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Schools in eclipse's path seize on ready
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A fourth-grade class at a suburban Kansas City school erupted in wonder when they tried on their solar eclipse glasses for the first time and turned toward the sun for an eclipse "practice."
Star That Survived Supernova Is Flying Through Milky Way
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This little star might have survived a supernova explosion, but the blast sent it flying through the Milky Way galaxy.
Avoid force with North Korea, Invest in research in Africa, Bermuda parties' different campaigns, An ally's help for Taiwan, More vegetables f
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[T]he UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea, after Pyongyang carried out two intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests...,” states an editorial. “US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley insisted that the resort to force against North Korea is not off the table yet, at least in theory.
Curology Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter to win a Curology three month trial!
Dr. Dennis Gross Skincare Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win Dr. Dennis Gross EyeCare Pro!
Avoid force with North Korea, Invest in research in Africa, Bermuda parties' different campaigns, An ally's help for Taiwan, More vegetables f
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[T]he UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea, after Pyongyang carried out two intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests...,” states an editorial. “US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley insisted that the resort to force against North Korea is not off the table yet, at least in theory.
Forecasters put the total solar eclipse into a weather model and the result is amazing
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The weather wizards at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have added the effects of the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse to one of their newest, highest-resolution computer models. The result is a gorgeously detailed view of how the eclipse will cause a decrease in incoming solar radiation as it crosses the country on Monday, from the Pacific Northwest to the Southeast.  Scientists at a NOAA laboratory in Boulder, Colorado added the eclipse's path to a computer model known as the "High-Resolution Rapid Refresh" or "HRRR" model. They released a simulation of the eclipse on Thursday, and starting  Saturday, the model will start incorporating the eclipse in its real-time forecasts.  SEE ALSO: How to watch the total solar eclipse from anywhere on Earth The eclipse algorithm was developed by a University of Barcelona team and shared by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. It calculates how much of the sun will be obscured by the moon at each point. The HRRR model breaks the country down into boxes with a width of just about 2 miles.  Image: noaa/esrlAs the incoming solar radiation changes with the eclipse, the model simulates how that will affect the weather. The eclipse can cause drops in temperature or even weakening thunderstorms temporarily, since they thrive in hot and humid conditions triggered by sunshine.  In a simulation using the weather on August 4, the researchers found that the eclipse will primarily affect temperatures by cooling a widespread area of the country by up to 7.2 degrees Fahrenheit. Such areas will experience a partial eclipse.  For the 70-mile-wide swath of the nation that will experience a total solar eclipse, the temperature impacts will be more significant, the model projects. Along the path of the full eclipse, the model shows that temperatures will drop between 5 and 12 degrees Fahrenheit.  WATCH: Here’s how many people in the U.S. will possibly see the eclipse
Solar eclipses have been a science fiction theme for thousands of years
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Storytellers have long fixated on the awe-inspiring phenomenon that is a total solar eclipse. From ancient myths about dragons eating the sun to hundreds of more contemporary depictions — in Stephen King’s 1992 novel Dolores Claiborne, the 2006 film Apocalypto, or any number of sci-fi TV shows — eclipses have been so present in fiction that they can be traced through literally thousands of years’ worth of storytelling, across a wide range of mediums. How are solar eclipses portrayed differently across different mediums?
This Enigmatic Dinosaur May Be the Missing Link in an Evolution Mystery
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A bizarre-looking dinosaur discovered by a young boy in Chile may be the missing link showing how members of one major dinosaur lineage evolved into a completely new dinosaur group, a new study finds. Researchers in the United Kingdom say the species, dubbed Chilesaurus diegosuarezi, explains how some theropods, mostly meat-eating, bipedal dinosaurs, evolved into the herbivorous, long-necked ornithischians. Previously, it was unclear how the "ornithischian group just suddenly appeared and became this well-adapted herbivorous group," said the study's co-lead researcher, Matthew Baron, a doctoral student of paleontology at the University of Cambridge in England.
Planning for your first total solar eclipse? Here are 8 tips from the pros on how to watch.
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
For the love of all good things, do not try to photograph the total solar eclipse. Here at Vox, we are thoroughly convinced the August 21 total solar eclipse will be worth the hype. As we’ve learned from astronomers, astrophysicists, and eclipse-chasing enthusiasts, in the 70-mile-wide band of totality from Oregon to South Carolina, the moon will completely block out the sun, day will turn to twilight, stars and planets will appear, and the sun’s ethereal atmosphere will dance in the sky.
Researchers find wreckage of WWII
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Civilian researchers say they have located the wreck of the USS Indianapolis, the World War II heavy cruiser that played a critical role in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima before being struck by Japanese ...
