World News
IN SHORT
Thursday, April 27, 2017

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
Scientists are racing nanocars on a solid gold track
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists are set to engage in a frivolous race of single-molecule "nanocars" on, if you can believe it, a solid gold track. It's the boldest show of academic elitism and greatest waste of taxpayer dollars since the duck penis thing. Oh wait, it's actually the greatest thing of all time.The whole thing is a bit of a lark, thought up by...
Mummies discovered in ancient tomb near Egypt's Luxor
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Egyptian archaeologists have unearthed several mummies, colourful wooden sarcophagi and more than 1,000 funerary statues in a 3,500-year-old tomb near the city of Luxor, hailing an "important discovery". The 18th Dynasty tomb containing at least eight mummies was discovered in the Draa Abul Nagaa necropolis near the famed Valley of the Kings, the antiquities ministry said in a Tuesday statement. It was opened to add more mummies during the 21st Dynasty, about 3,000 years ago, to protect them during a period when tomb-robbing was common, Mostafa Waziri, the head of the archaeological mission, said at the site.
John Glenn honored with launch of space station supply ship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A supply ship named for John Glenn is headed for the International Space Station
Police detonate 19th
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
HULL, Mass. (AP) — An antiques collector in Massachusetts says he didn't realize he had an explosive 19th-century cannonball sitting in his home until a bomb squad detonated the device.
Who stashed gold inside a British piano? It's a mystery
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LONDON (AP) — British officials say they have been unable to trace the rightful heirs to a trove of gold coins found stashed inside a piano and worth a "life-changing" amount of money.
Campaign books that help shatter our politics
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Contemporary campaign accounts don’t illuminate the soullessness of our political culture so much as they reflect it.
Sending Robots Into A Volcano Full Of Sharks [VIDEO]
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Robots are going where no man has gone before: into an underwater volcano that is constantly erupting and absolutely filthy with sharks.
Scientists are worried that humanity just keeps sending junk into space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Space is big and the hardware that humans keep sending into the great beyond is comparatively small, but our habit of letting random bits of space vehicles, boosters, and defunct satellites hang around in orbit is starting to concern scientists more than ever before. Now, the European Space Agency is sounding the alarm and pleading with the space-traveling nations to pitch in and help clean up the estimated 150 million bits of debris with the capability to destroy or damage spacecraft that accidentally collide with them. "Today, we find in space roughly 5,000 objects with sizes larger than 1 metre (3.25 feet), roughly 20,000 objects with sizes over 10 centimetres... and 750,000 'flying bullets' of around one centimetre (half an inch)," Rolf Densing, director of operations at the ESA said at a conference regarding space junk, held in Germany. "For objects larger than one millimetre (0.04 inch), 150 million is our model estimate for that." The problem has gotten bad enough that some countries, like Japan, have been trying to find a way to clean up the junk with their own tools. Unfortunately, some technical difficulties held up that operation and proved to be a huge disappointment. According to the ESA, the organization's fleet of 10 satellites is constantly under threat from potential collisions with the junk floating around in orbit, and typically needs to make a couple of safety maneuvers each year to prevent problems. That might not sound like much of a burden, but as the volume of debris continues to climb, it will only become more and more common.
Experts discuss the exponentially worsening space debris problem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In under 25 years, the amount of junk big enough to destroy a spacecraft has more than doubled, according to scientists who met at the seventh European Conference on Space Debris in Germany this week.
Facebook plans ethics board to monitor its brain
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Facebook will assemble an independent Ethical, Legal and Social Implications (ELSI) panel to oversee its development of a direct brain-to-computer typing interface it previewed today at its F8 conference. Facebook's R&D department Building 8's head Regina Dugan tells TechCrunch, "It's early days . . . we're in the process of forming it right...
NASA just filmed a 'potentially hazardous' asteroid flying near Earth, and it may be 2 times bigger than thought
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Astronomers are taking radar images of a "potentially hazardous asteroid" named 2014 JO25. The space rock looks like a peanut and may be twice as big as some of the tallest skyscrapers on Earth. NASA recently turned down an asteroid-hunting telescope program to find objects like 2014 JO25.
