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Antarctica Hides Giant Canyons That Could Make Melting Worse
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
When you picture Antarctica, you probably see vast white ice stretching evenly into the distance. In the paper, a team of scientists reported that they'd discovered three massive canyons in the land beneath Antarctica's ice. "If climate conditions change in Antarctica, we might expect the ice in these troughs to flow a lot faster towards the sea," first author Kate Winter, a scientist at Northumbria University in the U.K., told the BBC.
Massive beach clean
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
More than two thousand volunteers hit the beach on an outlying island of Hong Kong for a mass rubbish clean up Sunday as environment campaigners warned plastic is killing sea turtles and other wildlife. There has been increasing concern over the amount of rubbish in Hong Kong waters which washes up on its numerous beaches. Authorities and environmentalists have pointed the finger at southern mainland China as the source.
Baby panda born in Malaysia zoo makes public debut
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — A baby panda born in a Malaysian zoo five months ago made her public debut Saturday.
Billionaire entrepreneur Richard Branson says he's 'neck and neck' with Bezos in the space race
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Richard Branson, the 67-year-old British entrepreneur, says he's in a closely-fought race with Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos to get the first fare-paying passengers into space.
These poor creatures suffered from dandruff 125 million years before Head And Shoulders was invented
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These days, if you notice a bit of dandruff on your shoulder you just stop by the drug store and grab some specialized shampoo, but 125 million years ago the birds and feathered dinosaurs just had to deal with it. A new study published in Nature Communications has revealed that the ancient creatures shed their skin in small bits rather than in large chunks like most present day reptiles. According to the researchers, this new discovery also reveals how well the animals could fly. The scientists, who were originally studying the fossilized feathers of the dinosaurs, discovered the presence of tiny "white blobs" which they ultimately determined to be dandruff. The skin flakes are exactly the same as those shed by modern day animals, including humans. Researchers have long questioned how feathered dinosaurs shed their skin, as it would have been rather inconvenient for them to shed it all in one piece as modern reptiles do. This new discovery suggests that shedding it in tiny flakes evolved alongside the emergence of feathers, right around the middle of the Jurassic Period. "There was a burst of evolution of feathered dinosaurs and birds at this time, and it’s exciting to see evidence that the skin of early birds and dinosaurs was evolving rapidly in response to bearing feathers," Dr Maria McNamara of University College Cork, Ireland, and lead author of the work, explains. “The fossil cells are preserved with incredible detail – right down to the level of nanoscale keratin fibrils. What’s remarkable is that the fossil dandruff is almost identical to that in modern birds – even the spiral twisting of individual fibres is still visible." The dinosaur fossils that were studied appeared to match up with those from ancient birds at the time, with dandruff being present in both cases. However, there was a key difference between the fossilized skin flakes and those from modern birds. The skin cells of the fossils were largely devoid of the fat that is present in the shedded skin of modern birds, which the team believes is a sign that the creatures never got as warm as modern day birds do. They suggest that this is because the ancient feathered dinosaurs never flew for long periods, or were perhaps completely flightless.
Readers write: Mothers and forgiveness, reality of homelessness, how ‘Black Panther’ affects Africans, tariffs explained for average reader, high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It got deeper into issues around forgiveness, always recognizing that people are complex and face difficult paths – rarely simple or direct – through trauma. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? It introduces a reality that is often overlooked by many of those well-meaning people who want to “cure” homelessness.
Israelis must reach out to Gazans, Palestinians will live on despite recent violence, Europe walks a tightrope after Trump’s trashing of the Iran de
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“On [May 14], more than 60 Palestinians were reported killed in Gaza and more than 2,000 injured, according to the Hamas-run Health Ministry,” states an editorial. “It was the deadliest single day of violence since the 2014 war.... Even though the [Israel Defense Forces] defended the legality of using live fire against protests at a High Court challenge ... the larger question goes beyond what may be legal, to what may be in Israel’s best interests. “In defiance of international legitimacy and objections by countries around the world, the US opened its embassy in the occupied city of Jerusalem on [May 14], fuelling condemnation and angry protests in Palestine as well as Arab and Muslim countries...,” states an editorial.
