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China, France launch satellite to study climate change
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China sent its first ever satellite built in partnership with another country into space on Monday, a device tasked with helping scientists better predict dangerous cyclones and climate change by monitoring ocean surface winds and waves. A Long March 2C carrier rocket blasted off from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Centre in northwest China's Gobi Desert at 0043 GMT, according to China's State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence. The 650-kilogram (1,430 pound) China-France Oceanography Satellite (CFOSAT) is the first satellite jointly built by China and France and will allow climate scientists to better understand interactions between oceans and the atmosphere.
20 Minutes With: Color Genomics CEO Othman Laraki
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The former Twitter VP with a vision of using genetic testing to create a global platform for preventive health
Scientists to explore new sites in Puerto Rico, USVI waters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Scientists will explore new sites in deep waters surrounding Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to learn more about coral and fish habitats as part of a 22-day mission led by the U.S. government.
The Air Force Is Actually Considering Rocket Launches to Move Cargo Around the Globe
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Delivering cargo anywhere in the world in 30 minutes? Take that, Domino's.
Mountain birds on 'escalator to extinction' as planet warms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — A meticulous re-creation of a 3-decade-old study of birds on a mountainside in Peru has given scientists a rare chance to prove how the changing climate is pushing species out of the places they are best adapted to.
President Trump Punches Back Even as Synagogue Mourns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders opened her first press briefing in 26 days with a tearful statement about the shooting, but ended the briefing with a diatribe against what the White House views as unfair coverage by the press.
Ecuadorean discovery pushes back the origins of chocolate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
People have been enjoying chocolate far longer than previously known, according to research published on Monday detailing the domestication and use of cacao beginning 5,300 years ago at an ancient settlement in the highlands of southeastern Ecuador. The study indicates cacao was domesticated roughly 1,500 years earlier than previously known, and that it occurred in South America rather than in Central America, as previously thought. A tropical evergreen tree called Theobroma cacao bears large, oval pods containing the bean-like cacao seeds that today are roasted and turned into cocoa and multitudes of chocolate confections, although chocolate at the time was consumed as a beverage.
NASA spacecraft breaks record for coming closest to Sun
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Parker Solar Probe, which launched earlier this year, has set a new record for becoming the closest human-made object to the Sun, the US space agency announced Monday. "The spacecraft passed the current record of 26.55 million miles (42.73 million kilometers) from the Sun's surface on Oct. 29, 2018, at about 1:04 pm EDT (1704 GMT)," said a NASA statement. The $1.5 billion unmanned spacecraft launched in August, on a strategic mission to protect the Earth by unveiling the mysteries of dangerous solar storms.
The synagogue massacre was actually in Mister Rogers's neighborhood. What would he say?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Karen Struble Myers of the Fred Rogers Center reflected on what Rogers's message for America would be in the aftermath of the shooting in the Squirrel Hill area of Pittsburgh, where lived in and filmed his famous TV show.
RISE UP: CELEBRATING YOUNG LEADER ACTIVISTS — Naomi Wadler, age 12
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
From the civil rights movement to protests against the Vietnam War and the fight for women’s rights, the youth of America have been at the forefront of advocating for social change. In a new series titled RISE UP: Celebrating Young Leader Activists, Yahoo News profiles five up-and-coming leaders from the millennials and from Gen Z. Our first installment features 12-year-old Naomi Wadler of Alexandria, Va. After watching the horrific Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting — in which 17 were killed and 17 injured — unfold on her living-room TV, Naomi sat down with her mother to discuss the emotions that began building up inside of her.
100s of Oregon 'witches' paddle down river, minus the brooms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Hundreds of "witches" traded in broomsticks for paddles in Oregon during the last weekend before Halloween.
People find severed head in Oakland yard, take it to police
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Police investigators on Monday were trying to determine whether a decaying human head found in an Oakland backyard belongs to a recently discovered headless corpse.
Is this Boston sports fan 'tired of winning'? No, but understated in victory
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
At this point, being a Boston sports fan feels like gluttony.
The subway helped segment Atlanta; soccer at its stations may help unite it
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Curtis Jenkins grew up like most native Atlantans: riding MARTA trains, playing pick-up games of basketball, hanging his head about the Hawks. Decades later, Mr. Jenkins leads the Footie Mob, one of a number of supporters’ groups that have latched onto the Major League Soccer expansion team Atlanta United. Last week, the team did what many thought impossible: It knocked Real Madrid out of the Top 25 global soccer rankings, becoming the first MLS team to enter that echelon. The team regularly hosts the third or fourth best-attended soccer games – in the world.
