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Egos are a problem in international relations, Coverage of Finsbury mosque attack was a rarity, Why American voters don’t care about the Russia inve
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Qatar is finding itself still isolated from the other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries...,” writes Richard Miller. “The timing came right after a visit to the Saudi kingdom by U.S. President Donald Trump when he ... assured [King Salman] of a new American approach ... [in] dealings for their ally.... This century has seen a worldwide resurgence of egos on the international stage.... President Paul Kagame put things into perspective when he stated: ‘There are African leaders who have the dangerous habit of leading their people into an abyss’. “For Muslims who live in and around Finsbury Park, the attack was not a surprise,” writes Rafia Zakaria.
These 4 Animals Are Real Extinct American Creatures
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
They sound like mythical creatures but these prehistoric American animals were very real before they went extinct thousands of years ago.
2 Amazing Pictures Of Space Taken By An Amateur
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
These are some of the most visually striking things related to space.
Al Capone song, pocket watch fetch over $100K at auction
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOSTON (AP) — Artifacts connected to some of the nation's most notorious gangsters sold for more than $100,000 at auction Saturday.
Egos are a problem in international relations, Coverage of Finsbury mosque attack was a rarity, Why American voters don’t care about the Russia inve
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Qatar is finding itself still isolated from the other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries...,” writes Richard Miller. “The timing came right after a visit to the Saudi kingdom by U.S. President Donald Trump when he ... assured [King Salman] of a new American approach ... [in] dealings for their ally.... This century has seen a worldwide resurgence of egos on the international stage.... President Paul Kagame put things into perspective when he stated: ‘There are African leaders who have the dangerous habit of leading their people into an abyss’. “For Muslims who live in and around Finsbury Park, the attack was not a surprise,” writes Rafia Zakaria.
Watch a tiny virus take a constitutional under a laser
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
If you're anything like me, you spend a significant portion of the day wondering about the paths viruses take when they're cruising around your internals. Luckily for us, a newly developed microscope from Duke researchers can show the exact path taken by the little critters (?), down to the micrometer.The system, designed by a team led by...
You'll Want to Watch This Mesmerizing Supernova Flash GIF Over and Over Again
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
NASA scientists captured images of a supernova, or an exploding star, for the first time on March 21, 2016 and we are totally transfixed by the video. While NASA has been able to see supernovae for some time, they were only capable of obtaintaing video of the ephemeral flash by monitoring 500 galaxies every 30 minutes for three years.
Panda mania hits Germany as China's cuddly envoys arrive
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Germany had its first taste of panda mania on Saturday as two furry ambassadors arrived from China to begin a new life as stars of Berlin's premier zoo. The pair, named Meng Meng and Jiao Qing, jetted in on a special Lufthansa cargo plane, accompanied by two Chinese panda specialists, the Berlin Zoo's chief vet and a tonne of bamboo. A crowd of journalists and officials on hand to welcome the VIPs let out an "ooooh" as Meng Meng raised a paw after flight LH8415 made an especially gentle touchdown at Schoenefeld airport.
Global green pact supporters launch Paris campaign
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hollywood star turned activist Arnold Schwarzenegger joined politicians and legal experts in Paris Saturday to launch a campaign for a global pact to protect the human right to a clean, healthy environment. "Less talk, more action," urged former French prime minister Francais Laurent Fabius, who also presided over the 2015 Paris COP 21 conference on climate change. Seeking to underline the urgency of the need to act, Fabius borrowed the turn of phrase from ex-California governor-turned climate campaigner Schwarzenegger, who joined the gathering, as did former UN chief Ban Ki-moon.
Study: egg shape depends on flying skills of bird
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The rich variety in shapes of the eggs that birds lay -- elliptical, pointy, spherical -- seems to be linked to how well a given bird flies, researchers report. "In contrast to classic hypotheses, we discovered that flight may influence egg shape. Birds that are good fliers tend to lay asymmetric or elliptical eggs," said Mary Caswell Stoddard, a biologist at Princeton University and one of the lead authors of the study.
Polish protesters demand halt to logging in primeval forest
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Hundreds have marched in Warsaw to protest widespread logging in Europe's last primeval forest, a project undertaken taken by Poland's conservative government. The ruling Law and Justice party has allowed ...
Conference: US mayors may shape national climate policy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — With the Trump administration's withdrawal from the Paris climate accords, national policy on climate change will emerge from U.S. cities working to reduce emissions and become more resilient to rising sea levels, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said at the annual U.S. Conferences of Mayors meeting in Miami Beach.
