World News
IN SHORT
Saturday, October 20, 2018

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
Startup plans to launch small satellites from Virginia coast
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — A California-based startup has announced big plans to go small as it reaches into space, rocketing satellites the size of loaves of bread into orbit from Virginia.
China Wants Its Own X
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But spaceplanes come with certain liabilities.
The Making a Murderer Filmmakers on How Steven Avery's New Lawyer Changes Everything
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Filmmakers Moira Demos and Laura Ricciardi on how they used season 2 to responded to criticisms of Marking a Murderer's first season.
NASA puts out the call for science and technology payloads made for the moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA is following up on its plan to purchase rides on commercial lunar landers by soliciting ideas for the scientific and technological payloads to put on them. Those payloads could be flying to the moon as early as next year, NASA said today in its announcement of a program known as Lunar Surface Instrument and Technology Payloads. Somewhere between $24 million and $36 million would be available for the first round of payloads, with eight to 12 payloads expected to be selected. “We are looking for ways to not only conduct lunar science but to also use the moon as… Read More
'My Kind of Guy.' President Trump Praises Montana Congressman Who Assaulted a Reporter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Any guy that can do a body slam — he's my kind of guy," the President said at a rally
New moon: China to launch lunar lighting in outer space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
China is planning to launch its own 'artificial moon' by 2020 to replace streetlamps and lower electricity costs in urban areas, state media reported Friday. Chengdu, a city in southwestern Sichuan province, is developing "illumination satellites" which will shine in tandem with the real moon, but are eight times brighter, according to China Daily. The first man-made moon will launch from Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Sichuan, with three more to follow in 2022 if the first test goes well, said Wu Chunfeng, head of Tian Fu New Area Science Society, the organization responsible for the project.
MBS Says the Saudi Consulate in Turkey Is 'Sovereign Territory.' He's Wrong.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mohammed bin Salman said the Istanbul consulate in the case of Jamal Khashoggi was "sovereign territory." Here's why he was wrong.
My Kind of Guy.' President Trump Praises Montana Congressman Who Assaulted a Reporter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump defended Republican Greg Gianforte at a rally in Montana on Thursday, after the congressman pleaded guilty to assaulting a reporter last year.
Europe's set to blast off to Mercury – here's the rocket science
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It will take more energy to get the BebiColombo spacecraft inro a stable orbit around Mercury than it would to send it all the way to Pluto.
'Outside agitators,' a phrase from the civil rights era, resurfaces in Georgia governor's race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Republican Brian Kemp, in a tight race with Democrat Stacey Abrams for Georgia governor, resurrects the civil rights era charge that “outside agitators” are behind her campaign.
Georgia's fraught history with 'outsiders' shapes a tight governor's race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The race for governor of Georgia, which rarely attracts much national interest, is suddenly exciting this year, with a charismatic Democratic candidate in Stacey Abrams facing off against a standard-issue Southern Republican, Brian Kemp.
Reporter's Notebook: On edge of Sahara, camel is what's for dinner
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Discerning taste buds in the West may be unfamiliar with camel meat. Perhaps what gives pause is the thought of converting ornery camels – the working end of long, grimy caravans that have crossed deserts for centuries – into delicacies of the table. “It’s mostly Americans who always eat the camel,” says Mr. Mahamane, the head of the kitchen, whose clients range from a University of Chicago crew of dinosaur hunters – in Agadez en route to launching a two-month desert expedition – to European Union military advisers, who passed through recently.
Identity politics on the ropes in Iraq?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In a region rife with identity politics arising from ethnic and religious differences, Iraqis experienced something very universal in early October. A newly designated prime minister, Adel Abdul Mahdi, launched a website asking Iraqis to apply for top government ministers. Mr. Mahdi’s extraordinary move was quite contrary to a tradition in Iraq of politicians forming cabinets in backroom deals based on a power-sharing quota among the country’s three major communities: Shiites, Sunnis, and Kurds.
After charity sex
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
When Katie Meyler opened the tuition-free “More Than Me” school for girls in a smart green and white house in the center of Liberia’s capital in 2013, it seemed to many both here and abroad a perfect match. “More Than Me is designed specifically to help young women choose the lives they wish to lead,” explained a 2015 profile of Ms. Meyler in The Christian Science Monitor. Over a period of several years, one of the charity’s key founding staff members, Macintosh Johnson, allegedly had raped or assaulted as many as dozens of girls in its care.
California Principal Apologizes for Sending Email Warning About a Black Man at Starbucks
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A San Diego school principal apologized this week for sending an email to parents about a black man that perpetuated racist stereotypes.