Sulphur
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An enormous black worm that lives in the mud of the sea floor and survives on the remnants of noxious gases digested by bacteria has been unveiled by scientists for the first time. The slimy giant shipworm can grow up to 155 centimetres (five feet) in length, despite living a sedentary life in ocean sediment and apparently eating nothing more than the waste products of the micro-organisms that live in its gills. This is the first time we saw a shipworm as large as this.
Antarctic meltwater lakes threaten sea levels: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Antarctic meltwater lakes are far more common than once thought and could destabilise glaciers, potentially lifting sea levels by metres as global warming sets in, scientists said Wednesday. Most vulnerable are the massive, floating ice shelves that ring the Antarctic continent and help prevent inland glaciers from sliding toward the sea, they reported in the journal Nature. Antarctica holds enough frozen water to push up global oceans by tens of metres.
EPA seeks to derail cleanup of coal power plant pollution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is once again seeking to scuttle cuts to pollution from coal-fired power plants.
5 takeaways from Jon Ossoff’s showing in the Georgia special election
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
To no one’s real surprise, President Trump and Jon Ossoff came to different conclusions regarding the final results of Tuesday’s special election in Georgia. On balance, however, Ossoff may have more to brag about than the president. 1. Jon Ossoff was never likely to win the Sixth District primary outright.
Severe Acne Viral Video Offers Sufferers Comfort and Hope
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Brian has suffered from cystic acne for the last seven years. Brian wept on-camera as he told of the day when he broke down in school after being taunted by students, including his own best friend. Today Brian’s skin is clear! He joins The Doctors to talk about how painful acne can be for teenagers.
A Parking Ticket
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
One Michigan man left his empty car running in his own driveway to warm up the engine – and came back to find a $128 ticket on the windshield. Is this a fair cop, or a bogus bust?
A Spin Bike for Toddlers?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Toddlers have endless energy and they love to get moving. Fisher-Price’s new product, the Think & Learn Smart Cycle, is intended to combine exercise and learning. Parents connect the stationary tricycle to a tablet or TV so children can play learning games while they get more fit. But should kids this age be learning to ride a real trike outside instead?
Birthday Party Alligator Rides
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Forget the bouncy house and the clown – one Chicago party company will bring a live alligator to children’s parties and let the kids ride it! Is this a prescription for the best party ever, or a disaster waiting to happen? Bubba the alligator was rescued in the Chicago area. Ob/Gyn Dr. Nita Landry points out that “If you put a group of kids together and ask them if they want to ride Bubba, a lot of them will say yes.
Vast halo of hydrogen gas engulfing the entire Milky Way seen for the first time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Much of our galaxy's mass is not contained in the central bulge or spiral arms of the Milky Way, but is found instead a galactic halo of hydrogen gas. This shows neutral, atomic hydrogen that is not ionised, as it is in 99.99% of intergalactic gas, or in molecular H2 form, as it is on Earth. Although the halo is enormous, it is extremely hard to spot.
How GPS Changed the Way We Think About Our Planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Although it tracks where we walk, GPS's greatest benefit could be what it sees under our feet.
Orbital ATK launches cargo to space station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The barrel-shaped Cygnus spacecraft, nestled atop a white Atlas V rocket, soared into the blue sky over Cape Canaveral, Florida at 11:11 am (1511 GMT). "Liftoff of the Atlas V rocket with Cygnus and the S.S. John Glenn, extending the research legacy for living and working in space," said US space agency commentator George Diller. The cargo ship was named after John Glenn, the famed astronaut who was the first American to orbit the Earth and who died last year at age 95.
Science says hallucinogenic drugs do give you a higher level of consciousness
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new study has revealed that hallucinogenic drugs are capable of providing a 'higher level of consciousness' within humans.