Giant sequoia move on schedule in Idaho, tree doing well
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A massive Idaho tree that grew over more than a century from a seedling sent by a noted naturalist has been uprooted and is poised to travel about two blocks Sunday to a new location.
California father buries wrong man after coroner's mistake
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — Eleven days after laying his son to rest, Frank J. Kerrigan got a call from a friend.
Egos are a problem in international relations, Coverage of Finsbury mosque attack was a rarity, Why American voters don’t care about the Russia inve
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Qatar is finding itself still isolated from the other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries...,” writes Richard Miller. “The timing came right after a visit to the Saudi kingdom by U.S. President Donald Trump when he ... assured [King Salman] of a new American approach ... [in] dealings for their ally.... This century has seen a worldwide resurgence of egos on the international stage.... President Paul Kagame put things into perspective when he stated: ‘There are African leaders who have the dangerous habit of leading their people into an abyss’. “For Muslims who live in and around Finsbury Park, the attack was not a surprise,” writes Rafia Zakaria.
This Cornell scientist saved an $11
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
It started with rotting flesh. Slicing into the green skin of a Hawaiian papaya ordinarily...
Eclipse chasers blaze trail to Oregon for view of a lifetime
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
MADRAS, Ore. (AP) — Just before sunrise, there's typically nothing atop Round Butte but the whistle of the wind and a panoramic view of Oregon's second-highest peak glowing pink in the faint light.
SpeceX's Falcon 9 vs. Falcon Heavy
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The Falcon Heavy is seemingly just a Falcon 9 with two Falcon 9 first stages attached to it. Shouldn't it be easy to make it fly?
Watch: SpaceX is launching a reused rocket, hoping to prove spaceflight can get cheaper
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
One of the biggest problems with space travel is that it’s freaking expensive. If humans are ever going to become a spacefaring species, with colonies on the moon and Mars — as big thinkers like physicist Stephen Hawking insist we should — space travel is going to have to get a lot cheaper. "We have to figure out how to improve the cost [of traveling to Mars] by 5 million percent," Elon Musk said last year, announcing his personal dream to establish a human colony on Mars.
The 9 funniest lines from a coal kingpin's lawsuit against John Oliver
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
John Oliver is facing the legal wrath of a lawsuit-happy coal baron after a brutal segment in which the host tore into the American coal industry. The document accuses Oliver of a "ruthless character assassination" of Robert Murray, CEO of the nation's largest coal mining operation, Murray Energy. SEE ALSO: Coal company sues John Oliver for being John Oliver It didn't exactly come as a surprise; in fact, Oliver more or less dared the notoriously litigious coal boss by mocking an earlier cease-and-desist letter from his company on the show. And at least one first amendment lawyer has said Murray doesn't have much of a leg to stand on. But that doesn't mean we can't enjoy the absurd spectacle of the legal team for the man Oliver described as a "geriatric Dr. Evil" trying to out-bombast the HBO comedian's signature hyperbolic wit in dry legalese. Here are some of the lawsuit's best moments: Murray's giant squirrel tormenter "Defendants continued their ruthless character assassination and attack on Plaintiffs’ business reputations by describing Mr. Murray as someone who 'looks like a geriatric Dr. Evil' and arranging for a staff member to dress up in a squirrel costume and deliver the message 'Eat Shit, Bob!” to Mr. Murray.'" This is one of the lawsuit's several references to a staffer dressed as a giant squirrel whom Oliver brought out to insult Murray. The stunt was a reference to some apocryphal company lore about a squirrel urging Murray into the coal business — it's a long story. Suffice to say, Mr. Nutterbutter seems to have really gotten under Murray's skin. BTW Murray didn't actually talk to a squirrel, OK? "Specifically, in reference to an absurd story that Mr. Murray claimed a squirrel had told him he should operate his own mines, Defendant Oliver stated 'You know what, I actually believe him on that one.'" At least everyone's in agreement that Murray didn't actually consult a squirrel about his business decisions. Maybe there's hope for an amicable resolution yet! Oliver endorses Mr. Nutterbutter's vulgar harassment "If that were not enough, after the live taping, Defendant Oliver exclaimed to the audience that having someone in a squirrel costume tell Mr. Murray to 'Eat Shit' was a 'dream come true.'" On second thought, he's got a point. Have you no decency, Mr. Nutterbutter? Good faith efforts "Even worse, toward the end of the broadcast, Defendant Oliver confirmed that Defendants intentionally expanded their