller
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LONDON, (Reuters) - - A large long-term study on the use of the big-selling weedkiller glyphosate by agricultural workers in the United States has found no firm link between exposure to the pesticide and cancer, scientists said on Thursday. Published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI), the study found there was no association between glyphosate, the main ingredient in Monsanto's popular herbicide RoundUp, "and any solid tumours or lymphoid malignancies overall, including non-Hogkin Lymphoma (NHL) and its subtypes". The findings are likely to impact legal proceedings in the United States against Monsanto, in which more than 180 plaintiffs are claiming exposure to RoundUp gave them cancer - allegations that Monsanto denies.
SEAL candidate injured in study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Navy is investigating a slapping incident near San Diego that left a SEAL candidate in a coma.
28 Turkey Stuffing Recipes Your Thanksgiving Needs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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16 Simple and Flavorful Ways to Prepare Green Beans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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19 Easy and Delicious Ways to Cook Potatoes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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Cats may prevent children getting asthma, scientists say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Keeping a cat in the home may prevent asthma in young children, according to Danish scientists. A study of nearly 400 toddlers revealed that those growing up with a cat had a far lower likelihood of suffering from the inflammatory condition. Researchers believe this is due to a genetic variation that plays a significant role in triggering asthma which is somehow switched off in the presence of a cat. It’s very exciting that they find this connection because other studies have struggled to conclude anything finalDr Arne Høst However, the same gene does not appear to be affected by the presence of dogs. When activated, the variation of the TT gene doubles the risk of asthma and is also responsible for bronchitis and pneumonia. Almost one in three children in the study carry the variant, which experts believe is proportionate to the population in general. Jakob Stokholm, who led the study at the Copenhagen Studies on Asthma in Childhood Research Center, said: the explanation could be related to bacteria that cats carry and perhaps fungi or viruses that they bring into the home. “If we can explain these mechanisms, it opens up opportunities to isolate them and to protect against the disease,” he said. The TT gene variant was previously suspected to be involved in some way to asthma, bronchitis and pneumonia, however scientists did not know precisely how. "It’s very exciting that they find this connection because other studies have struggled to conclude anything final,” said Dr Arne Høst, who co-led the research. “Now it looks like the effect is linked to a particular gene-variant, which goes to show just how complex the development of asthma and allergies are," he added. "It’s not only about genes and the environment, but how the two interact, and there’s so much that we still don’t know. Approximately 5.4 million people in the UK are currently receiving treatment for asthma, including more than 1.1 million - equivalent to one in 11 - children. Professor Hans Bisgaard said the study showed in unprecedented detail how the environment affects the behaviour of genes, in particular in early life and during pregnancy. “For me, this is the core message because it’s a recognition in the direction of how disease occurs,” he said.
Woman Abruptly Ends Her Date After She Found Out the Guy Voted for Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The course of true love never did run smooth
Billionaire Yuri Milner discusses his plan to look for life on Saturn moon – and his Russian connections
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russian billionaire Yuri Milner today laid out his vision to send the first privately funded interplanetary space mission to look for life at the Saturnian moon Enceladus — but first he had to address less lofty matters. Milner has been in the news for the past week because newly published confidential documents known as the “Paradise Papers” revealed that two firms controlled by the Russian government backed his early investments in Facebook and Twitter. So, of course, that was the first topic Milner was asked about during an onstage fireside chat at The Economist’s “New Space Age” conference at the Museum… Read More
Senate Republicans Have Their Own Tax Reform Plan. Here's How It Differs From the House Bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We have been laser focused, Mr. President, on reducing taxes for the middle class"
Search for Aliens: Why China Will Find Them First
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The biggest radio telescope in the world is dedicated to looking for extraterrestrial life—and if it finds something, sharing that information will be up to the Chinese government. Ross Andersen’s feature in The Atlantic’s December issue goes through all of the reasons and the history influencing China’s rise as an alien-scouting superpower. A few factors cited include the country’s heavy investment in scientific research, especially since the 1980s.
All the Ways Alabama Republicans Are Defending Roy Moore
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Mary was a teenager and Joseph was an adult carpenter. They became parents of Jesus"
Jumbo air tanker wins protest, may fight more US wildfires
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A giant passenger jet converted to fight wildfires was grounded this year by U.S. officials during much of what turned out to be an especially destructive U.S. fire season, but it could be flying much more next year.