On a mission to make Philadelphia the most accessible US city for the arts
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Throughout her adult life, Eleanor Childs has been immersed in arts and culture, be it through attending concerts, visiting museums, or facilitating students’ access to such experiences when she was a school administrator. Thanks to the nonprofit Art-Reach in Philadelphia, she has not had to give up her love of the arts in her retirement. “I have gone to plays, dance performances, and concerts, [and] I even participated in a ceramics workshop,” says Ms. Childs, noting that Art-Reach has made those opportunities possible for her and others who are blind or visually impaired.
Ethereum Startup Omise Gains Megabank Sponsor for Blockchain Coworking Space in Japan
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mizuho, one of Japan’s three so-called ‘megabanks’, will sponsor Neutrino, the country’s first blockchain coworking space established by Ethereum-based startup Omise Japan. Named ‘Neutrino’, the country’s first specialized blockchain co-working space was established by Omise in Tokyo in March this year. Omise, a Thai-based startup, sees Ethereum co-founder Vitalik Buterin among its advisors and closed
Why AI can't solve everything
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The dangers of AI solutionism need to be addressed.
‘The Expanse’ is saved: Jeff Bezos says Amazon will pick up sci
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
LOS ANGELES — I wanted to start out talking with Jeff Bezos tonight about his vision for settling outer space, but the billionaire founder of Amazon and Blue Origin had other plans. When I asked my first question at a fireside chat, set up during an awards banquet here at the National Space Society’s International Space Development Conference, Bezos stopped me short. “Before I answer that question, I want to do one small thing,” he told me. “Does anybody here in this audience watch a TV show called ‘The Expanse’?” Wild applause followed — in part because the science-fiction TV series is… Read More
‘My Life Is at Risk of Being Undermined.’ Morgan Freeman Pushes Back Against Misconduct Allegations
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
He says his behavior never crossed certain lines
Problem with container spurs evacuation at nuke waste dump
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Workers had to evacuate the U.S. government's only underground nuclear waste repository after finding a container of waste misaligned inside its packaging, but officials confirmed Friday that no radiation was released.
Satellites in space see lava pouring from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
From the ground, lava pouring from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano can look terrifying.  Over the past few weeks, newly cracked fissures in the ground have allowed fountains and pools of molten rocket to well up to the surface, destroying homes and other structures in the area surrounding the active volcano.  SEE ALSO: An astronaut saw Hawaii's Kilauea volcano erupting from space. And he took a picture. But from space, those fissures and lava flows take on a new look.  #Kilauea lava channels are clearly visible in this #Sentinel2 B image of the #Hawaii volcano from 23 May (crop and full image). Follow @USGSVolcanoes for updates. pic.twitter.com/ZSCeL81xEB — ESA (@esa) May 25, 2018 The European Space Agency's Sentinel 2 B satellite snapped a photo of Kilauea from above on May 23, showing off the bright lava channels bringing the molten rock up to the Big Island's surface.  One of the most amazing parts of this image is the scale it provides. From space, the viewer can really get a sense of how small of an area is being affected by the lava flowing from Kilauea. Other images taken from space also provide a new perspective.  Lava by night.Image: NASA Earth Observatory Lava looks like lines of neon light cutting through darkness near the Leilani Estates neighborhood near Kilauea in a photo taken by NASA's Landsat 8 satellite on May 23.  NASA has also been tracking the lava flowing from the volcano from space.  The images help people on the ground track volcanic activity and warn the public when people might be in danger.  A red alert has been issued after explosions from #Hawaii's Kilauea volcano intensified. Сlouds of volcanic ash rise in the air at 3.7 thousand meters, that's why it is easy to see even from the @Space_Station . pic.twitter.com/wFwMK6oQN7 — Anton Shkaplerov (@Anton_Astrey) May 17, 2018 Crewmembers on the International Space Station have also been able to monitor Kilauea from above, snapping photos from the orbiting laboratory's huge windows.  "Сlouds of volcanic ash rise in the air at 3.7 thousand meters, that's why it is easy to see even from the @Space_Station," space station cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov wrote on Twitter. WATCH: Mayon volcano erupts, leading to evacuation of over 56,000
Readers write: Mothers and forgiveness, reality of homelessness, how ‘Black Panther’ affects Africans, tariffs explained for average reader, high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It got deeper into issues around forgiveness, always recognizing that people are complex and face difficult paths – rarely simple or direct – through trauma. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? It introduces a reality that is often overlooked by many of those well-meaning people who want to “cure” homelessness.