attack against Mr. Murray and the Plaintiffs as retaliation for Plaintiffs' good faith efforts to ensure the accuracy of the broadcast. Defendant Oliver stated "Bob Murray, I didn't really plan for so much of this piece to be about you, but you kind of forced my hand on that one." Murray's lawyers seem to be working under a loose definition of "good faith efforts" that encompasses cease-and-desist letters. Neither ceasing nor desisting "Intentionally and in obvious retaliation for this humanitarian request, Defendant Oliver boldly announced '[a]s we have been explicitly told to cease and desist, let us do neither of those things, and let's talk about Bob Murray.'" How many lawsuits are able to claim that a defendant explicitly announced their intention to ignore them on national television?  Clinton conspiracy "[HBO parent Time Warner] is widely reported as a top ten donor of Hillary Clinton, as tracked by the Center for Responsive Politics at OpenSecrets.org. As a presidential candidate, Mrs. Clinton's agenda was to 'put a lotta coal miners and coal companies outta business.'" Murray's lawyers have connected the dots. This one goes all the way to the top. Anti-Trump agenda  "[The defendant's statements] advance their biases against the coal industry and theirdisdain for the coal-related policies of the Trump Administration." What's a controversy these days without a Donald Trump cameo? Oliver's job description "Instead, presumably to boost ratings, line their pockets with profits and advance the show’s anti-coal agenda..." The first two items are, after all, Oliver's job. As for the third, it seems pretty fair to say he's not a huge fan of the industry's practices. Public shame and disgrace "The Defamatory Statements are defamatory per se in that, on their face, they reflect upon Plaintiffs' reputation and character in a manner that: injured Plaintiffs' reputation and subject Plaintiffs to public hatred, ridicule, shame, or disgrace." This would actually make a good blurb for Oliver's show. WATCH: John Oliver proves Trump's scandals are way worse than Clinton's with raisins
US investigates after lab improperly ships nuclear material
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — U.S. regulators said Friday they are launching an investigation into the improper shipment of nuclear material from the laboratory that created the atomic bomb to other federal facilities this week, marking the latest safety lapse for Los Alamos National Laboratory as it faces growing criticism over its track record.
Egos are a problem in international relations, Coverage of Finsbury mosque attack was a rarity, Why American voters don’t care about the Russia inve
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Qatar is finding itself still isolated from the other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries...,” writes Richard Miller. “The timing came right after a visit to the Saudi kingdom by U.S. President Donald Trump when he ... assured [King Salman] of a new American approach ... [in] dealings for their ally.... This century has seen a worldwide resurgence of egos on the international stage.... President Paul Kagame put things into perspective when he stated: ‘There are African leaders who have the dangerous habit of leading their people into an abyss’. “For Muslims who live in and around Finsbury Park, the attack was not a surprise,” writes Rafia Zakaria.
Beware the Hype of Artificial Intelligence
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Beware the Hype of Artificial Intelligence
Ancient Egypt: 3,000
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A big wood-and-leather toe from Egypt is the oldest prosthetic discovered so far, researchers believe, and provides an insight into the world of ancient medicine. Researchers at the University of Basel found that the wooden toe had been refitted several times to the shape of the woman who wore it, that it had signs of wear and that the user, a priest's daughter, wanted the prosthetic device to be comfortable. "By using a sophisticated way of fixing the individual parts of the prosthesis to each other, the artificial limb had a balancing effect and gave, to some extent, a freedom of movement," Andrea Loprieno-Gnirs of the University of Basel told CNN.
US halts Brazil beef imports after failed safety tests
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The United States announced Thursday a halt to all imports of fresh beef from Brazil, the world's second-largest producer, citing "recurring" concerns after large shipments failed food safety tests. The ban will remain in place until satisfactory corrective actions are taken, the US Department of Agriculture said in a statement that will again put the reputation of Brazil's industry under the spotlight. All meat imported to the US from Brazil has been inspected since March, when some of the country's top meat producers became embroiled in a tainted-meat scandal.
Huge, homely mastiff named Martha wins world's ugliest dog
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
Martha is big, ugly, lazy and gassy. And a world champion. In a competition annually dominated by the old, the tiny, and the hairless, the 3-year-old, 125-pound Neapolitan Mastiff used her lollygagging ...
