World News
IN SHORT
Saturday, May 27, 2017

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
Jake Gyllenhaal throws serious shade at Trump's treatment of the environment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jake Gyllenhaal is clearly not happy with his country's political situation. The Hollywood actor didn't directly mention Trump during the Cannes press conference for his latest film Okja on Friday, but really he didn't need to. His feelings were clear. SEE ALSO: Watch Netflix's first look at Bong Joon-ho's new monster movie 'Okja' Okja is a film about a little girl's friendship with a large creature — a "super pig" — which has been specially bred by an American corporation. Directed by Bong Joon Ho, the film's message about society's mistreatment of the environment is unambiguous. When asked about the film's treatment of environmental issues, Gyllenhaal said that the timing of the film is very important. "I don't think there is any better time for this film and what it says about the environment than now, given the current political state," he said. "Particularly, I would say, from my country, of things being sort of brought back what I would consider a few decades, if not more. "Sometimes it's not just an issue of aim, it's also an issue of when a movie comes out and what it has to say, and I think there's no better time than now for something like this." 'Okja' is a film with a clear message about society's treatment of the environment.Image: netflixGyllenhaal went on to reference the film's distributor Netflix, who have been at the centre of some controversy about their inclusion at the Cannes Film Festival this year, saying the platform of a film — and how many people it can communicate its message too — is "extraordinarily important". "I think it's truly a blessing when any art gets to reach one person, let alone hundreds of thousands if not millions of people," Gyllenhaal continued. "And particularly in today's day and age when we are inundated with information — sometimes true, sometimes not — that we get the artistic expression in whatever form we can." Gyllenhaal finished with something of a curveball: "And also, I just really want to add that I'm very excited about the appointment of Robert Mueller," he said, to smatterings laughter and applause. (For anyone not familiar with Mueller, he's the former FBI director now heading up the investigation into links between Russia and Trump's campaign, who some have suggested "could be Trump's worst nightmare"). Burn. WATCH: Take a dive with a marine biologist working to restore our ecosystem
Why astronomers are scrambling to observe the weirdest star in the galaxy this weekend
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was early Thursday morning when astronomer Matt Muterspaugh noticed something strange with the star he had been observing for the last year and a half. Telescope data taken from the night before showed that the brightness of the star had dipped significantly. Then by the following morning, the star had dimmed even more.
Will North Korea bring the US and ASEAN together?, Chibok girls freed but concerns remain, What did Erdoğan get out of talks with Putin?, Venezuelan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"Diplomatic relations between the US and countries in this region have often been hampered by different standards and interpretations of political integrity...," states an editorial. "At least on the black-and-white threat posed by an armed and boisterous North Korea, America and Southeast Asia can sing the same tune. It’s the grey issues that have rendered our ties tenuous.... White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus has said Washington wants to be ‘on the same page’ with [the Association of Southeast Asian Nations] regarding North Korea, and that takes precedence over allegations of rights abuses hampering democratic progress in the region.
Can You Battle Depression by Changing the Way You Think?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Depression is classified as a mood disorder, but which came first: the disorder or the distressed mood? Conversely, if depression results in negative thoughts and emotions, can changing those thoughts and emotions alleviate depression? "To some extent, the answer is yes," says Dr. Ken Duckworth, assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard University Medical School and medical director for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, or NAMI.
Evidence is mounting that Apple is working on a glucose
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Apple CEO Tim Cook has been seen testing a glucose monitoring device, according to a CNBC report that fuels speculation Apple is working on its own glucose monitoring technology. Cook was spotted using a glucose monitor at the new Apple Campus in Cupertino, according to a CNBC source. Sadly there are no photos but the source reportedly said that the glucose monitor was physically attached to Cook's Apple Watch in some way.
Nuclear blasts have screwed up space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
N/A
President Trump's first trip abroad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump’s first foreign voyage will be an astonishingly ambitious adventure — Saudi Arabia, Israel, the Vatican, a NATO summit in Brussels, and a Group of Seven (i.e.: rich country) gathering in Sicily. He’s coming with a packed agenda of the weightiest issues in global affairs, like defeating ISIS, containing Iran, convincing the Muslim world to confront extremism, overhauling relations with crucial allies in Europe and Asia, and forging Middle East peace.