Wear solar specs or make a viewer to safely watch eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Solar specs are a must for safe viewing of Monday's total solar eclipse, the first to span U.S. coast to coast in 99 years.
Avoid force with North Korea, Invest in research in Africa, Bermuda parties' different campaigns, An ally's help for Taiwan, More vegetables f
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[T]he UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea, after Pyongyang carried out two intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests...,” states an editorial. “US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley insisted that the resort to force against North Korea is not off the table yet, at least in theory.
Powerful Laser Lets Scientists Study What the Inside of Planets Are Like
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It just got souped up by a factor of three.
Scientists remotely hacked a brain, controlling body movements
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Imagine someone remotely controlling your brain, forcing your body's central processing organ to send messages to your muscles that you didn't authorize. It's an incredibly scary thought, but scientists have managed to accomplish this science fiction nightmare for real, albeit on a much small scale, and they were even able to prompt their test subject to run, freeze in place, or even completely lose control over their limbs. Thankfully, the research will be used for good rather than evil... for now. The effort, led by physics professor Arnd Pralle, PhD, of the University at Buffalo College of Arts and Sciences, focused on a technique called "magneto-thermal stimulation." It's not exactly a simple process — it requires the implantation of specially built DNA strands and nanoparticles which attach to specific neurons — but once the minimally invasive procedure is over, the brain can be remotely controlled via an alternating magnetic field. When those magnetic inputs are applied, the particles heat up, causing the neurons to fire. The study, which was published in the most recent edition of the journal eLife, includes experiments where were performed on mice. Using the new technique, the researchers were able to control the movement of the animals, causing them to freeze, lock up their limbs, turn around, or even run. Despite only being tested on mice, the research could have far-reaching implications in the realm of brain research. The holy grail for dreamers like Elon Musk is that we'll one day be able to tweak our brains to eliminate mood disorders and make us more perfect creatures. This groundbreaking research could very well be an important step towards that future.
Avoid force with North Korea, Invest in research in Africa, Bermuda parties' different campaigns, An ally's help for Taiwan, More vegetables f
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[T]he UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea, after Pyongyang carried out two intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests...,” states an editorial. “US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley insisted that the resort to force against North Korea is not off the table yet, at least in theory.
The message from a day of protests in Boston
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
One of America's oldest theaters for free speech today signaled that when it comes to issues of white nationalism, it doesn't want to have a public conversation.
Grand Teton park to escape Yellowstone's shadow for eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Its jagged, soaring peaks rise high over northwest Wyoming, but Grand Teton National Park is always in the shadow of its world-renowned neighbor, Yellowstone National Park.
What a Weather Channel Meteorologist Wants You to Know About the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
What a Weather Channel Meteorologist Wants You to Know About the Eclipse
18 space suits from science fiction, from worst to best
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Space suits are cool — and complicated. Unsurprisingly, science fiction writers, movie directors, and prop-makers also love space suits — you’ll find them everywhere from Robert A. Heinlein’s novel Have Space Suit — Will Travel, to the latest Alien movie. There’s no such thing as an “ideal” space suit, because you need specific features for different environments.
Neuroscientist who studied Einstein's brain dies at 90
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Marian Cleeves Diamond, a neuroscientist who studied Albert Einstein's brain and was one of the first to show that the brain can improve with enrichment, has died. The University of California, Berkeley, ...
Do's and Don'ts of Viewing the Eclipse—And Not Getting Fuzzy Eyes
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
By that time it might be too late.
