World News
IN SHORT
Saturday, August 18, 2018

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
Melania Trump's Parents Were Sworn in as U.S. Citizens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Slovenian couple had been living in the U.S. as permanent residents
The rise of cyberlockers: how online piracy is fighting back
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'Cyberlocker' illegal streaming sites are in a constant cat-and-mouse struggle with law enforcement.
MIT created a high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For all the ultra-powerful technology that doctors have at their disposal, it's still shockingly difficult to see what's actually happening inside the human body. Sure, CT scans can offer a glimpse at where things are, but spotting irregularities still requires surgeons to break out their blades — or in the case of gastrointestinal issues, shoving a camera in one end or the other. MIT is hoping to make that uncomfortable experience a thing of the past with swallowable smart pills that can check out what's going on inside a person's digestive system, with no strings (or thick cables) attached. As ZDNet reports, MIT scientists have been building the chip-in-a-pill system for some time. It doesn't use a remote camera — though that would be pretty neat — but it does have sensors that can detect the presence of blood in a very special way. Inside the chip are tiny reservoirs that are filled with special bacteria. These bacteria are home grown, and they have one job: to light up if they come into contact with blood. When the bacteria are released, they spread out around the chip, mixing with the gut contents. If a bacteria finds red blood cells they begin to glow. A tiny sensor on the chip can detect the light of the activated bacteria and the chip then sends that data back to the doctors. With this system, doctors can detect the presence of blood throughout the digestive system by releasing fresh bacteria when the chip reaches new areas. It doesn't use much power, so it can take its time as it moves through a person's body, returning valuable data whenever healthcare providers require it. The information the chip sends back can be used to form treatment plans or, if things are particularly dire, speed up the timeline or jump straight to surgery. It's obviously a very cool system, but it's not quite ready for prime time yet. The pill's functions are still being fleshed out, but it may not be long before you're swallowing a sensor to give doctors a better look at your insides.
Significant Digits For Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You’re reading Significant Digits, a daily digest of the numbers tucked inside the news. 26.5 million viewers The Oscars — which garnered a record low 26.5 million viewers last year — will try and improve the ratings for its live awards telecast by telecasting fewer of its awards live. It will also introduce an award […]
Tennessee Executes Its First Inmate in Nearly a Decade
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Billy Ray Irick, 59, was condemned for the 1985 rape and murder of a 7-year-old girl
Michael Brown's mom seeks reinvestigation, City Council seat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The Missouri governor's office said Friday it doesn't have the authority to appoint a special prosecutor reinvestigate the 2014 fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, despite pressure from Brown's mother to do so.
Officers seize 3 king cobras, 300 other reptiles from home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ALLEGANY, N.Y. (AP) — State wildlife officers have seized three king cobras among the more than 300 reptiles kept in a New York home.
Mountain lion breaks into Colorado home, kills house cat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOULDER, Colo. (AP) — A mountain lion that became trapped inside a Colorado home killed a house cat before police and wildlife officers were able to scare it out.
How one man left hate behind – and helped others do the same
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Christian Picciolini was recruited into America’s first skinhead group, Chicago Area Skinhead, when he was a young teenager. Picciolini is the host and narrator of a new documentary produced by Part2Pictures, “Breaking Hate,” which traces the story of how he helped a Charlottesville protester walk away from the neo-Nazi views he espoused – with the help of Susan Bro, whose daughter was killed in the protests. Q: What originally attracted you to white supremacy?
Researchers Think Preventing Alzheimer's Might Actually Be Within Your Control
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A breakthrough study suggests that a lifestyle change may help ward off dementia
Appeals Court Orders EPA to Ban a Pesticide Known to Harm Children
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A coalition of farmworkers and environmental groups sued last year after then-EPA chief Scott Pruitt reversed an Obama-era effort to ban chlorpyrifos
Physicists Ignite Beef Over What Happens When You Fall Into a Black Hole
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Some of it's brilliant and wonderful and some of it is crap."
A Trump Ally in Kansas Is Responsible for Overseeing the GOP Primary He Now Leads by Just 91 Votes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Secretary of State Kris Kobach's opponent, Gov. Jeff Coyler, asked that Kobach recuse himself
Judge Threatens to Hold Jeff Sessions in Contempt of Court Over Deportation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The judge halted the deportation of two immigrants in the middle of a lawsuit
Insight: Gene
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Calyxt Inc, an eight-year-old firm co-founded by a genetics professor, altered the genes of a soybean plant to produce healthier oil using the cutting-edge editing technique rather than conventional genetic modification. Seventy-eight farmers planted those soybeans this spring across 17,000 acres in South Dakota and Minnesota, a crop expected to be the first gene-edited crop to sell commercially, beating out Fortune 500 companies. Seed development giants such as Monsanto, Syngenta AG and DowDuPont Inc have dominated genetically modified crop technology that emerged in the 1990s.
