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Making Sense of the Different CBO Healthcare Plan Scores
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Republican plans to overhaul health insurance seem to change almost every day. So it's understandable if you feel confused about how it all might affect you. There is plenty of information. But i...
Make Right Now Your Best Age Ever!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Psychologist Dr. Robi Ludwig joins The Doctors with tips to make your milestone birthdays amazing instead of miserable.
Are You Ready for End of Life Decisions?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
In spite of this, “60 percent end up dying in a hospital,” says ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork. Filmmaker Dan Krauss and Palliative Care Specialist Dr. Jessica Zitter join The Doctors to discuss the film and the hard choices dying patients and their families face. “We are so uncomfortable talking about end-of-life care in this country,” Dr. Stork says.
Teen with Mysterious Pain Returns
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Casey was suffering from “psychogenic pain.” Anxiety “flipped on” the pain signals in his brain. “My hopes are for Casey to be back in school and on the baseball team,” Alan told Casey and The Doctors. Alan visits a batting cage with Casey – an activity that once caused him severe pain.
Add Vinegar to Your Salad Dressing to Slim Down!
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Salad dressing makes it easier, and tastier, to eat your healthy greens. But it can also be loaded with calories. Use a simple hack to make your salads less fattening!
Kim Kardashian's Belly Button Makeover
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Reality and social media star Kim Kardashian has opened up about a recent cosmetic procedure – not to her face or her world-famous derriere, but her belly button! Kim explains to her social media followers that pregnancy left her bellybutton looking a little different and she wanted it restored to its former splendor, so she visited cosmetic surgeon Dr. Simon Ourian. “It’s actually called a belly-button lift,” he says.
Tour the International Space Station With Google Street View
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A gravity-free Google Street View has landed…on the International Space Station (ISS). The search engine on Thursday announced that anyone can now see inside the ISS using its popular map tool, Street View. Launched in 2007, the technology feature in Google Maps and Google Earth provides 360-degree views from different positions—previously limited to streets around the world.
Evolution: Brains and Grandchildren Drove Emergence of Menopause in Women
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Why this is has long baffled scientists, with many evolutionary theories as to why women go through menopause emerging over the years. One of the most prominent theories is known as the grandmother hypothesis. This says that as the cost of reproduction increases with age, resources become better spent in helping current offspring to reproduce themselves—to help rear grandchildren, for example.
What Would You Say To An Extraterrestrial?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists have a plan for responding to signals from a planet outside our solar system: Keep calm and send dog videos.
We still have no idea why humans speak over 7,000 languages
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The thatched roof held back the sun’s rays, but it could not keep the tropical heat at bay. As everyone at the research workshop headed outside for a break, small groups splintered off to gather in the shade of coconut trees and enjoy a breeze. I wandered from group to group, joining in the discussions.…
Researchers in Cambodia find nest of rare riverine bird
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) — Wildlife researchers in Cambodia have found a breeding location for the masked finfoot, one of the world's most endangered birds, raising hopes of its continuing survival.
This mud volcano has been erupting for more than a decade — and scientists are still puzzled about the cause
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The world’s most destructive mud volcano was born near the town of Sidoarjo, on the island of Java, Indonesia, just over 11 years ago – and to this day it has not stopped erupting. The mud volcano known as Lusi started on May 29, 2006, and at its peak disgorged a staggering 180,000 cubic metres of mud every day, burying villages in mud up to 40 metres thick. The worst event of its kind in recorded history, the eruption took 13 lives and destroyed the homes of 60,000 people.
Neil Armstrong's moon bag sells for $1.8 million at auction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By Taylor Harris NEW YORK (Reuters) - A bag used by U.S. astronaut Neil Armstrong to bring the first samples of moon dust back to Earth was sold to an anonymous bidder for $1.8 million at an auction in New York on Thursday marking the 48th anniversary of the first moon landing. The bag, which for years sat unidentified in a box at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, was bought by a person who bid by telephone and did not wish to be named publicly, auctioneer Sotheby's said. Auctioneers had expected the bag to fetch between $2 million and $4 million.
Builder of illegal LA mansion gets fines, community service
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The father of fashion models Bella and Gigi Hadid has been fined and given community service for illegally building a gigantic mansion in Los Angeles.
New librarian finds live Civil War
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
CARLISLE, Mass. (AP) — A Massachusetts librarian on her first day on the job has come across live military shells from the Civil War inside a closet in her new office.
