World News
IN SHORT
Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Channels
frontpage
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business

Latest
Overview
world
entertainment
odd news
politics
science
technology
health
sports
business
AD
John McCain Says His Health Care Vote Wasn’t Personal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I was raised in the concept and belief that duty, honor, country is the lodestar for the behavior that we have to exhibit every single day," McCain said.
Palestinian Kills Three Israelis in a Settlement Near Jerusalem
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It was one of the deadliest attacks in a two-year spate of violence
Pat Tillman's Widow Says Her Husband's Service 'Should Never be Politicized'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Tillman walked away from the NFL to join the Army after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. He was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan in 2004
Protesters Got Dragged Out of a Hearing on the Republican Health Care Repeal Bill
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Senate is headed toward a last-ditch repeal vote this week
Microsoft Billionaire Bill Gates Doesn't Understand Quantum Computing, Either
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Quantum computing is like 'hieroglyphics' for Bill Gates. Current Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has trouble perfectly explaining the concept, too, Gates said.
Evacuations from Bali volcano swell to more than 57,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
BALI, Indonesia (AP) — More than 57,000 people have fled the surrounds of Mount Agung volcano on the Indonesian tourist island of Bali, fearing an imminent eruption, officials said Tuesday.
Trump defends NFL tweets amid Puerto Rico crisis: 'I have plenty of time on my hands'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
President Trump defended sending a barrage of tweets berating professional athletes as Puerto Rico reels in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.
Hurricane Maria coverage revives old questions about Puerto Rico’s status
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
The U.S. media coverage of Hurricane Maria has resurrected old conversations about Puerto Rico’s relationship with the United States.
Trump says Puerto Rico aid is ‘doing well’ as island faces crisis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Abi de la Paz de la Cruz, 3, holds a gas can as she waits in line with her family, to get fuel from a gas station, in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Monday, Sept. 25, 2017. The U.S. ramped up its response Monday to the humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico while the Trump administration sought to blunt criticism that its response to Hurricane Maria has fallen short of it efforts in Texas and Florida after the recent hurricanes there. President Trump took time out from his ongoing Twitter tirade against the NFL on Monday night to tweet about the crisis in Puerto Rico, but his message struck some people as tone deaf.
Convenience store disputes claim of maggots in sandwich
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
EWING, N.J. (AP) — A convenience store chain is challenging a man's claim that he found maggots in a sandwich he ordered from a store in New Jersey.
Velcro's video implores consumers to say 'hook and loop'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Lots of pop songs have hooks. This one has loops, too.
The fantasy photo booth: in South Sudan, using pictures as 'vacation' from war
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
In a bright and boxy photo studio in South Sudan’s capital, an industrial printer is spitting out a glossy stack of exotic vacation snapshots. Recommended: Think you know Africa? “Couches, grand pianos, far away houses – these are the things people most like to have the backgrounds in their pictures,” says Tsedeke Abebaw, the owner of On Time Photo Studios in downtown Juba, barely glancing up from the computer screen in front of him.
Mexico earthquake: How one girl came to represent hope – and distrust
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For two days after Mexico’s 7.1 earthquake toppled scores of buildings, killing what’s now believed to be nearly 300 people, the country was captivated by the story of Frida Sofía, a 12-year-old on the brink of a miraculous rescue. Frida Sofía didn’t exist. Recommended: How much do you know about Mexico?
An artistic lift after disasters
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
After a hurricane, earthquake, or a terrorist attack, artists and performers are usually not first responders. A good example was Telemundo’s four-hour telethon on Sept. 24 that brought out stars such as Jennifer Lopez on behalf of the victims of hurricanes Maria, Harvey, Irma, as well as the Mexican earthquakes. “The healing power of the arts is a real thing,” says Jake Speck, executive director of Houston’s A.D. Players.