The U.S. Desperately Needs a Better Way to Predict Storms
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hurricane Predictions for 2018
Trump adviser Stone's associate held in contempt in Russia probe: reports
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
An associate of President Donald Trump's longtime adviser Roger Stone was found in contempt on Friday after refusing to appear as a witness before a grand jury convened as part of U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe, U.S. media reported. Andrew Miller's refusal to comply with the subpoena from Mueller's office prompted a sealed hearing before a federal judge, who then made the ruling, the Washington Post and CNN said. CNN also reported that the special counsel's office, which is probing alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, had subpoenaed comedian and talk show host Randy Credico, another Stone associate.
Michael Brown's mother seeks reopening of investigation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
ST. LOUIS (AP) — The mother of Michael Brown is pressing Missouri's governor to reopen the investigation into the 2014 police shooting that killed her son in Ferguson and helped spark the Black Lives Matter movement.
Erdogan tells Turks to buy crumbling lira as Trump turns the screws
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The lira has long been falling on worries about Erdogan's influence over monetary policy and worsening relations with the United States. Reverberations spread through global markets, with European stock markets especially hit as investors took fright over banks' exposure to Turkey. U.S. stocks were also rattled.
NASA sending spacecraft straight into sun's glittering crown
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA is sending a spacecraft straight into the sun's glittering crown, an atmospheric region so hot and harsh any normal visitor would wither.
The key Trump revelations in Omarosa Manigault Newman's new book
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Omarosa Manigault Newman, whose association with Donald Trump goes back all the way to his days on reality TV, has displayed her flair for spectacle by publishing a scathing insider’s account of his White House. Manigault Newman, who embraced the role “villain” on The Apprentice, said in 2015: “When you have a big reality TV star as the front-runner for the Republican nomination there is no way to separate it. When the Guardian approached the White House for comment about Manigault Newman’s book on Thursday, there was no response.
William & Mary board rescinds Bill Cosby honorary degree
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (AP) — The board of visitors of The College of William & Mary has voted to rescind an honorary degree awarded to comedian and actor Bill Cosby.
Confirmation hearings for U.S. top court nominee Kavanaugh open Sept. 4
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Confirmation hearings for U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will begin on Sept. 4, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley announced in a statement on Friday. Opening statements by committee members will take place on Sept. 4, and the questioning of Kavanaugh will start the following day, the committee statement said. The hearings are expected to last three or four days. Republican President Donald Trump nominated Kavanaugh, 53, on July 9 to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. ...
Officers seize 3 king cobras, other reptiles from home
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ALLEGANY, N.Y. (AP) — State wildlife officers have seized three king cobras and other venomous reptiles from a New York home.
In Canada's spat with Saudi Arabia, signs of a trickier road for democracies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The furious reaction by Saudi Arabia to what was a rather stock Canadian statement calling for the release of imprisoned human rights activists has little to do with Canada – and everything to do with the ruling agenda of Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman. In doing so, it has raised questions about the price Canada must pay to stand up for its principles on the global stage, which has become a lonelier place as of late.
Paving Mexico’s road to reconciliation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Elected as Mexico’s next president by a wide margin on July 1, Andrés Manuel López Obrador does not take office until Dec. 1. It’s part of a broad effort to reform institutions and create new options for youth, including those already seduced by crime. AMLO stresses the need for citizens – of every country – to help create the conditions for peace and ensure that the tragedies of recent years are ended and not repeated.
For people of Charlottesville, a year of reckoning
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The best seats are already taken half an hour before the Charlottesville City Council is due to start. There are scattered boos and hisses when she is followed by her predecessor and fellow city councilmember Mike Signer, who stepped down after being widely criticized for his management of last year’s protests and the consequent fallout.
Google Doodle Celebrates Mary G. Ross. Here's What to Know About the First Native American Woman Engineer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mary G. Ross' work opened the door for future female engineers
Antidepressants are changing animals' behaviour – and we're using technology to find out how
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Drugs are finding their way into lakes and rivers, and we need to know exactly what they're doing to wildlife.