The Battle for the Moon Begins
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
An increasing number of nations and companies are headed there. One group says the UN needs to start making more rules before it’s too late.
SpaceX plans to relaunch a rocket just 24 hours after it lands
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SpaceX, the pioneering force behind reusable rocket technology, has already proven to the world that single-use rockets will one day be a thing of the past, but the company clearly isn't done honing its recovery and refurbishing techniques. Head man, and possible future super hero sent back in time to usher humanity into a new technological golden age, Elon Musk revealed his company's plans for the immediate future of its first stage rocket reuse program. It seems that Musk has some seriously insane plans for shortening the turnaround between a rocket's launch recovery and its subsequent flights, and he wants the whole process to take less than 24 hours. Speaking at the ISS R&D event today, Musk spoke about SpaceX's targeted 24-hour turnaround time which he hopes to achieve as soon as 2018. He noted that the plans are already in place for making that epic feat a reality, and expanded on the notion that recovering the first stage of the rocket is really just the beginning. The fairing, which sits at the very top of the rocket and provides some aerodynamic stability while also offering protection of the payload as it launches into space, is a rather pricey piece of hardware. Coming in at between $5 million and $6 million, the component is potentially salvageable, and Musk revealed that SpaceX is getting closer than ever to landing and recovering the fairing for refurbishing as well. Likewise, the company plans on trying to recover the second stage of the rocket in certain circumstances as well, which would further reduce cost and speed up launch timelines.
USAF honored at 2017 Royal International Airshow Tattoo
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Fox Firepower: The US Air Force celebrated its 70th Birthday at the 2017 RIAT event, showing off a wide range of outstanding aircraft including the B-52 Stratofortress, B-2 bomber and the U-2 spy plane
Elon Musk clarifies that AI regulation should follow observation and insight
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Elon Musk made headlines over the weekend with comments calling for government controls around artificial intelligence, which he has said repeatedly he believes is an existential threat to humanity if left unchecked. Musk was at the International Space Station R&D conference today, and during a fireside chat explained more about his views on...
Congressman Asks NASA if There’s an Ancient Civilization on Mars. For Real
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Updated | A Republican congressman from California on Tuesday asked members of a NASA panel if there had been ancient civilizations on Mars. Addressing a NASA scientist testifying before the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, U.S. Representative Dana Rohrabacher said, “You have indicated that Mars was totally different thousands of years ago,” according to a video posted to YouTube. In his answer, Ken Farley, a project scientist on NASA’s Mars 2020 Rover mission team, corrected Rohrabacher by saying the evidence shows that Mars was different billions—not thousands—of years ago.
Apollo 11 bag laced with moon dust sells for $1.8 million
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
NEW YORK (AP) — A bag containing traces of moon dust sold for $1.8 million at an auction on Thursday following a galactic court battle.
A weird Florida mystery: Frozen pork falling from the sky
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Meat falling from the sky is weird, even by Florida standards.
Texas company recalls coffee with Viagra
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
GRAND PRAIRIE, Texas (AP) — A Texas coffee company is recalling one of its roasts because it was making some men a bit too excited.
Winning toilet paper gowns offered to brides
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
By Taylor Harris NEW YORK (Reuters) - A toilet paper wedding dress with 1,500 hand-cut butterflies made by a mother of two in her spare time won the $10,000 first prize in a quirky New York fashion competition on Thursday and a bride-in-need may have the chance to wear it down the aisle. Ripley's Believe It or Not!, which exhibits winning entries every year, is donating about 20 of the top gowns to brides whose plans were shattered by the sudden bankruptcy of wedding dressmaker Alfred Angelo last week. Kari Curletto said she spent three months on her submission "Quilted Enchantment," with its six-foot cathedral train.
McDonald's adds Big Mac onesie, sweatsuit to delivery items
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
OAK BROOK, Ill. (AP) — With McDonald's now offering a delivery service, the fast-food giant is looking to make customers comfortable eating at home with a new clothing line that includes an adult-size Big Mac onesie.
Presidential persuasion: So far, the art eludes Trump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Until this week Mr. Trump has been largely uninvolved in twisting arms and bending ears in an effort to win passage of the bill. In recent days Trump has thrown himself into lobbying for a health-care “win,” but his message has at times contradicted itself, while the bill teeters on the edge of extinction. The irony is that the image Trump has long sold – the dealmaker, the negotiator, and the guy who gets everybody in the room to “yes” – might be somebody America could really use at the moment.
