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Sounds of Jupiter sent back by NASA's Juno are oddly familiar
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The spacecraft studying the giant planet picks up some wave signals, and NASA slows them to a frequency humans can hear.
Tech makes dirty water drinkable — with a little help from carbon dioxide
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A multidisciplinary team of researchers have developed a new method of making water drinkable -- by counterintuitively mixing it with carbon dioxide, which is normally considered a pollutant.
Marijuana Extract Reduces Seizures in Kids with Rare Disorder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A highly anticipated clinical trial has shown that treating patients with epilepsy with a compound derived from marijuana can significantly reduce and, in some cases, eliminate seizures in children and young adults. In the study, children and young adults with a rare and debilitating form of epilepsy called Dravet syndrome who took doses of marijuana extract experienced half as many seizures per month as those who received a placebo.
Climate Change Is Making It Harder to Sleep
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
About a third of Americans already toss and turn. Warming temperatures will spread the insomnia.
New Hope for Rheumatoid Arthritis?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
The following material contains graphic images that may be disturbing. Parents are advised that these images may not be suitable for young children.
What Caused Woman's Mysterious Freckle Pattern?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Why does Samantha have freckles on only half of her body!? Samantha’s freckling pattern is quite dramatic. Dermatologist Dr. Sonya Batra and Plastic Surgeon Dr. Andrew Ordon examine her and have the solution to the mystery!
On This Day: President John F. Kennedy Asked Congress To Send A Man To The Moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
JFK was aiming high when he asked Congress to send a man to the moon.
Scientists found a way to turn ordinary clothes into power generators using body movement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Movement is energy. Anytime you move an object, including your arms or legs, you’re transferring energy to it. That kinetic energy can be turned into other types of energy, which means you could potentially harvest it and turn it into a power source—a dream scientists have been working on for some time. One group of…
Forget Supersonic. Hypersonic Is the U.S. Military’s New Speed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Pentagon is pushing speeds above Mach 5 for quicker access to space.
Trump's budget cuts West Coast quake warning system funding
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LOS ANGELES (AP) — President Donald Trump's budget proposal would cut federal funding for an earthquake early warning system for California, Oregon and Washington state, a development that seismology experts and some local leaders say would be the end of the project.
Hillary Clinton repeatedly tweaks Trump during a college commencement address
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Hillary Clinton delivered the commencement address at her alma mater, Wellesley College, Friday, 48 years after she was the school’s first-ever student commencement speaker when she graduated in 1969. In one of her most high-profile appearances since losing the presidential election, Clinton doled out biting criticism of President Trump’s tumultuous administration, albeit without mentioning him by name. Pointedly, she referenced the political climate at the time of her 1969 speech, when “we were furious about the past presidential election of a man whose presidency would end with disgrace with his impeachment for obstruction of justice, after he fired the man running the investigation into him at the Department of Justice.” This reference to Richard Nixon’s Watergate scandal was an apparent connection to Trump, who sparked a firestorm by suddenly firing James Comey as FBI director earlier this month (although Nixon resigned before he was actually impeached).
The Right Way to Wear Sunscreen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Like brushing, flossing, and eating vegetables, it’s important to wear sunscreen—whether we like it or not. When you let...
Microsoft's Xbox Game Pass will end your free time forever
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Microsoft's new Xbox Game Pas service will give you access to more than 100 Xbox 360 and Xbox One games for $10 a month.
Sergey Brin is building the world’s biggest aircraft for humanitarian missions and family trips
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Google co-founder Sergey Brin's secret airship will be used for humanitarian missions, but it will also serve as a giant RV in the sky for his friends and family, according to The Guardian. The dirigible, which was first revealed by Bloomberg one month ago, is reportedly going to wind up being the biggest aircraft in the world at 200 meters long. The giant humanitarian sky yacht is being built at Moffett airfield, which is part of NASA’s Ames Research Center in Northern California, where Google’s Planetary Ventures division holds a 60-year lease valued at $1 billion.
Boxing Day Tsunami: Scientists drill deep in ocean to find out why Indonesia earthquake was so deadly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have long been puzzled about why the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake was so devastating, as it didn't unfold as traditional hazard models would have expected. New analyses of the sediments entering the subduction zone have allowed them to come up with a potential explanation. It was accompanied by a huge tsunami – which remains known today as Boxing Day tsunami because it occurred on 26 December.
Survey finds US honeybee losses improve from horrible to bad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — There's a glimmer of hope for America's ailing honeybees as winter losses were the lowest in more than a decade, according to a U.S. survey of beekeepers released Thursday.
Representative — and defendant — Greg Gianforte: How will it work?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
After his victory, Gianforte apologized to Guardian journalist Ben Jacobs by name and vowed to never embarrass fellow Montanans again.
Shaking hands with President Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Of President Trump’s many idiosyncrasies, one that stands out is his aggressive style of shaking hands, which many have experienced since he took office. His handshakes have become an event to watch in and of themselves as he makes the rounds meeting world leaders.