Twitter's Jack Dorsey Defends Stance on Conspiracy Theorist Alex Jones in Sean Hannity Interview
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Sean Hannity and Alex Jones have both been accused of fueling conspiracy theories
Wildfire smoke from California has reached New York City, 3,000 miles away
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Anthony Wexler, the director of the Air Quality Research Center at the University of California, Davis, packed his bags and drove his family out to the coast.  They're escaping the smoke. Davis, California, sits amid a layer of wildfire smoke in Northern California. To the northwest, the largest fire in state history, the Mendocino Complex Fire, continues to burn. To the southeast, the Ferguson Fire has closed down smoke-choked Yosemite National Park indefinitely. And to the North, the Carr Fire, infamous for its towering fire tornado, still burns.  SEE ALSO: California just had its hottest month on record, and that means more wildfires The air quality in the region around the fires — whose spread has been enhanced by extreme heat parching the land — is some of the worst in the world.  "I decided to go out to the coast for a couple days because it was so ridiculous," Wexler said.  On Wednesday, the National Weather Service illustrated how winds have lifted bounties of smoke across the entire U.S., bringing pollution even beyond the East Coast.  Smoke from the western fires is making it all the way to the East Coast and beyond (at least aloft—mostly above a mile above the surface). Here's the vertically integrated smoke (HRRR model from last night). Another map showed some smoke near the surface even in New England. pic.twitter.com/0Jl6WDAFjg — NWS San Diego (@NWSSanDiego) August 8, 2018 That said, it's not as if these smoke particles are harmful to those on the East Coast. By the time that smoke arrives in Boston and New York, the particles have been diluted with fresh air, and certainly can't be seen, nor are concentrations unhealthy. It's normal for pollution to waft from west to east across the country, just like pollution from China is regularly transported over the Pacific Ocean into the U.S. That's how air generally moves over the Northern Hemisphere, said Wexler. But it's much rarer for even low concentrations of smoke to find their way across the nation. "It doesn’t happen every day," Gabriele Pfister, deputy director of the National Center of Atmospheric Research’s atmospheric chemistry lab, said in an interview. "But, it can happen."  "Normally, the pollution isn’t so great that it’s noticeable when it gets east," added Wexler. This isn't stratus this morning looking west from the @LickObservatory, it's smoke. #CAwx pic.twitter.com/dcAMDwShCG — NWS Bay Area (@NWSBayArea) August 7, 2018 But just how bad is the air pollution in large regions of the West? "It's been like a reasonably decent day in Beijing," said Wexler. "That's really telling. It’s really awful there." "It’s unbelievable," said Pfister.  She noted that planes flying over the area, as part of a National Science Foundation-funded wildfire study, have picked up some alarming pollution numbers.  It's expected that particulate matter — tiny fragments of pollution 30 times thinner than a human hair — would be bad. But the flights even picked up abnormally high concentrations of carbon monoxide, an odorless gas that can be dangerous to human health in enclosed spaces, and at worse, lethal. However, some of the measured values around the fires are about 5 parts per million, or ppm, which are not considered nearly dangerous — but it's still telling.  The amount of smoke over the West tonight is nothing short of astounding. pic.twitter.com/Mya0rZauMl — Dan Satterfield (@wildweatherdan) August 8, 2018 "These are values you don’t typically find near the surface in the U.S.," said Pfister. "Maybe you’ll find that if you stick your head into the exhaust of a car." It's not carbon monoxide, however, that people in burning regions need to be concerned about. One of the main factors that's figured into air quality ratings is particulate matter.  Both U.S. government and university researchers have repeatedly shown that breathing this stuff is bad for your heart, as it accelerates plaque build-up in blood vessels.   In some areas of Oregon, the Air Quality Index currently registers as "Hazardous." In Redding, California, where a fire tornado spun for 80 minutes last week, the air quality is rated as "Unhealthy." But out near the windswept coast, like in San Francisco, the air quality is "Good." Here is what the #smoke looked like over the Central Valley and affecting #AirQuality today. Deep smoke up to 10,000 feet AGL with multiple layers of smoke caused by transport of different #wildfire plumes. Thanks to @MBrewerWX @weather_jack #MendocinoComplexFire #CarrFire pic.twitter.com/aOlNqLLJNV — SJSU FireWeatherLab (@FireWeatherLab) August 9, 2018 It's likely that the West will be intermittently blanketed in unhealthy to hazardous air for months ahead, as the fire season is not nearly over.  Rains aren't expected for months, and more temperature and fire records might be broken. Many Westerners aren't near the fires themselves. But it's harder to outrun the smoke. "In my experience, it's never been this bad," said Wexler.  WATCH: A tick is spreading and making people allergic to beef
Exclusive: As Trump cracks down on Pakistan, U.S. cuts military training programs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The move, which has not been previously reported, is one of the first known impacts from Trump's decision this year to suspend U.S. security assistance to Pakistan to compel it to crack down on Islamic militants. The Pentagon and the Pakistani military did not comment directly on the decision or the internal deliberations, but officials from both countries privately criticized the move. U.S. officials, speaking to Reuters on the condition of anonymity, said they were worried the decision could undermine a key trust-building measure.