She arrived in Senegal 43 years ago – and is still there working on social issues
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Two dozen men and women sit in a circle at a training center an hour’s drive from Dakar, the capital of Senegal. Molly Melching, a warm American in her 60s who is Tostan’s founder and chief executive officer, listens attentively as participants share what they’ve learned. With support from the Atlanta-based Carter Center, these individuals are learning about human rights at Tostan.
Abraham Lincoln mystery solved by enhanced tech
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers in the UK use enhanced 'N-Gram Tracing' to solve a longstanding mystery over a letter written during the Civil War
DeepMind’s founder says to build better computer brains, we need to look at our own
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In a review published in the journal Neuron today, Hassabis and three co-authors argue that the field of AI needs to reconnect to the world of neuroscience, and that it’s only by finding out more about natural intelligence can we truly understand (and create) the artificial kind. The review takes a tour through the history and future of AI, and points out where collaboration with the field of neuroscience has led to new discoveries. AI researchers will be inspired by what they learn about natural intelligence, while the task of “distilling intelligence into an algorithmic construct [could] yield insights into some of the deepest and most enduring mysteries of the mind.” How’s that for win-win?
Did A Dwarf Planet Crash Into Mars?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Why does Mars look so weird? A dwarf planet may have crashed into it as it was forming, and threw everything out of whack.
World's plastic waste could bury Manhattan 2 miles deep
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
WASHINGTON (AP) — Industry has made more than 9.1 billion tons of plastic since 1950 and there's enough left over to bury Manhattan under more than two miles of trash, according to a new cradle-to-grave global study.
Tomb Of King Tutankhamun’s Wife’s Likely Discovered, Archaeologists Say
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Archaeologists say that the tomb of King Tutankhamun’s wife, Ankhesenamun, is likely to have been finally discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings.
Obamacare infighting looms as Republicans look ahead to budget battle
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Rep. Diane Black, R-Tenn., announces the 2018 budget blueprint during a press conference on Capitol Hill, July 18, 2017. WASHINGTON — With the latest stalled effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, congressional Republicans are beginning to look to the budget, tax reform and other big ticket legislative items to bolster their credibility ahead of August’s traditional recess. The House Budget Committee approved the budget Wednesday, just days after they formally unveiled it.
GOP senator: We don’t have ‘luxury’ of knowing what health care plan we’ll move on
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
JULY 19: U.S. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) ©, Senate Majority Whip Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) ® and Sen. John Thune (R-SD) leave after they spoke to members of the media outside the West Wing of the White House after a lunch meeting with President Donald Trump July 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump invited all Republican senators to discuss health care over lunch.
Trooper reels in massive 650
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
RYE, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire state trooper reeled in a big fish — a massive 650-pound (295-kilogram) tuna.
McDonald's adds Big Mac onesie, sweats to items it delivers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
OAK BROOK, Ill. (AP) — With McDonald's now offering a delivery service, the fast food giant is looking to make customers comfortable eating at home with a new clothing line that includes an adult-size Big Mac onesie.
Curiosity as an answer for income inequality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
The closer that economists look at the rise in income inequality, the more they find one cause may be the rise of another inequality: The least productive firms are falling further behind the most productive firms. This point was made in a recent study spanning 16 countries by the Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. It found the “productivity gap” between firms in the top 10 percent by productivity and those in the bottom 10 percent rose by about 14 percent from 2001 to 2012.
How Western spyware is being used to shut down Arab rights activists
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
For veteran observers in the Middle East, the revelation that the UAE may have hacked Qatar’s news agency, precipitating a diplomatic crisis, reads like the rejected plot for a spy novel. Since the so-called Arab Spring erupted seven years ago, Arab governments and intelligence agencies have spent millions on spyware, malware, and hacking services, experts and analysts say, waging a digital battle against their own citizens.
Growing shortage of ob
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
There are about 20,000 ob-gyns in the U.S., but nearly half of U.S. counties lack an ob-gyns, according to the American College of Nurse- Midwives. The American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecologists (ACOG) projects the U.S. could face a shortage of up to 8,000 ob-gyns by 2020 and 22,000 by 2050.
Stop Talking About Your Generation
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Of course millennials and boomers are different. Maybe we should consider the economic conditions they grew up in to see why.
What is Virgin Galactic and how much will it cost to travel to space? 