Israelis must reach out to Gazans, Palestinians will live on despite recent violence, Europe walks a tightrope after Trump’s trashing of the Iran de
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“On [May 14], more than 60 Palestinians were reported killed in Gaza and more than 2,000 injured, according to the Hamas-run Health Ministry,” states an editorial. “It was the deadliest single day of violence since the 2014 war.... Even though the [Israel Defense Forces] defended the legality of using live fire against protests at a High Court challenge ... the larger question goes beyond what may be legal, to what may be in Israel’s best interests. “In defiance of international legitimacy and objections by countries around the world, the US opened its embassy in the occupied city of Jerusalem on [May 14], fuelling condemnation and angry protests in Palestine as well as Arab and Muslim countries...,” states an editorial.
Beekeepers are stealing each other’s hives to survive the cutthroat industry
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Nearly a million-dollars worth of honeybees stolen from almond orchards in Fresno, California were located last spring. Police caught one of the thieves while he was tending to 100 of the pilfered hives; they later found his accomplice—and the 2,000 other hives the duo stole—in two other local fields. The scale of this operation is…
Readers write: Mothers and forgiveness, reality of homelessness, how ‘Black Panther’ affects Africans, tariffs explained for average reader, high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It got deeper into issues around forgiveness, always recognizing that people are complex and face difficult paths – rarely simple or direct – through trauma. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? It introduces a reality that is often overlooked by many of those well-meaning people who want to “cure” homelessness.
Israelis must reach out to Gazans, Palestinians will live on despite recent violence, Europe walks a tightrope after Trump’s trashing of the Iran de
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“On [May 14], more than 60 Palestinians were reported killed in Gaza and more than 2,000 injured, according to the Hamas-run Health Ministry,” states an editorial. “It was the deadliest single day of violence since the 2014 war.... Even though the [Israel Defense Forces] defended the legality of using live fire against protests at a High Court challenge ... the larger question goes beyond what may be legal, to what may be in Israel’s best interests. “In defiance of international legitimacy and objections by countries around the world, the US opened its embassy in the occupied city of Jerusalem on [May 14], fuelling condemnation and angry protests in Palestine as well as Arab and Muslim countries...,” states an editorial.
This Sugar 3D Printer Could Enable Scientists to Print Human Organs
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers from the University of Illinois, have created a new kind of 3D printer capable of producing complex shapes from sugar that can be used to grow biological tissues. The printer uses a process called free-form printing to create intricate structures from isomalt—the type of sugar used to make throat lozenges—that could not be made with traditional layer-by-layer 3D printing.
Readers write: Mothers and forgiveness, reality of homelessness, how ‘Black Panther’ affects Africans, tariffs explained for average reader, high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It got deeper into issues around forgiveness, always recognizing that people are complex and face difficult paths – rarely simple or direct – through trauma. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? It introduces a reality that is often overlooked by many of those well-meaning people who want to “cure” homelessness.
Israelis must reach out to Gazans, Palestinians will live on despite recent violence, Europe walks a tightrope after Trump’s trashing of the Iran de
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“On [May 14], more than 60 Palestinians were reported killed in Gaza and more than 2,000 injured, according to the Hamas-run Health Ministry,” states an editorial. “It was the deadliest single day of violence since the 2014 war.... Even though the [Israel Defense Forces] defended the legality of using live fire against protests at a High Court challenge ... the larger question goes beyond what may be legal, to what may be in Israel’s best interests. “In defiance of international legitimacy and objections by countries around the world, the US opened its embassy in the occupied city of Jerusalem on [May 14], fuelling condemnation and angry protests in Palestine as well as Arab and Muslim countries...,” states an editorial.
Trump is Cutting the Red Tape in Space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A Falcon 9 rocket lifted off perfectly from pad 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base March 30, carrying aloft satellites for Iridium Communications Inc. Video from the vehicle flipped on 2 minutes and 35 seconds later, just in time for webcast viewers to witness the first stage falling to Earth and the second stage light up. Video will be cut “due to restrictions placed on us by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.” The reason? SpaceX ultimately received a commercial license from NOAA’s remote-sensing office, but the regulatory framework that requires such permits hasn’t been updated in decades.
Can DNA Sampling Unveil the Loch Ness Monster?
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A team of researchers are combing through the waters of the Loch Ness for DNA evidence of the mythical beast.