Jeremy Hunt mocked for trying to school Stephen Hawking on Twitter
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Jeremy Hunt has taken on famous scientist Stephen Hawking, firing off tweets defending himself against the professor's earlier criticism. Mr Hunt has been mocked and questioned by social media users, who said he is "trying to school the world's most famous scientist on numbers and evidence." In tweets Mr Hunt said: "Stephen Hawking is brilliant physicist but wrong on lack of evidence 4 weekend effect. 2015 Fremantle study most comprehensive ever ... And whatever entrenched opposition, no responsible health sec could ignore it if you want NHS 2 be safest health service in world as I do." Stephen Hawking is brilliant physicist but wrong on lack of evidence 4 weekend effect.2015 Fremantle study most comprehensive ever 1/2— Jeremy Hunt (@Jeremy_Hunt) August 18, 2017 The world-renowned scientist had attacked Health Secretary for "cherry-picking" favourable evidence while suppressing contradictory research in order to suit his argument. The 75-year-old, who was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 1962, said he "would not be here today if it were not for the service" and accused the Conservatives of putting the NHS in crisis. Angela Rayner said she was firmly on the side of the physicist, writing: "Jeremy Hunt telling Stephen Hawking he doesn't know how to interpret evidence on NHS statistics. I trust Stephen." Clive Lewis joined in, tweeting: "Well,1 gave us complex theories on blackholes & alt universes.The other left a blackhole where the NHS was & covered his back with alt facts". Well,1 gave us complex theories on blackholes & alt universes.The other left a blackhole where the NHS was & covered his back with alt facts https://t.co/NNuHzWCIBS— Clive Lewis (@labourlewis) August 19, 2017 Jeremy Hunt telling Stephen Hawking he doesn't know how to interpret evidence on NHS statistics. I trust Stephen. https://t.co/fngfbKW4wd— Angela Rayner MP (@AngelaRayner) August 19, 2017 The Health Secretary was condemned on social media for his tweets. Jeremy Hunt takes on Stephen Hawking on twitter about interpretation of an academic study *ducks* https://t.co/Ecm42kTJBU— Bobby Pratap (@BobbyPratapMH) August 18, 2017 Worst health secretary ever tries to school the world's most famous scientist on numbers and evidence. Soooo 2017 https://t.co/DKprPfbLcu— Dean Burnett (@garwboy) August 19, 2017 One user wrote: "Really?? You take issue with one of the foremost scientific minds of the century? And a lifelong adult NHS patient to boot. What arrogance." Another said: "Yeah, Hawking's always been terrible at analysing data and understanding complex issues so I'm convinced." And another pointed out: "When the Health Secretary thinks he knows more about science than Stephen Hawking". Stephen Hawking: Labour cannot win election under Corbyn 00:38    
How the Solar Eclipse Could Help Us Solve a Mystery About the Sun
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Scientists may uncover the secrets of the corona during the total eclipse
Avoid force with North Korea, Invest in research in Africa, Bermuda parties' different campaigns, An ally's help for Taiwan, More vegetables f
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[T]he UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea, after Pyongyang carried out two intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests...,” states an editorial. “US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley insisted that the resort to force against North Korea is not off the table yet, at least in theory.
Special eclipse glasses selling out quickly
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Eclipse mania is building and so is demand for the glasses that make it safe to view the first total solar eclipse to cross the U.S. in 99 years.
Here's a total solar eclipse on Earth as seen from the moon
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The US is about to be treated to a rare coast-to-coast eclipse, but at least one robot will also be watching from a distance.
Tribes hope for renewal in solar eclipse; not all will watch
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — While much of the country gawks at the solar eclipse, Bobbieann Baldwin will be inside with her children, shades drawn.
Two Sisters to Work With NASA During Solar Eclipse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Rebecca and Kimberly Yeung are participating in NASA's Eclipse Ballooning project in conjunction with the University of Montana on Aug. 21.
Woman stuck in swimming pool turns to Facebook for help
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
EPPING, N.H. (AP) — A New Hampshire woman who became stuck in a swimming pool after the ladder broke turned to Facebook to ask for help getting out.
Avoid force with North Korea, Invest in research in Africa, Bermuda parties' different campaigns, An ally's help for Taiwan, More vegetables f
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[T]he UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea, after Pyongyang carried out two intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests...,” states an editorial. “US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley insisted that the resort to force against North Korea is not off the table yet, at least in theory.
What Would the Solar Eclipse Look Like From the Moon?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Pat Rawlings was thinking about next week’s eclipse nearly 30 years ago. Rawlings has spent more than three decades as a space illustrator, creating scenes of human exploration in the cosmos, from spacecraft in orbit to astronauts on alien terrain. While preparing for a trip from his home in Texas to Idaho, where he’ll observe Monday’s eclipse with other space artists in the International Association of Astronomical Artists, he remembered a painting he’d made years ago for this very occasion. In 1989, Rawlings was working on illustrations for a collection of children’s science books by the science-fiction writer Isaac Asimov. Using acrylics, he painted a view of a solar eclipse as seen from the moon, and named it after the date when the next eclipse would cross over the continental United States: August 21, 2017.
The Oldest Ice Core Ever Discovered Reveals CO2 Levels Of Millions Of Years Ago
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Oldest ice core ever reveals CO2 levels were far lower 2.7 million years ago than they are today.
From the Moon Landing to Donald Trump’s Alternative Facts—Why People Believe in Conspiracy Theories
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
This article was originally published on The Conversation. One picks up a discarded newspaper and chuckles derisively as she reads about the latest “alternative facts” peddled by Donald Trump. The others soon chip in with their thoughts on the U.S. president’s fondness for conspiracy theories.