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Virgin Galactic is the world’s first commercial spaceline company - but when will its first spaceflight be and how much will it cost to travel to space?  What is Virgin Galactic? Today's SpaceShipTwo test flight is complete! For the first time, we tested VSS Unity's unique re-entry system, called 'the feather,' in flight. The test was a success, and both vehicles and all crew are now safely back on terra firma. We'll have more images and video soon. You can read more at https://virg.in/1feather A post shared by Virgin Galactic (@virgingalactic) on May 1, 2017 at 12:02pm PDT Commercial spaceline Virgin Galactic is funded by Sir Richard Branson’s Virgin Group, its aim is to send incredibly rich tourists into space within the next few years. Founded in 2004, the team includes rocket scientists, engineers and designers from around the world. What can Virgin Galactic passengers expect? Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson  Credit: Bloomberg  Virgin Galactic passengers will depart from Spaceport America, the world’s first purpose-built commercial spaceport. It was opened in New Mexico in 2011. WhiteKnightTwo, a jet-powered cargo aircraft, will climb to an altitude of 50,000 feet before releasing SpaceShipTwo, a spacecraft that will bring passengers on the final part of the journey. SpaceShipTwo will travel at approximately three and a half times the speed of sound, propelling the vehicle and passengers to space. We're gearing up for a #SpaceShipTwo flight test. It's always an in interdisciplinary effort, drawing on the talents of our pilots, engineers, mission controllers, space wrenches, and more. Preparation for the test is proceeding well, and SpaceShipTwo and WhiteKnightTwo are now headed out to the end of runway. A post shared by Virgin Galactic (@virgingalactic) on Feb 24, 2017 at 9:07am PST “After the rocket motor has fired for around a minute, the pilots will safely shut it down,” Virgin Galactic say. “Having just experienced a thrilling, dynamic rocket ride, the dramatic transition to silence and to true weightlessness will be a profound moment for our astronauts as they coast upwards towards space.” Richard Branson unveils new Virgin Galactic passenger spaceship 00:55 The amateur astronauts will then leave their seats to experience weightlessness. The whole experience is expected to last two hours. The spacecraft is expected to carry six passengers and two pilots. Once SpaceShip Two has reentered the earth’s atmosphere, the vehicle’s wings will be returned to their normal configuration, and the spaceship will glide back to the original runway.  How high will Virgin Galactic go? A WhiteKnightTwo flight is a good way to start the morning (and for some people at the far right of the photo, an interesting sight during a morning yoga session!). Flight number 204 is now in the books. A post shared by Virgin Galactic (@virgingalactic) on May 19, 2016 at 11:39am PDT Virgin Galactic will carry passengers to an altitude of 110km (68 miles) to the edge of space. That’s over the Karman line (an altitude of 100km), which represents the boundary between the earth’s atmosphere and outer space. When will the first commercial spaceflight be? Virgin Galactic Credit: PA Branson initially hoped that Virgin Galactic would carry tourists into space by 2011, but now refuses to give a definitive launch date. “Well we stopped giving dates,” he told The Telegraph in April. “But I think I’d be very disappointed if we’re not into space with a test flight by the end of the year and I’m not into space myself next year and the programme isn’t well underway by the end of next year.” Accidents A crash in 2014  Credit: Reuters  Three workers died in an explosion during testing of SpaceShipTwo in 2007. In 2014, a Virgin Galactic spaceship exploded in mid-air, killing a test pilot and seriously injuring another. Co-pilot Michael Alsbury died after inadvertently unlocking the spaceship’s braking mechanism 14 seconds too early during a test flight causing catastrophic structural failure, US safety investigators ruled. Test flights of SpaceShipTwo resumed in 2016. How much will it cost to travel to space? Stephen Hawking plans Virgin Galactic space trip 00:27 A lot, at least initially. A seat on a Virgin Galactic flight will cost you $250,000, which has to be paid up-front as a deposit. More than 700 people have signed up so far, including celebrities Brad Pitt, Ashton Kutcher, Angelina Jolie, Tom Hanks and Paris Hilton, reports say. At a glance | Virgin Galactic
Total Solar Eclipse 2017: Bill Nye on How, When, Where and Why to Watch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A total solar eclipse is coming to a sky near you for just one performance this August, and Bill Nye wants everyone to get out and see it. Nye, the CEO of the Planetary Society, is a mechanical engineer who became a popular television host and educator as “the Science Guy” in the 1990s. Newsweek spoke to Nye about his plans and tips for the momentous celestial event he believes will blow viewers’ minds and change them forever.
Indian Poultry Farms Are Breeding Drug
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Indian poultry farms aren’t just rearing chickens — they’re also breeding germs capable of thwarting all but the most potent antibiotics, researchers found.