Obamacare Repeal Is on Life Support. These 5 Senators Could Decide Its Fate
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Congress is facing a looming vote on repealing Obamacare that will be decided by a handful of key Republicans. Here are 5 senators to watch.
Need To Adapt May Not Have Caused Brain Evolution
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A popular theory, called the cognitive buffer hypothesis, says large brains were a result of the need to quickly cope with frequent or unexpected changes to the environment.
What a Roy Moore Win Could Mean for Washington
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On Tuesday, Alabamians will cast ballots in a highly anticipated primary election
Lone Steelers Player Who Stood During the National Anthem: 'I Feel Embarrassed'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I threw my teammates under the bus, unintentionally"
President Trump and Republicans Are Planning Big Tax Cuts for the Rich and Corporations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It would be the first major tax overhaul in three decades
Can This Tesla Alum Build the World’s Greenest Battery?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A planned electric vehicle battery factory in Sweden wants to incorporate green energy and mineral sourcing practices to make a super-green car.
Archaeologists Solve Mystery Of How Easter Island's Tiny Population Built Hundreds Of Statues
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
“It appears the island could have supported 17,500 people at its peak, which represents the upper end of the range of previous estimates,” said Cedric Puleston, lead author of the study, based at the Department of Anthropology at the University of California, in a statement. “Despite its almost complete isolation, the inhabitants of Easter Island created a complicated social structure and these amazing works of art before a dramatic change occurred,” Puleston added. “We examined detailed maps, took soil samples around the Island, placed weather stations, used population models and estimated sweet potato production.
President Trump Says Hurricane
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Millions could be without power for months
Roger Stone: Manafort's mood 'amazingly good' despite coming indictment
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Yahoo News interviews Roger Stone, President Trump’s longtime political adviser, about the expected indictment of Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and Stone’s upcoming appearance before the House Intelligence Committee.
Hillary Clinton: I'm not sure Trump knows that Puerto Ricans are American citizens
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In a town hall event Monday night, the former presidential candidate took issue with Trump’s priorities as he devoted more attention to protesting athletes than to the condition of millions on Puerto Rico.
Titanic 'fatberg' of congealed waste clogs Baltimore sewer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BALTIMORE (AP) — A gigantic glob of congealed fat, wet wipes and other waste — deemed a "fatberg" because of its iceberg-like size — has been blamed for a sewer overflow in Baltimore.
Man claims he found maggots in convenience store sandwich
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
EWING, N.J. (AP) — A man claims he found maggots in a sandwich he ordered from a convenience store in New Jersey.
Pioneering nerve treatment gives man in vegetative state signs of consciousness for first time in 15 years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A 35-year-old man who had been in a vegetative state for 15 years is showing signs of consciousness after receiving a pioneering treatment based on nerve stimulation. In the month since a vagus nerve stimulator was put into his chest, the man, who was injured in a car accident, has begun responding to simple orders that had been impossible before. The findings reported in Current Biology may help to show that by stimulating the vagus nerve "it is possible to improve a patient's presence in the world", according to lead researcher Angela Sirigu of Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod in Lyon, France. The researchers say it may challenge the view that a vegetative state which lasts for more than 12 months is irreversible. "Other scientists have hailed it as "a potentially very exciting finding" but have also urged caution. Images show how brain stimulation in the patient changed Credit:  Corazzol et al/PA After treatment, it was reported the patient could follow an object with his eyes, turn his head on request and his mother said there was an improved ability to stay awake when listening to his therapist reading a book. The vagus nerve connects the brain to many other parts of the body, including the gut. It is known to be important in waking, alertness, and many other essential functions. The patient, who was picked because he had been lying in a vegetative state for more than a decade with no sign of improvement, also appeared to react to a "threat". Researchers spotted that he reacted with surprise by opening his eyes wide when the examiner's head suddenly approached his face. Changes in brain activity may show that he had shifted from being in a vegetative state to being a state of minimal consciousness. An important signal in distinguishing between these conditions increased significantly in areas of the brain involved in movement, sensation, and awareness, according to the scientists. Gains were also spotted in the brain's functional connectivity, metabolic activity in both cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. The researchers are now planning a large collaborative study. Dr Tom Manly of Cambridge University's MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, described it as a "potentially very exciting finding". He added: "It is very important to take into account that the patient moved from a vegetative to a minimally conscious state. That is, consciousness remains severely altered but, in contrast to the vegetative state, there is minimal but definite behavioural evidence of self or environmental awareness. "The finding is therefore in my view an exciting preliminary indication that prolonged intervention could produce benefits that further work will no doubt address. "In my view it would be fair to say that this treatment could potentially restore consciousness in some patients in a vegetative state, rather than that it can." Roland Jones, professor in neuropharmacology at the University of Bath, said: "These results need to be repeated in other patients with long-term vegetative conditions to confirm the findings. "If they can be, this treatment could complement a growing range of pharmacological approaches (eg: low doses of the anti-anxiety drug, zolpidem) that have been shown to partially reverse vegetative states and restore both motor and cognitive function in some cases."