Matt Damon and Jimmy Kimmel Appear to Bury the Hatchet in the Name of Baseball
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The two were spotted together in "I'm with stupid" t-shirts
Sophie Turner's Fiancé Joe Jonas Dressed Up as Sansa Stark for Halloween
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Check out that wig
There’s Worrying New Research About Kids’ Screen Time and Their Mental Health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hours of daily use are linked to depression and anxiety
Vitality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We're guessing this isn't going to make the 2018 Goop Gift Guide
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Got Spooked for Halloween
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They entered an elaborate costume party
Banned Ozone
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A hazardous, ozone-depleting compound is still being used in China, even though it is banned worldwide by the Montreal Protocol, a new study finds. Eastern China has emitted significant amounts of this substance — known as carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) — which is known to eat away at the ozone, a protective layer in Earth's atmosphere that shields the world from dangerous ultraviolet radiation. The new research is yet another piece of evidence pointing toward China as the source of the ozone-destroying emissions.
The PlayStation Classic's Full List of Games Could Make it 2018's Must
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From 'Grand Theft Auto' to 'Twisted Metal,' the gang's all here
Earth’s carbon dioxide levels are likely the highest they've been in 15 million years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
We’ve entered some profoundly unfamiliar planetary territory. Amid a backdrop of U.S. politicians still questioning whether the changing climate is attributable to humans (it is), it's quite likely that we’ve actually boosted Earth's carbon dioxide — a potent greenhouse gas — to the highest levels they’ve been in some 15 million years.  The number 15 million is dramatically higher than a statistic frequently cited by geologists and climate scientists: That today's carbon levels are the highest they've been on Earth in at least 800,000 years — as there's irrefutable proof trapped in the planet's ancient ice. Though scientists emphasize that air bubbles preserved in ice are the gold carbon standard, there are less direct, though still quite reliable means to gauge Earth's long-ago carbon dioxide levels. These measurements, broadly called proxies, include the chemical make-up of long-dead plankton and the evidence stored in the breathing cells, or stomata, of ancient plants. Scientists have identified this 15 million number by measuring and re-measuring proxies all over the world. Ancient air stored in ice core bubbles.Image: nasa“It’s a good scientific documentation, but it’s an indirect measure,” Michael Prather, a professor of earth system science at the University of California Irvine, said in an interview. “And there’s several lines of evidence,” Prather, a lead author on UN climate reports, added, citing the carbon dioxide evidence in fossilized marine life. “It’s not just one person’s crazy number.” Direct measures of the air show carbon dioxide levels have recently hit 410 parts per million, or ppm, the highest-recorded number in human history. “For the most part, carbon dioxide was below 400 ppm for the last 14 million years or so,” Matthew Lachniet, a paleoclimatologist at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, said in an interview.  SEE ALSO: This scientist keeps winning money from people who bet against climate change There may have been a time, roughly 3 million years ago during an extremely warm period called the Pliocene Epoch — when sea levels were between 16 and 131 feet higher than today — during which carbon concentrations could have approximated present levels. “However, the concentration of CO2 currently in Earth’s atmosphere is higher or is nearly as high as it has been over any time period during the past 15 million years,” Daniel Breecker, a paleoclimatologist at the University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences, said over email. The critical difference today, however, is that carbon emissions are expected to continue rising. With the unprecedented burning of fossil fuels, carbon accumulations will simply keep going up.  Different proxies, like phytoplankton (red), give scientists a good range (blue background) of past atmospheric carbon dioxide estimates.Image: United Nations/Ipcc“Of course, C02 concentrations aren’t stopping today,” said Lachniet. “We’re probably going to blow through 550 to 600 ppm.” Those sorts of high carbon concentrations haven't been experienced on Earth in well over 20 million years, noted Lachniet. “That makes this conversation even more stark,” he said. Some folks in the climate community, though, have even argued that today’s climate has the highest concentration of total greenhouse gases — when gases like methane (natural gas) and nitrous oxide are added to the mix — in 20 million years.  This idea, called the “carbon dioxide equivalent” has some support in the climate community, though a variety of climate scientists we reached out to weren’t aware of research supporting this 20 million-year claim. 