Scientists rank all the ways an asteroid can kill you
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tonight, a particularly large asteroid is going to cruise by Earth at its closest point in 400 years, and while we humans are going to be observing the flyby at a safe distance, there's always a small twinge of doubt that whispers "what if...?" in the back of our minds. Scientists led by Clemens Rumpf of the University of Southampton in the UK decided to answer that question by figuring out what aspects of an asteroid collision are actually the biggest threats to human existence. The results might surprise you. The research paper, which attempted to rank seven key effects of an asteroid slamming into Earth in terms of their destructive capabilities, was published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters this week. To generate the rankings, the scientists ran 50,000 asteroid impact simulations, playing out the scenario over and over on different parts of a virtual Earth. The simulations took into account asteroids that simply explode before actually reaching the ground, called airbursts, as well as space rocks of much larger sizes. Of the seven different destructive effects — which included wind, thermal, cratering, tsunami, pressure, seismic, and ejecta (debris) — the simulations showed that wind was by far the biggest threat to human life in the wake of an astroid impact, pushing down everything in its path including structures. The thermal threat and high-pressure shock wave are more pronounced on land than they are during an oceanic impact, but the tsunamis created during an asteroid strike at sea remains the biggest threat to life in those particular scenarios. In short, it's not the actual impact of an asteroid that is most likely to kill you, but the response of Earth's elements to the unwelcome invader that will spell your doom.
Texas police search for three suspects who firebombed a home and vehicle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Plus, scientists identify a new planet seven times the size of earth.
​Google's giant Earth update: Now you get storytelling, better 3D, plus guided tours
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Google's new Earth adds video and storytelling to encourage users to explore new parts of the world.
Eight Mummies Discovered In Ancient Egyptian Tomb
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In addition to the mummies, archaeologists found 10 sarcophagi and thousands of funerary statues.
How to Choose the Best Medigap Plan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Medigap health plans are basically bookkeeping operations. Unlike Medicare Advantage plans, Medigap plans don't make any decisions about what to cover. They don't have networks of doctors or hosp...
FCC on how to eliminate annoying robocalls
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
On a single day in mid-December, Nancy Duke’s phone rang three times with the same pre-recorded sales pitch. It claimed that the Elgin, Texas, resident could win $3,000 worth of groceries if she’...
15 Long
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
Would You Buy These Etsy Crafts for Your Wedding?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
40 Signs You Might be Self
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
N/A
This New Mom Expertly Clapped Back After a Stranger Gave Her Unsolicited Weight Loss Advice
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"My body doesn't need to be wrapped or squeezed or changed."
Hoda Kotb Turned to YouTube for Help Parenting Her New Baby
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"I was literally YouTubing how to change a diaper, how to give a bath, how to burp."
Everything We Know About Jennifer Lopez and Alex Rodriguez's Whirlwind Romance
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Here's a timeline of their budding relationship.
This Couple Has 3 Sets of Twins — All Born On the Same Day
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
February 28 is a big day in the Kosinski house.
Jenna Bush Hager Credits Her "Feminist" Father George Bush With Inspiring Her to Raise Strong Daughters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"Our dad led us to believe that we were the smartest, most capable kids out there."
See April the Giraffe's Calf Meet His Daddy for the First Time
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
It was worth the wait just for this adorable moment!
Your Guide to Mosquito and Tick Diseases
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Mosquitoes and ticks are spreading more rapidly than ever, both across the U.S. and around the globe. And with each new season, the list of diseases they carry grows longer. The reasons for this ...
Monty Python Star Describes His Illness: What Is Frontotemporal Dementia?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The irreverent, surreal style of humor in the "Monty Python" movies and TV series came, in part, from comedian Terry Jones, a member of the comedy troupe. Jones was diagnosed in 2015 with a condition called frontotemporal dementia, The Guardian reported on Sunday (April 16). But what is this type of dementia?
How can Facebook better control their live streaming?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tech Take: Android Central's Daniel Bader on the challenges Facebook must overcome in order to control and censor graphic violence on their live streaming platform
Negative Mass: Scientists Create Fluid That Moves Forward When You Push It Back
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Physicists in the U.S. have created a fluid with “negative mass”—meaning that when you push it away, it accelerates towards you. Negative mass is a hypothetical concept that says matter can exist with a mass opposite to normal matter. Instead of having a positive weight—1kg, for example—negative mass would weigh minus 1kg.