European Council President Says There Is Not Enough Progress On Brexit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
European Council President Says There Is Not Enough Progress On Brexit
Europe, Japan ready spacecraft for 7
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BERLIN (AP) — Final preparations were underway Friday for the launch of a joint mission by European and Japanese space agencies to send twin probes to Mercury, the closest planet to the sun.
Driver Fatally Shoots North Carolina State Trooper During a Traffic Stop
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A North Carolina state trooper was shot and killed after pulling over a pickup truck on suspicion of speeding.
The T Rex’s tiny baby arms might have been way more useful than they seem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Running into a Tyrannosaurus rex in the wild would have been a truly frightening thing for just about any animal that roamed the earth between 65 million and 80 million years ago, and for an obvious reason. The mighty meat-eater was huge in size and had a mouth built to turn bones into powder. If it snagged you with its jaws you were probably going to have a bad time, but nobody was afraid of its puny little arms... or were they? As Live Science reports, a new study presented at a recent meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology took a close look at how T. rex's arms would have functioned, and it makes some bold predictions. Just how T. rex used its arms and for what purpose has been hotly debated for years and years. Some believe the arms didn't do much of anything, while others have suggested that the tiny limbs flailed wildly with sharp claws that could have seriously injured prey or foes. This latest round of research approaches things from a different angle, seeking to determine the range of movement of the arms as a clue to their usefulness. The researchers studied the limbs of two distant modern relatives, the alligator and turkey, for hints. What the team concluded is that the T. rex could likely have turned its hands inward if it wanted to, and it may have used its arms to hold prey in place or pull it closer. The idea here is that the T. rex knew its jaws were its most potent weapon and so it used its arms to keep prey at the perfect biting distance. We'll of course never know for sure unless we could somehow watch a T. rex or similar upright carnivore find a meal, but the researchers are confident in what the fossils and modern animals tell them about how the dinosaur could move its limbs.
Turkish Official Says Jamal Khashoggi's Remains May Have Been Taken Outside Istanbul
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Investigators are looking into the possibility that missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi's remains may have been taken out of Istanbul
Is the GOP facing a 'thumping' or 'shellacking' — or can it pull off an escape?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In 2006 President George W. Bush called it a “thumping.” In 2010 President Barack Obama compared it to a “shellacking.” If the polls and prognostications are correct and Republicans end up losing the House on Nov. 6, how will President Trump describe the experience? It’s worth asking after the week Trump’s GOP just had. For months now forecasters have given Democrats a better chance than Republicans of running the next House of Representatives.
How Stacey Abrams has gotten within one point of Georgia governor’s mansion
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
With one point separating her and Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp, Abrams could very well become not only the first black governor of Georgia, but the first black woman in America to ever lead a state. The razor-tight race has been accompanied by record early voting, national scrutiny, and heated controversy.
Dr. Leana Wen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fighting the Politics of Medicine
Water woes as drought leaves Germany's Rhine shallow
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Months of drought have left water levels on Germany's Rhine river at a record low, exposing a World War II bomb and forcing ship operators to halt services to prevent vessels from running aground. The water level on the Rhine on Friday reached just 77 centimetres (30 inches), 4 cm below a previous record low of 81 cm recorded in 2003, Cologne's waterworks authorities said. Although rainfall is expected next week, forecasters said it would not suffice to bring up water levels in Germany's most important waterway and a key shipping route for the Netherlands and France.
Carrots could be key to making greener buildings, say researchers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A group of researchers at Britain's Lancaster University has been using a household food blender to mix particles from the root vegetable with concrete to see if they can produce a stronger and more environmentally sound product.     "We found out you could increase the strength of concrete by 80 percent by using a small amount of this new material," lead researcher Mohamed Saafi told Reuters. The addition of carrots prevent any cracks in the concrete, the team said. It also means less cement is required, therefore lowering the global carbon dioxide (CO2) output.
Former U.K. Prime Minister Says Electing Women Could Help Combat Wave of Populism
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Women are the answer to rising populism and extremism in the U.K., according to the country's former Prime Minster John Major.
'Skullduggery': Washington think tank says 'no' to Saudi funds
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A prominent Washington think tank will stop taking money from Saudi Arabia as a result of the apparent murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, its chairman said.
The Bracing Honesty of Kiese Laymon’s Memoir Heavy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Kiese Laymon's memoir 'Heavy' explores his relationship with his mother while growing up as a black man in Mississippi.