Egos are a problem in international relations, Coverage of Finsbury mosque attack was a rarity, Why American voters don’t care about the Russia inve
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Qatar is finding itself still isolated from the other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries...,” writes Richard Miller. “The timing came right after a visit to the Saudi kingdom by U.S. President Donald Trump when he ... assured [King Salman] of a new American approach ... [in] dealings for their ally.... This century has seen a worldwide resurgence of egos on the international stage.... President Paul Kagame put things into perspective when he stated: ‘There are African leaders who have the dangerous habit of leading their people into an abyss’. “For Muslims who live in and around Finsbury Park, the attack was not a surprise,” writes Rafia Zakaria.
Snake Solution: Dangerous Venom Could Fight Kidney Disease
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
The venom of the green mamba — one the most dangerous snakes in Africa — might one day help to treat people who have a genetic disorder that affects the kidneys, according to a new study conducted in mice. The disorder, called polycystic kidney disease, causes numerous cysts to grow in the kidneys. The disorder may lead to kidney damage, according to the National Kidney Foundation.
NASA's Curiosity rover has a pet rock on Mars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mars is probably a pretty lonely place.  The red planet is littered with rusty red rocks and, as far as we know, devoid of any kind of life. But even so, rovers still roam the surface of the world on humanity's behalf, making their solitary treks along previously unexplored paths.  And sometimes, they make friends.  SEE ALSO: NASA photo captures the loneliness of the Mars Curiosity rover NASA's Curiosity rover — which has been exploring the red planet's Gale Crater since 2012 — appears to have a little pet rock caught in one of its wheels.  The rock got stuck in the right front wheel at some point in the last couple weeks, but scientists aren't exactly sure when it started hitching a ride because the rover doesn't snap photos of its wheels every day. Sol 1729 and 1730 MAHLI images of the hitchhiker rock pic.twitter.com/m5SEYXyrep — Lars (@LarsTheWanderer) June 19, 2017 This isn't the first time a rock has gotten caught in Curiosity's shoe, according to Emily Lakdawalla, a planetary scientist writing a book about the rover. Lakdawalla said that NASA and other interested folks back on Earth keep an eye on Curiosity's wheels and the rocks that might pop up in them as it roams the Martian surface. Scientists also spotted another rock, which appeared in that same right front wheel starting in January and disappearing by April, according to Ashwin Vasavada, a Curiosity project scientist.  The current pet rock was seen in photos taken on Sol (Mars day) 1729 and 1730, which translates to June 17 and June 18 on Earth.  "We don’t exactly know how the rocks get in the wheels, but it’s likely that they can hop in as the wheels (and heavy rover) break rocks and sink into the soil around loose rocks," Vasavada said via email. As for the rock's effect on Curiosity's wheels, it seems to be pretty benign.  MARS FACT: All rocks on Mars are freeloading stowaways. pic.twitter.com/m8nSdVUXE4 — SarcasticRover (@SarcasticRover) June 20, 2017 The rocks are small and relatively soft, Vasavada said, so they shouldn't pose too much of an issue to the long-running rover's movements. However, it's always possible that something unexpected could happen.  "There are some bad scenarios, such as when a rock gets jammed and makes a larger hole in a wheel, or if a rock interferes with some cables that run to the wheel motors," Vasavada said. "But we don’t think those are credible problems with these small rocks." Scientists have Curiosity take these photos of its wheels to keep an eye on any holes that have developed in the rover's machinery.  The holes in Curiosity's wheels are a sign of the wear and tear the rover has taken on during its years of work on the red planet, but for the moment, the worn wheels are still functioning well.  And hey, at least Curiosity has a friend. WATCH:
Bringing Otto Warmbier home from North Korea: Part 4
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
U.S. special envoy Joseph Yun arrived on an American military plane in North Korea to insist they release Otto Warmbier.
Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop under fire after sharing phony information
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Gwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle brand website, Goop, removed a claim that Body Vibes' products used material originally made for NASA after it was debunked.
What happened when Otto Warmbier was detained in North Korea: Part 2
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Officials in North Korea say Warmbier took a poster down from a staff-only floor of the hotel he was staying in.
Pets Help in Hospitals, But Safety May Be Lacking
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Researchers found that hospitals typically had stricter health and safety policies for animal-visitation programs than eldercare facilities did. The facilities surveyed didn't always have strong policies in place to ensure that their animal therapy programs were safe and effective for both the participants and the visiting animals, said veterinarian Deborah Linder, the lead author of the study and associate director of the Tufts Institute for Human-Animal Interaction at Tufts University in North Grafton, Massachusetts. People at health care facilities often assume that therapy-animal organizations have liability insurance, strong training programs for the animals, and testing standards for both the animals and their handlers, as well as rigorous health and grooming requirements for the animals, Linder told Live Science.