U.S. strongly condemns Russia's poisoning of former spy: White House
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
"The attack against Sergei and Yulia Skripal in Salisbury, United Kingdom, on March 4, 2018, was a reckless display of contempt for the universally held norm against chemical weapons," said a spokesman for the White House National Security Council in an email. The spokesman said sanctions that the State Department said it would impose by the end of August fulfilled its legal obligations "after determining a foreign government has used chemical or biological weapons against its own nationals or in violation of international law." Skripal, a former colonel in Russia's GRU military intelligence service, and his 33-year-old daughter were found slumped unconscious on a bench in the southern English city of Salisbury in March, after a liquid form of the Novichok type of nerve agent was applied to his home's front door.
State senator pleads not guilty to domestic violence charges
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
LANCASTER, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire state senator is pleading not guilty to assault and domestic violence charges.
St. Louis DA victory latest for Black Lives Matter movement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
When LaShell Eikerenkoetter cast her vote for Wesley Bell in the St. Louis County Democratic primary on Tuesday, she took the spirit of Michael Brown with her to the ballot box. "To show that four years later, when this man — who could've given us justice decided not to and did everything in his power to do the opposite — that we hadn't forgotten about him and that Mike Brown was still in our hearts. "It was about so much more than getting Bob McCulloch out.
Trump escalates feud with Turkey, imposing higher metals tariffs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Criticizing the state of the U.S. relationship with Ankara, Trump announced on Twitter that he had authorized a doubling of duties on aluminum and steel imported from Turkey, making them 20 percent and 50 percent respectively. The White House said Trump would use a section of U.S. law that allows for tariffs on national security grounds to impose the increased duties. Washington and Ankara have been at odds for months over an American pastor detained in Turkey, the Syrian civil war and other diplomatic issues.
Erdogan tells Turks to buy plunging lira as Trump turns the screws
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The lira has long been falling on worries about Erdogan's influence over monetary policy and worsening relations with the United States. Reverberations spread through global markets, with European stockmarkets especially hit as investors took fright over banks' exposure to Turkey. U.S. stocks were also rattled, with banks again in focus.
As U.S. unleashes sanctions, Americans view Russia as bigger threat than Iran: Reuters/Ipsos poll
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
While a majority of U.S. adults view Iran as a threat to the United States, that number has decreased slightly over the past three years, the poll shows. In comparison, the number of Americans who consider Russia a threat to their country increased since 2015, as U.S. intelligence agencies concluded that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election and on new accusations of Russian meddling ahead of the November midterm elections. Highlights from Reuters/Ipsos polls show: Sixty-seven percent of U.S. adults said in a poll conducted in July 2018 that Iran poses a "moderate," "serious" or "imminent" threat to the United States.
South Korea should not warm to North Korea too quickly, Iran cannot blame Trump for its problems, New Israeli law hurts the balance between nationalit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“In a joint announcement by the Department of State, the Treasury and the Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. government on [July 24] issued a warning not to loosen sanctions on joint ventures with [North Korea]...,” states an editorial. “It also warned about tactics used by Pyongyang to evade international sanctions.... The Trump administration released a list of suspicious countries.... Surprisingly, South Korea is no exception.
Buddhism flourishes in Siberia, opening window on its pre
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
This cluster of wildly eclectic, multicolored pagoda-style temples, rising out of the dusty steppe a few miles south of Ulan-Ude, is something almost unique in a Russian landscape. Just 30 years ago there was only one little wooden dugan, or temple, in this place: the first – and for a long time, only – one allowed to exist in the entire Soviet Union. Now there are almost 40 temple complexes in Buryatia alone, as the native Mongol-speaking Buryats enthusiastically rediscover their ancestral beliefs.
Dozens of Children Killed as Saudi
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An airstrike by the Saudi-led coalition fighting Shiite rebels hit a bus driving in a busy market in northern Yemen on Thursday, killing at least 50 people including children and wounding 77.
NASA experiment that included Trump note caused alarm
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
SOUTH BRUNSWICK, N.J. (AP) — A suspicious package that fell from the sky over New Jersey caused some alarm because it contained a note that mentioned President Donald Trump.