Ashley Judd: What Harvey Weinstein's Arrest Does — And Doesn't — Change for the #MeToo Movement
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
After Harvey Weinstein turned himself in for rape and sexual assault charges, this is what the #MeToo movement needs from the accused men.
An autonomous robot captured detailed images of the treasure
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
In 2015, an underwater search effort led by a robot found the San José, one of the richest sunken treasures in maritime history. The government of nearby Colombia promptly declared the location a state secret. This week, one of the organizations behind the hunt shared detailed images of the wreck, some 600 meters below the…
Cash Found in Bags During a Raid on Property Linked to Malaysia's Former Prime Minister Totals $29 Million
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The cash was in 26 different currencies
Leaders of North and South Korea Hold Surprise Second Summit
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in met for the second time in a month, holding a surprise summit
Readers write: Mothers and forgiveness, reality of homelessness, how ‘Black Panther’ affects Africans, tariffs explained for average reader, high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It got deeper into issues around forgiveness, always recognizing that people are complex and face difficult paths – rarely simple or direct – through trauma. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? It introduces a reality that is often overlooked by many of those well-meaning people who want to “cure” homelessness.
Israelis must reach out to Gazans, Palestinians will live on despite recent violence, Europe walks a tightrope after Trump’s trashing of the Iran de
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“On [May 14], more than 60 Palestinians were reported killed in Gaza and more than 2,000 injured, according to the Hamas-run Health Ministry,” states an editorial. “It was the deadliest single day of violence since the 2014 war.... Even though the [Israel Defense Forces] defended the legality of using live fire against protests at a High Court challenge ... the larger question goes beyond what may be legal, to what may be in Israel’s best interests. “In defiance of international legitimacy and objections by countries around the world, the US opened its embassy in the occupied city of Jerusalem on [May 14], fuelling condemnation and angry protests in Palestine as well as Arab and Muslim countries...,” states an editorial.
These Mars Rocks Could Hold Vital Clues to Life On the Red Planet
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Iron-rich rocks found near ancient lake sites on Mars could hold vital clues as to whether life once existed on the Red Planet, according to new research published in the Journal of Geophysical Research. An international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of Edinburgh, suggest that these rocks should be prime targets for upcoming missions—such as NASA’s Mars 2020 rover—which are designed to search for signs of life. The rocks in question formed at the bottom of ancient lake beds between three and four billion years ago, when the Martian surface was abundant in water and its climate was warmer.
President Trump signs off on directive to deregulate commercial space ventures
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Donald Trump has signed his administration’s second space policy directive, focusing on streamlining licensing procedures and turning the Commerce Department into a “one-stop shop” for commercial space companies. Space Policy Directive 2 follows up on an initial directive that refocuses America’s space exploration vision on the moon, Scott Pace, executive secretary of the White House’s National Space Council, told reporters in advance of today’s signing. Pace noted that NASA will be working with commercial partners to establish an outpost in lunar orbit and extend operations to the moon’s surface. “The Trump administration’s actions on space mean investments in high-tech,… Read More
Why Child Soldiers Rarely Stay Free for Long in the Central African Republic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Eighteen years since the ratification of OPAC, the international child soldier treaty, the world still struggles to protect children.
Hawaii's Erupting Volcano Looks Even Crazier From Space at Night
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
See the incredible image
These Cities Have the Best Public Park Systems in the Country
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Trust for Public Land has ranked the public park systems of the 100 most populous cities in America.
Alan Bean: Fourth man to walk on Moon dies aged 86, Nasa announces
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Alan Bean passed away at Houston Methodist Hospital on Saturday after a short illness. Alan Bean flew twice into space, first as the lunar module pilot on Apollo 12, the second moon landing mission, in November 1969. “Alan Bean was the most extraordinary person I ever met,” said astronaut Mike Massimino, who flew on two space shuttle missions to service the Hubble Space Telescope.
Irish Voters Head to the Polls in a Landmark Abortion Referendum
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The referendum could open the door for more liberal legislation on abortion
Readers write: Mothers and forgiveness, reality of homelessness, how ‘Black Panther’ affects Africans, tariffs explained for average reader, high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It got deeper into issues around forgiveness, always recognizing that people are complex and face difficult paths – rarely simple or direct – through trauma. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? It introduces a reality that is often overlooked by many of those well-meaning people who want to “cure” homelessness.