Silicon Valley’s elite have a new buzzword technology to dangle over our heads
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One day we won’t need technology, because we’ll be the technology. At least that’s the promise of tech leaders like Elon Musk, Mark Zuckerberg, and Regina Dugan, who have all expressed interest (and Musk even started a company) around the idea of merging our brains with computers. At Facebook’s F8 developer conference, Zuckerberg said this…
iPhone 8 design leak hints at backside Touch ID, vertical dual cameras
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If the Apple rumor mill is heating up, it must mean that a new piece of iPhone information has leaked, in this case the iPhone 8. And this one is a biggie.  A new schematic drawing for what appears to be the iPhone 8 has appeared online and, based on the visuals, it looks like the rumors of a back-mounted Touch ID button may have been accurate.  SEE ALSO: We finally have proof Apple is working on a self-driving car The image was posted by frequent (and reasonably trustworthy) mobile device info leaker Sonny Dickson on Wednesday morning.  Covered with watermarks that indicate it may have been snagged from Chinese social network QQ, the black and white illustration shows us what is presumably the inside back panel of the upcoming smartphone.  iPhone 8 looks to be taking a new direction pic.twitter.com/mG19bcDYiC — Sonny Dickson (@SonnyDickson) April 19, 2017 At this point, all we have is visual guesswork, but the design of the panel shows a space for the iPhone's rumored vertical dual lens camera, the Apple logo, and what is possibly a space for a Touch ID fingerprint sensor. Or, and this is another longshot-but-totally-feasible-notion, maybe it's a wireless charging space.  In recent days, other rumors have surfaced hinting that component supplier issues may force Apple to ditch rumored plans to include a fingerprint sensor on the front of the device, located under its glass screen. Of course, this new illustration, even from the good source, is confirmation of nothing regarding the iPhone 8. And with rumors of several different versions in the offing, all with significantly different design elements, we are officially fumbling around in the dark in terms of what physical features to expect.  Nevertheless, this new image offers another tantalizing piece of the puzzle as anticipation mounts for Apple's 10th anniversary iPhone.  WATCH: Charge your phone wirelessly from anywhere with this handy gadget
Report: Can't blame El Nino as global temps spike in March
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — In what scientists call a clear sign of a warming world, Earth's temperatures in March were the most above normal on record without an El Nino spiking temperatures.
Close call: When asteroids whisk past Earth
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A peanut-shaped asteroid 1.3 kilometres (3,280 feet) across streaked past Earth on Wednesday, giving astronomers a rare chance to check out a big space rock up close. Dubbed 2014-JO25, the asteroid came nearest at 12:20 GMT and is now hurtling away from the centre of our solar system, said Ian Carnelli, an astronomer from the European Space Agency (ESA). "It does not represent a danger to our planet," Carnelli told AFP, noting that the asteroid passed within 1.8 million kilometres (1.1 million miles) of Earth -- about four times the distance to the moon.
Trump to call commander of International Space Station
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump will speak next week to the commander of the orbiting International Space Station.
Plastic pollution builds up in Arctic waters: study
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Even though few people live in the Artic, some seas in the region are heavily polluted with plastic because of an Atlantic ocean current which dumps debris there, researchers said Wednesday. Scientists aboard the globe traveling French schooner, Tara, in 2013 were surprised to find the seas east of Greenland and north of Scandinavia are a dead-end for plastics, said the report in the journal Science Advances. The reason the Greenland and Barents Seas and are a dumping ground is known as the North Atlantic branch of the Thermohaline Circulation, a current sometimes called "the global ocean conveyer belt," which ferries plastic particles to the area.
Victims of neo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The Southern Poverty Law Center has filed a lawsuit on behalf of Tanya Gersh, a Jewish mother resident of Whitefish, Mont., who was the main target of an anti-Semitic “troll storm” launched by neo-Nazi blogger Andrew Anglin.