Scientists in Chile unveil 'A Cosmic Titan' cluster of galaxies
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hyperion has a mass 1 million billion times greater than the sun and is so distant that it is viewed from earth as it looked billions of years ago. "Hyperion is like 5,000 galaxies of the Milky Way", astronomer Steffen Miefke, the chief of operations for the European Southern Observatory, told Reuters. The ESO operates the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, which detected Hyperion.
President Trump Threatens Mexico If Caravan of 4,000 Honduran Migrants Reaches U.S. Border
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As about 4,000 Hondurans made their way through Guatemala, attention — and pressure — turned to Mexico Thursday, after U.S.
In new book, a White House correspondent takes the Trump presidency seriously
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
A new book by veteran CBS News journalist Major Garrett — “Mr. Trump’s Wild Ride” — examines President Trump's legacy.
Red brother vs. blue brother
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Midterm races are fertile territories for family feuds.
93 More Women Accuse Former USC Gynecologist George Tyndall of Sexual Misconduct
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Ninety-three more women have accused former University of Southern California gynecologist George Tyndall of sexual misconduct in two new lawsuits filed against the doctor and the school, according to their lawyer.
An Australian Woman Has Been Charged After Faking Cancer to Raise Money
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
She allegedly raised tens of thousands of dollars for a fraudulent GoFundMe page
Joe Biden, 75, Says His Age Would Be a 'Legitimate Issue' If He Runs for President
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"They're gonna judge me on my vitality"
WHO says Zika risk low in Pacific ahead of Meghan visit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
As Prince Harry and his expectant wife Meghan prepare to tour Fiji and Tonga next week, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has declared the risk of contracting Zika virus in the Pacific nations is low. The British royals, currently in Australia, arranged their trip before Meghan's pregnancy was known, sparking fears she and her unborn baby could be vulnerable in the island nations, where Zika is officially listed as a risk.
The world’s biggest organism is facing its end
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
At first glance, Pando is unimpressive. If you aren’t looking for it, you could easily drive past the homogenous forest of stems ranging from a few inches to some 100 feet (about 30 meters) tall—the biggest they appear more like trunks—all with matching leaves, on one of the few roads leading to Fish Lake in…
No, Elizabeth Warren: DNA Testing Can’t Tell You Who You Are, and Here’s Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Over-generalization can be dangerous. Read More...
Man rescued from Arizona mine lucky to survive fall, snakes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona man who fell to the bottom of an old abandoned gold mine shaft, broke both his legs, fought off a trio of rattlesnakes and went two days without food or water before a friend heard his cries for help is lucky to be alive, said the head of a rescue team.
Eating Fish May Help Keep You Healthy Into Old Age, Study Says
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Thanks to omega-3 fatty acids
Breaching dams to save Northwest orcas is contentious issue
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention.
President Donald Trump Wants to Stop the Caravan. Here's What Experts Think Would Help
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For the second year in a row, President Donald Trump is upset about a caravan of Central American migrants headed to the United States.
Justice Department Opens Investigation of Catholic Church Sex Abuse in Pennsylvania
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Confidential files and testimony from church leaders have been subpoenaed
Saudi Lobbying in the U.S. Has Tripled Since Trump Took Office
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Lobbying from Saudi Arabia has tripled since President Trump took office
How life changes when you're 11 years old and arrested for murder
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jordan Brown, now 21, shares the conditions he faced after his arrest at age 11 for murder and his life today after his conviction was overturned.
Trump praises Gianforte, recounting his assault on reporter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
"Never wrestle him," Trump said of the Montana Congressman who pleaded guilty to physically assaulting a reporter.
Nebraska's message for tourists? 'It's not for everyone'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska's no longer nice, at least in its next tourism campaign. The new sales pitch has a decidedly self-deprecating bent: "Nebraska. Honestly, it's not for everyone."
Man who fell into Arizona mine 'fortunate' to survive
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona man who fell to the bottom of an old abandoned mine shaft, broke both his legs, fought off a trio of rattlesnakes and went two days without food or water before a friend heard his cries for help is lucky to be alive, said the head of a rescue team.
Donald Trump Didn't Really Win 52% of White Women in 2016
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The idea that a majority of white women voted for the President has shaped national narratives. The only problem? It's probably wrong.
Melania Trump Visits Newborn Victims of Opioid Crisis Following Plane Malfunction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
First lady Melania Trump is touring an intensive care unit at a Philadelphia hospital to learn about the care being given to newborns suffering from opiate withdrawal.