Clouds On Brown Dwarfs Move In Mysterious Ways
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Clouds move in strange ways on brown dwarfs, the things in space that are halfway between a star and a planet.
Sometimes you need a pulsing red circle of data to understand how abnormally hot Earth is getting
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Earth is constantly breaking heat records. The latest international State of the Climate report noted that 2016 was the hottest year on record, and NASA just announced that July 2017 tied with July 2016 as the hottest July on record. We’ve heard a variation on this theme, well, a few times: 16 of the 17…
Boston ‘free speech’ rally and counterprotest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
'Boston Free Speech Rally' activists and counterprotesters gather in Boston Common drawing thousands a week after a demonstration in Virginia turned deadly.
Avoid force with North Korea, Invest in research in Africa, Bermuda parties' different campaigns, An ally's help for Taiwan, More vegetables f
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[T]he UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea, after Pyongyang carried out two intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests...,” states an editorial. “US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley insisted that the resort to force against North Korea is not off the table yet, at least in theory.
How to Make a Pinhole Viewer for the Total Solar Eclipse, and What to Do While You Wait for Totality
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Travel-friendly gadgets and game plans to entertain eclipse-chasers during the long partial phases on August 21.
Asian carp found near Lake Michigan got past barriers
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — An adult Asian carp found in a Chicago waterway near Lake Michigan this summer began its life far downstream and apparently got around a series of electric barriers intended to keep the invasive species out of the Great Lakes, officials said Friday.
Avoid force with North Korea, Invest in research in Africa, Bermuda parties' different campaigns, An ally's help for Taiwan, More vegetables f
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[T]he UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea, after Pyongyang carried out two intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests...,” states an editorial. “US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley insisted that the resort to force against North Korea is not off the table yet, at least in theory.
How to Get Your Kid to Wear Sunscreen
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Being a kid in the summer is all about playing outside, but if you don’t protect him or her from the sun’s UV rays, the consequences can be serious. Just one blistering sunburn during childhood c...
White nationalist Richard Spencer, Antifa member Lacy MacAuley confront each other: Part 6
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Spencer blames Antifa for most of the violence between the groups, while MacAuley refused to condemn that Spencer was punched in the face.
How the Charleston massacre changed the Confederate flag market
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, politics
White supremacists carry a shield and Confederate flag as they arrive at a rally in Charlottesville, Va., Aug. 12, 2017. Belinda Kennedy’s Alabama Flag and Banner, founded in 1985, had always sold Confederate battle flags. Custom flags, especially oversize U.S. flags, table covers and banners were more important to the small company’s bottom line.
Readers write: Prioritizing options, difference
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Robert Klose’s July 3 Home Forum essay, “We waited, and it was worth it,” rightfully pointed out that people have lost the pleasure of anticipation because so much is instantaneously available. Since almost everything can be done right now, we must be constantly prioritizing our options.
Avoid force with North Korea, Invest in research in Africa, Bermuda parties' different campaigns, An ally's help for Taiwan, More vegetables f
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“[T]he UN Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution imposing additional sanctions on North Korea, after Pyongyang carried out two intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) tests...,” states an editorial. “US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley insisted that the resort to force against North Korea is not off the table yet, at least in theory.
Le Petit Marseillais Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win Le Petit Marseillais body wash!
Caress Giveaway
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Enter for a chance to win Caress body wash!
Google Lunar XPrize: Would
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
On top of extending the mission deadline and tweaking the goal, competition organizers have added nearly $5 million in prize money.
Stunning new view of Jupiter flips Great Red Spot on its side
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A new view of Jupiter takes the usual shot of the planet's Great Red Spot and flips it on its side. The captivating new perspective comes from an image created by two citizen scientists who used data from the JunoCam on NASA's Juno spacecraft that's been in orbit for more than a year studying the planet, according to NASA. The north end of the planet is shown on the left side of the new photo (above) and that's where the Great Red Spot rages. SEE ALSO: Perhaps staring at this photo of a storm on Jupiter will help us all relax after a hard week The image comes from the recent batch of photos and data from the Juno spacecraft's fly-by on July 10. The Great Red Spot, a 10,000 mile-wide storm, had quite a photo session when the spacecraft flew 5,600 miles above it. For this newer image, created by Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran, the spacecraft was 10,274 miles above the planet and its clouds. The Great Red Spot is usually photographed on top, like this photo below, so the storm gets a different vantage point in this latest image. The Great Red Spot as we usually see it.Image: NASANo matter what angle, it's quite the sight. WATCH: NASA is looking for a planetary protection officer to keep space safe