Readers write: Older operagoers, Middle East coverage, political history
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
Facts can help remove the political bull’s-eye currently painted on Jared Kushner and others for talking with the Russians. If mistakes of protocol were made, then they should be brought to light and we should move on.
Egos are a problem in international relations, Coverage of Finsbury mosque attack was a rarity, Why American voters don’t care about the Russia inve
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, world
“Qatar is finding itself still isolated from the other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries...,” writes Richard Miller. “The timing came right after a visit to the Saudi kingdom by U.S. President Donald Trump when he ... assured [King Salman] of a new American approach ... [in] dealings for their ally.... This century has seen a worldwide resurgence of egos on the international stage.... President Paul Kagame put things into perspective when he stated: ‘There are African leaders who have the dangerous habit of leading their people into an abyss’. “For Muslims who live in and around Finsbury Park, the attack was not a surprise,” writes Rafia Zakaria.
SpaceX aims for rarefied air with upcoming launches
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
No private company has successfully launched two rockets in a 48 hour time frame since United Launch Alliance did so in March 2008.
Mysterious Sea Pickles Invading West Coast in Bizarre Bloom
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Mysterious creatures called sea pickles are showing up in large numbers on the West Coast. These organisms are actually conglomerations of zooids—small, multicellular organisms—which come together into tubular shapes that in this case stretch from about 6 inches to 2 feet long, according to EarthFix, an offshoot of Oregon Public Broadcasting.
What's next for North Korea, U.S. relations: Part 6
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
President Trump wrote in a tweet, "While I greatly appreciate the efforts of President Xi & China to help with North Korea, it has not worked out."
US High School Students Ready To Take On The World In Rocket Launch Competition
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
High school students are representing the U.S. this week in Paris at an international rocketry competition.
Take your love of the environment to work with these 11 products
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission. Thinking green is more than just a bumper sticker. These days, it’s a whole new way of life. You already recycle at home and compost whatever you can, but what happens when you go to work? Just because you have to work 9-5 doesn’t mean all those eco-friendly vibes should get tossed out the window.  SEE ALSO: You’re just 1 minute away from iced coffee with the HyperChiller These 11 products can help take environmentally friendly habits to the next level – without requiring employees to totally abandon their usual routine.    Stacks on stacks    Image: treefrogStop feeling guilty about all those memos. This tree-free paper is manufactured from 100 percent bagasse, a byproduct of sugarcane that is renewable and fast growing. Oh yeah, it’s also completely biodegradable and compostable. Get a five-ream case here for $49.87.       Sun power  Image: Everly home & giftOffice with a view? Turn any window into a power outlet with this attachable disk that uses sunlight to charge your iPhone or tablet. Get it here for $49.99.         The eco-friendly push you need   Image: ecobuttonEven if it’s just a few minutes, putting your computer to sleep when you step away can save energy. The Ecobutton plugs into your computer via USB. Press it once to have the computer enter a low energy state, and then again to return it to full functionality. The software provided with the button tracks activity and calculates the amount of energy saved. Grab it here for $25.38.        Show off that green thumb  Image: click and growThis innovative indoor tabletop garden supports several herbs, including basil, thyme, and mini tomatoes, which are packaged in cartridges that slot into various units. Simply add water to start the growing process and enjoy fresh herbs with your lunch every day. Grab it here for $64.95.  Sippin’ green   Image: Collingwood ecowareIf your office has a kitchen, reusable straws are an easy way to reduce plastic waste. While a bit more of an investment than buying plastic ones in bulk, you’ll end up purchasing them less frequently. Grab a pack of four here for $7.99.    Charge up  Image: ecoalkalinesEach purchase of these certified carbon neutral batteries supports corporate green initiatives such as reforestation, alternative energy initiatives, and biofuel production. Get a 24-pack here for $17.99.      More energy, less waste  Image: PrimulaReduce paper waste and still get your caffeine fix by trading those flimsy paper coffee filters for the Primula single serve coffee brewer. The “brew buddy” sits right on the rim of your mug and features a reusable mesh filter, giving you a great cup with each pour. Grab it here for $6.81.     Refill friendly  Image: If you insist on your caffeine fix being store bought, this BPA-free reusable mug, which is dishwasher and microwave safe, can be used over and over. Check if your local spot has a similar policy to Starbucks, which gives customers a discount for bringing their own tumbler. Get the coffee chain lookalike here for $10.95, or an all blue version here for $8.62.  Time is fluid  Image: bedolKeep track of meeting times with this water-powered alarm clock. Perfect for your desk, the clock only needs to be refilled with tap water about once a year. Get decorative and grab it here for $22.71.   Get organized   Image: greatusefulstuffThis multi-device charging station is made of rapidly renewable bamboo that is not only aesthetically pleasing, but also eco-friendly. Keep things organized at your desk and get it here for $39.99.        Snack bag  Image: moosooWith eco-friendly aluminum insulation and a leak-proof design, this lightweight reusable bag is ideal for bringing meals on the go – sans plastic. Go for the lunchbox look by fastening the buttons on the sides, or leave them be and carry it as a tote. Get it here starting at $10.99.