Will North Korea bring the US and ASEAN together?, Chibok girls freed but concerns remain, What did Erdoğan get out of talks with Putin?, Venezuelan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"Diplomatic relations between the US and countries in this region have often been hampered by different standards and interpretations of political integrity...," states an editorial. "At least on the black-and-white threat posed by an armed and boisterous North Korea, America and Southeast Asia can sing the same tune. It’s the grey issues that have rendered our ties tenuous.... White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus has said Washington wants to be ‘on the same page’ with [the Association of Southeast Asian Nations] regarding North Korea, and that takes precedence over allegations of rights abuses hampering democratic progress in the region.
Collection bag from Apollo 11 moon mission to be sold at auction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It is a simple, square white bag that traveled to the moon in 1969 on Apollo 11 and carried back to Earth the first sample of lunar material ever collected. The bag - which contains remnants of moon dust and is labeled "LUNAR SAMPLE RETURN" - is a collection pouch used by astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon, during the Apollo 11 mission. Scheduled for July 20, the 48th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, the auction will be the first legal sale of such an artifact from the mission, Jim Hull, head of exhibits and artifacts at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), said in a telephone interview on Friday.
Artificial spider silk is not only super strong, it's sustainable too
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ever dreamed of being a real-life Spider-Man? Researchers at Stockholm’s KTH Royal Institute of Technology have developed the strongest artificial spider hybrid silk fibers yet.
Italy makes 12 vaccines mandatory for school
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MILAN (AP) — The Italian government on Friday made 12 vaccines mandatory for children attending school up to age 16 in an effort to combat what it characterizes as misinformation about vaccines.
Will North Korea bring the US and ASEAN together?, Chibok girls freed but concerns remain, What did Erdoğan get out of talks with Putin?, Venezuelan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"Diplomatic relations between the US and countries in this region have often been hampered by different standards and interpretations of political integrity...," states an editorial. "At least on the black-and-white threat posed by an armed and boisterous North Korea, America and Southeast Asia can sing the same tune. It’s the grey issues that have rendered our ties tenuous.... White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus has said Washington wants to be ‘on the same page’ with [the Association of Southeast Asian Nations] regarding North Korea, and that takes precedence over allegations of rights abuses hampering democratic progress in the region.
What You May Learn by At
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Spit in a vial, pop it back into the test-kit carton, return it to the company and voila -- within weeks you can view the results of your personal genetic analysis online. Direct-to-consumer genetic testing is becoming increasingly popular. Advocates say people have a right to access their genetic information without taking the traditional path of genomic testing.
Three different families struggle with the excessive use of technology
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For hours each day, Brooke would use her phone, and Josh and Chris would play video games.
Talking turkey: NC firefighters rescue baby birds from drain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ASHEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — For once, there's a turkey giving thanks.
Appearance of young bear puts kibosh on high school game
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
WELLS RIVER, Vt. (AP) — The appearance of a bear cub — a real one, not a mascot — forced the cancellation of a pair of high school baseball and softball games in Vermont.
Will North Korea bring the US and ASEAN together?, Chibok girls freed but concerns remain, What did Erdoğan get out of talks with Putin?, Venezuelan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"Diplomatic relations between the US and countries in this region have often been hampered by different standards and interpretations of political integrity...," states an editorial. "At least on the black-and-white threat posed by an armed and boisterous North Korea, America and Southeast Asia can sing the same tune. It’s the grey issues that have rendered our ties tenuous.... White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus has said Washington wants to be ‘on the same page’ with [the Association of Southeast Asian Nations] regarding North Korea, and that takes precedence over allegations of rights abuses hampering democratic progress in the region.
Easy Healthy Eating Tips for Women
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Like a rock-solid friendship or the perfect little black dress, much of the advice experts give women on what to eat for...
What 100 Calories of Picnic Foods Looks Like
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Shopping for picnic food for your Memorial Day bash? The burgers, hot dogs, and other items on your grocery list may be ...
The T. Rex Had the Most Powerful Bite That's Ever Existed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Bones would regularly explode out of the lizard king's mouth.