1 Dead in Police Chase and Shootout on Busy Interstate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Witnesses said they saw the truck ramming other cars
Roy Moore denies knowing woman who says he preyed on her as a teen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Republican Senate candidate in Alabama, former chief justice of the state's supreme court, rejects the claims made by women who have said that he pursued them sexually when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s.
Saudis Warned to Leave Lebanon 'Immediately' as Tensions Rise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Saudi Arabia has since asked all citizens to leave Lebanon immediately
4 People and Dog Found Shot to Death in Apparent Murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They were found thanks to a concerned neighbor
Roy Moore Is Fundraising Off Report He Pursued Relationships With Teens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"The forces of evil are on the march in our country," he told supporters
First Visitor From Outside Our Solar System Has a Name and an Origin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Less than a month after spotting the first ever confirmed object from another solar system visiting Earth, astronomers haven't just given it a name, 1I/'Oumuamua—they even think they know where it came from. Astronomers were first struck early in their observations of the object, which at the time they thought was a comet, by its extraordinarily weird path. Most comets travel more or less in the plane of space that contains Earth, our sun, and our neighboring planets.
The New York Times Is Launching A Monthly Section For Kids
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The New York Times announced Thursday that it will launch a monthly section for kids in its print newspaper.
Activists occupy ranger headquarters in primeval forest dispute
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Several dozen environmental activists on Thursday occupied the Warsaw headquarters of Poland's state forest management agency to protest against logging in the Bialowieza forest, a protected UNESCO site that includes Europe's last primeval woodland. Critics say Poland's rightwing government is defying a European Court of Justice injunction to suspend logging in the forest, but the environmental ministry says it is obeying the order and felling trees only for public safety reasons.
Nuclear 'accident' sends radioactive pollution over Europe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A cloud of radioactive pollution spread over Europe after a possible "accident" at a nuclear facility in Russia or Kazakhstan, French nuclear safety officials confirmed on Friday. France's nuclear safety institute, IRSN, picked up faint traces of ruthenium 106, a radioactive nuclide that is produced when atoms are split in a nuclear reactor and which does not occur naturally, in three of its 40 monitoring stations late September. Faint traces were also detected in Germany, Austria, Italy and Switzerland. There has been no impact on human health or the environment in Europe, a French official stressed, but he added that detection of such a cloud was "absolutely not normal". At a glance | Nuclear incidents and accidents IRSN, the technical arm of the French nuclear regulator, said in a statement it could not pinpoint the location of the release of radioactive material but that based on weather patterns, the most plausible zone lay south of the Ural mountains, between the Urals and the Volga river. This could indicate Russia or possibly Kazakhstan, it said. At the source of the leak, the quantity of ruthenium 106 released was "major", between 100 and 300 teraBecquerels, it said, adding that if an accident of this magnitude had happened in France it would have required the evacuation or sheltering of people in a radius of "a few kilometres around the accident site". But it said that the probability of importation into France of foodstuffs, notably mushrooms, contaminated by ruthenium 106 near the site of the accident was extremely low. Measurement from European stations showed high levels of ruthenium 106 in the atmosphere of the majority of European countries, at the beginning of October, with a steady decrease from Oct. 6 onwards. France picked up traces of the pollution in monitoring stations of Seyne-sur-Mer, Nice and Ajaccio from September 27 to October 13, and has not detected anything since. Jean-Christophe Gariel, director for health at the IRSN, said that, according to "the data at our disposal, no ruthenium 106 was detected in the UK". Chernobyl disaster 31 years on: haunting images from then and now 00:41 Duncan Cox, leader of Public Health England’s radiation emergency response group, said: “Radiation monitors at our sites in Oxfordshire and Glasgow have been checked since September when this substance was reported by other European radiation monitoring institutes, and we have not detected any unusual sources of radiation.” IRSN ruled out an accident in a nuclear reactor. "We observed only ruthenium, which indicates it couldn't come from a nuclear reactor as we would have seen other fission products, like Caesium," said Mr Gariel. The ruthenium 106 was probably released in a nuclear fuel treatment site or centre for radioactive medicine, he said. Because of its short half-life of about a year, ruthenium 106 is used in nuclear medicine, for example in cancer therapy for eye tumours. IRSN had initially also thought the radioactive material might have come from a satellite equipped with a thermo-generator containing ruthenium that disintegrated in the atmosphere.  "But we don't think this is the case," said Mr Gariel as an IAEA investigation has concluded that no ruthenium-containing satellite has fallen back on earth during this period. He had contacted his Russian colleagues, and they insisted nothing was amiss.  "From their point of view, they said they had had no problems at all. Rosatom (the Russian nuclear operator) said it had detected nothing." He added that the institute had not yet been in contact with Kazakh authorities. A spokeswoman for the Russian Emergencies Ministry told Reuters she could not immediately comment.