Even more historic NASA flight footage is up on YouTube
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center in California has a trove of old flight footage — like 1940s old.  The videos have always been available but hidden away on the Edwards, California-based center's website. More recently a lot more of the historic videos, like test flights from the 1970s and into the '90s and early 2000s, have been moved onto YouTube. SEE ALSO: Two NASA astronauts just completed a last-minute spacewalk outside the Space Station In just the past few days, the center's YouTube page has been filling up fast. Armstrong's social media manager Rebecca Richardson said in a phone call Wednesday that older legacy videos are being migrated to YouTube in a big push to put the archival footage on a more searchable and accessible platform. So far just over 300 videos have been migrated over since earlier this year. The center, which was previously named Dryden before changing to Armstrong in 2014, has 500 videos total that it eventually will house on its YouTube page and the NASA website.  Richardson said some videos are really short with just a few seconds of footage and pretty old so the quality isn't perfect. But that makes it almost better.  "We have a following who love the older content," she said. Like these clips from 1947 showing the initial flight of the D-558-I aircraft. Or this 1962 home video of an M2-F1 "flying bathtub" model filmed by now-deceased NASA engineer Dale Reed. Here's a test drop of the plane which led to wingless flying vehicles that helped with Space Shuttles research. Other popular videos show NASA's X-planes, like the one from the late 1950s at the top of this page showing the X-1, flight tests, and anything related to life-saving technology, Richardson said. Here's a 1976 landing test of the Space Shuttle Enterprise, which never flew in space. "Anybody that’s interested in airplanes is fascinated by all of it," she said. Take a look through the historic playlists and watch history take off. WATCH: This is the proper way of eating pudding in space
MH370 search reveals hidden undersea world
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The painstaking search for missing flight MH370 has uncovered a previously unknown undersea world of volcanoes, deep valleys and soaring ridges, according to detailed maps released by Australia. Although no trace of the Malaysia Airlines plane was found during the search in the southern Indian Ocean -- the most expensive ever of its kind -- large volumes of data showing a detailed picture of the sea floor had to be collected to guide the probe. "It is estimated that only 10 to 15 percent of the world's oceans have been surveyed with the kind of technology used in the search for MH370," Geoscience Australia's environmental geoscience chief Stuart Minchin said late Wednesday.
After Trump rebuke, Sessions shows up for work, will stay ‘as long as that is appropriate’
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein dodged questions about their future with the Department of Justice following criticisms from President Trump. In an interview with the New York Times published Wednesday evening, Trump said that he would not have appointed Sessions as attorney general if he knew Sessions would recuse himself from the Russia investigation. “We in the Department of Justice will continue every single day to work hard, to serve the national interest, and we wholeheartedly join in the priorities of President Trump,” said Sessions when asked if he had considered resignation.
Rare birth of endangered hairy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The population of one of the world's rarest species has been boosted with the birth of a northern hairy-nosed wombat joey, Australian wildlife officials said Wednesday. The joey emerged from its mother's pouch at the Richard Underwood Nature Refuge in Queensland state, which was established just eight years ago and is one of only two known colonies remaining. Queensland Environment Minister Steven Miles said wildlife officers had been closely observing the mother for the past 10 months.
Belgian doctors pin hope on large brain collection to treat diseases
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A psychiatric hospital in Belgium is home to one of the world's largest collections of human brains, which researchers say could hold the key to developing new treatments for diseases such as psychosis, schizophrenia and severe depression. The Duffel Psychiatric Hospital's more than 3,000 brains of diseased psychiatric patients had been part of an even larger brain collection started more than 40 years ago by British neuropathologist John Corsellis. The London hospital that stored the brains had run out of space and needed to find a new home, eventually agreeing last year to send them to the Duffel hospital in northern Belgium.
This Cave Holds a Spectacular Record of 5,000 Years of Tsunamis
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Benjamin Horton remembers being in Southeast Asia just months after the devastating 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. “They were still dealing with a disaster,” he says. “The roads were in a terrible state.” But in those days, the formerly niche field of tsunami research had taken on new urgency. Horton, who studies sea levels at Rutgers University and Nanyang Technological University, was just one of dozens of researchers who came in search of answers: Had this happened before? Would it happen again?
‘Give it hell, John’: Family, colleagues and former foes wish McCain well
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
Following news of Sen. John McCain’s, R-Ariz., brain cancer diagnosis, the senator saw an outpouring of support from family, friends and lawmakers across the political spectrum.