407.04 parts per million (ppm) CO2 in air 23-Oct-2018 https://t.co/MGD5CTru41 — Keeling_Curve (@Keeling_curve) October 24, 2018 In the end, it’s not just the actual concentration of carbon dioxide that matters — it’s how sensitive the planet ends up being to this dramatically rising carbon accumulation, noted Breecker. Already, Earth has proven quite sensitive Since the onset of the Industrial Revolution, Earth's average temperature has risen by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit, or 1 degree Celsius.  Major consequences have already been regularly observed in Earth’s water cycle — bringing greater odds of extremes in deluges and drought. The most easily-predicted results, record-breaking heat waves and historic wildfires, are manifesting globally, as well as more complex atmospheric changes. “It [global warming] raises sea levels and makes storm surges worse, it makes the atmosphere wetter, leading to flooding from extreme rainfall, and warming ocean temperatures provide extra energy to tropical storms,” climate scientist Stefan Rahmstorf, head of Earth System Analysis at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, said in September.  Record low sea ice extent continues on the Atlantic side of the #Arctic Ocean. This region has been well below average over the last several months. Daily data on the chart is from the @NSIDC. pic.twitter.com/nD1tGpHmPX — Zack Labe (@ZLabe) October 26, 2018 "The polar ice is melting, in the ocean the Gulf Stream System is weakening, and in the atmosphere the jet stream is getting weird,” Rahmstorf added.  Unlike previous geologic epochs, the defining circumstance today isn’t just notably high carbon in the air — it’s how fast it’s all accumulating.  The natural world both loads and removes carbon from the atmosphere over long periods of thousands to tens of thousands of years. For example, a warm period called the Eemian, which ended around 120,000 years ago, slowly melted a significant portion of Greenland’s ice sheets — even with profoundly lower carbon concentrations of around 280 ppm. But these days, the climate hasn’t yet caught up. It’s been an unprecedentedly warm spring and summer 2018 in Europe, smashing previous records. https://t.co/PhSlTG9kck — Ed Hawkins (@ed_hawkins) October 26, 2018 “We’re warming so fast that we haven’t even begun to let Greenland melt,” noted UC Irvine’s Prather.  Where civilization ultimately ends up, carbon-wise, is contingent upon how quickly global societies transition to clean energy, and generate electricity without a deep reliance on fossil fuels.  “I would argue what's really relevant is where we stabilize out,” said Lachniet. “Over the next hundred years we really set the next 10,000 years of climate history.” WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?
Humans and chocolate: a 5,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Humans have hankered after chocolate for centuries longer than previously thought, scientists said Monday, tracing the earliest known consumption of its key ingredient to more than 5,000 years ago in South America. Archaeologists have long believed that ancient civilisations in Central America started drinking concoctions of cacao -- the bean-like seeds from which cocoa and chocolate are made -- from around 3,900 years ago.
Ghostly happenings give people a chill: How researchers use thermal imaging in paranormal investigations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Witnessing a wraith dancing in the shadows of a creaky, old house might not be the only reason for the chill people report during active hauntings, according to paranormal researchers.
‘No Man’s Sky’ Gives Oceans Full
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
With unlimited skies now come unlimited seas as well. Procedurally-generated universe game “No Man’s Sky,” which allows players to explore literally infinite new planets, has expanded the diversity of ocean biomes in the latest update, appropriately called The Abyss by studio Hello Games. While underwater creatures already lived in ponds, lakes and ocean-like water bodies […]
A North Carolina High School Did Not Dismiss Class After a Student Was Fatally Shot on Campus. Here's Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Charlotte-Mecklenburg district spokesman clarified the decision to keep the high school open to TIME
Deadly storms lash Italy leaving Venice afloat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At least five people died Monday in Italy as fierce winds and rains lashed much of the country and caused waters in the canal-ringed city of Venice to reach historic high levels. In Venice, rain-soaked tourists were barred from St. Mark's Square where local authorities said the "acqua alta" (high water) peaked at 156 centimetres (61 inches) by early afternoon. The waters have only topped 150 centimetres five times before in recorded history.
Missing Lion Air Plane Crashed Into the Sea With 189 Passengers and Crew on Board
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Indonesia’s disaster agency says a Lion Air passenger jet crashed into the sea shortly after takeoff from Jakarta and was carrying 189 passengers and crew.