Roger Stone accuses House intel panel of 'cowardice' for insisting on closed
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In a feisty statement to be delivered to the House Intelligence Committee, Roger Stone, President Trump’s longtime political adviser, denies any collusion with Russia during last year’s presidential election and accuses panel members of “cowardice” for insisting that he testify behind closed doors rather than in a public session.
Mac OS High Sierra makes the Mac a teeny, tiny bit better — for free
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, technology
Mac OS High Sierra (macOS 10.13). As the new name suggests, it’s just a refinement of last year’s Mac OS Sierra. In fact, you could sum up what's new in an article about as short as this one.
Has This Happened Before? 6 Things to Know About the History Behind NFL Protests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"Why is 'The Star-Spangled Banner' part of sporting events?" and 5 other questions
Extinct Big
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Initially, the scientists calculated the bite force in small "Pac-Man" frogs, also known as South American horned frogs. Then, the researchers scaled up their findings to determine bite force in an extinct relative, a giant, armored amphibian known as Beelzebufo ampinga, or "devil frog," that lived about 65 million to 70 million years ago. The scientists' findings showed that the extinct devil frog would have had a vise-like mouth grip even more powerful than that found in living horned frogs.
Nobel Foundation increases cash award for prizes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One week before the announcement of the 2017 Nobel prizes begins, the Nobel Foundation said Monday that this year's winners will receive a larger monetary award worth over a million dollars. "The Board of Directors of the Nobel Foundation decided at its meeting on September 14 that the 2017 Nobel Prize will amount to SEK 9 million ($1.1 million, 944.000 euros) per prize category," the private institution based in Stockholm said in a statement. In 2012, the cash award was reduced by 20 percent to 8 million krona from the 10 million krona which had been awarded since 2001 in order not to put the foundation's capital at risk long term, it said at the time.
Australian space agency plans are about to lift off
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Unlike most other developed nations, Australia doesn’t have one.
One week on, jittery Mexico far from coming to grips with quake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A week after an earthquake that killed more than 300 people, a shaken Mexico was torn Tuesday between trying to get back to normal and keeping up an increasingly hopeless search for survivors. Improbably, it hit just two hours after an annual earthquake drill, turning Mexico City's most seismically unstable neighborhoods into something out of a post-apocalyptic movie. Scores more were killed in the states of Morelos, Puebla, Mexico, Guerrero and Oaxaca.
Locals take on China's invasion of Africa's biggest economy: 'They're like Goliath, we're David'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
In Nigeria, a scrappy local company is trying to crack the smartphone market, which is dominated by a foreign behemoth. This is the story of the upstart AfriOne and the Chinese-based Tecno.