Anger in Nigeria's south over oil spill clean
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Under a leaden sky in oil-rich southern Nigeria, young men hang around with nothing to do, covering their noses from the noxious fumes of the polluted swamp. The sight in Bodo, some 40 kilometres (25 miles) southeast of Port Harcourt, is repeated in communities elsewhere in the maze of creeks that criss-cross Ogoniland. One year after the launch of a much-heralded clean-up programme, the oil slicks which blackened the waters, killed the fish and ruined the mangroves remain untouched.
Doctors Want Sugar and 'Cancer
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
A major doctors' group hopes to put an end to a great irony served up daily at most U.S. hospitals: The food offered there tends to contribute to obesity, diabetes, heart disease, stroke and cancer — the very same conditions for which many of the hospital patients are seeking treatment. At its annual meeting on June 14, the American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates, which represents more than 200,000 physician members, issued a policy statement that called for the reduction of sugar-sweetened beverages and processed meats, and an increase in the availability of healthful, plant-based foods in hospitals. Under the resolution, physicians and hospital staff are encouraged not only to counsel their patients about the health consequences of a poor diet but also to lead by example by offering healthier foods at the hospital.
'City that never sleeps' wants to dial down the volume
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Car horns, sirens, drilling, jet overflights and restaurants where diners have to yell to be heard -- New York is one of the loudest cities in the world. The five-year, $4.6 million project -- the brainchild of researchers at New York University, working in concert with city residents and city hall -- is using machine learning technology and sensors to build a sound library. The idea is to record the full panoply of noises in the city of 8.5 million residents and use artificial intelligence so that machines can recognize sounds automatically, ultimately giving authorities a way to mitigate noise levels.
Former US State Dept. diplomat on why people are held prisoner in North Korea
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Evans Revere, who was working with Otto Warmbier's family, says it's hard to know if Warmbier would've had to serve his entire prison sentence.
Stephen Hawking: Humans Should Ride a Beam of Light to Other Planets
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
Humanity should focus its efforts on exploring other worlds that we might inhabit, and to get there, Earthlings may need to ride on a beam of light, famed physicist Stephen Hawking says. The human imagination has led us to peer ever deeper into the universe with scientific tools, Hawking said. The answer is, no," Hawking said in his address.
Albuquerque TV truck stolen while crew worked on crime story
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — While a television news crew was gathering footage for a story about crime in the Albuquerque downtown area, a thief drove off in the station's SUV.
Huge, homely mastiff named Martha wins world's ugliest dog
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, odd news
PETALUMA, Calif. (AP) — Martha is big, ugly, lazy and gassy. And a world champion.
Senate Healthcare Bill Threatens Pre
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, health
Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Senate leaders designed their Affordable Care Act replacement bill to seem like a friendlier version of an earlier House...
The EPA Quietly Approved Monsanto's New Genetic
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
DvSnf7 dsRNA is an unusual insecticide. You don’t spray it on crops. Instead, you encode instructions for manufacturing it in the DNA of the crop itself. If a pesky western corn rootworm comes munching, the plant’s self-made DvSnf7 dsRNA disrupts a critical rootworm gene and kills the pest.  
Stephen Hawking lays out plan for settling space, from moon and Mars to the stars
JAY GORY, MANAGING EDITOR, science
British physicist Stephen Hawking has repeatedly warned us that we have just a century or two to move off Earth, and he just shared his vision for how to do it. Hawking laid out a timetable this week during a lecture titled “The Future of Humanity,” presented to an audience of 3,000 attending the Starmus Festival in Trondheim, Norway. He said a base could be established on the moon within 30 years to serve as a gateway to the rest of the solar system. Settlers could follow up with a Mars base within 50 years. But Hawking went on to… Read More