Google seeks to grant $25 million to AI for 'good' projects
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The "AI Impact Challenge" is meant to inspire organizations to ask Google for help in machine learning, a form of AI in which computers analyze large datasets to make predictions or detect patterns and anomalies. Focusing on humanitarian projects could aid Google in recruiting and soothe critics by demonstrating that its interests in machine learning extend beyond its core business and other lucrative areas, such as military work. After employee backlash Google this year said it would not renew a deal to analyze U.S. military drone footage.
Mountain birds on "escalator to extinction" as planet warms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — A meticulous re-creation of a three decade-old study of birds on a mountainside in Peru has given scientists a rare chance to prove how the changing climate is pushing species out of the places they are best adapted to.
Japan launches environment monitoring satellite
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Japan's space agency on Monday launched a rocket carrying a satellite that will monitor greenhouse gases, as well as the first satellite built entirely in the United Arab Emirates. About 16 minutes later, it sent a Japanese satellite nicknamed Ibuki-2 into orbit. The satellite is officially named GOSAT-2, short for "greenhouse gases observing satellite-2", and is intended to provide data that will help Japan create and publish "emission inventories" of the CO2 output of various countries, as outlined in the Paris climate accord.
'Respond to Hate With Love': Muslim Organizations Raise Thousands to Benefit Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting Victims
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"We do hope the money can in some way lift their spirits"
Lopez Obrador says will cancel Mexico airport project
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mexico's incoming leftist president Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said Monday he will halt construction of a new airport for the capital after it was rejected in a referendum. "The decision is to obey the mandate of the citizens," Lopez Obrador told reporters, adding that the money would be used instead to improve existing facilities. Business leaders said the new airport at Texcoco was needed to ease traffic at Mexico City's aging airport, which handled nearly 45 million passengers last year.
With racial tension high in Florida race, Trump calls Gillum a 'thief'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The president portrayed the choice in the race as between a Republican with an Ivy League pedigree and a Democrat he sees as a criminal.
Over nearly a century, Rose Mallinger saw the best and worst of America. Until Saturday.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The oldest victim of the Tree of Life synagogue shooting had seen anti-Semitism rise and fall over the years, but was shielded from the worst of it. Until Saturday.
Beto O'Rourke within striking distance of Ted Cruz, new poll finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A Quinnipiac Poll found Cruz ahead by just 5 points, with 3 percent of likely voters undecided and 2 percent saying they could still change their minds.
Who is Gab founder Andrew Torba?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The murder of 11 people at a Pittsburgh synagogue Saturday has brought new attention to Gab, the social media service created by Andrew Torba that bills itself as pro-free speech and serves as a gathering place for white supremacists, neo-Nazis and other extremist figures online, and counted among its users suspected gunman Robert Bowers.
Rick Scott’s Halloween party is a Trump rally
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
On Halloween this Wednesday, Florida Gov. Rick Scott will dress up as a candidate who wants to appear with President Trump on the campaign trail. Scott, a Republican and two-term governor, has kept the president at arm’s length much of this year, during his run for a U.S. Senate seat held by Democrat Bill Nelson, who is seeking reelection to a fourth term. Scott was a prominent backer of Trump in 2016.
A different Mexico as a US partner on migration
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
As they trek together toward the United States, a few thousand migrants from Central America could end up doing more than pose a crisis at the border. The mass exodus has the potential to build a better partnership between the US and Mexico in addressing the “push factors” that drive such people to leave home. To be sure, part of any new US-Mexican coordination should include enhanced enforcement of immigration laws as well as adherence to treaties regarding refugees.
How Big Sky Country became the front line in a long battle over dark money
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Jaime MacNaughton’s future in law can be traced back to the time when she was locked in the trunk of a car, sweating inside a garbage bag. Fast-forward 15 years and Ms. MacNaughton, now a lawyer, is a key player in enforcing Montana’s strict laws against mega-spending in politics. Seventy miles to the south, in the brick historical district of Butte, Mont., Anita Milanovich is marshaling arguments for her side of those cases.
Meanwhile in ... Austria, poll shows eagerness to lose country’s reputation as 'ashtray of Europe'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Austria, a recent public opinion poll shows an eagerness to lose the country’s reputation as “the ashtray of Europe.” A nationwide petition collected nearly 900,000 signatures (about 14 percent of the total electorate) of people who support a ban on smoking in restaurants and cafes. India, Gayam Motor Works has become the world’s first electric auto-rickshaw maker. Canada, nearly half the identifiable plastic trash cleaned up from the nation’s beaches came from just five companies: Nestlé, Tim Hortons, PepsiCo, Coca-Cola, and McDonald’s. Greenpeace Canada and other environmental groups counted the sources of plastic debris during a nationwide coastal cleanup effort in September.