From 'step aside' to Biblical citations, how Republicans responded to the Roy Moore scandal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Republicans officials have had a range of responses since the Washington Post published a bombshell story Thursday afternoon quoting a woman alleging that Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore had attempted sexual relations with her when she was 14 and he was 32.
Weather observer braves frigid 100 mph wind for 'fun'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
MOUNT WASHINGTON, N.H. (AP) — Weather observers stationed atop the highest peak in the Northeast are having some fun with a blast of cold wind.
Big cheetah
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
READING, Pa. (AP) — Police captured a big African cat, resembling a cheetah, running loose through the streets of a Pennsylvania city.
Thanksgiving’s ties to safety and comfort
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation that set the last Thursday in November as a national “day of Thanksgiving,” he did so at the height of the Civil War. He asked Americans to entrust to God’s “tender care” all those who had suffered from the war’s violence. In the decades since, that spirit of care and giving has endured in the holiday season. Witness the many who will volunteer in soup kitchens this Nov. 23.
Concerned about hackers, states turn cyber insurance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As the threat from hackers and cybercriminals intensifies, a growing number of states are buying cyber insurance to protect themselves – and taxpayers. More than a dozen states now have cyber insurance policies, which cover losses and expenses if a computer network is hacked. Insurers typically pick up the cost of investigating and restoring data, notifying those whose information may have been compromised, and providing legal and public relations services and credit monitoring.
On gun violence, a pat diagnosis may only deepen a stigma
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Some mass shooters have been diagnosed with mental illness. Jared Loughner, who killed six and severely wounded then US Rep. Gabrielle Giffords in 2011, was found by psychiatrists to have a mental disorder.
In Trump era, a sudden flood of women candidates
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Three weeks after announcing her candidacy for the Virginia state legislature, Ms. Carroll Foy discovered she was pregnant – with twins. The Virginia house will go from 17 women out of 100 members to at least 28, with some races still undecided – a display of female power that was no coincidence. In the Seattle suburbs, prosecutor Manka Dhingra won a special election for a Washington state senate seat – flipping control of the chamber to the Democrats.
Early Humans Became Tall and Thin 1.5 Million Years Ago To Survive Outside the Forest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For most of hominid evolution, our ancestors got heavier as they got taller. This was likely a response to changes in human behavior. In research published in Royal Society Open Science, scientists at Cambridge’s Department of Archaeology discussed their analysis of 311 specimens of upright-walking hominids.
Police Officer Identified as Father of 4
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The child's mother was charged with first-degree murder
How Asian Leaders Fed President Trump's Ego and Stomach
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
360-year-old soy sauce, anyone?
Trump's APEC Speech Holds Few Answers For Regional Allies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trump offered few concrete answers to partners looking to Washington to counter Beijing's growing ambitions
Catalonia's Top Lawmaker Has Been Jailed by a Spanish Judge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Madrid judge set bail for Carme Forcadell at 150,000 euros ($175,000) and confiscated her passport
Boy with rare disease gets brand new skin with gene therapy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LONDON (AP) — Doctors treating a critically ill boy with a devastating skin disease used experimental gene therapy to create an entirely new skin for most of his body in a desperate attempt to save his life.
Dozens More Have Been Detained in Saudi Arabia's Corruption Purge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Experts say the move by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is aimed at consolidating power
Veterans get new hope with prosthetic advancements
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New breakthroughs in prosthetic limb technology are offering better options for America’s wounded veterans. Firepower’s Allison Barrie shares the exciting news and advancements.