Trump doubles tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminum, says relations 'not good'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
U.S. President Donald Trump said on Friday he had authorized higher tariffs on imports from Turkey, imposing a 20 percent duty on aluminum and 50 percent one on steel, as tensions mount between the two NATO allies over Ankara's detention of an evangelical pastor and other diplomatic issues. "I have just authorized a doubling of Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum with respect to Turkey as their currency, the Turkish Lira, slides rapidly downward against our very strong Dollar!" Trump said in an early morning post on Twitter.
Kobach to recuse himself from Kansas governor's race recount
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Kobach told CNN late on Thursday that as Kansas's current secretary of state, he has no role in the counting or recounting of provisional ballots, and that all the work is done at the county level. "I'll be happy to recuse myself." In a letter to Kobach on Thursday, Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer wrote that some clerks were given wrong information about which ballots to count and requested that Kobach recuse himself from "rendering further advice in these matters." "I believe that the designation of the Attorney General as a neutral party to advise county election officials on these matters will help ensure the confidence of the voting public in the outcome of the primary election," Colyer wrote. Thomas County Clerk Shelly Harms confirmed to Reuters on Thursday that Colyer's vote total had been corrected to 522, up 100 votes from the 422 initially reported.
Erdogan tells Turks to buy free
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The lira has been falling on worries about Erdogan's influence over monetary policy and worsening relations with the United States. Trump said he had authorized higher tariffs on imports from Turkey, imposing a 20 percent duty on aluminum and 50 percent one on steel. The lira, he noted on Twitter, "slides rapidly downward against our very strong Dollar!" "Our relations with Turkey are not good at this time!" he said in an early morning post.
India lawmaker dresses as Hitler to criticize prime minister
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW DELHI (AP) — An Indian lawmaker has appeared in Parliament dressed like Adolf Hitler with a toothbrush moustache and wearing a khaki coat with swastika symbols on his pocket and arm. His demand: More funds for the development of his state in southern India.
These bizarre ancient creatures looked like huge aquatic plants, but they were actually animals
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fossil hunting isn't quite as cut-and-dry as you might think it is. Finding the leftovers of a creature that lived a hundred million years ago is exciting, and while dinosaurs and many plants are relatively easy to identify based on their remains, creatures from even farther back in Earth's history have left scientists scratching their heads. One group of organisms which got its start in the Ediacaran period — roughly 500 million years ago, or so — looked a bit like oversized leaves that could measure up to two meters in length. Long-studied, these organisms confounded researchers for years, with scientists unable to determine if they were indeed plants or animals, or maybe something in between. Now, new research points to them indeed being animals, albeit ones that seem utterly alien here on Earth. The study, which was published in Palaeontology, was conducted by researchers from multiple universities around the world, closely examined known fossils of a species called Stromatoveris psygmoglena. The creatures looked like large, ribbed leaves on the ancient ocean floor, but after examining over 200 known examples of the creature it's become apparent that they were actually just really, really weird animals. The researchers reached their conclusion by using a computer model which makes an educated guess as to where a species might reside on the evolutionary tree. Using all the data as their disposal, the scientists now believe that these organisms may have been an entirely new phylum of the animal kingdom, more complex than simple sea sponges but not as advanced as animals with full digestive systems. These animals do not appear to have evolved into any other known organisms, so it seems like the entire group ran into a brick wall after thriving for tens of millions of years. Researchers still don't know exactly why they went extinct, and figuring that out might indeed be impossible. Nevertheless, it's an interesting discovery, and helps researchers paint a clearer picture of what the world was like half a billion years in the past.
Grieving Mother Orca Still Carrying Her Dead Calf as Researchers Begin to Fear for Her Health
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
J35 was first seen carrying her baby after its death on July 24, in what scientists call a mourning ritual
Efforts to develop small
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
News Brief: The latest “State of the Industry” report for small orbital-class launch vehicles tracks 101 reported efforts to create such rockets, compared with a mere 31 in 2015. But many of those efforts are defunct or in limbo, Northrop Grumman’s Carlos Niederstrasser said today at the SmallSat Conference in Logan, Utah. “We’re definitely starting to see attrition” in the industry, he said. Niederstrasser said only four small launch vehicles have entered service since 2015: three Chinese rockets and Rocket Lab’s Electron. He also noted that the per-kilogram price for putting a payload in orbit can go as high as… Read More
Respite for firecrews as Portugal blaze dies down
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Wildfires which have blazed along a stretch of Portugal's Algarve for a week died down on Thursday, but fears remained that winds could reignite the flames. "It's calmer and we do not have active flames any more, and that gives us some peace of mind," said Rui Andre, the mayor of Monchique close to where the fire broke out last Friday. Hundreds of firefighters have been battling to control the blaze that has menaced the popular tourist region in southern Portugal for a week as sweltering temperatures and strong winds fanned the ferocious fires.