Scientists hunt down super rare T. Rex ant and are shocked at what they find
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In nature, creatures that look ferocious and intimidating oftentimes have personalities to match. So, when researchers finally managed to find an active colony of an ant species with a frightening appearance and a name that literally means "tyrant ants," they expected to observe some seriously aggressive insect action. What they got instead has left them completely puzzled, and with more questions than answers. Scientists have known that the Tyrannomyrmex rex ant exists for a long while now. Researchers first discovered a single dead member of the species way back in 2003 in Malaysia. Other solitary examples of the species were spotted later, but until now, nobody had ever found an actual nest. Researchers theorized that the ant was so rare because they only existed in untouched, pristine jungles, but when an intact nest was discovered on the grounds of a military training area in Singapore, it was only the first of many surprises the ants were ready to offer. The most shocking thing about the ants may be that, despite their intimidating appearance, they exhibited no aggressive behavior in any of the testing the researchers performed. In fact, when faced with other insects, they froze, hid, or fled at the first sign of potential danger. As National Geographic reports, lead researcher Mark Wong "had a good laugh" when all of the ants' would-be prey seemed to send the insects running for the hills. Along with being a bit funny, the ants' refusal to attack any of the potential prey offerings has left the scientists at a loss to explain what the species even eats. On top of that, the team found that the ants don't even have the same personal hygiene glands that other ants use to keep themselves and their colonies free of devastating bacteria. The specimens have preserved for further study, and may provide even more surprises down the road.
Three different families struggle with the excessive use of technology: Part 1
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For hours each day, Brooke would use her phone, and Josh and Chris would play video games.
A cancer patient wonders: ‘Will the government still have my bacK?’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The bill would create a mechanism in which people with pre-existing conditions could be charged considerably more for their coverage.
Readers write: Train memories, Brontës depiction, people's enemies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
There are no more train whistles, but we hear lots of talking, laughing, and people enjoying themselves. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? Regarding the March 27 Chapter & Verse blog, “ ‘To Walk Invisible’ brings to life the Brontës and the genius forged on the moors”: I recently viewed “To Walk Invisible.” It was excellent – much better than the 1946 movie “Devotion.” I have read all the Brontë novels and never wondered where they found the material.
Will North Korea bring the US and ASEAN together?, Chibok girls freed but concerns remain, What did Erdoğan get out of talks with Putin?, Venezuelan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
"Diplomatic relations between the US and countries in this region have often been hampered by different standards and interpretations of political integrity...," states an editorial. "At least on the black-and-white threat posed by an armed and boisterous North Korea, America and Southeast Asia can sing the same tune. It’s the grey issues that have rendered our ties tenuous.... White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus has said Washington wants to be ‘on the same page’ with [the Association of Southeast Asian Nations] regarding North Korea, and that takes precedence over allegations of rights abuses hampering democratic progress in the region.
Teen gets phone back during trip home from treatment: Part 4
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Since arriving at her treatment facility, Brooke is allowed some cell phone use to test her limits while visiting family.
Russia’s ‘Killer Satellites’ Re
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The trio of mysterious spacecraft were idle for at least a year. Now they’re zooming toward foreign satellites again—and no one really knows why.
Parents see son for the first time since he unplugged from technology: Part 5
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I didn't really notice that video games were destroying me mentally," Josh said of his video game use.
Dad, teen adjust to life after weeks without video games: Part 6
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Brooke returns to her treatment center, where she was treated for mental health issues and excessive phone use.
Scientists trolled animals around the world with thousands of fake worms – here’s why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It's not every day that researchers from around the world launch a singular effort to ruin the days of predatory birds, lizards, and various other creatures, but that's just what a team of scientists led by Tomas Roslin of the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences just did. The team glued thousands of fake caterpillars onto plants in a number of different countries in a study that likely bummed out a huge number animals. The ultimate goal? Well, that's a bit harder to explain. The study was aimed at discovering how risky it is to be a caterpillar in Greenland, but quickly changed scope when Roslin realized nothing was actually attacking the fake bugs. Roslin's colleague noted that using fake caterpillars in the rain forest had proved valuable for her, the two decided to see how wide-ranging of a study they could form. However, in order to get enough data to make the study worthwhile, the team needed to be huge, with dozens of participants spread out as far as possible. By asking other researchers to reach out to their own networks of scientists, the group eventually reached a total of 31 different sites around the world, stretching from the Arctic Circle to south Australia. The huge team of researchers put their bright green fake worms on plants, ground cover, and various other places. When a predator attacked a fake worm, it left bite marks on its soft clay body, which were then analyzed. When the data was compiled, the scientists realized that not only are caterpillars hunted at a much higher rate closer to the equator (as one might assume), the risk of being eaten greatly diminished at higher altitudes. The study could help paint a much clearer picture of insect migrations than previously possible.