Hillary Clinton repeatedly tweaked Trump during a college commencement address
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Hillary Clinton delivered the commencement address at her alma mater, Wellesley College, Friday, 48 years after she was the school’s first-ever student commencement speaker when she graduated in 1969. In one of her most high-profile appearances since losing the presidential election, Clinton doled out biting criticism of President Trump’s tumultuous administration, albeit without mentioning him by name. Pointedly, she referenced the political climate at the time of her 1969 speech, when “we were furious about the past presidential election of a man whose presidency would end with disgrace with his impeachment for obstruction of justice, after he fired the man running the investigation into him at the Department of Justice.” This reference to Richard Nixon’s Watergate scandal was an apparent connection to Trump, who sparked a firestorm by suddenly firing James Comey as FBI director earlier this month (although Nixon resigned before he was actually impeached).
$10K bill for getting car stuck in newly poured concrete
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — A driver could be facing a $10,000 bill after he plowed into newly poured concrete in Lincoln, Nebraska, and became stuck.
US science agency: Selfies with seal pups a no
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — U.S. officials are warning people not to take selfies with seals, no matter how tempting.
Swan statue stolen by naked man has been found in Florida
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LAKELAND, Fla. (AP) — A large, black-and-white checkered statue of a swan that was stolen in Florida by a naked man was found on Friday.
A day for Africans to rise
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Across Africa on May 25, thousands of people celebrated Africa Day, an event first marked in 1963 to honor the continent’s liberation from colonial powers. The day was dubbed “Africans Rising,” which hints at both its optimism and its grass-roots nature. “Let this be the day that Africa starts having conversations of change with itself,” said Mildred Ngesa of Peace pen Communications in Kenya.
Trump at NATO: How Manchester delayed alliance's reckoning with Russia
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The horrendous terrorist attack in Manchester this week gave a tragic assist to President Trump’s hopes of escaping, with a nine-day overseas trip, Washington’s focus on all things Russian. In these experts’ view, the diversion represents a failure to recognize that Vladimir Putin’s Russia and groups like the Islamic State are both adversaries of the Western liberal order – two peas in the same anti-Western pod, so to speak. Recommended: How much do you know about NATO?
Montana election victory is also a warning for Republicans
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Montana’s wild election for an open US House seat is in the history books. Recommended: What do you know about Donald Trump? “There’s no question that the House is in play” in the midterms, says GOP strategist Ford O’Connell.
How artists can heal – and heal others – after tragedy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The American rock band Eagles of Death Metal was performing on stage at the Bataclan, a Paris club, when gunmen opened fire. “Music is important … It’s a talisman for helping those people heal, ” said Josh Homme, the band’s drummer, in a recent HBO documentary about their return to Paris. The documentary, “Eagles of Death Metal: Nos Amis (Our Friends),” captures an emotional journey after the attacks for the band and fans.
19 Chic All
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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14 Bikinis That Will Help You Slay Your Beach Style
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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4 Foolproof Ways to Repair Your Damaged Hair
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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15 Salad Recipes That Will Complete Your Summer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
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This Video of a Mom Acting Like Her Toddler Will Have You Crying/Laughing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
For every mom who's been jumped on by toddler at 6 a.m., this one's for you.
The Pay Gap for Moms is Even Worse Than Women In General
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
File this under depressing, but not surprising, news.
These Raw Photos of a Mom Delivering Her Preemie Are a Reminder of How Powerful Birth Really Is
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
"I know that I did everything I could at that time to help bring our girl into the world."
Ancient Hunter Gatherers And Farmers Had Children Together, Study Finds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Previous research said the two groups did not intermix.
A Very Confusing Makeup Guide for Field Scientists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It’s called McMurdo Station, and it’s fully equipped with a bunch of laboratories, three harrowing aircraft runways literally made of ice and compacted snow, a couple of bars, and an interfaith chapel. In the summer, the place is teeming with “field scientists” — folks who trade in their lab coats for immersion survival suits or headlamps or affectionately nicknamed “Big Red” parkas (yup, the same ones you see everywhere on the streets of New York) to investigate what’s happening in the great outdoors. You might not think that field scientists all the way down at McMurdo Station care about how they look.
Sweet Therapy: Chocolate May Help Prevent Irregular Heartbeat
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Eating chocolate has been linked with a reduced risk of heart disease and stroke, and now a new study from Denmark suggests that regular consumption of the treat may help to prevent the development of atrial fibrillation, a type of irregular heartbeat. Researchers found that adults in the study who ate chocolate at least once a month — or more frequently than that — had rates of atrial fibrillation that were 10 to 20 percent lower than those who ate chocolate less than once a month, according to the findings published today (May 23) in the journal Heart. Atrial fibrillation is a condition in which the heart's two upper chambers, known as the atria, do not beat at the same pace as the heart's two lower chambers, resulting in an irregular heartbeat.