People Were Convinced Justin Trudeau's Photographer Was Actually Prince Harry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The video is pretty hilarious
14 Things Flight Attendants Know About Flying — and You Probably Don't
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
You really should avoid the water
In a Landmark First, the U.S. Marines Now Has a Female Infantry Officer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The lieutenant is the first woman to completed the grueling 13-week course
Satellite photos show Puerto Rico went dark after Hurricane Maria
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When Hurricane Maria's Category 4 winds roared across Puerto Rico last week, it left the U.S. territory and its 3.4 million residents nearly entirely without power.  It's possible that parts of Puerto Rico could be without electricity for months, due in part to the hurricane's diagonal track across the entire island. The darkness that has fallen on the island is so prevalent that it's even visible in photos of the territory taken from space.  SEE ALSO: Photos from Puerto Rico reveal the devastating power of Hurricane Maria A nighttime photo taken of Puerto Rico from space on September 25 shows most of the island has gone completely dark. This is particularly apparent when this picture is compared to images taken prior to the storm, which show the bright lights of cities around the island. Image: noaa Image: noaa The power failure isn't the only problem facing Puerto Rico. Communications are also hobbled. According to reporting from the Associated Press, 1,360 of Puerto Rico's 1,600 cell phone towers are no longer in service.  While the power outages across the island are devastating, they aren't a surprise.  The Suomi NPP satellite generated this "before/after" image of visible lights in #PuertoRico early this morning (9/25/17) vs. (7/24/17) pic.twitter.com/V7vjMNDgOV — NOAA Satellites PA (@NOAASatellitePA) September 25, 2017 Governor Ricardo Rossello reportedly predicted that 100 percent of the island would be without power after Maria. The territory's aging infrastructure is in part to blame for the widespread outages. The storm is the worst to hit the island in modern memory, and now, the territory is facing months or even years of rebuilding.  WATCH: This is how hurricanes are named
Botanical gardens a lifeboat for threatened plants
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Botanical gardens are a Noah's Ark for endangered plants, collectively safeguarding four out of 10 species known to face extinction, researchers said Monday. Species diversity is far richer in the tropics, but more than 90 percent of vegetal safe havens are in the northern hemisphere. "The global network of botanical gardens is our best hope for saving some of the world's most endangered plants," said senior author Samuel Brockington, a researcher at the University of Cambridge in England.
'Those Kids Have Every Right to Protest.' 97
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
"I'm trying to say that you have to love everybody"
Anthony Weiner Is Going to Prison for Sexting Scandal
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He broke down in tears when the sentence was announced
How Russian Voters Fueled the Rise of Germany's Far
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russian emigrees and Kremlin influence helped steer the anti-migrant Alternative for Deutschland party into the Bundestag
Republicans Throw Money at Reluctant Senators Amid Last
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Yet it could still prove impossible to change the Affordable Care Act
UW center targets moonshots in materials science with $15.6 million federal grant
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The University of Washington has received a $15.6 million, six-year grant from the National Science Foundation to fund its Molecular Engineering Materials Center and take on “moonshots” that could lead to cleaner energy, advanced light-based electronics and quantum computing. The grant was awarded as part of the NSF’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center program, or MRSEC. Funding was provided to continue work at six MRSEC centers and start up three more centers, including UW’s. UW’s center brings together an initial team of 15 faculty members, including researchers who work at the university’s Clean Energy Institute and Molecular Engineering and… Read More
North Korea Says Trump's Latest Threat Is a 'Declaration of War'
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It also said it has the right to shoot down U.S. bombers
This Photo of MLK Kneeling Has New Power Amid the NFL Protests. Here’s the Story Behind It
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He was leading a group of protesters in prayer
These are the horrifying things a nuclear war would do to the planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The bomb blasts themselves would be devastating, but firestorms and radioactivity would do even more damage, says Jurica Dujmovic.
Pro Racer Dale Earnhardt Jr. Sides With NFL Players Protesting Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After NASCAR owners threaten to fire protesting drivers
Ford Turns to Students for the Future of Truck Design
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The company wants to challenge existing notions of what makes a good pickup.