Melting Arctic Ice Jeopardizes Humanity's Plant Backup Plan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A global seed depository in the Arctic recently flooded, and scientists are worried that climate change is taking its toll.
Apollo moon rocket engines finally fill a place of honor at Museum of Flight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Almost 50 years after they were fired up, rocket engines that sent NASA’s Apollo crews on the first leg of their trips to the moon have reached their final destination at last, in the spotlight at the Museum of Flight’s “Apollo” exhibit in Seattle. During a press preview today, the museum showed off the mangled components from the Saturn V first-stage engines for two Apollo moon missions, alongside an intact 18-foot-high F-1 rocket engine on loan from NASA. It was a bittersweet moment for David Concannon, who put together the team that found the engines in 2013 with backing from Amazon’s billionaire founder, Jeff Bezos.… Read More
Ancient Aboriginal Australians Left Behind Artifacts From 51,000 Years Ago
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Artifacts left behind by Australia’s first human settlers show they got to the area as early as 51,000 years ago and were able to adapt to a changing coastal environment.
ChroMedX Completes HemoPalm System Prototype
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Toronto, Ontario--(Newsfile Corp. - May 19, 2017) - ChroMedX Corp. (CSE: CHX) (OTCQB: MNLIF) (FSE: EIY2) (the "Company"), developer of the HemoPalm Handheld Blood Analyzer System, is pleased to announce the completion of a HemoPalm handheld analyzer and cartridge system prototype.The HemoPalm system prototype has been developed as a collaborative effort led by ChroMedX CEO & President Ash Kaushal with key contributors internationally. The prototype system demonstrates portability and in-field handheld analysis capabilities.To view an ...
Bill and Melinda Gates are betting on this biotech in the race to develop a Zika vaccine
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Moderna Therapeutics aims to turn human bodies into factories that make proteins to fight infections and disease like the Zika virus.
EPA devotes money to buyouts while adding bodyguards for controversial new leader
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
There's no better way to measure priorities in Washington, D.C. than by scrutinizing agency budget proposals.  In the case of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), new figures show the Trump administration is putting a premium on cutting the agency workforce, reducing spending on climate change-related programs, while at the same time devoting more money to protecting the agency's leader, Scott Pruitt, from any security threats.  A letter sent on May 17 by David Bloom, the agency's acting chief financial officer, to agency leaders details how the organization plans to spend carryover funds from Fiscal Year 2016 through the end of Fiscal Year 2017. This refers to money that was not spent during the previous fiscal year, and is carried over into the next one, much like rollover minutes on a cell phone plan.  SEE ALSO: EPA chief denies carbon dioxide is main cause of global warming and... wait, what!? The proposal includes savings generated by cutting spending for climate change-related programs, and devotes $12 million to workforce reshaping activities, including buyouts that would help reduce the number of employees at the agency.  The gas-powered Valley Generating Station is seen in the San Fernando Valley on March 10, 2017 in Sun Valley, California.Image: David McNew/Getty ImagesThe buyouts are likely to accelerate the process of draining the agency of its most senior, experienced workers in technical fields that can be difficult to impossible to replace. The EPA is responsible for everything from cleaning up hazardous waste sites to making sure air and water are clean to drink, and if scientists leave the EPA in droves, it could imperil its mission.  While reducing the organization's workforce, the Trump administration is also seeking to use $800,000 in carryover funds to pay for travel expenses incurred by  security guards for EPA administrator Scott Pruitt. This is an unusual request for the EPA, whose leaders normally travel with a light security footprint. Unlike previous administrators, however, Pruitt has asked for a protective detail that is on duty 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, rather than the door-to-door security provided to previous EPA leaders, including those under former president Barack Obama. Such protective details are typically reserved for those in national security positions or persons in the constitutional line of succession, such as the Secretary of State, Speaker of the House, and the Secretary of Defense.  In fact, a budget proposal the Washington Post obtained in April showed that while the administration wants to slash the agency's budget by at least a third, one of the only areas to get a funding increase would be Pruitt's security.  