How whales went from just big to absolutely enormous
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Blue whales are among the biggest creatures on the planet today. But a few million years ago, they were practically petite. Scientists think they know why these whales gained so much weight. Environmental changes likely altered the distribution of whales' food supplies in a way that rewarded gargantuan creatures, a new study found. That likely prompted blue whales to balloon ten-fold, from roughly 10 feet long to their present size of up to 100 feet. SEE ALSO: Dozens of humpback whales have died in the last year and nobody knows why Scientists traced the transformation of whale sizes back nearly 30 million years. They found that very large whales only appeared along several branches of the family tree some 2 million to 3 million years ago, according to a study published this week in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.  "We live in a time of giants," Jeremy Goldbogen, an author of the paper and a marine biologist at Stanford University, said in a press release. Baleen whales, the filter-feeding beasts that include blue whales, "have never been this big, ever." Gonna get me some krill.Image: silverback films/bbcGoldbogen and colleagues from the University of Chicago and the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History measured more than 140 museum specimens of fossilized whales. Using a statistical model, they found that several distinct lineages of baleen whales developed independently of one another starting around 4.5 million years ago. "...All of a sudden — 'boom' — we see them get very big, like blue whales," Nicholas Pyenson, an author of the paper and the curator of fossil marine mammals at the Smithsonian, told the New York Times .  "It's like going from whales the size of minivans to longer than two school buses," he said. Their expansion coincided with the early development of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere, which likely changed the distribution of the tiny krill and plankton that whales eat. Up until then, the minuscule prey would've been fairly evenly distributed throughout the ocean. As filter feeders, whales can swallow swarms of crustaceans in a single massive gulp, but they were still only moderately large marine mammals. A blue whale, the largest vertebrate animal ever in the history of life, engulfs krill off the coast of California.Image: silverback films/bbcAs glaciers formed, however, run-off from the new ice caps would've washed nutrients into coastal waters at particular times of the year, boosting food supplies seasonally, instead of year-round. The Earth's cooling poles also affected ocean currents in a way that caused dense patches of prey to become more predominant. This all created a seafood feast for the whales. But it meant they had to travel farther and work harder to find each meal. Being large meant the whales could not only swallow more prey when they found it, but they could also migrate very long distances to sustain that all-you-can-eat feeding style. Researchers said the new findings on ancient whales could shed light on what's happening on the planet today.  Human-caused global warming is accelerating the thinning and retreating of sea ice, causing glaciers to melt at unprecedented rates, and warming and acidifying the oceans — not over the course of millennia, but mere centuries.  "With these rapid changes, does the ocean have the capacity to sustain several billion people and the world’s largest whales?" Pyenson said in a press release. "The clues to answer this question lie in our ability to learn from Earth’s deep past... embedded in the fossil record." WATCH: Man swims and frolics with a orca whale in the wild
Rocket Lab launches orbital
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rocket Lab has made history today, launching an orbital-class rocket to space from a private launch facility for the first time ever. The launch took place at 16:23 NZST (9:23 PM PT) on Thursday, using one of Rocket Lab's Electron rockets which took off from Rocket Lab Complex 1 in New Zealand.While the launch got the rocket up in the air and...
From 'Magic' Mushrooms to Meth: The ER Rates for Drug Users
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alcohol and marijuana may be the most commonly used recreational drugs in the world, but "magic" mushrooms appear to be the safest, a new survey finds. At the opposite end, the drug that resulted in the most emergency medical treatments was methamphetamine: Nearly 5 percent of the 1,500 people who reported using it said they wound up needing treatment, the Global Drug Survey found. The Global Drug Survey is a London-based research group that's focused on making drug use safer.
Boeing teams up with DARPA to create a new spaceplane
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The plane maker and secretive government agency are teaming up to make shooting satellites into orbit more like catching a flight home for the holidays, if your layover were in space, that is.
Monstrous cyclones churning over Jupiter's poles
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Monstrous cyclones are churning over Jupiter's poles, until now largely unexplored
Trump exalts ‘great win’ for candidate charged with assault
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
No other leader at the G-7 meeting mentioned Thursday’s GOP victory in Montana, so President Trump praised it himself.
Ohio hospital drops rule requiring women to wear pantyhose
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
AKRON, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio hospital system has rewritten its dress code to allow women to skip the pantyhose while wearing dresses and skirts at work.
Renovation on New Mexico church finds new visitors _ bees
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Two pastors renovating and working to reopen a historic New Mexico church found out they already had visitors — bees.
Chechnya's anti
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
By all accounts, Chechnya is a legal black hole. In the former rebel Russian republic, human rights monitors are murdered, women are terrorized for rejecting Islamic dress codes, and Kremlin-backed local strongman Ramzan Kadyrov acts out his personal fantasies as if it were his private stage. Recommended: Sochi, Soviets, and czars: How much do you know about Russia?