In Iran, US sanctions are being felt, with harsher measures to come
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
One sign of the impact of stepped-up American sanctions on Iran can be found on the northeast edge of Tehran: anxiety at Iran’s largest charity for children diagnosed with cancer. Mahak, a private charity with a $60 million annual budget that cares for 17,500 patients across the country, free of charge, is deeply concerned that crucial drug supplies from abroad are already dwindling as foreign banks and suppliers cease doing business. While humanitarian goods such as medicine are exempt from US sanctions, which were reimposed after President Trump withdrew the United States from the multinational deal to curtail Iran’s nuclear program, the severe banking restrictions that are part of the sanctions regime have just as negative an effect.
The Red Sox Are Celebrating Their World Series Victory By Silencing Everyone Who Doubted Them on Twitter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Red Sox are taking their World Series victory celebration online by shutting down critics on Twitter with hilarious comments.
The Best Celebrity Halloween Costumes of 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From Harry Styles to Kendall Jenner
President Donald Trump and Melania Trump Host Trick
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Trick-or-treat at the White House
Is Granola Healthy? Here's What Experts Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Watch out for sneaky sugar
Angela Merkel Is Stepping Down As German Chancellor in 2021. Here's What That Means
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
German Chancellor Angela Merkel will not seek reelection as the chair of her party in December. She has ruled Germany since 2005.
NASA says the Hubble is back up and running after bizarre gyroscope issues
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Hubble Space Telescope — one of NASA's most reliable and important pieces of space hardware — has had a rough couple of weeks. Earlier this month NASA revealed that the Hubble was experiencing some unexpected downtime after one of its gyroscopes failed and the backup gyro returned bizarre readings. NASA's engineers remained at a loss to explain why the Hubble's gyro was acting up. They turned the components off and back on, but that didn't seem to fix the problem. Believing that some kind of blockage was responsible for the telescope's odd behavior, NASA's team performed a series of maneuvers intended to free up the gyroscope, ultimately correcting the problem. Now, it seems that everything is working splendidly and NASA is comfortable in announcing that Hubble is back to normal. "Late Friday, the team began the process to restore the scientific instruments to standard operating status," NASA said in a statement. "Hubble successfully completed maneuvers to get on target for the first science observations, and the telescope collected its first science data since Oct. 5." It's still not completely clear what the problem was. The telescope was returning readings that made no sense, and since the gyroscopes are what the Hubble uses to orient itself while drifting in orbit it's vital that they work correctly. The strategy of sending repeated maneuvers to the telescope apparently fixed things, so NASA is moving forward and resuming science operations. That's obviously great news, but NASA is quick to point out that Hubble is definitely getting up there in terms of age. The telescope has nearly doubled its original intended mission timeline, lasting over 28 years thus far despite only being designed to fly for around 15 years. In a perfect world, the James Webb Space Telescope would already be up and running, collecting data alongside the Hubble. Unfortunately, due to a series of inexcusable blunders on behalf of contractor Northrop Grumman, the telescope's planned launch in 2007 has been delayed by nearly a decade and a half and at a cost of nearly $10 billion. The original budget for the new telescope was $500 million.
China permits limited trade of rhino, tiger goods
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China on Monday announced it was authorising the trade of rhinoceros and tiger parts for scientific, medical and cultural purposes, a move wildlife conservationists fear could have "devastating consequences" globally. The trade of rhinos, tigers, and their related products will be allowed under "special" circumstances, the State Council, or cabinet, said in a statement. Only doctors at hospitals recognised by the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine will be allowed to use powdered forms of rhino horn and tiger bones.
Big quake in Romania could topple many schools, buildings
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Romanian authorities say 170 schools and some 350 apartment buildings in the capital of Bucharest would not withstand a major earthquake. The Inspectorate for Emergency Situations said kindergartens, schools and higher education facilities such as the Law Faculty were among the educational facilities at risk. Separately, the Alert project, which assesses earthquake risks in Bucharest, said 345 apartment buildings, some with restaurants and bars, are at major risk of collapse in the event of a big quake — 7 magnitude or more.