According to the New York Times, Pruitt is seeking to add 10 new full time employees to the agency's security office, along with money for infrastructure and operations staff. This would amount to at least a doubling of this office's staffing level, at a time when so many other parts of the agency would be seeing more empty desks with each passing week. Science, you know, that thing the EPA is supposed to inform us about.Image: AP/REX/ShutterstockThe budget cuts would touch virtually all areas of the EPA and would have profound impacts for many states, including eliminating climate protection grants, Great Lakes Restoration funding, and Chesapeake Bay cleanup programs.  Pruitt, who has said he does not believe human emissions of greenhouse gases are the main cause of climate change, contradicting thousands of climate science studies, has quickly become one of the most controversial cabinet members.  He received the greatest number of "no" votes during his Senate confirmation of any EPA nominee in history, and there have been protests against him and his agenda outside EPA headquarters in recent weeks.  WATCH: NASA timelapse shows just how quickly our Arctic sea ice is disappearing
Cancer: Could Zika Be Used to Treat Glioblastoma—the Deadliest Form of Brain Tumor?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Zika virus, which has caused birth defects in thousands of children over the last three years, could be used to treat one of the most common and aggressive forms of brain tumor. Harry Bulstrode, a neurosurgeon at the University of Cambridge and Cancer Research UK scientist, is about to begin tests to find out if the virus can destroy glioblastoma cancer cells in the same way it attacks the developing brains of fetuses. If successful, the research could lead to the development of new, effective treatments for this type of brain tumor—and potentially even other types of cancer where stem cells cause the disease to return.
With animal farts and singing mice, Twitter's scientists introduce themselves to Bill Nye
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists on Twitter are introducing themselves to the famous TV host Bill Nye (of Bill Nye the Science Guy fame), using the hashtag #BillMeetScienceTwitter. The Twitter campaign was born out of frustration. It started when Melissa Marquez, a marine biologist, tweeted from a collective Twitter account hosted by a new scientist every week, called @biotweeps.
Liver Damage From Supplements Is on the Rise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. You’ve probably heard that too much alcohol or excessive amounts of certain medications can damage your liver, an organ ...
Inside the world's greatest scavenger hunt, Part 3
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
GISHWHES stands for the Greatest International Scavenger Hunt the World Has Ever Seen. Each August, as the world’s largest scavenger hunt is under way, the general public is usually unaware—except when teams perform their tasks in public places.
How to get 4 billion unconnected people online
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
There are still 4 billion people around the world without internet access. Here's how that will change.
Microsoft's new Surface Laptop takes dead aim at Apple and Google
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Microsoft is taking on Apple's MacBooks and Google's Chromebooks with its new Surface Laptop and Windows 10 S.
Microsoft Surface Laptop hands
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The new Microsoft Surface Laptop is a gorgeous machine built to take on Apple's MacBook Air and MacBook Pro.
Why Hulu with Live TV and other streaming TV services are worth the money
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
It's true: streaming TV services will save you money over your cable subscription.
The New 2DS XL could be Nintendo's best handheld yet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
We went hands-on with the New Nintendo 2DS XL, and it looks like it could be the best handheld the company's ever made.
These are the tech industry's 2 biggest concerns about Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
The tech industry still has two major concerns when it comes to the Trump administration.
How to delete your data from your old devices
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
If you're getting a new smartphone, tablet or computer, you'll need to backup your old data and reset your device, or risk losing it to potential criminals.
Why investors are paying huge premiums for enormous tech companies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Amazon, Facebook, Alphabet, Apple, and Microsoft are massive companies. And yet, investors keep piling in. Why?
How Gogo will transform your Wi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Gogo is drastically increasing the speed of its in-flight Wi-Fi offering.
How a wider laptop ban could threaten your safety and data
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
A ban on laptops on U.S.-bound flights from Europe could impact both your safety and your data.