Israelis must reach out to Gazans, Palestinians will live on despite recent violence, Europe walks a tightrope after Trump’s trashing of the Iran de
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“On [May 14], more than 60 Palestinians were reported killed in Gaza and more than 2,000 injured, according to the Hamas-run Health Ministry,” states an editorial. “It was the deadliest single day of violence since the 2014 war.... Even though the [Israel Defense Forces] defended the legality of using live fire against protests at a High Court challenge ... the larger question goes beyond what may be legal, to what may be in Israel’s best interests. “In defiance of international legitimacy and objections by countries around the world, the US opened its embassy in the occupied city of Jerusalem on [May 14], fuelling condemnation and angry protests in Palestine as well as Arab and Muslim countries...,” states an editorial.
Asteroid Mining (Phase 1) to Begin in 2020, Says This Space Pioneer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Planetary Resources plans to begin dispatching spaceships in just two years.
Event Horizon: Scientists Edge Closer to Imaging Black Hole at Center of Milky Way
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
New analysis of observations from telescopes around the world has brought scientists one step closer to imaging the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, known as Sagittarius A*. The observations form part of the hugely ambitious Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project, which links together telescopes around the world over the internet, essentially creating a powerful global observatory. The goal of EHT is to image, for the first time, the event horizon—the point of no return beyond which nothing, not even light, can escape the immense gravitational pull of the black hole.
Kurtz: Why Tesla, Space X visionary Is fighting mad
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
'MediaBuzz' host Howard Kurtz weighs in on Elon Musk turning against the media after recent negative press.
Only a Handful of Birds Survived the Dinosaur Killing Asteroid—Now Scientists Have Worked Out Why
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The impact and its after-effects ushered in a great extinction event that wiped out nearly three quarters of all plant and animal life. This is because the impact and its after-effects decimated the planet’s forests, leading to the extinction of all tree-dwelling birds, according to an international team of researchers. "Perching birds went extinct because there were no more perches,” Regan Dunn, a paleontologist at the Field Museum in Chicago and a co-author of the study, said in a statement.
Orbital ATK Unveils Its New OmegA Rocket Ship
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
But will it arrive in time? For that matter, is it already too late?
Trump aims to make it easier for companies to get to space
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — President Donald Trump is asking the government to make it easier for private companies to get to and from space.
Peruvian scientists use DNA to trace origins of Inca emperors
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers in Peru believe they have traced the origins of the Incas -- the largest pre-Hispanic civilization in the Americas -- through the DNA of the modern-day descendants of their emperors. From their ancient capital Cusco, the Incas controlled a vast empire called Tahuantinsuyo, which extended from the west of present-day Argentina to the south of Colombia. The empire included the mountain-top citadel of Machu Picchu in modern-day Peru -- now a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a major tourist attraction.
125
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers have discovered the oldest known case of dandruff—in feathered dinosaurs and early birds which lived around 125-million-years-ago, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Communications. Paleontologists from University College Cork (UCC), in Ireland, say their findings are the first evidence for how dinosaurs shed their skin. For the study, Maria McNamara, lead author from UCC, and her colleagues, studied dandruff from modern birds and mammals, as well as fossilized dandruff from three types of feathered dinosaurs—Microraptor, Beipiaosaurus and Sinornithosaurus—and an early type of bird known as Confuciusornis.
Putin, Abe speak to ISS astronauts from Kremlin
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Russian President Vladimir Putin and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Saturday spoke to astronauts on board the ISS via a live video link from the Kremlin. Russian astronaut Anton Shklaperov and his Japanese colleague Norishige Kanai, on board the International Space Station (ISS), appeared on a giant screen in the Kremlin after the two leaders held bilateral talks.
A Prominent Conservative Scholar Is Arguing the Mueller Probe Is Unconstitutional
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One of the founders of the Federalist Society is advancing a controversial legal theory that Robert Mueller’s probe is unconstitutional.
Readers write: Mothers and forgiveness, reality of homelessness, how ‘Black Panther’ affects Africans, tariffs explained for average reader, high
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
It got deeper into issues around forgiveness, always recognizing that people are complex and face difficult paths – rarely simple or direct – through trauma. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? It introduces a reality that is often overlooked by many of those well-meaning people who want to “cure” homelessness.