ESA: China's Out of Control Space Station Tiangong
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers have known for months that the station was going to hit Earth at some point, as Newsweek reported, in January or February of 2018. This week, however, the European Space Agency (ESA) honed the estimates. “Owing to the geometry of the station’s orbit, we can already exclude the possibility that any fragments will fall over any spot further north than 43ºN or further south than 43ºS,” says Holger Krag, Head of ESA’s Space Debris Office.
Police: Suspect's overwhelming gas shuts down interrogation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A police interrogation of a Kansas City man charged with drug and gun offenses ended prematurely when an investigator was driven from the room by the suspect's excessive flatulence.
Kenya craftsmen to build boat out of plastic waste
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By Siegfried Modola LAMU, Kenya (Reuters) - The beaches of Kenya's idyllic Lamu island are dotted with traditional Swahili stone and coral houses, mansions built by European royalty, the odd donkey and, increasingly, tidal lines of plastic trash. When a resident organized a beach clean-up that collected 33 tons of rubbish in a single summer, British-Ethiopian safari organizer Ben Morrison decided he couldn't stand by while his beloved island was ruined. "It is getting harder and harder for boat builders to find wood.
In less than a decade, Poland's massive far
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Fascists and other far-right extremists are set to assemble Saturday in Warsaw for a march that has become one of the largest gatherings in Europe and perhaps beyond for increasingly emboldened white supremacists. The march held on Poland's Nov. 11 Independence Day holiday has drawn tens of thousands of participants in recent years. Extremists from Sweden, Hungary, Slovakia, and elsewhere now join Polish nationalists in a public display of xenophobic and white supremacist views since the event began on a much smaller scale in 2009.
European Union ramps up pressure Britain for real progress in Brexit talks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As if British Prime Minister Theresa May wasn't facing enough pressure at home, the European Union piled on more Friday by insisting there must be real progress in the Brexit talks in the next two weeks if Britain wants negotiations to move on to future trade relations next month. After another inconclusive negotiating session, both sides said differences remained on vital divorce issues including Britain's Brexit bill, the Irish border and the rights of citizens affected by Brexit. EU leaders are due to assess at a Dec. 14-15 summit whether "sufficient progress" has been made on divorce terms to move to phase two of the talks, as Britain desires.
As Weinstein aftershocks hit Westminster, a watershed for British politics?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The Weinstein scandal had just started to unfurl in the news, and across the British political scene, women began sharing their own stories of sexual harassment on the instant messaging app. The term “handsy” became the word of choice to describe male members of Parliament with wandering hands, and before long names and alleged offenses – including serious cases of rape and sexual assault – had spread like wildfire around the Palace of Westminster. They soon spilled out in the press and quickly claimed a top-level victim: Prime Minister Theresa May’s right-hand man, Defense Minister Michael Fallon. Now, with eight MPs from the ruling Conservative party and four more from the opposition Labour party facing sexual misconduct allegations, along with MPs and party officials from most of the other political parties, there is a palpable feeling in Westminster that women from all parties have had enough, says Sam Smethers, chief executive of the Fawcett Society, which campaigns for women’s rights.
Top Republicans respond to Roy Moore sexual misconduct allegations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
A woman has accused Roy Moore, the Republican nominee for the United States Senate in Alabama, of initiating a sexual encounter with her when she was 14 years old and he was 32, the Washington Post reported on Thursday, prompting top Republicans to say he should step aside if the allegations prove true. President Trump would want Moore to step aside if the allegations against him are true, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said on Friday.
Why Republicans Won't Quit Trying to Repeal Obamacare
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s the political promise Republicans can’t seem to admit they will break: repealing Obamacare.
Five terrifying ways Stephen Hawking predicts we're all going to die
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Stephen Hawking isn’t always the world’s cheeriest soul
Man drops cocaine in his hat while in court on a drug charge
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
EAGLE, Colo. (AP) — Authorities say a man who was in a Colorado court for violating his bond on a drug charge is in even more trouble after a wad of cocaine fell from his hat while he was in front of the judge.